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EVAN SALE Yale School of Architecture | March 2017

E VA N S A L E University of Cincinnati | January 2016


E VA N S A L E evan.sale@yale.edu | 1.217.816.5455

E D U C AT I O N

Yale School of Architecture | Master of Architecture I Candidate 2019 University of Cincinnati DAAP| BS Architecture 2016, Cum Laude École Spéciale d’Architecture Paris | French-language exchange Autumn 2015

HONORS

P U B L I C AT I O N S

National Merit Scholar AIA Ohio Student Competition 1st Place 2015 DAAPWorks People’s Choice Award 2016

University of Cincinnati Honors Program Cincinnatus Excellence Scholar

Retrospecta | 2017 Autumn 2016 work included in annual YSoA student publication. Studio project “Library of Bushwick,” critic Brennan Buck. Analytical drawing from Formal Analysis, Professor Peter Eisenman and TA James Coleman. Echos | 2016 Undergraduate capstone “Projective Space” included in collection of student work from University of Cincinnati DAAP. Ed. Professor Mara Marcu Autonomy: Architectural Limits | 2015 Paper “The Formal Legacy of Etienne-Louis Boullée in Aldo Rossi’s San Cataldo Cemetery” included in student publication of l’École Spéciale d’Architecture. Ed. Professor Brent Patterson.

ENGAGEMENT

“Digital Constructivism” | Paris, 13 November 2015 Conference at l’École Spéciale d’Architecture. Keynote architect Theo Sarantoglou Lalis, advisor Brent Patterson.

Zoomable Worlds//Misbehaved Tectonics | Cincinnati, July 2014 Helped to prepare exhibition of student sculpture, digital fabrications, and architectural drawings. Professors Stephen Slaughter and Mara Marcu. American Institute of Architecture Students | 2012-2016 The News Record | 2016 Campus newspaper contributor Catholic Heart Work Camp | 2008-2013 Renovated homes each summer

SKILLS

AutoCAD, Rhinoceros 3D, V-Ray for Rhino, Revit, Adobe CS6, MS Office Intermediate German, Beginning French


E X P E R I E N C E Andre Kikoski Architect | New York City, May-Aug 2015

Full-time co-op intern. Entrusted with materials research, product specification, CD revision, and presentation renderings. Built an interactive physical model for the co-op board of The Columbia, in Manhattan. Initiated schematic facade options for developers of 75 Kenmare, a luxury residential building in Manhattan. Centerbrook Architects and Planners | Centerbrook, CT Aug-Dec 2014 Full-time co-op intern. Developed presentation renderings and CDs, specified products. Assisted with master planning and community focus groups for The Derryfield School in Manchester, NH. Other projects included Lyme Art Assocation in Old Lyme, CT and Mystic Seaport Museum in Mystic, CT. Hammond Beeby Rupert Ainge Architects | Chicago, Jan-May 2014 Full-time co-op intern. Developed programming and schematic design for Jenkins and Nanovic Halls, University of Notre Dame. Assisted in master planning for Evergreen Farms, Kenosha, WI. Berners-Schober Associates | Springfield, IL May-Aug 2016 Half-time field representative, worked remotely with supervisors at headquarters in Green Bay. Documented renovations and the allocation of space at several hospitals, including St. John’s Hospital, Springfield. Graham and Hyde Architects | Springfield, IL May-Aug 2016 Half-time intern. Produced renderings, schematic design options, and CD’s. Projects included urban infill surrounding Trinity Lutheran Church and renovations to Christ the King Catholic Church, both in Springfield. Panther Creek Country Club | Springfield, IL May 2012-Aug 2013 Served members and guests at receptions and special events. United Wealth Solutions | Springfield, IL Feb-April 2012 Clerk for an accounting firm during tax season.


ACADEMIC 1 2 3 4 5

Page Space Seeds and Furrows Cellars Row Home Upward Mobility

PROFESSIONAL 6 Andre Kikoski Architect 7 Centerbrook Architects 8 Hammond Beeby Rupert Ainge

INDEPENDENT 9 Discourse Unfolds


ACADEMIC


PA G E S PA C E 6 | Library for Bushwick Professor Brennan Buck Autumn 2016 This library explores how accreted layers can obscure spatial boundaries and transform each other through superposition. Much of the existing building is preserved, and sections of its faรงade contribute to a collage of new fragments. The volume yields to planes and striated space. Thin spaces emerge between delaminated layers, and these gaps reveal the inevitable disjunctions that occur when 2-dimensional graphic systems are projected onto forms with depth. Gaps allow different readings between perspective and elevation while moderating natural light. The complicated perimeter of the plan accommodates stacks and study spaces, while the porous facades complicate any delimitation of the interior. Existing warehouse

Excision and applique

New Collage


South Elevation S O U T H E L E VAT I O N


West Elevation W E S T E L E VAT I O N


Bushwick street art: 2-dimensional coherence broken by discontinuous depth. Opposite: physical section model


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BASEMENT 1 Gardens 2 Reserves and workroom 3 Mechanical

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GROUND 4 5 6 7 8 9

Amphitheater Lobby Circulation desk Periodicals Cafe Kitchen

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2 10 Reading room 11 Administration

3 12 Meeting rooms 13 Administration

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4 14 Terraces 15 Seminar room


ADMIN

CLASS

SEEDS AND FURROWS VA U L T

8 | Archive and Landscape Critic Brennan Buck Autumn 2016 An array of occupiable walls cross Yale’s Science Hill. Buried between them are laboratories and seed vaults, as well as spaces for public outreach and accommodations for visiting researchers.

T H E I N S T I T U T E F O R A D VA N C E D S E E D S T U D Y N E W H AV E N , C O N E N C T I C U T

The heights of the walls varies with that of the hill. At its crest, the walls part to frame a pathway that diffuses the axis of Hillhouse Avenue. Subdividing the underused land allows for subtle grade adjustments and stitches campus buildings together with outdoor spaces of an occupiable scale.


Section model through entrance, occupiable wall, and seed storage vault.


W H AT YO U C A N N OT S E E 8 | Analytical Drawing Autumn 2016 - Spring 2017

R A I N A L D I A N D B E R N I N I AT P I A Z Z A D E L P O P O LO Formal Analysis, Autumn 2016 Professor Peter Eisenman and TA James Coleman The volumetric differences of the churches at the Piazza del Popolo are deliberately minimized in elevation. The elevations, bound by the differing widths of the blocks that they span, fix the footprints in their lateral dimensions but allow manipulation in depth. The narrower site of Monte Santo forces a narrower dome as seen in front elevation, but the elongation of the dome into an ellipsoidal footprint helps to perceptually enlarge it on approach and bring it into closer correspondence with the dome of Miracoli. The impression breaks down as the viewer moves away from an elevational vantage point and the differences in depth become apparent. The architect’s willingness to prioritize the piazza view over all others, to distort built reality in service of a subjective impression, suggests a sensibility far removed from the Renaissance. Wittkower describes it as “that subjective principal which maintains that reality is to be found not so much in the fact as in the impression produced on the spectator.�


JOŽE PLEČNIK’S

CHURCH OF THE ASCENSION

Diagrammatic Analysis, Spring 2017 Professor Peter Eisenman and TA James Coleman


CELLARS 8 | Subjectivity and Suggestion Professor Rebecca Williamson Spring 2016

Jackson Brewery presides over Elm Street in Cincinnati’s Overthe-Rhine neighborhood. The hillside between is terraced with crumbling masonry, obscured in its interactions with its site and by years of construction, demolition, and changing use. Organic swells in the ground crash against man-made geometries, buckling walls and confusing what is buried and exposed, remembered and forgotten.

History tells us of a brewing company, of Prohibition, of a fire and a landslide, and of abandonment. Topography is as alive as the vines that wedge into crumbling mortar, with the ability to submerge pieces of the past and, occasionally, to yield them up again. A massive doorway marks an improbable transition from the mapped, trafficked, daylit world of the street to that of the cellars. The chambers are volumetrically self-contained. A glimpse through a connecting doorway shows us some things for certain about an adjoining space, but it also creates a void into which we speculate.


“As for the cellar, we shall no doubt find uses for it ... But it is first and foremost the dark entity of the house, the one that partakes of subterranean forces. When we dream there, we are in harmony with the irrationality of the depths� Gaston Bachelard, The Poetics of Space


VIEWSHEDS These plan perspectives show the extents of the cellars as they appear from singular points. They register spaces both visible and suggested, as by doorways seen obliquely. Any understanding of the whole must be assembled from fragmentary impressions. They are in charcoal, with interventions originally presented as acetate overlays.

Before we cross a threshold, it might lead to anything. Our experiencing the next space comes at the cost of the potentials it held when it was uncharted.


HUMANIZING INTERVENTIONS

PODIUM

G A N G WAY

COCOON

NODE

Implies an inviolate space between occupants and envelope, gives vision primacy over haptic senses.

Constricts movement and identifies destinations. Space is difficult to scope visually, and stimuli are reduced.

Replaces indeterminate space with a graspable room. Humane materials engage haptic senses and provide a comfortable degree of aspect.

Inverts the cocoon. Creates peripheral circulation and offers a locus for orientation and amenities.

ANTI-DELIMITING DEVICES

steel rail with integrated LED lighting hardwood platform steel substructure

PA L I M P S E S T

G AT E

ABYSS

Registers changing functions and forms. Vestigial elements allude to earlier intentions and uses.

An area that is visible but inaccessible thwarts delimitation. Alludes to something more without defining it.

Impassable except by the eye. Suggests another dimension of potential spaces.


existing stone vault diffusing cove existing concrete LED lighting

existing portal glass awning steel casework light shelves concrete platform steel substructure


open plenum existing drainage new utilities

hardwood radiant heating coils plywood subfloor sleeper slats LED lighting steel substructure

Revolver 4 pts Bourbon 1 pt coffee liqueur 2 dashes orange bitters steel shelving steel casters existing rails existing concrete platforms


ROW HOME 9 | Typology and Section Professor Bob Burnham Winter 2015

To begin a semester studying urban housing types, I designed a home for a photographer and her family in Covington, KY. It responds to its 19th-century context and to views across the Ohio River to Cincinnati. Left: 422 Riverside Drive, Covington, KY Center: Early section models Right: Collage of site influences


Early section models

Collage of site influences


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Private spaces are secluded at the back of the site, while the entertaining spaces open into the courtyard and possess views across the river. A dynamic section gives each space a distinct character and promotes visual connections.

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Studio Utility

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Salon Dining Kitchen Courtyard Master Suite Garage

9 Study 10 Bedrooms

11 River Terrace 12 Family Room 13 Family Terrace


U P WA R D M O B I L I T Y 10 | Multi-Unit Housing Professor Bob Burnham Spring 2015 8

Confronts a housing shortage in Cincinnati’s Over-theRhine neighborhood, which is resurgent after decades of decay. A serpentine base engages Vine Street and McMicken Avenue and defines outdoor subspaces. The wedgeshaped tower has a minimal profile when seen parallel to either street.

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Opposite: Group site model with my intervention RESIDENCES 1

Sx8 1 br/1 ba

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Mx8 2 br/2 ba

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Lx4 3 br/2 ba

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AMENITIES 4 5 6 7

Lobby, lounge, and administration Cafe Ballroom with terrace Fitness SUPPORT

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Skip-stop circulation core Parking Mechanical

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GROUND FLOOR 1 2 3 4 5

Cafe Lounge Terrace Fitness Administration


EVEN FLOORS Contain bedrooms and amenity spaces. Major living spaces occupy both levels and are visually connected to upper level spaces.

ODD FLOORS Contain common circulation and the public spaces of 5 apartments. Each apartment has a balcony and a high-volume living area


PROFESSIONAL


ANDRE KIKOSKI ARCHITECT 3 | Internship New York City Summer 2015

I worked full-time as an intern at Andre Kikoski Architect, producing renderings and CD’s. Projects included a transformable model of interior renovations at The Columbia and schematic facade designs for 75 Kenmare. Both are luxury residential buildings in Manhattan.


CENTERBROOK ARCHITECTS 4 | Internship Centerbrook, CT Autumn 2014

I worked full-time as an intern at Centerbrook Architects and Planners. My tasks included progress renderings, as well as programming, schematic modeling, and construction documents. Projects included the Derryfield School in Manchester, NH and Mystic Seaport Museum.


HAMMOND BEEBY RUPERT AINGE 5 | Internship Chicago Spring 2014

N E T ANREETA

ACA ACADEMIC

-ECON

-POLIT

-SOCI

-CLAS

-SHAR

-ASSIG

A.D. P

INTE INTERNATI

-KELLO

-KROC

-KEOU

-NANO

-LIU IN FIRST FLOOR FIRST FLOOR 43,992 43,992 GSF GSF

SECONDSECOND FLOOR FLOOR 33,550 33,550 GSF GSF

I worked full-time as an intern at Hammond Beeby Rupert Ainge Architects. My largest tasks involved schematic design for Jenkins and Nanovic Halls at the University of Notre Dame. I allocated program spaces to reconcile departmental demands with formal constraints. Above: Demarcation of academic departments in Jenkins and Nanovic Halls

BUILDING TOTALTOTAL BUILDING AREA AREA 181,440 181,440 GSF GSF

-SCHO

THIRD FLOOR THIRD FLOOR 32,834 32,834 GSF GSF

-SGA/

BASEMENT SHELL: 6,283 BASEMENT SHELL: 6,283 ATTIC 2,334 SHELL: 2,334 ATTIC SHELL:

-CLAS

-SHAR

-KELLO 4

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I.P. PRO

BUIL BUILDING

-CAFE


INDEPENDENT


DISCOURSE UNFOLDS 1 | 1st Place AIA Ohio Student Competition 2015

I organized a 2-day charrette with Kevin Kastle, Shinji Miyajima, and Samantha Schuermann. Our structure serves the Architectural Congress of Ohio and the Miami University community, and it was selected as the best entry from among architecture schools in Ohio. My major contributions were the plan and site organization, as well as the digital models that provided a base for our renderings. The building opens up to visitors in a way that allows them to glimpse the exhibition space before reaching the entrance. Resource spaces are secluded, while open studios face a pond at the southeast. The expressive plate language of the exhibition space frames shifting views and prompts a more critical examination of space, views, and light. An outdoor gathering space mediates between interior and exterior.


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Exhibition Studios Reference Fabrication Terrace

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THANK YOU Evan Sale evan.sale@yale.edu | 1.217.816.5455

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