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Copyright Š 2016 by REHDA Malaysia

All rights reserved. This book or any portion thereof may not be reproduced or used in any manner whatsoever without the expressed written permission of the publisher. Printed in Malaysia First Printing, 2016

Real Estate and Housing Developers’ Association Malaysia Wisma REHDA No. 2C, Jalan SS 5D/6 Kelana Jaya 47301 Petaling Jaya Selangor www.rehda.com

Disclaimer: This handbook serves only as a guide. Whilst every effort has been made to ensure that the information in this book is correct at printing time, readers are advised to refer to the source of the information stated. The Association shall not be held liable for any loss / damages incurred due to the use of information provided in this handbook.


ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The Contributors The REHDA First Home Buyers’ Guide was developed by REHDA Malaysia with the assistance of the Task Force on the First Home Buyers’ Guide which comprised representatives from the following member companies:

TASK FORCE ON FIRST HOME BUYERS’ GUIDE Dato’ Wan Hashimi Albakri (Task Force Chairman) Sime Darby Property Berhad Datuk Muztaza Mohamad Fairview Development Sdn Bhd Pn Rohaya Abdullah Glomac Berhad Mr Chai Kian Soon IJM Land Berhad Mr Tang Wai Hoong MKH Berhad Dato’ Ricque Liew Paramount Property Development Sdn Bhd En Dzulkifli Muhamad Sime Darby Property Berhad Pn Norlina Mohd Noor SP Setia Bhd Ms Rajes Kalidass SP Setia Bhd En Zadil Hanief Mohamad Zaidi UEM Sunrise Berhad 01


MESSAGE FROM MINISTER OF URBAN WELLBEING, HOUSING AND LOCAL GOVERNMENT It is my pleasure to be a part of yet another initiative by the Real Estate and Housing Developers’ Association (REHDA). My congratulations to REHDA on the successful release of their maiden publication of the “First Home Buyers’ Guide”! Homeownership has long been and will always be one of the Government’s main concerns. Realizing the importance, the Government has made homeownership a national agenda with the objective of encouraging homeownership among Malaysians. This is evident through the many policies and programmes undertaken by the Government to ensure that the rakyat have access to adequate shelter i.e. housing as well as facilitate the process of purchasing for home buyers. I applaud REHDA for their support in complementing the Government towards achieving the homeownership agenda. We are encouraged by your continuous efforts and perseverance in bringing the industry to the next level and the inception of this useful publication is yet another testament of your strong commitment to the industry. This comprehensive guide is hoped to be of great assistance to those on the look-out to purchase a home. The First Home Buyers’ Guide would make a good reference for our local purchasers as it encompasses all the relevant information and valuable tips. The Government will endeavour to facilitate developers in meeting the country’s housing needs and in this respect, we will continue to formulate, promote and coordinate pertinent programmes and plans for an orderly and sustainable growth of the industry. At the same time, we hope private sector developers, through REHDA, will play a commendable role, providing us with constructive feedback and recommendable solutions. The provision of housing is a concerted effort both on the part of the Government as well as the private sector. The strong synergistic partnership between the private and public sectors will go a long way towards successfully achieving the country’s housing targets. To the rakyat, I can only advise that you consider not only your future but your children’s future. As you all know, a good piece of property creates wealth. A property is an asset which not only puts a roof over your head and provides shelter but also provides security for your retirement, your children’s education, your children’s future.

DATUK ABDUL RAHMAN BIN DAHLAN 02


MESSAGE FROM PRESIDENT OF REHDA MALAYSIA The successful publication of this Guide is yet another noteworthy initiative by REHDA Malaysia. Containing all the necessary information and details pertaining to the process of purchasing a home, this essential reference is specially designed to provide homebuyers, especially first time buyers, with a comprehensive guide for a successful home buying experience. REHDA, as the leading representative body for private developers, since its establishment more than four decades ago, has been committed not only in safeguarding the interests of its members but also to continuously provide services beneficial to its members. In addition, as a Responsive, Respected, Responsible and Relevant NGO, we strive to safeguard the priorities of our Customers, who are the house buying public. Similarly, we are thoroughly committed to work in concert with the Government to serve the interests of the industry whilst achieving the nation’s home ownership agenda. We are also focussed on maintaining a conducive business environment for the sustainable growth of economic development. It is towards these noble objectives in mind that REHDA has forged ahead with its latest project, a step by step reference guide on home buying. It was envisioned that this guide would contain all the relevant information and useful tips pertinent to the process of buying a home, thus providing a pleasant and informative experience for home buyers. Some pertinent chapters are even supported with illustrations and calculations for readers’ better understanding. I fervently hope readers will find the Guide useful and a good quick and easy reference in your endeavour of owning your dream home. I take this opportunity to record my thanks to all members of the REHDA Task Force on First Home Buyers’ Guide for sharing their knowledge, experience and practical know-how namely representatives from Fairview Development Sdn Bhd, Glomac Berhad, IJM Land Berhad, MKH Berhad, Paramount Property Development Sdn Bhd, Sime Darby Property Berhad, SP Setia Berhad and UEM Sunrise Berhad. Last but not least, on behalf of REHDA, we look forward to the continuous contributions from members and not forgetting my thanks to the Secretariat personnel who had supported the Task Force in this endeavour, your hard work and dedication is exemplary. All the generous contribution and assistance has made the REHDA FIRST HOME BUYERS’ GUIDE possible and a reality. Best Wishes and may you soon be the proud owner of your own home!

DATUK SERI FD ISKANDAR 03


CONTENTS Ch

1.0

WHY BUY A PROPERTY

Ch

2.0

BUDGETING TIPS

Ch

3.0

CHOOSING THE RIGHT LOCATION

Ch

4.0

YOUR IDEAL HOME

Ch

5.0

THE DEVELOPER

Ch

6.0

SIGNING ON THE DOTTED LINE – SPA

Ch

7.0

HOUSING LOAN

Ch

8.0

HANDING OVER OF HOUSE

Ch

9.0

USEFUL TIPS

Message from

MINISTER OF URBAN WELLBEING, HOUSING AND LOCAL GOVERNMENT Message from

PRESIDENT OF REHDA MALAYSIA 04

Ch

10.0

• Housing and Strata Management Tribunal • Home Renovation • Selling Your Property • Other Useful Tips

USEFUL CONTACTS


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1.0 | WHY BUY A PROPERTY

READY TO OWN A HOME? So you’re ready to buy a home, or perhaps you’re just thinking about it and preparing yourself. In any case, purchasing a home is a major investment. Whether it is your first or subsequent purchase, we have put together a guide which will hopefully help you through the buying process and provide some useful tips.

FINANCIAL

Home is a comfortable nest Buying a property is one of the biggest financial investment in one’s lifetime. Whether you are financially ready to start now, or working hard towards the dream, owning a home is a great achievement in life. It provides physical and emotional security for you and your family. Some people purchase homes to rent it out and create extra income, but there are also others who are content with just renting due to their apprehensions about the responsibility. Whatever the reason, here are some good reasons why you should consider owning a home.

As An Investment

Easier To Get Bank Approvals

Tangible Asset

FINANCIAL From an Investment Point-of-View Inheritance

Retirement Fund

Easier Than Stocks and Shares

Rental Income 05


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01 AS AN INVESTMENT Investing in property is a sound investment that is relatively stable because property values generally appreciate over time. Investing in a home is much less volatile compared to stocks and shares that fluctuate in price greatly.

02 EASIER TO GET BANK APPROVALS Although banks may tighten their loan approvals due to uncertain market conditions, they still view residential property investment as relatively stable. Thus they are more willing to lend towards residential purchase over other assets like commercial factories or warehouses. First time home buyers should have an easier time getting approvals from banks.

03 EASIER THAN STOCKS AND SHARES Investing in stock market can be tricky and understanding how it works is just the tip of the iceberg which ultimately, if done wrong can lead to a disaster. Property investing, however is easy and research can be done by simply surfing the internet.

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04

RENTAL INCOME A fair amount of people use home ownership as a means for making extra income. They purchase properties and rent them out, using the rental income to finance their monthly mortgage payments. This is a great way to build assets and increase wealth. The supply and demand of the Malaysian residential property over the years indicates that there is a healthy demand for rental properties.

05

RETIREMENT FUND As a long-term investment, the value of your home generally appreciates over time, well into your golden age. Because of this, property investment is a great way to increase wealth and build a nest egg for your retirement, whether in capital gain upon selling or rental income as pension fund. The good news is, 20-30 years down the road, the value of a home will increase and you will get to earn more each year.

06 INHERITANCE After you have had a good life and passed on, the home you purchased some 30 years ago can still continue to give. Depending on the legal structure of your property, your children would be able to inherit and they can continue to reap the evergrowing investment!

07 TANGIBLE ASSET Investing in properties is much more secure and tangible. Physically, you can evaluate your home before making a purchase unlike stocks and shares which are just figures on the computer screen.

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NONFINANCIAL

After settling down and starting a family, you’ll want a place of your own. Renting just doesn’t sound so appealing after taking into consideration that the money you spend each month on rent could have been put to better use paying for your own home. Having your own home essentially means that you can do whatever you want to it. Whether it’s renovating it, keeping pets or subdividing the extra rooms and etc. Being a homeowner means you have an equity in your own asset and not someone else’s and no more landlords knocking on your door at odd hours of the morning asking for money.

This is how owning your own house can make your life better:

FREEDOM Sometimes we often overlooked the sense of freedom when we have achieved one of our major life goals. Many first-time home buyers experienced a feeling of great accomplishment and usually all other goals which they have set out to achieve becomes effortless.

CONVENIENCE Location, location, location, is one of the most important criteria when buying a house. Naturally, when you choose a place to stay, it is usually in an area you are familiar and comfortable with. A buyer purchases a home that is convenient, close to public transportation hubs if they do not own a car and close to public amenities like shopping malls and grocery stores. This provides you ease of life and better wellbeing. 10


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Freedom

SelfAccomplishment

NON-FINANCIAL

Convenience

From An OwnerOccupier Pointof-View

A Safe Haven

Sense of Belonging

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SENSE OF BELONGING Once you have chosen, the residential area where you will settle in becomes your community. Overtime, you will feel more attached and a sense of belonging to the surrounding area and the people living next to you. Active participation in attending town hall and committee meetings, something you rarely do, becomes a priority. Purchasing a property for the first time means you are making a big decision in your life. A sign of maturity with a strong commitment and stability allows you to think of the future and taking it to the next step. Owning a home gives you peace of mind and freedom without restrictions from tenants and landlords for future planning.

A SAFE HAVEN Freedom, safety and happiness is the sanctuary of a home and it is an essential to starting a family. No more worries from landlord concerning redecorating or renovating to accommodate your family needs. Even the children need not worry that they will suddenly be forced to change their lifestyle based on the decisions of others.

SELF-ACCOMPLISHMENT We live our life one-step at a time. From finishing high school, graduating from college to landing a job, we are constantly looking for lifelong goals that we can be proud of. Owning a house is one of the monumental goals and a testament of our achievement and moving forward in life and family. Your first home will also give you the leverage in your financial equity to jumpstart you in purchasing a better home later on.

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2.0 | BUDGETING TIPS

“The most important thing that you should take note before buying a house is the servicing of your monthly loan instalments.” This ensures you don’t have to pay through the roof and have additional surplus aside for other important things in your life and family. Apart from that, there are also other additional processes which is costly such as signing the Sale and Purchase Agreement (SPA), dealing with solicitors, legal fees and stamp duty payment. (Refer to Chapters 6 and 7)

Here are some tips to guide you turn your dream home into a reality:

The best way to know how much you can afford for a home is: • Look at your monthly loan / financing instalments plus your current commitments i.e car loan or personal loan • Total up the numbers and this amount must not exceed one-third of your monthly income If the amount does not exceed the above requirement then you are good to go. Over-committing yourself financially could give you difficulties when making payments especially if the interest rate goes up. When calculating a budget for a new home, you should take into account 3 main criteria: Gross monthly income, monthly expenses and information on the new home. For your gross monthly income, you have to take into consideration your total wage, investments or dividends, whether or not you receive alimony and other income credited into your account.

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When applying for a loan, do take note of these additional information / cost as well: • The cost of the property which you are planning to buy • The downpayment deposit to secure your unit • How many years should I serve my loan tenure depending on my budget • What is the interest rate • How much is the house insurance per year and loan stamp duty

Lastly, do you own a car? Most likely you do, then the bank would like to know how much you are paying for it. As well as other debts that you have if any i.e alimony, credit cards, personal loans and others. The reason being the bank will then gather all the information, calculate and advise you on how much is the house instalment and the price range of the property you can afford. This ensures you have maximised your income to obtain your dream home without breaking your wallet.

LOAN AFFORDABILITY House Price

90% Loan

Tenure (Yrs)

Est. 2014 Interest Rate

Monthly Instalment

Min. Gross Household Income

RM100,000

RM90,000

30

5.10%

RM489

RM2,000

RM200,000

RM180,000

30

4.70%

RM934

RM2,000

RM300,000

RM270,000

30

4.50%

RM1,368

RM2,600

RM400,000

RM360,000

30

4.50%

RM1,824

RM3,000

RM500,000

RM450,000

30

4.50%

RM2,280

RM3,900

RM600,000

RM540,000

30

4.50%

RM2,736

RM4,700

* Assume no other commitments

Source: Loanstreet.com.my Note: Total commitment / borrowing of 1/3 of the income. However, banks may give loan based on higher percentage of debt to service ratio (case to case basis). 14


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3.0 | CHOOSING THE RIGHT LOCATION

Geographic Location City vs Suburb vs Rural

Visit During the Day and at Night

School District

Proximity to Leisure Activities

Neighbourhood

Safety

Proximity to Work (Connectivity)

Location of where you will want to live is one of the most important decisions you will have to make, whether you are buying your home as an investment or a lifestyle upgrade. The location of your home will help determine not only the future value of your investment, but also many aspects of your everyday life. Here are some factors you should consider carefully when buying a house. 16


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GEOGRAPHIC LOCATION Make your decision carefully. The location where you choose to live in will have a major impact on your lifestyle, especially if you wish to make your home a place where you will spend your lifetime. Do consider the factors that are most important to you such as the average home prices in the area, job opportunities and proximity to your loved ones.

CITY vs SUBURB vs RURAL

“Do take into consideration the factors that are most important to you such as the average home prices in the area, job opportunities and proximity to your loved ones.�

The location you choose to reside in either the city, rural or suburb will affect the amount of serenity you may enjoy. Lot size, primary and secondary education options for your children, proximity to shopping, entertainment, medical services and anything else you might want or need, and more.

SCHOOL DISTRICT School district is an important consideration if you are planning to have kids. Even if you do not plan to have any, it is still a good idea to consider since the quality of the neighbourhood schools will maximise your property investment. Living in a good public school district will save you ten of thousands of dollars which you may have to spend for private school.

NEIGHBOURHOOD Within a particular area, different neighbourhood will have different characteristics. You will want to choose the one that best fits your lifestyle and personality - a place where you will feel comfortable and where you are likely to get along with your neighbours. You will also want to try to live close to the places you visit frequently such as grocery stores, your job (if you plan to keep that job long-term) and if you have kids, the schools you want them to attend.

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What’s the point of paying less when you are constantly living in fear? Plus if you decide to resell your home, it may also be harder to get a good price due to the crime rate in the neighbourhood.

SAFETY Safety is always the top priority when raising a family or even buying a property as an investment. What’s the point of paying less when you are constantly living in fear? Plus if you decide to resell your home, it may also be harder to get a good price due to the crime rate in the neighbourhood.

PROXIMITY TO WORK (CONNECTIVITY) Another important factor to consider is the accessibility of where you live to where you want to go – major highways, ERLs, LRTs, MRTs, commuter and etc. The length of your daily commute can have a significant impact on your disposable income, quality of life and how much time you get to spend at home with your family. How long of a commute can you endure? Are you planning to stay at your current job long-term or do you expect to switch jobs in the near future? If you plan to stay at your current job, how close to work do you want to live? If you plan to switch jobs, what are the job prospects in or near the area where you would like to live?

PROXIMITY TO LEISURE ACTIVITIES If your favourite pastime is dining out, you might not be happy living in an area with a few restaurants. But if you’re a home kind of person, your choice is endless when it comes to choosing the right location. Make sure you research the surrounding area you plan to live in to ensure all your needs are fulfilled, assuming you’re not familiar with the area.

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VISIT DURING THE DAY AND AT NIGHT What a neighbourhood looks like on paper and how you feel when you’re in it are not necessarily the same thing. Sometimes little details can make a big difference. For example, some neighbourhoods have narrow roads, lots of cars parked on the street or distinctive architectural features that may not suit your taste. If these things aren’t what you envisioned in your ideal neighbourhood, you may not want to live there no matter how great the statistics are. Also, a neighbourhood might feel comfortable during the day, but seem disconcerting at night. It’s important to visit several neighbourhoods on different days and at different times to get an accurate picture of its character. It may be hard to judge a neighbourhood’s character when everyone is cooped up indoors. You’ll also want to check for things like how well the neighbourhood is lit at night, which you obviously can’t observe during the day.


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4.0 | YOUR IDEAL HOME

Property Title

Property Type

Finishes

Choice of Development

Built-Up

PROPERTY TITLE

MALAY RESERVE PROPERTY

FREEHOLD PROPERTY Defined as the entitlement to hold a property with a perpetual right.

LEASEHOLD PROPERTY Defined as the entitlement to hold the property for a period of time as stated in the title.

Defined as the entitlement to hold the property only by the person of the Malay ethnicity. Properties under this category can only be sold, leased or otherwise disposed off to Malay individuals or corporations. 19


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PROPERTY TYPE BUNGALOWS LANDED PROPERTY Properties built on a plot of land that is sub-divided horizontally. For example bungalow, semi-detached and terrace houses. However, there are instances of landed properties which share the common facilities such as club house, swimming pool, playground and etc, which is considered as Strata title properties.

Bungalow refers to detached, single unit family residences sometimes two or three storeys, with its own compound surrounding the structure.

SEMI-DETACHED HOUSES Two houses sharing a common side wall, commonly with yard area surrounding the front, side and back.

HIGH-RISE PROPERTY

TERRACE HOUSES

Properties built vertically upwards with multi-dwelling units are referred to as high-rise. High-rise property owners will be issued with separate individual titles called Strata Title. Strata title properties comprise individual lots owned by individual owners and common property areas such as staircase, driveways, roof, corridor, visitors’ car parks, swimming pool, gymnasium, garden, common toilets, rubbish compartments and etc which are jointly owned.

Houses which are designed in a row and attached to one another with a wall dividing each of them on both sides. The houses could be single, double or even triple storeys.

Strata title properties are required to be managed by an appointed Building Management entity which manages the security, common areas, lifts, cleaners, swimming pools and etc. Property owners are required to pay monthly management service charges and sinking fund.

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CONDOMINIUMS Condominiums or condos for short, are considered as luxury apartments (high-rise buildings) with ample recreational facilities such as swimming pool, tennis court, sauna, squash court, gymnasium, BBQ area and services such as concierge and housekeeping.

TOWNHOUSES Townhouses are built similarly to 3 storey terrace houses. Each 3 storey townhouse consists of 2 units whereby one unit occupies the ground floor and part of the first floor whilst the other unit occupies part of the first floor and the second floor. Each unit has their own separate entrance and car porch. These parcels are governed under the Strata Titles Act.


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CHOICE OF DEVELOPMENT CLUSTER HOUSES

GATED COMMUNITY

Cluster houses are usually quadrant double storey houses whereby 4 units are attached together.

A Gated Community is a residential community set within perimeter walls with controlled access for vehicles and pedestrians. It usually consists of small residential streets and includes various amenities. Typical amenities include swimming pools, tennis courts, gymnasium, squash courts, club house and etc. It is common to see a mix of residential properties such as bungalows, semi-detached houses, terraced houses and condominiums within one gated community. A professional property management company is engaged to manage these gated community. These parcels are governed under the Strata Titles Act.

APARTMENTS Apartments are high rise or low rise buildings with basic facilities such as security guards, playground, swimming pool, basketball court, gymnasium and etc.

SERVICED APARTMENTS Serviced apartments (highrise) are residential properties that are developed on commercial land.

SOHO (SMALL OFFICE HOME OFFICE) SOHO are residential properties with commercial titles which may be used partly for human habitation and partly for business premises.

GUARDED COMMUNITY A Guarded Community refers to landed developments which have controlled access with a guard house and with or without fencing surrounding the whole development. Upon delivery of vacant procession of the houses and with a minimum of 75% agreement from the residents, a Resident Association (RA) can be formed. The Resident Association will represent the community on the application of the security guard house and perimeter fencing around the community to the local council for approval.

Strata title properties are required to be managed by an appointed building management entity which manages the security, common areas, lifts, cleaners, swimming pools and etc. Property owners are required to pay monthly management service charges and sinking fund. 21


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BUILT - UP The parcel of the property for sale is measured by the size of the actual unit’s area. This measurement of area is defined as built up area of your home. In high-rise properties, the built-up area of a parcel is measured based on the entire parcel area. Whereas for landed properties, the built-up area of a parcel is measured based on the entire parcel area of the ground floor and first floor for a 2 storey house and for a 3 storey house, the measurement area will include the ground floor, first floor and second floor.

FINISHES The finishes of your home is stated in the Sale and Purchase Agreement (SPA) under the Specification Schedule.

STRUCTURAL Reinforced Concrete (RC) consists of concrete, sand, aggregate and steel bar; designed by the professional Structural Engineer.

WALL Reinforced Concrete (RC)

Consists of concrete, sand, aggregate and steel bar

Clay Brick

Product from clay

Cement Sand Brick

Product from cement and sand

Light Weight Block

Product from cement and other by-product materials

CEILING

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Cement Plaster

Cement and sand plastering to Concrete slab soffit

Fibre Cement Board

Product make of cement, silica, water and wood pulp

Skim Coat

Skim coat to Concrete slab soffit

Fibrous Plaster Board

Plasterboard is made of gypsum plaster reinforced with strands of fibreglass


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DOOR Solid Timber Door

The interior of the door does not have hollow spaces. Solid timber doors are manufactured by binding wood slabs and sometimes with veneers/adhesives.

Flush Door

Flush doors are manufactured by using two sections of plywood that are attached to each side by a timber frame. The interior of the door is hollow.

PVC Door

PVC stands for Polyvinyl Chloride, a synthetic resin among the plastic products. PVC doors are 100% waterproof.

Fire Door

Fire doors are manufactured with fire-resistance up to a certain hour rating. Fire doors help to reduce the spread of fire or smoke between compartments.

WINDOW

ROOF

Aluminium Window

Concrete Roof Tile

The window framework is manufactured from aluminium that is secured with single or a number of glass panes.

Tiles made from cement, sand and water and dried in oven.

Adjustable Louvres Window

Clay roof tiles are made of clay and baked in a kiln until harden.

Clay Roof Tile

Windows that are manufactured with horizontal glass panes that are angled to admit light, air and to keep out rain, direct sunlight and noise. Timber Casement Window

Metal Roof Metal roofs or roof decks are manufactured from steel which is strong and light weight. Reinforced Concrete Roof

Timber casement windows are manufactured with timber frame that is secured with single or a number of glass panes.

Concrete roof slabs are horizontal slab of steel reinforced with concrete.

PAINTING Emulsion Paint

Paint that is not shiny when dry. Paint used for wall, slab soffit, ceiling board, columns and etc.

Gloss Paint

Paint which dries to produce a hard, shining surface. Paint used for metal and timber finish products. 23


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5.0 | THE DEVELOPER

A “housing developer” means any person, body of persons, company, firm or society (by whatever name described), that undertakes a housing development. Before any project can be carried out, they are required to obtain a Developer’s Licence (DL) from the Housing Controller of the Ministry of Urban Wellbeing, Housing and Local Government (KPKT).

An Advertisement and Sale Permit (AP) is an official document issued by KPKT that authorises a property developer to conduct marketing activities (market, advertise and sell) for an approved property development. The advertisement content shall be in accordance with the AP approved by the Housing Controller.

Developers will be blacklisted by KPKT if they have problematic or delayed projects, abandoned projects, failed to settle compounds for various offences, failed to settle claims awarded by the Tribunal.

Who are the housing developers in Malaysia? First, let’s take a look at the definition and the role they play in society.

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DL & Expiry Date

Name of Local Authority

AP & Expiry Date Name & Address of Developer, Authorised Agent, Holder of Power of Attorney & Project Management Company

Number of Units by Type of Housing

WHAT NEEDS TO BE CHECKED IN ADVERTISEMENTS

Land Tenure, Expiry Date, Restrictions in Interest & Encumbrances

Selling Price of Each Type of Housing

Expected Date of Completion Description of the Proposed Housing Accommodation

Name of Housing Project

FINANCIAL

Land Banks

Announcement/ Land Office/ Council

• Newspaper • Website • TV news

Profit & Sales Value

No. of Projects

Business Diversification

Annual Report

Where to find? • Company’s website • Company’s Secretary What are inside? Financial summary (profit & revenue) • Directors listings & background • Subsidiary listing & shareholders • Business diversification (related & non-related to housing development) • Awards & recognition • Audit reports • How long company has been in operation

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TRACK RECORD

Innovativeness

GreenRE Projects GBI Projects

Early Completion

LAD Cases

Where to check?

Where to check?

• Ministry of Urban Wellbeing. Housing & Local Government through 7f report • Developer’s office

• National Housing Department • Housing & Strata Management Tribunal • Consumer Tribunal • House Buyers’ Association • State Housing Boards

Specification

Financing Packages

Where to check?

Construction Method

Where to check? • CIDB • SIRIM

• Project Brochure

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Abandoned Projects

Where to check?

Where to check?

• www.greenre.org • www.greenbuildingindex.org

• Banks / Financial Institutions


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REPUTATION

Awards & Recognition

Local

International

• FIABCI Prix d’Excellence Award • Aon Hewitt Best Employers Program • BCI Asia Awards • South East Asia Property Award (SEAPA) • Frost & Sullivan Best Practices Award • BCA Green Mark (Singapore)

Offences

• Abandoned Project • Ailing / Delayed Project • Development without DL & AP • Non - compliance of Tribunal award. • Failure to perform duties / responsibilities as required by the Act / Regulations • Failure to settle compound

• FIABCI Malaysian Property Award • The Edge Property Excellence Award • GreenRE • Green Building Index (GBI) • Frost & Sullivan Malaysia Excellence Award

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REFERENCES NATIONAL HOUSING DEPARTMENT, MINISTRY OF URBAN WELLBEING, HOUSING & LOCAL GOVERNMENT • To check developer’s profile • To check blacklisted status • To check abandoned projects http://ehome.kpkt.gov.my/ • To check the construction status • To check offences made by developers • To check status of Tribunal Claims with FAQ’S STATES HOUSING BOARDS To check abandoned projects

Eg. lphs.selangor.gov.my

NATIONAL HOUSE BUYERS ASSOCIATION

www.hba.org.my

GREENRE

www.greenre.org

GREEN BUILDING INDEX

www.greenbuildingindex.org

AWARDS INTERNATIONAL FIABCI Prix d’Excellence Award

www.fiabciprix.com

Aon Hewitt Best Employers Program

www.aonhewitt.com.au

BCI Asia Awards

www.bciasia.com

South East Asia Property Award (SEAPA)

www.asiapropertyawards.com

Frost & Sullivan Best Practices Award

www.apacbp-awards.com

BCA Green Mark (Singapore)

www.bca.gov.sg

LOCAL

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FIABCI Malaysia Property Award

www.fiabci.com.my

Frost & Sullivan Malaysia Excellence Awards

www.malaysia-awards.com

The Edge Property Excellence Awards

www.theedgeproperty.com.my

GreenRE

www.greenre.org

Green Building Index (GBI)

www.greenbuildingindex.org


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6.0 | SIGNING ON THE DOTTED LINE - SPA

PAYMENT AND SALE & PURCHASE AGREEMENT Usually, once you have selected your ideal unit, you are required to pay the first 10% of the purchase price upon signing of the Sale and Purchase Agreement (SPA). However, you may request for an extension of time to sign the SPA and 10% deposit, but this would be upon the sole discretion of the developer.

If you do not wish to be represented by a solicitor in the SPA transaction, the solicitor acting for the developer is required to obtain from the buyer, a duly signed certificate (in the presence of a Commissioner for Oaths). (Section 84 of the Legal Profession Act 1976)

LEGAL REPRESENTATION Legally, in order to process the SPA, the developer and home buyer are entitled to appoint their own solicitor to advise and act on their behalf. The name of the solicitor acting on your behalf and the developer, must be indicated in the SPA as required in the Housing Development (Control and Licensing) (Amendment) Regulations 2015. If you do not wish to be represented by a solicitor in the SPA transaction, the solicitor acting for the developer is required to obtain from the buyer a duly signed certificate (in the presence of a Commissioner for Oaths). (Section 84 of the Legal Profession Act 1976)

FEES & CHARGES Generally, the fees of the solicitor representing you for the SPA is borne by you. Sometimes, certain developer may offer to pay your legal fees as part of their marketing campaign. It is important for you to confirm whether you are represented by the solicitor concerned.

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LEGAL FEES

Notwithstanding the above scale fee, in the case of any transaction governed by the Housing Development (Control and Licensing) Act 1966 or any subsidiary legislation made under that Act, the following discount shall be applicable:

* Source: Solicitors’ Remuneration Order 2006, Legal Profession Act 1976 30


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STAMP DUTY

Note: As part of the efforts to reduce the cost of home ownership for first time home buyers, the Government has extended the 50% stamp duty exemption on instruments of transfer and loan agreements until 31 December 2016 and increased the purchase price limit from RM400,000 to RM500,000.

TYPES OF SALE AND PURCHASE AGREEMENT (SPA) There are 4 types of Sale and Purchase Agreement as prescribed in the Housing Development (Control and Licensing) Regulation 1989. To ensure home buyer’s interest is protected, the SPA cannot be altered without the approval of the Housing Controller. The developer and / or buyer’s solicitor will ensure the right type of SPA to be signed by the buyer.

Sell-Then-Build is where you get to buy a house before completion of construction. You will also have to make a 10% payment upon signing the SPA and then be billed progressively over the duration of the construction until completed. Whereas under the Build-Then-Sell 10:90 concept, you will have to pay 10% of the purchase price upon the signing of the SPA and then pay the remaining 90% balance of the purchase price upon delivery of the vacant possession.

Currently, housing developers are offering to sell properties under 2 categories which are the Sell-ThenBuild (STB) or Build-Then-Sell 10:90 (BTS) concept. 31


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Essentially, the prescribed Sale and Purchase Agreements are as follows:

SELL - THEN - BUILD CONCEPT

SCHEDULE G

SCHEDULE H

Purchase of landed residential property with individual title. Examples are terraced houses, semi-detached houses or bungalows.

Purchase of stratified properties. Examples are condominiums, apartments and landed stratified terraced houses, semi- detached houses or bungalows.

BUILD - THEN - SELL 10:90 CONCEPT

SCHEDULE I

SCHEDULE J

Purchase of landed residential property with individual title. Examples are terraced houses, semi-detached houses or bungalows.

Purchase of stratified properties. Examples are condominiums, apartments and landed stratified terraced houses, semi- detached houses or bungalows.

SALIENT TERMS OF SCHEDULE G AND SCHEDULE H A) PAYMENT OF PURCHASE PRICE • Payment of purchase price by instalments and at the time and manner as prescribed in the Third Schedule of the SPA. • Payment of 10% of the purchase price immediately upon signing of SPA and the balance of 90% of purchase price shall be paid in stages based on construction progress certified by the Architect.

B) INTEREST ON LATE PAYMENT • All progress invoices have to be paid within 30 days from date of the billing. • If you fail to make payment within the 30 days period, late payment interest will be charged calculated per day at the rate of 10% per annum. 32


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C) TIME FOR DELIVERY OF VACANT POSSESSION • Vacant possession is when the buyer is able to take possession of the property he has purchased. • For properties where the SPA is signed under Schedule G and I, vacant possession shall be delivered within 24 months from the date of the SPA. Whereas, for properties where the SPA is signed under Schedule H and J, vacant possession shall be delivered within 36 months from the date of the SPA. There may be instances where the period of delivery goes beyond the 24 or 36 months but this must be duly approved by the Housing Controller. • Vacant possession shall be delivered to you upon the following: - the Architect has issued a Certificate of Completion and Compliance (CCC) - water and electricity supply are ready for connection to the said property - you have paid all monies payable • Extra costs to be paid by you during vacant possession include service charge, deposit for utilities, assessment, quit rent and etcetera. • The delivery of vacant possession by the developer shall be supported by a Certificate of Completion and Compliance and includes the handing over of the keys of the property to the buyer. • If the buyer does not take delivery of vacant possession within the 30 days from the date of service of the notice from the developer, the buyer shall be deemed to have taken delivery of vacant possession.

D) DEFECT LIABILITY PERIOD • Within 24 months from the date of vacant possession, if the buyer detects any defects to the property which is due to defective workmanship, material or that the property is not built in accordance to the plan or specifications as stated in the SPA, the developer is required to make good those defects at no cost to the purchaser.

E) STAKEHOLDER • The last 5% of the purchase price shall be paid to the appointed stakeholder solicitor during the delivery of vacant possession. • If the developer fails to rectify the defects lodged by the buyer within the stipulated time stated in the SPA, the buyer shall be entitled to carry out the repairs himself and recover the cost of repair from the money retained by the stakeholder. All claims must be made in accordance to the procedures set out in the SPA.

F) PAYMENT OF OUTGOINGS • The buyer shall pay all outgoings including quit rent, rate, tax, assessment and other charges in respect of his property from the date he takes vacant possession or the date the property is transferred to the purchaser, whichever is earlier.

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G) MAINTENANCE OF SERVICE • Maintenance of service are expenses for refuse collection, cleaning of public drains, grass cutting and etcetera. • Normally, the local council does not take over the maintenance of the public area surrounding the property immediately after vacant possession. Until such time the local council takes over, the developer shall provide the required services. • The buyer will be required to contribute to the developer a fair and justifiable proportion of the cost and expenses of such services. The buyer is required to pay 6 months of advance charges for maintenance of service on the date of vacant possession.The developer is entitled to collect the charges until the maintenance of service is taken over by the local council.

H) PAYMENT OF SERVICE CHARGES (ONLY APPLICABLE FOR SCHEDULE H AND J AGREEMENTS) • The buyer shall be liable to pay the service charges for the maintenance and management of the common areas and facilities. • The buyer will have to pay the service charges and contribution to the sinking fund for the first 4 months in advance during vacant possession, and any payment thereafter shall be payable monthly in advance.

I)

SINKING FUND (ONLY APPLICABLE FOR SCHEDULE H AND J AGREEMENTS) • The sinking fund is collected over a period of time, based on 10% of the monthly service charges for purposes such as painting / repainting of common areas, purchase of any movable property for common use and renewal / replacement of any fixtures or fittings.

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STAMPED SALE AND PURCHASE AGREEMENTS • Four (4) sets of stamped Sale and Purchase Agreement will be prepared by the solicitor. • Two (2) copies (one original and one duplicate) will be given to the buyer, who is required to submit the original SPA to the bank and retain a duplicate for himself. • One (1) copy of the SPA shall be retained by the solicitor. • One (1) copy of the SPA shall be retained by the developer.

SALIENT TERMS OF SCHEDULE I AND SCHEDULE J • Clauses in Schedule I and J are almost identical to the clauses in Schedule G and H respectively except for the schedule of payment clause (Clause 5 and Third Schedule). • Schedule I and J do not provide for the last 5% of the purchase price to be held by the developer’s solicitors as stakeholders until the expiry of the defects liability period.


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7.0 | HOUSING LOAN SOURCE OF FUNDING

Loan Facility from a Financial Institution

TYPES OF FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS Financial institutions that offer housing loans to house buyers are :i) Banks

Withdrawal from Employees Provident Fund (EPF) Account

ii) For government employees: Public Sector Home Financing Board [Lembaga Pembiayaan Perumahan Sektor Awam (formerly known as Bahagian Pinjaman Perumahan)]

Home buyers are advised to shop around before deciding on any financial institution.

Savings

FACTORS TO CONSIDER IN CHOOSING FINANCIAL INSTITUTION • What are the interest rates? • How competent is the financial institution in dealing with customers? • Does the financial institution offer quality service in terms of efficiency and reliability? • What are the available loan packages and which package suits you best? • What are the charges / costs / fees involved? 35


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It is important that you choose a loan package that best suits your needs.

You are encouraged to apply and secure a housing loan immediately after signing the SPA as the financial institution will require time to process and release the loan to the developer. Any delays in the release of loan from the financial institution to the developer will result in the developer charging late payment charges of 10% per annum to the buyer.

BANK LOANS Housing loan packages vary from one financial institution to the other. As a service to home buyers, most developers would have negotiated reasonable interest rates from several financial institutions. You should also find out all other features of a loan package before making any decision.

TYPES OF HOME FINANCING Generally, home financing can be categorized into two different groups :Conventional and Islamic.

CONVENTIONAL FINANCING In a conventional housing loan, a borrower agrees to repay the loan amount via monthly instalments over an agreed loan period. The monthly instalment consists of repayment of the principal loan amount and the interest charged thereon. Banks make a profit from the interest charged. Banks normally charge either a fixed or variable interest rate on conventional loans (or a combination of the two). Most property loans in Malaysia are variable interest rate loans, with the interest rate tied to the base rate (BR) of banks. Besides standard conventional home loan, banks also offer flexible home loan to borrowers who want to make payments in advance or withdraw any excess payments that the borrower may have made. A current account is usually linked to the flexible loan.

ISLAMIC FINANCING Islamic home financing is a Shariah-compliant loan. While Shariah-based Islamic home financing products have the same characteristics as conventional housing loans, they are based on different concepts and principles. Islamic home financing introduces the concept of buying something on the borrower’s behalf and selling it back to the borrower at a profit. In place of interest, a profit rate is defined in the contract. Like conventional financing, profit rates can be a fixed rate or based on variable rate.

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Islamic home financing typically comes in two types:-

BAI’ BITHAMAN AJIL (BBA) OR DEFERRED PAYMENT SALE

MUSHARAKAH MUTANAQISAH (MM) OR DIMINISHING MUTANAQISAH

BBA is based on a buy-and-sell concept where the bank first buys the property at current market price and sells it back to the borrower at an agreed marked-up price. The borrower will then pay for the property in instalments over an agreed period of time.

MM is based on a partnership concept where the bank and the borrower enter into a partnership to purchase a property. The borrower gradually acquires more ownership of the property by making monthly instalments to the bank until a complete ownership is achieved.

(Source : loanstreet.com.my and imoney.my)

TYPES OF INTEREST/PROFIT RATE FIXED INTEREST / PROFIT RATE A fixed interest/profit rate home loan/financing requires borrowers to pay fixed instalments throughout the loan/financing tenure irrespective of market conditions. It offers stability against fluctuating financing costs and ease of planning your monthly financial commitments. With fixed rate, borrowers need not worry about the fluctuation in monthly instalments.

VARIABLE INTEREST / PROFIT RATE Home loan/financing with variable interest/profit rate may result in borrowers paying monthly instalments that fluctuate based on the movements of the interest/profit rate. Market conditions will influence the interest/profit rate.

MARGIN OF FINANCING Margin of financing (also known as loan-to-value [LTV] ratio) means the loan amount granted by the financial institution, expressed as a percentage of the value of the property. For example, if a financial institution approves a loan amount of RM450,000 to Miss A for her purchase of property valued at RM500,000. The margin of financing offered by the financial institution to Miss A is 90%.

Margin of financing could go as high as 95% of the value of the house. The higher the margin, the higher the monthly instalments the borrower has to pay.

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Value of the house

The number of houses currently owned by the borrower

Whether the house is for own occupation or investment

Borrower's age

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Property type

FACTORS THAT DETERMINE THE MARGIN OF FINANCING

Borrower's income

Borrower's repayment capability


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REPAYMENT CAPABILITY One of the criteria that a financial institution will assess is the loan repayment capability of the borrower (that is, the ability of the borrower to repay the loan). Different financial institutions have different criteria in calculating the repayment capability. A good rule of thumb to follow is that the borrower’s monthly loan instalments and current commitments (such as car loan, personal loans and etc) should not exceed one-third of the gross monthly salary. For example, Mr A’s gross monthly salary is RM6,000 and he is currently paying monthly car loan instalments of RM800. One-third of his gross monthly salary is equivalent to RM2,000. However, since he has an existing car loan instalment of RM800, the financial institution will only grant a housing loan whereby the monthly instalment would not exceed RM1,200. So the higher the existing commitment a buyer has, the lesser the financial institution will lend.

LOAN TENURE The length of a loan repayment can range up to 35 years or until the borrower reaches the age of 65, whichever is earlier. Some financial institutions may offer different loan tenure but the variation is very small. The tenure will have an effect on the monthly repayment amount. For example, a shorter tenure will require the borrower to pay higher monthly instalments.

INSURANCE It is important for buyers to consider taking insurance coverage when purchasing a house. There are two important insurances to consider:

i) Mortgage Reducing Term Assurance (MRTA) Mortgage Reducing Term Assurance (MRTA) is also frequently referred to as Mortgage Life Assurance. MRTA provides for full settlement of outstanding balance of the housing loan with the financial institution in the event of total permanent disability or death of the borrower. The premium is paid once, generally computed based on the age of the borrower(s), loan amount, tenure and interest rate. It can be paid in cash upfront or included in the loan.

Before choosing the insurance policy, it is important for buyers to ask the insurance company / financial institution the effective date of the insurance i.e. whether it is effective upon acceptance of the letter of offer, after the payment of the insurance premium or after the loan disbursement.

ii) Fire Insurance / Householder Policy During construction, the developer will buy all insurances covering the construction of the house. For landed individual titled houses, a buyer will need to purchase basic fire insurance policy only when the house is completed and vacant possession has been handed over to him. The basic fire policy provides coverage for the building only and covers loss or damage by fire or lightning. A fire policy can be extended to cover other perils such as flood damage, riot strike or malicious damage, damage by falling tree, branches and objects and etc with additional premium. The buyer is required to present the insurance certificate to the financial institution so that the financial institution does not buy another fire insurance on the property. The Householder Policy covers the household contents and includes coverage for fatal injury to the insured. 39


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It is important to note that for strata titled properties, the buyer need not buy the insurance as the developer or joint management body (JMB) or management corporation (MC) is required under the Strata Management Act (2013) to take up insurance under a master policy. You must ensure that you obtain a copy of the individual certificate of insurance for your property to check the coverage under the master policy taken by the developer, JMB or MC. In the event your financier or bank has insured the property, you must remember to give a copy of the individual certificate of insurance to them so that they will terminate any insurance taken on your behalf.

LOAN APPLICATION Home buyers will be required to provide the following basic documents to the financial institution of their choice. However, some may require additional supporting documents before processing the loan application.

DOCUMENTS REQUIRED FOR LOAN APPLICATION • • • • • • • •

A photocopy of identity card or passport Latest 3 months’ salary slip Latest income tax return form (Form J) or EA form Sale and Purchase Agreement / deposit or booking receipts / letter of offer from the developer A photocopy of the land title (if any) Latest bank statements (compulsory in the absence of salary slips and / or Form J / EA Form) / savings passbook / fixed deposit Valuation report (for completed houses) For self employed, documents required are business registration documents, latest 3 months’ bank statements, latest financial statements and other supporting documents

LOAN APPROVAL AND LOAN RELEASE Upon submission of a complete application from the buyer, it usually takes about 1 - 2 weeks for the loan application to be approved. Once approved, a letter of offer will be issued and upon acceptance, the buyer will need to appoint a lawyer to attend to the loan documentations. Ideally the appointed loan lawyer should be familiar with the documentation requirements of the financial institution. In general, the financial institution requires two (2) to three (3) months from the date of acceptance of the letter of offer to effect the release of loan. Therefore, it 40

is prudent that the buyer applies for a loan immediately after signing the SPA. This is to ensure that the lawyer and the financier are given sufficient time to complete the loan documentations and release the loan timely to the developer. Delays in application and completion of the loan documentations by the lawyer will lead to delays in the loan being released by the financial institution and this will result in the developer charging late payment charges at 10% per annum on the buyer.


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FEES AND CHARGES Generally, legal fees on the loan documentation are borne by the buyer. However, certain developers may offer to pay the legal fees and disbursement on the loan documentation as part of their marketing package. Some financial institutions may also extend financing for the loan documentation fees. Below are some of the common fees and charges on loan documentation that a buyer would expect to incur: LEGAL FEES ON PREPARATION OF LOAN AGREEMENT

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Notwithstanding the above scale fee, in the case of any transaction governed by the Housing Development (Control and Licensing) Act 1966 or any subsidiary legislation made under that Act, the following shall be applicable:

* Source: Solicitors’ Remuneration Order 2006, Legal Profession Act 1976

STAMP DUTY ON LOAN AGREEMENT*

TYPE OF STAMP DUTY

Loan Agreement

RATE

0.5% of the loan amount or RM5 per RM1,000

* Source: First Schedule of Stamp Duty Act 1949

OTHER DISBURSEMENT FEE Fees payable include but not limited to registration fee on charge, land search fee, bankruptcy search fee, winding up search fee, stamping fee, affirmation fee, purchase of document fee, printing / photocopying fee and transport fee. It is advisable that the buyer obtained a quotation from the solicitors before proceeding with the appointment of the loan solicitors. 42


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BANK NEGARA MALAYSIA’S (BNM) COOLING MEASURES price stated in the Sale and Purchase Agreement (SPA).

In November 2010, BNM issued a policy regulating the loan - to - value (LTV) ratio for housing loans. For individuals who are currently having two outstanding mortgage loans and intend to take on a third loan, that individual is only entitled to a maximum of 70% LTV.

For example, SPA price of the property purchased by Mrs B is RM600,000 and Developer X offers a ten percent rebate (equivalent to RM60,000). The net selling price of the property purchased by Mrs B is RM540,000 (RM600,000 – RM60,000). With the BNM’s new rule, Mrs B, who is a first time buyer, would only be able to secure a loan of RM486,000 (RM540,000 x 90%).

For example, Mr A has purchased a new house and applied for a bank loan. If Mr A has two existing outstanding mortgage loans, the new loan is only entitled to a maximum of 70% margin. The ruling of 70% loan cap is applicable to financing of residential properties including serviced apartments.

Among some of the cooling measures introduced by BNM were the lowering of maximum tenure for property loans to 35 years from 45 years, abolishing the Developer’s Interest Bearing Scheme (DIBS) and raising the Real Property Gains Tax.

In November 2013, BNM issued a circular requiring financial institutions to calculate the LTV ratio based on the property net price instead of the

PUBLIC SECTOR HOME FINANCING BOARD (LEMBAGA PEMBIAYAAN PERUMAHAN SEKTOR AWAM (LPPSA)) formerly known as Bahagian Pinjaman Perumahan

Buyers who are working in the public sector have the option to apply for housing loans from LPPSA to finance the purchase of their property.

BASIC REQUIREMENT Some of the basic requirements that must be met by applicants are: Malaysian citizen

Confirmed staff

Application must be submitted one year before retirement/ end of service

A government employee with a permanent position

Not a bankrupt

No disciplinary problems

Has been in employment with the government for at least 1 year 43


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TYPE OF LOAN

TYPE

DESCRIPTION

I

Purchase of completed house or residential parcel

II

Build house on own land

III

Purchase of house or residential parcel under construction

IV

Purchase of land to build house

V

Settle outstanding loan from financial institution

VI

Build a house on land purchased by the applicant using government loan

VII

Renovation of house or residential parcel

LOAN ELIGIBILITY (EFFECTIVE 1 JANUARY 2015)

MONTHLY SALARY (RM)

LOAN ELIGIBILITY (RM)

8,500 and above

600,000

6,500 to 8,499

562,000

5,500 to 6,499

525,000

4,500 to 5,499

500,000

3,500 to 4,499

475,000

3,000 to 3,499

400,000

2,500 to 2,999

350,000

2,000 to 2,499

320,000

1,500 to 1,999

260,000

1,200 to 1,499

210,000

1,000 to 1,199

150,000

999 and below

120,000

For further information, buyers can refer to Pekeliling Perbendaharaan PR1.1 / 2013.

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LOAN APPLICATION (TYPE III : PURCHASE OF HOUSE OR RESIDENTIAL PARCEL UNDER CONSTRUCTION FROM DEVELOPERS)

DOCUMENTS REQUIRED FOR LOAN APPLICATION 1

Application form

2

Original copy of the accompanying letter from head of department

3

Photocopy of identity card certified by head of department

4

Original copy of the latest salary slip / e-slip certified by head of department

5

Copy of confirmation letter of current job position certified by head of department

6

Declaration form on selection of insurance / takaful

7

Copy of title certified by solicitor / developer

8

Copy of the Sale and Purchase Agreement certified by solicitor

9

Borang 2 - letter of consent from applicant to settle the remaining outstanding housing loan and interest from the salary, whatsoever benefits and receipts from the government

10

Borang 3 - undertakings from solicitor

11

Borang 4 - letter of disclaimer from the chargee (required if property is under master title)

12

Borang 5A - undertakings from developer / land owner and solicitor to transfer the property to the applicant and charge to the Government of Malaysia (required if property is under master title)

Applicants may be required to produce additional documents to LPPSA from time to time or on a case-to-case basis. For further information, buyers can refer to LPPSA’s website www.lppsa.gov.my or visit Lembaga Pembiayaan Perumahan Sektor Awam at the following address : No. 9, Kompleks Kementerian Kewangan Persiaran Perdana, Presint 2 Pusat Pentadbiran Kerajaan Persekutuan 62592 Putrajaya T 03-8880 1600 45


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TYPES OF EPF HOUSING WITHDRAWAL

Withdrawal to Purchase A House

WITHDRAWAL FROM EMPLOYEES PROVIDENT FUND ACCOUNT TO PURCHASE HOUSE

Withdrawal to Reduce / Redeem Housing Loan

The Employees Provident Fund (EPF) allows a member to withdraw savings from Account 2 to finance the purchase of a house. Account 2 comprises 30% of a member’s savings.

WITHDRAWAL TO PURCHASE A HOUSE Who Can Apply?

Housing Loan Monthly Instalments Withdrawal

i) Malaysian citizen; or Non-Malaysian citizen who has become an EPF member before 1 August 1998; or Permanent Resident ii) Has not reached 55 years old at the time of application iii) Has at least RM500 of savings in Account 2 Terms Of Withdrawal

or

Flexible Housing Withdrawal

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i) Buy or build a residential house (bungalow / terrace / semi-detached / condominium / apartment / studio apartment / serviced apartment / townhouse / SOHO) a shop house with a residential unit ii) Cash purchase or has obtained loan from institutions approved by EPF iii) Has signed the Sale and Purchase Agreement not more than 3 years from the application date iv) Has never made a housing withdrawal before OR if housing withdrawal has been made before, withdrawal to purchase a second house is allowed after the first house has been sold or disposal of ownership has taken place


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Withdrawal Amount Eligibility

Individual Purchase

Joint Purchase

100% loan

Cash Purchase

The difference between house price and loan amount with an additional 10% of house price

The difference between house price and loan amount with an additional 10% of house price

10% of house price

House price with an additional 10% of house price

OR

OR

OR

OR

All savings in Account 2

All savings in each applicant’s Account 2

All savings in Account 2

All savings in Account 2

(whichever is lower)

(whichever is lower)

(whichever is lower)

(whichever is lower)

Withdrawal Application

DOCUMENTS REQUIRED FOR SUBMISSION • KWSP 9C (AHL) (D5) withdrawal form • Personal identification card • Bank passbook / savings or current account statement (if payment is to be made via direct crediting into applicant’s bank account) • KWSP 3 form (if payment is to be made via mail) • Sale and Purchase Agreement • Marriage or Birth certificate (if joint purchase)

• Housing loan’s letter of offer / Form 16A / Deed of Assignment / title in applicant’s name and mortgaged to Financier (if purchase is by way of loan) • Developer’s confirmation letter on cash purchase, proof of payment of not less than 20% of house price and architect’s certificate / billing confirming progress of construction is not less than 20% (if purchase is by way of cash)

EPF reserves the right to request for any additional documents and reject any incomplete applications or those that do not comply with the terms and conditions. Enquiry For more information on other types of housing withdrawal and general guidelines, buyers can visit EPF’s website at www.kwsp.gov.my or contact: • Any nearest EPF Office; • EPF Call Management Centre (CMC) at: 03-8922 6000 • Customer Feedback: http://enquiry.kwsp.gov.my 47


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INSTALMENTS PAYABLE MANNER OF PAYMENT OF PURCHASE PRICE • The purchase price shall be paid by the buyer to the developer by instalments and at the time and in the manner prescribed in the Third Schedule of Schedule G or Schedule H. The developer is not bound to commence or complete the works in the order referred to in the Third Schedule and the buyer shall pay the instalments according to the stage of works completed by the developer provided that any damage to the completed works by subsequent stage of works shall be repaired and made good by the developer at its own cost and expense before the buyer takes vacant possession of the said property. • Every notice referred to in the Third Schedule requesting for payment shall be supported by a certificate signed by the developer’s architect or engineer in charge of the housing development and every such certificate so signed shall be proof of the fact that the works therein referred to have been completed.

LATE PAYMENT CHARGES • If any of the instalments set out in the Third Schedule shall remain unpaid by the buyer at the expiration of the period of thirty (30) days as stipulated in the Third Schedule, late payment charges on such unpaid instalment shall commence immediately thereafter and be payable by the purchaser and such charges shall be calculated from day to day at the rate of ten per centum (10%) per annum.

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8.0 | HANDING OVER OF HOUSE

STAGES

PARTIES INVOLVED

• Pre - Handing Over • During Handing Over • Post - Handing Over

• Developer • Financier / Bank • Solicitor / Lawyer

PRE - HANDING OVER STAGE

Notice of Handing Over Vacant Possession After years of waiting in anticipation, finally your dream house is complete. The developer would then issue a letter / notice of Handing Over of Vacant Possession (VP) to notify you that your property is ready. Upon receiving the letter / notice, you should follow the processes below in order to receive the keys to your new home:

Issuance of Vacant Possession Letter / Notice

Financier / Bank

• Follow up on final disbursement • Disbursement period? • Any outstanding interest?

Credit Department (Developer) • Settle miscellaneous charges • Follow up on final disbursement & other pending charges • Issuance of Clearance Letter

Customer Service (Developer)

• Arrange handing over of keys appointment

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Financier / Bank • Follow up on the full disbursement. • Find out how long it will take for the disbursement (usually it can take up to 21 working days to disburse). • Check on any other pending items such as outstanding interest and etcetera.

Credit Department (Developer) • Settle any miscellaneous charges such as quit rent, assessment, service and maintenance, electricity and water deposit and other pending charges as stated in the Vacant Possession notice. • After all payments have been settled (bank disbursement and miscellaneous charges), Clearance Letter will be issued by the Credit Department. • Follow up on the issuance of Clearance Letter for handing over of keys appointment.

Customer Relationship Management (CRM) Department / Customer Service / Customer Care (Developer) • Finally, call for an appointment with the CRM / Customer Service personnel for the handing over of keys. • Make sure you note down the appointment details: date, time, person in charge, contact number and location.

DURING HANDING OVER STAGE

At Handing Over Office

Brief & explain the overall handing over process to homeowner.

Please ensure you bring along these documents during the Handing Over process with the Customer Service personnel: 50

At Owner’s Unit

A walk-through of inventory checklist with the homeowner at the unit.

• Identity card • A copy of the Clearance letter • Owner’s Authorization Letter (to authorize representative to collect the house keys on behalf of the Owner)


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The Customer Service personnel will then carry out the briefing session at the Customer Service Office on the following items: Home Owner’s Manual (if any) • Utilities Deposit (if any) • Defect Rectification Form & Defect Liability Period • Keys Listing • Loose Fittings • Warranty Cards (if any) • Inventory Briefing Checklist • Free Gifts (if any) • Customer Feedback Survey The developer’s Customer Service personnel or representative will conduct an Inventory Briefing with you at your unit using the Inventory Checklist to ensure that the house is in good condition and subsequently to sign-off upon completion.

POST - HANDING OVER STAGE House Inspection

Defect Liability Period (DLP)

(Checking For Defects)

• Owners may conduct the house inspection and record the defects found (if any) • It is advisable for owners to ensure that the property is properly locked upon completion of inspection. • The developer is not responsible for any losses after the property has been handed over to the owner. (Except for stratified development where security services are provided). • Owners may submit the list of dissatisfactions or defects within the Defect Liability Period (DLP).

• The developer is obliged to rectify any defects in the unit, the common property or the housing project which becomes apparent within a period of 24 months from the date the developer actually delivers Vacant Possession of the unit to the owners. • If the owners discover defects at any time during the Defect Liability Period, they should follow the procedure set out in the SPA for the developer to rectify the defects.

Defect Rectification To ensure that the rectification works are being carried out smoothly, the owner should take note of the following: • Be specific on the defects which the developer is asked to rectify. • Put a sticker to mark the defect. • Record all defects in the Defect Rectification Form (DRF) provided by the developer and keep a copy for your reference. • Make arrangements with the Customer Service personnel to allow access to the contractor to carry their rectification works. • Monitor and follow up closely with the Customer Service personnel on the status of the rectification works. • Once all defects have been rectified, owners must sign-off the DRF to acknowledge closure of the defect rectification works. 51


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9.0 | USEFUL TIPS

HOUSING & STRATA MANAGEMENT TRIBUNAL MINISTRY OF URBAN WELLBEING, HOUSING & LOCAL GOVERNMENT OBJECTIVE • The Tribunal is established for the purpose of minimizing the burden that home buyers have to face in order to claim remedies from housing developers. • The Tribunal provides a faster avenue for home buyers to claim against developers with minimum expenses.

TRIBUNAL FOR HOMEBUYER CLAIMS PRESCRIBED FEE

MAXIMUM CLAIM RM50,000

RM10

WHO CAN FILE A CLAIM WITH THE TRIBUNAL? LANDED PROPERTY

STRATA PROPERTY

52

Buyer of property

• • • • • • •

Developer Buyer of property Proprietor Joint Management Body Management Corporation Subsidiary Management Corporation Managing Agent


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TYPES OF CLAIMS

TECHNICAL CLAIMS

NON-TECHNICAL CLAIMS

Damages for defective workmanship or non-compliance of specifications prescribed in the SPA

Compensation for late delivery of vacant possession

TRIBUNAL FOR HOMEBUYER CLAIMS Strata Management Tribunal • Dispute over the failure to perform a function, duty or power imposed by the Strata Management Act 2013. • Dispute over costs or repairs of a defect. • Claim for the recovery of charges, contribution to the sinking fund or any debt. • Claim for an order to convene a general meeting. • Claim to invalidate proceedings of a meeting as well as nullify a resolution on matters decided in a general meeting. • Claim for an order to revoke amendments of by-laws. • Claim for an order to vary the rate of interest fixed by the joint management body, management corporation or subsidiary management corporation for late payment of charges or contribution to sinking fund. • Claim for an order to vary the amount of insurance to be provided as well as to pursue an insurance claim. • Claim for compelling a developer, joint management body, management corporation or subsidiary management corporation to supply information or documents. • Claim for an order to give consent to effect alterations to any common property or limited common property. • Claim for an order to affirm, vary or revoke the Commissioner’s decision.

WHEN CAN YOU FILE YOUR CLAIMS? Claims can be filed not later than 12 months from:

Date of insuance of Certificate of Completion and Compliance (CCC) or Certificate of Fitness for Occupation (CFO)

Expiry date of defect liability period as set in the SPA

Termination of SPA

• The Tribunal only hears cases when vacant possesions have been delivered to buyers.

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DOCUMENTATION

Notice of Delivery of Vacant Possession (VP)

Sale & Purchase

Copy of IC

TYPES OF DOCUMENTS REQUIRED TO FILE A CLAIM

Certificate of Completion & Compliance (CCC) or Certificate of Fitness for Occupation (CFO)

Four (4) copies of Borang 1

Other related documents

• Claim amount & particulars of claims must be stated in the form

Quotation on the cost of repairs by the contractor engaged by the Claimant (if any)

• Form must be signed or thumbprinted by the Claimant personally

HOW TO CALCULATE NON-TECHNICAL CLAIM (Compensation for late delivery of vacant possession) Example: Purchase Price Date of SPA Date of Vacant Possession Actual Date of Vacant Possession Number of Days (overdue) • FOR HOUSE / PARCEL (Provision under Section 24 (2) Schedule G and Section 25 (2) Schedule H of the SPA)

54

= RM42,000 = 14 March 2002 = 13 March 2005 = 18 March 2006 = 370 days (13 March 2005 till 18 March 2006 ) • FOR COMMON AREA (IF RELATED) (Provision under Section 29 (2) Schedule H of the SPA)

RM42,000 (Purchase Price) x 10% x 370 days (overdue)

RM42,000 (Purchase Price) x 10% x 20% X 370 days (overdue)

365 days

365 days

= RM4257.53

= RM851.06


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LAWYER REPRESENTATION No party shall be represented by a lawyer(s) at the hearing unless it involves complex issues of law, or one party will suffer severe financial hardship if not legally represented.

RECOURSE FOR NON-COMPLIANCE OF TRIBUNAL AWARD CIVIL ACTION • Inform the Tribunal on the failure by the respondent to abide award. • Tribunal send copy of award to the Magistrate’s Court or the Sessions Court. • Award registered in court deemed to be an order of the court and can be enforced accordingly through civil action.

TRIBUNAL AWARD The Award made by the Tribunal is final and binding on all parties and treated as a court order.

PENALTY FOR NON-COMPLIANCE OF TRIBUNAL AWARD 1st offence : Fine < RM250,00 or imprisonment < 3 years; or both Continuing offence: Further fine of < RM5,000 per day

CRIMINAL ACTION • Lodge a complaint with the Enforcement Division, Ministry of Urban Wellbeing, Housing & Local Government at the following address: Enforcement Division Ministry of Urban Wellbeing, Housing & Local Government Level 30, No. 51, Persiaran Perdana, Presint 4 Pusat Pentadbiran Kerajaan Persekutuan 62100 Putrajaya T 03-8891 4410 E enforcement@kpkt.gov.my

TRIBUNAL CONTACT DETAILS Ministry of Urban Wellbeing, Housing & Local Government Tribunal for Housing and Strata Management Level 3 & 4, No. 51, Persiaran Perdana Precint 4 62100 Putrajaya T 03 88914650 / 4750 / 4751 F 03 88914755 E tribunal@kpkt.gov.my www.kpkt.gov.my

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USEFUL TIPS FOR HOME RENOVATION

OBJECTIVE: Why do you want to renovate? Is it because you want to beautify a space or something is broken? PLANNING: Have written plans or at least simple drawings to illustrate your ideas. COST: Get several quotations for the renovation works before you decide to start, even if the contractor is someone highly recommended. TIME / SCHEDULE: Consider your own time. It may be cheaper to employ individual contractors for specific works like wiring or concrete works but to supervise / get them working together can be a headache. CONTRACTORS & DESIGNERS: If you are giving your home a complete makeover, it would be best to engage an interior designer who will help you to take care of everything. ALTERNATIVES: It is most important that during the process of renovation, you move to an alternative place to stay. OTHERS: Consider your neighbourhood and the type of renovation works if you plan to sell it later.

Renovation can mean different things to different people. If you are planning to renovate, there are several factors that you need to consider before you start so that you will not have to suffer any wastage of funds and time because this process will very much determine the next few years of your lifestyle. Here are some tips that you should consider.

TIP # 1 : OBJECTIVE

TIP # 2 : PLANNING

You need to first identify why you want to renovate. Is it because you want to beautify a space or because something is broken? Next, list down everything you want to do on paper. Create a priority list so that you know which part you want to do first. This helps you to save on costs. You can then deal with the smaller items.

Have written plans or at least simple drawings to illustrate your ideas. Make copies of the plans and drawings so that there will not be any arguments or miscommunication. Making copies is very simple nowadays. Just get your digital camera or your phone and snap a photo of your drawing. Always refer to the sketches and plans if there is any disagreement.

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TIP # 3 : COST You need to start with a budget and then work your way from there. Get several quotations for renovation works before you decide to start, even if the contractor is someone highly recommended. This way, you have an idea of the range of cost. Also ask how extra cost are calculated. You have to consider the quotations and not necessarily to choose the cheapest quote. Some contractors under-quote to get your renovation project and make up for it by charging much higher for work variation. Do budget for some extra cost of around 2025% more for extra works. This amount is normal for items you did not plan for or extra material or minor changes to the renovation.

TIP # 4 : TIME / SCHEDULE Consider your own time. While it may be cheaper to employ individual contractors for specific works like wiring, concrete works and plaster ceiling, to supervise them working together can be a headache. For smaller renovation jobs, it may be cheaper to get individual contractors. Try not to target your renovation to complete just before the festive season. Contractors tend to charge more and may rush when you push them too hard to meet your deadline. You are pressured to have your house ready for the holidays and may decide to give in to the contractor because of this.

TIP # 5 : CONTRACTORS & DESIGNERS If you are giving your home a complete makeover, it would be best to engage an interior designer who will help you take care of everything. They will deal with the contractors while helping to work within your means. In most cases, the interior designer will be involved throughout the entire process and will be aware of your budget.

TIP # 6 : ALTERNATIVES It is most important that that you move out of your home during the renovation process. You need to factor the cost for this as it means uprooting the family for a few months.

TIP # 7 : OTHERS If the purpose of your renovation is to increase the value of your home with plans to possibly sell it later, consider your neighborhood and the type of renovation works. Installing expensive toilets and bath may not work well in a middle class neighborhood. However, for most houses, renovated kitchen cabinets, clean new toilets and repairs to doors and floors probably may increase the value.

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WHAT YOU NEED TO DO BEFORE YOU START YOUR RENOVATION Homeowners have to obtain written consent / approval from the Appropriate Authority (e.g. MPSJ/MBSA/MDKS) prior to commencement of any renovation works. For those living in strata properties (condos, apartments, etc), homeowners have to obtain a letter of consent from the management corporation (MC). The MC is vested with the right to check the proposed renovation plan in order to ensure the work does not disturb the neighbourhood. For gated and guarded communities, it is important to check the conditions stated in the deed of covenants / by-law / regulations / house rules. If you require access to your neighbourâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s property during the construction period, try to obtain their written consent at this stage. Your neighbours include people staying next to, in front of, or at the back of your house. However, if your construction work involves piling and deep excavation, you are encouraged to engage neighbours who are staying a few units away from your house as well because the effects of piling and deep excavation extend much further. Homeowners have to ensure that his / her authorized representatives / contractors fully comply with the requirements stipulated by the Authority. Appoint an architect or registered draughtsman registered with the Board of Architects Malaysia to prepare the building plans/renovation plan for submission to the appropriate authorities. Appoint a chartered engineer registered with the Board of Engineers Malaysia should the extension / renovation work involves concrete structures. Appoint a contractor who is registered with the Construction Industry Development Board (CIDB).

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STEP BY STEP GUIDE TO SELLING YOUR PROPERTY

01

HOW MUCH IS IT WORTH NOW?

02

GET IT APPRAISED

04 03

05

06

LEGAL ADVICE

08

SALE & PURCHASE AGREEMENT

MAKE IT LOOK GOOD!

VIEWING

07

ACCEPTING AN OFFER

09

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It is important to know what is happening in the property market and the economy as a whole. Additionally, you should consider your own personal objectives, your ability to finance a new property and meet ongoing repayments as well as capital gains tax implications. WHEN IS THE BEST TIME TO SELL?

STEP BY STEP GUIDE TO SELLING YOUR PROPERTY

Lifestyle changes are often the reason behind our decision to sell. Whether you are relocating, have a growing family or are downsizing, working out when to sell can be daunting especially for first-time sellers. Your decision to sell your property may not coincide with perfect market conditions. Therefore, it is important to know what is happening in the property market and the economy as a whole. Additionally, you should consider your own personal objectives, your ability to finance a new property and meet ongoing repayments as well as capital gains tax implications.

Step 1 - How much is it worth now?

R RTY FO

SALE!

PROPE

60

The current value of the property should not be based on its purchase price. It should be higher and do take into account the costs that would be incurred in the course of selling a property. Check real estate portals and gauge the price that most sellers are going for, and see if it matches the minimum return-on-investment that you are expecting.

Step 2 - Get it appraised Get your property appraised by a certified valuer from a real estate agency as well before inviting potential buyers to view the property. This will provide you with a more accurate indication of what the selling price in the area is and also details of other recent transactions involving similar properties within the vicinity. Make sure that the valuer you engage is duly registered with the Board of Valuers, Appraisers and Estate Agents.

Step 3 - Make it look good! First impression matters. Be sure that your property is in good shape by fixing everything that needs to be fixed, giving the place a solid spring-cleaning and throw in a fresh coat of paint on the walls. Do not underestimate the power of aesthetic appeal as they attract the attention of potential buyers. More importantly, these buyers will remember your property! Make potential buyers want to live there!


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Step 4 - Advertise Use the services of a reputed property agent to cut down on the time and work involved on your part. These agents will advertise the property for you, vet through potential buyers, negotiate with them, and complete the paperwork on your behalf, once the sale is concluded. Make sure that the agent you engage is duly registered with the Board of Valuers, Appraisers and Estate Agents.

Step 5 - Legal advice Appointing a lawyer right from the beginning could help avoid delays and allow time for the collection of necessary documentation involved in transferring ownership of your property to the new buyer.

Step 6 - Let the viewing begin Viewings are usually conducted in the evenings and on weekends as this is the time when prospective buyers are available.

Step 7 - Accepting an offer If a buyer is interested, he / she will make an offer. This is normally done through negotiations with your estate agent; if you are handling it yourself, then the offer will be made to you directly. The buyer does not necessarily have to offer the asking price. If you get a private offer but you have signed a contract with an estate agent, you may still have to pay professional fees, depending on the kind of contract you have. Many buyers will make an initial offer below the asking price, so you should expect to negotiate. However, when there is a lot of demand, some properties may eventually sell for more than the original asking price.

The price you are likely to get usually depends on: • Whether the asking price is realistic compared to similar properties • How quickly the buyer wants to move in • Whether property prices are rising • Whether your property is in a popular area

Step 8 - Sale & Purchase Agreement (SPA) After accepting an offer, you or your estate agent will need to give your lawyer certain information to begin the legal preparations for the sale. When the buyer executes the SPA, the buyer will pay the balance of the first 10% of the purchase price. The documents will then be forwarded to you for execution and then stamped. This must be done within 14 days of the date of the signing of the ‘Letter of Offer to Purchase’. Based on the standard terms in the SPA, the remaining 90% will be payable to you within three months from the SPA date.

Step 9 - Sold! Once all payments have been made and all documents have been finalised, the property will successfully be transferred to the buyer. Do note that you may need to pay the Real Property Gains Tax (RPGT).

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OTHER USEFUL TIPS BRIGHT WAYS TO SAVE ENERGY @ HOME

Tip

Tip

02

Tip

03

Tip Tip

Tip

Tip

62

01

04 05 06 07

A full load of laundry saves energy and time. Washing machines consume a lot of energy. Full loads will save energy by reducing the number of times you have to do your laundry.

Tip

08

Tip

09

Clean the filter of your air conditioner to save energy.

Tip

10

Close the windows to keep cool and save energy. Closing your windows and doors while your air conditioner is on, cools your room faster.

Tip

11

Tip

12

Tip

13

Tip

14

Tip

15

Tip

16

Save smart with energysaving light bulbs. Iron in bigger amounts to bring down your energy usage. Fill your kettle to the maximum level to maximize your energy savings. 5-star appliances give you 5 star savings.

Give your fridge some space to breathe, it will consume less. Switch off your computer to switch on the savings. Use outdoor light to prevent excessive energy use. Brighten up for less with T5 fluorescent lights. Set your air conditioner at 24oC for optimum coolness with higher savings. Setting a timer on your air conditioner is a smart way to manage and save energy. Use spotlights with motion sensors to brighten your savings. Use energy saving water pumps to pump up your energy savings. An organized fridge makes room for energy savings.


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ENERGY SAVINGS

TIPS Tip

17

Keep your kettle clean to enjoy more savings.

Tip

18

Switch to instant water heaters to save more energy.

Tip

19

Save smart with cold wash.

Tip

20

Your air conditioner size / capacity matters when it comes to energy savings.

Tip

21

Tip

22

Tip

23

Choose fans over air conditioners to save energy. Open up to natural light to save energy. A higher energy rating means higher energy savings. When buying electrical appliances, be sure to look out for the energy rating label. Choose 5-star rated appliances which are designed to save energy.

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10.0 | USEFUL CONTACTS

REHDA MALAYSIA SECRETARIAT REHDA Malaysia Wisma REHDA No. 2C, Jalan SS5D/6, Kelana Jaya, 47301 Petaling Jaya, Selangor T 03 - 7803 2978 F 03 - 7803 5285 E secretariat@rehda.com www.rehda.com REHDA Malaysia

BRANCHES JOHOR BRANCH

MELAKA BRANCH

Branch Secretariat No. 27-C, Jalan Glasiar Taman Tasek 80200 Johor Bahru, Johor

Branch Secretariat 1-1, Blok Mawar 2 Jalan Murni 2, Taman Malim Jaya 75250 Melaka

T 07 - 236 0930/931 F 07 - 236 0932 E rehdajhr@gmail.com

T 06 - 337 4288 / 336 5188 F 06 - 337 5140 E secretariat@rehdamelaka.org / rehdamk@hotmail.com

KEDAH/PERLIS BRANCH

www.rehdamelaka.org

Branch Secretariat No. 197, Tingkat Satu Susuran Sultan Abdul Hamid 8 Kompleks Perniagaan Sultan Abdul Hamid Fasa 2 Persiaran Sultan Abdul Hamid 05050 Alor Setar, Kedah T 04 - 777 2118/9 F 04 - 777 2117 E rehdakdh@yahoo.com

Branch Secretariat No. 75-1, Tingkat Satu Jalan S2 F2, Garden Homes, Seremban 2 70300 Seremban, Negeri Sembilan T 06 - 630 7764 F 06 - 630 7762 E rehdans@yahoo.com

KELANTAN BRANCH

PAHANG BRANCH

Branch Secretariat 3180-C, Tingkat 1, Jalan Sultan Ibrahim 15000 Kota Bahru, Kelantan

Branch Secretariat No. 12, Lorong Lengkok Kanan 2 Taman LKNP, Tanah Putih Baru, 25150 Kuantan, Pahang

T 09 - 744 6648 F 09 - 747 7900 E rehdakelantan@yahoo.com.my 64

NEGERI SEMBILAN BRANCH

T 09 - 513 3355 F 09 - 516 5295 E rehdaphg@gmail.com


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PENANG BRANCH

WILAYAH PERSEKUTUAN (KL) BRANCH

Branch Secretariat Unit 6, Level 5, Axis Complex 35, Cantonment Road 10350 Penang

Branch Secretariat Wisma REHDA No. 2C, Jalan SS5D/6, Kelana Jaya 47301 Petaling Jaya, Selangor

T 04 - 227 6916 F 04 - 226 9399 E secretariat@rehdapenang.com

T 03 - 7803 2978 F 03 - 7803 0016 E kul@rehda.com

www.rehdapenang.com PERAK BRANCH Branch Secretariat 33-C, 2nd Floor Jalan Tun Sambanthan 30000 Ipoh, Perak T 05 - 253 1472 F 05 - 254 7677 E rehdapk@gmail.com SELANGOR BRANCH Branch Secretariat Wisma REHDA No. 2C, Jalan SS5D/6, Kelana Jaya 47301 Petaling Jaya, Selangor T 03 - 7806 4853 / 4860 F 03 - 7880 4685 E selangor@rehda.com www.rehdaselangor.com TERENGGANU BRANCH Branch Secretariat Unit No 3, Tingkat 1 Bistari Centre, Jalan Hiliran 20300 Kuala Terengganu, Terengganu T 09 - 631 2882 F 09 - 631 3993 E rehdaterengganu@yahoo.com

REHDA YOUTH Wisma REHDA No. 2C, Jalan SS5D/6, Kelana Jaya 47301 Petaling Jaya, Selangor T 03 - 7803 2978 F 03 - 7803 5285 E secretariat@rehdayouth.com www.rehdayouth.com www.facebook.com/REHDAYouth REHDA INSTITUTE Wisma REHDA No. 2C, Jalan SS5D/6, Kelana Jaya 47301 Petaling Jaya, Selangor T 03 - 7803 6006 F 03 - 7880 3823 www.rehdainstitute.com GREENRE SDN BHD Wisma REHDA No. 2C, Jalan SS5D/6, Kelana Jaya 47301 Petaling Jaya, Selangor T 03 - 7803 2978 F 03 - 7803 5285 E info@greenre.org www.greenre.org

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MINISTRY OF URBAN WELLBEING, HOUSING AND LOCAL GOVERNMENT No 51, Persiaran Perdana, Presint 4 Pusat Pentadbiran Kerajaan Persekutuan 62100 Putrajaya T 03 - 8000 8000 F 03 - 8891 5557 www.kpkt.gov.my NATIONAL HOUSING DEPARTMENT Ministry of Urban Wellbeing, Housing and Local Government Aras 30-38, No 51 Persiaran Perdana, Presint 4 Pusat Pentadbiran Kerajaan Persekutuan 62100 Putrajaya

ENFORCEMENT DIVISION National Housing Department Ministry of Urban Wellbeing, Housing and Local Government Aras 35, No.51 Persiaran Perdana, Presint 4 Pusat Pentadbiran Kerajaan Persekutuan, 62100 Putrajaya T 03 - 8891 4356 F 03 - 8891 4045 E enforcement@kpkt.gov.my ABANDONED PROJECT REHABILITATION DIVISION National Housing Department Ministry of Urban Wellbeing, Housing and Local Government

T 03 - 8891 5000 F 03 - 8891 4088 E jpn@kpkt.gov.my

Aras 33, No.51 Persiaran Perdana, Presint 4 Pusat Pentadbiran Kerajaan Persekutuan 62100 Putrajaya

http://ehome.kpkt.gov.my

T 03 - 8891 4283 F 03 - 8891 4228

HOUSING DEVELOPMENT LICENSING DIVISION National Housing Department Ministry of Urban Wellbeing, Housing and Local Government Aras 31, No.51 Persiaran Perdana, Presint 4 Pusat Pentadbiran Kerajaan Persekutuan 62100 Putrajaya T 03 - 8891 4100 F 03 - 8891 3185 E pelesenan@kpkt.gov.my PRIVATE HOUSING MONITORING DIVISION National Housing Department Ministry of Urban Wellbeing, Housing and Local Government Aras 32, No.51 Persiaran Perdana, Presint 4 Pusat Pentadbiran Kerajaan Persekutuan 62100 Putrajaya T 03 - 8891 4200 F 03 - 8891 4215 66

HOUSING AND STRATA MANAGEMENT TRIBUNAL Ministry of Urban Wellbeing, Housing and Local Government Aras 3 & 4, No. 51 Persiaran Perdana, Presint 4 62100 Putrajaya T 3 - 8891 3284 (Hotline) F 3 - 8891 4755 E tribunal@kpkt.gov.my www.kpkt.gov.my PUBLIC SECTOR HOME FINANCING BOARD Ministry of Finance No. 9, Kompleks Kementerian Kewangan Persiaran Perdana, Presint 2 Pusat Pentadbiran Kerajaan Persekutuan 62592 Putrajaya T 03 - 8880 1600 F 03 - 8880 2440 E weblppsa@lppsa.gov.my www.lppsa.gov.my


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EMPLOYEES PROVIDENT FUND Bangunan KWSP Jalan Raja Laut, 50350 Kuala Lumpur T 03 - 8922 6000 F 03 - 8922 6222 Customer Feedback : http://enquiry.kwsp.gov.my www.kwsp.gov.my

BOARD OF VALUERS, APPRAISERS AND ESTATE AGENTS MALAYSIA A-19-13A,Level 19, Tower A Menara UOA Bangsar No. 5 Jalan Bangsar Utama 1, Bangsar 59000 Kuala Lumpur T 03 - 2288 8815 F 03 - 2288 8819 E info@lppeh.gov.my www.lpph.gov.my

CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY DEVELOPMENT BOARD (CIDB) Level 10, Menara Datoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Onn Putra World Trade Centre No 45, Jalan Tun Ismail 50480 Kuala Lumpur T 03 - 4047 7000 F 03 - 4047 7070 www.cidb.gov.my BOARD OF ARCHITECTS MALAYSIA (LAM) 17th Floor, Block F Ibu Pejabat JKR Jalan Sultan Salahuddin 50582 Kuala Lumpur T 03 - 2698 2878 F 03 - 2693 6881 E info@lam.gov.my www.lam.gov.my BOARD OF ENGINEERS MALAYSIA (BEM) 17th Floor, Ibu Pejabat JKR Jalan Sultan Salahuddin 50580 Kuala Lumpur T 03 - 2610 7095 F 03 - 2692 5017 E bem1@jkr.gov.my www.bem.org.my

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Copyright Š 2016 by REHDA Malaysia

All rights reserved. This book or any portion thereof may not be reproduced or used in any manner whatsoever without the expressed written permission of the publisher. Printed in Malaysia First Printing, 2016

Real Estate and Housing Developersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Association Malaysia Wisma REHDA No. 2C, Jalan SS 5D/6 Kelana Jaya 47301 Petaling Jaya Selangor www.rehda.com

Disclaimer: This handbook serves only as a guide. Whilst every effort has been made to ensure that the information in this book is correct at printing time, readers are advised to refer to the source of the information stated. The Association shall not be held liable for any loss / damages incurred due to the use of information provided in this handbook.


REAL ESTATE AND HOUSING DEVELOPERSâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; ASSOCIATION MALAYSIA Wisma REHDA No. 2C, Jalan SS5D/6 Kelana Jaya 47301 Petaling Jaya Selangor T 03-7803 2978 F 03-7803 5285 E secretariat@rehda.com www.rehda.com

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