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evan remington graduate portfolio 2010-2013 GSAPP columbia university


All artwork included in this book is original work created by or in conjunction with Evan Remington. All rights reserved. May 2013


GSAPP Masters of Architecture Portfolio of Academic Work Evan Remington Fall 2010 - Spring 2013


001

Fall 2 12 - Mario Gooden Studio

Kunsthalle Amman, Jordan

T

“For those of us who are nonartists, it is a really amazing thing to go from a blank canvas to a descriptive and deep collage of thought and color,” said Paul Beran, director of the Outreach Center at the Center for Middle Eastern Studies (CMES).

toward a freer approach to shape and color. “You have to be a kind of ‘artivist,’ an artist and an activist at the same time,” he said. “And I believe that is the duty of art: to speak what other people do not want to speak. Say loudly what other people don’t want to say.”

whipped the canvas too violently to continue, eL Seed would break to speak to his audience in English, French, and Arabic. -

ation in Tunisia.

EL Seed drew inspiration for his work from a visit to Tunisia in December. He was there to paint a mural in Kairouan compurple, which had been the color of former ruler Ben Ali’s regime. Sensitive to the political weight of the color, eL Seed obliged, but later reconsidered his stance. “Just as the people take back their freedom of speech, as an artist, I need to take back this color.” He sees his art as a vector for change, hoping that viewers develop a feeling of taking back what is theirs. He told many stories of popular participation in December’s project, describing citizens who had “never picked up a can” of paint joining him for Seed, instills a sense of pride that bodes well for the future of Tunisia.

While eL Seed was the only one to wield the spray can last week, he had what amounted to an artistic consultant in the crowd. Tamer Sameer, a Saudi Arabian street artist who studies at the University of Massachusetts, Boston, stepped forward to advise “He is like a guide to me,” said Sameer. “When I return to my city, I’d like to cover all the walls like this.” By Matthew McClellan


“.. artists create revolutions.”


003

GRAFITTI

street art

gallery art


005


007


amman

kunsthalle A

rt in the middle east is gaining interest in the highly competitive art world. The art itself is accompanied by a message that carries with it the weight of the Arab spring movement, of a revolution for a new generation of Arab nations. The message that the art carries is born on the street and carries upward through all the genres until eventually gaining recognition or currency within the global art market. This communicative path creates a dialogue between the genres, moving from graffiti to street art to galleries, and vice versa from gallery to the street. This communication can be understood as a transaction, each giving value in the translation from one to another. These spaces which represent the three genres also share a transactional communication, be it inspirational, verbal or simply visual. The

The spaces take advantage of the verticality of the site and the adjacent lots by allowing a public path to dissect the site with the pedestrian walkway/ stairway. The walkway not only dissects the gallery spaces as you continue through, but also connects them in strategic locations. The walkway reveals the spaces slowly as you proceed through the ‘valleys’ that open up to entrances to the galleries, cafe or outdoor ‘street art’ exhibition spaces. The administrative, educational, storage and maintenance are all below the galleries along with the theatre/lecture hall. Along the lower street at the bottom of the site lies a public meeting/lecture hall as well as a gift shop and restroom facilities.


009


011


013

A

venida Brazil is a major bloodline of Rio, pumping the necessary travelers in and out of the city daily, at an amazing rate. Many people realy on the Avenida to run clearly everyday. The avenue runs through an amazingly diverse fabric of urban density, from industrial coast line that is currently being revamped to rural residential countryside that is beautifully green and lush. The RIO REMIX studio is attempting to imagine the future of the Avenida Brazil more than 30 years into the future, well after the fog of post-olympic Rio has settled. The studio attempted to create a dialogue of the possibility that can transform the forgotten site of the Avenida

My attempt to transform the avenida is two-fold.

1- is to give to the people that live in the dense urban areas an escape from the hard, cold surface of the concrete and asphalt that surround the factories of the North Zone. Bring some of the forest from the outlying rural areas into the Avenue, creating the Avenida Selva do Parque (Avenue Jungle Park).

2- is to make a destination point along the Avenida that is within the Avenida itself. Bring people from outside the local areas into the escape and give the people that are residents of the area a more stable local economy.


“Profiles that contain the possibility of the various programs intersect and intertwine to create multiple spatial complexities with hidden escapes scattered in the structure...�


015


017


019


021


023


rendering - Pedestrian Entry


025

spring 2 13 - keith kaseman Studio


rendering - rooftop escape


Fall 2 10 - Joaquim Moreno Studio

027

mobile research lab -NEW YORK CITY

With 11 feet of water set to crash onto the shore-hemmed city of New York, what assurances do we have that New York City will not become Milwaukee-by-the-sea or, more disturbing, something like Port-au-Gotham?

I

n April 1993, 400,000 people in Milwaukee (total population: 1.6 million) became ill from an intestinal microbe, cryptosporidium, courtesy of contaminated drinking water. Each developed a week-plus of diarrhea and general intestinal misery; of them, more than 100, all with abnormal immune systems, died. How and why did it happen? Bad plumbing. The city’s water filtration system, which took Lake Michigan water and (allegedly) filtered it clean, failed for some reason—and cryptosporidium entered the water supply, then people’s stomachs. Perhaps the spring rains overwhelmed the filtering capacity. Perhaps an unusually large run-off of cryptosporidium from the excrement of various local farm animals spiked the lake.

(mostly from the lakes and reservoirs) and used water out. Logic and civic planning prevail. This is your government actually working.

With 11 feet of water set to crash onto the shorehemmed city of New York, what assurances do we have that New York City will not become Milwaukee-by-the-sea or, more disturbing, something like Port-au-Gotham? Pleanty-New York City abd, I suspect, other urban centers, has a forward-thinking approach to the water supply informed with hard-earned lessons from Haiti and New Orleans. New Yorkers use 1.3 million gallons of water each day, sending it downstream across 7,400 miles of sewer pipes. That’s about 160 gallons per head per day. The Department of Sanitation sees it in basic terms: fresh water in

Yes, cities—those reviled warts on the American imagination, the ancient sources of all sin and fornication. Cities, unlike other places, are built for people to live in—and they are built to last. The government, that other major wart, has a clear and present role in their functioning, hiring the guys who are measuring coliform content in the water right now and making the decisions about what to do next. More than anything else, Sandy—or any natural disaster—reminds us just why and how government exists, why taxing and spending are necessary, and the forcefulness of that forgotten virtue, the common interest.

When this all settles, hopefully soon, much attention will be given to how quickly communities get back to normal. There will be tragic stories and heart-warming stories and everything in between. Each political side will try to make hay out of the disaster by pointing out various “heckuva job, Brownie” screwups, past and present. But what won’t be covered is a discussion of how quickly cities regain their balance compared with small towns and rural areas. My guess is that cities will be far ahead and not just because they have the dough.

The Scariest Thing About Sandy: Guarding the Water Supply by Kent Sepkowitz The Daily Beast Online Oct 30, 2012


029


8’

1

12 ’

3

2

3

~1’-6”

10’


031

Fall 2 10 - Joaquim Moreno Studio


W 103rd & Amsterdam Manhattan

3/4”=1’ scale physical model

acrylic, aluminum


033

Fall 2 10 - Joaquim Moreno Studio

T

he cell project was the name given for the medium scale project of the CORE I studio. Meant to be a precursor to the larger scale project that would become the Airlab. The Cell was meant to be a mobile research lab that would be a remote tool for the Columbia Earth Institutes new home of the Airlab. My initial study of the various types of bacteria and viruses that sometime show up in the water sample tests that are conducted on NYC’s water supply to figure out the amount of additives that are needed to keep the water poSalmonella is among the list of bacteria to look out for. The bacteria cell that attaches itself to a host body and acts as parasite, feeding off the host and using the ‘infrastructure’ of the host body as a way to spread and replicate.

It was these traits from the bacteria cell that I decided to mimic in the my design for the mobile design research lab so the cell can survive and do its work with no other connections than to the host body that is the New York City water supply. The cell connects to the water supply via fire hy drants. The natural pres sure in the water line drives a generator for electricity, as the water tank of the Cell lab is filled. This water supply becomes the samples for which the lab will con duct the tests, as well as the source of water for the occupants of the lab. The unit is designed to allow a single researcher to conduct the tests in the target areas in an ef ficient amount of time. There is also a quick de ployment system in which the cell can be delivered on a flatbed truck, or moved rather easily by a fireman in case of an emergency.

-

-

-


035

Fall 2 10 - Joaquim Moreno Studio


037

Fall 2 10 - Joaquim Moreno Studio

[

]

Peck Slip, Manhattan “Sustainable development means rising living standards for everybody in a way that's not going to destroy our ecosystems...� Q: This year you moved from the Center for International Development at Harvard to Columbia and started the Earth Institute, which is dedicated to the idea of sustainable development. What is that? A: Sustainable development means rising living standards for everybody in a way that's not going to destroy our ecosystems, cause mass extinctions and add to enormous problems in climate or water scarcity. The links between the physical environment and the economic environment are much more profound than economists have recognized. If they really want to get to the core of what's happening in Africa, they had better start understanding AIDS, tuberculosis, malaria and nitrogen-depleted soil.

These are important phenomena that help to explain why the poorest countries are not achieving economic progress. Q: That seems like common sense. Why do you even need the idea of sustainable development? A: In academia, the scientists and the policy types rarely deal with one another directly, especially on problems of the poor. The idea of the Earth Institute is to focus not on the disciplines but on the problems and to bring together five main areas in an intensive dialogue: the earth sciences, ecological science, engineering, public health and the social sciences with a heavy dose of economics. QUESTIONS FOR JEFFREY SACHS By Amy Barrett New York Times Online December 15, 2002


039

Fall 2 10 - Joaquim Moreno Studio

Section Study Sketches


FDR-drive south street

A

irlab is a headquarters and lab for the Earth Institute. The overall layout of the complex and its plan is based on the path of a visitor’s arrival to the site and procession through the various labs that are made up of three buildings. The site is the location of the old Peck Slip. The path begins at the visitors entrance slightly below grade on the side facing lower Manhattan. This portion of the building also houses the administration offices. The path then leads up and over a pedestrian walkway that seperates the first and second buidings. Along the path there is an outer mesh that changes in levels of opacity that essentially curates the experience of the city from within the building. The path continues to rise past all the various labs until ending at the top of the third building overlooking the East River with a view of Brooklyn and the Brooklyn Bridge.

front street

peck slip

water street AirLAB - Peck Slip, NYC - Site Plan NTS


041

Fall 2 10 - Joaquim Moreno Studio

data/server 200

lab 800

ground

lower

level

mezzanine

AirLAB - Peck Slip, NYC - Floor Plan Scale- 1/32” = 1’ 0”


second

third


Fall 2 10 - Joaquim Moreno Studio

043

11

12

10

13 9

8

7

14

6

5

4

3 2

1

east section 14 north & south manhattan 13 airlab courtyard 12 brooklyn 11 over FDR 10 upper east river 9 lower lab roof 8 east river 7 brooklyn bridge 6 higher north manhattan 5 south east river 4 south manhattan 3 south peck slip 2 north manhattan 1 airlab stair sequence


south section


045

Fall 2 10 - Joaquim Moreno Studio


047

Fall 2 10 - Joaquim Moreno Studio


Library

049

spring 2 11 - karel klein Studio

downtown branch

The New York Publlic Library’s archive is so massive that some of the material has never been seen except on request. The New York Public Library's archive is so massive that some of the material has never been seen except on request.

Beginning Friday, the library presents a selection of those hidden gems, a group of works showcasing the extraordinary printmaking skills of American impressionist artist Mary Cassatt. "Daring Methods: The Prints of Mary Cassatt" includes 88 prints donated to the library in 1900 by Samuel Putnam Avery, a Manhattan art dealer who developed a close working relationship with the artist. It is the first time that the 30 color prints and 58 monochromes, created between 1878 and 1898, are being shown as a group at the New York Public Library. Born to a wealthy Pennsylvania family, Cassatt was the lone woman and only American among the French impressionists in the late 1800s. Her paintings are celebrated for her tender depictions of mothers and children in domestic settings. She died in 1926, the last 11 years nearly in darkness as her eyesight failed. Her prints are less sentimental and more incisive than her paintings, said Anne Higonnet, professor of art history at Barnard College and Columbia University and author on different aspects of impressionism. Her print imagery still deals with childhood and motherhood but she also tackles subject matter not found in her paintings: woman performing their daily routines and toilettes. She even did some nudes, albeit in a discreet and modest manner, said Madeleine Viljoen, curator of the library's print collection, which contains 200,000 original works of art on paper beginning with the 15th century. Cassatt's talents as a printmaker are well documented, but what makes this exhibition so compelling is the focus on the artist's printmaking methods, beginning with her first tentative black-and-white attempts in 1878 and ending with her fully realized and dazzling color prints. The show demonstrates how invested Cassatt was in the printmaking aesthetic, again and again reworking her copper printing plates, experimenting with different methods and making numerous iterations of the same composition with only slight changes to achieve the effect she desired. "One of the things I wanted to show in this exhibition was not only her great successes but also some of her failures as a printmaker," said Viljoen. "Some of her early prints are disastrous," she said. "It's kind of wonderful as a result because you can really see her using this medium and not always finding what she wants, dropping it and then trying again." The Avery collection includes multiple trial proofs of the same print "so we can document how she worked on an individual print," she added. Cassatt was just as skillful a draftsman as Edgar Degas or Camille Pissarro, said Higonnet. But she was "better with color and more conceptually inquiring about East-West and ideas about authorship. She not only signed each single impression of the print, which declared each one as a work of art, she also signed some of the preliminary states of the prints, so she extended the notion of authorship in a way that's still resonating with us today." NYC EXHIBIT SHOWCASES MARY CASSATT AS PRINTMAKER

By ULA ILNYTZKY Mar, 5 2013


051

unfolded section study of NYPL

unfolded section / decor transformation


053


atmospheric / geometry study


055

[7]

south exterior

west interior

south exterior

west exterior

[5b]

north interior

north interior


unfolded descending path [9]

[8]

[4] [10]

east interior

[2]

[4]

[11]

[3]

south interior

west interior

south exterior

unfolded ascending path

east exterior

north interior

east interior


057


059

kitchen

museum/ path up library stackes/ reading area

gift shop cafe

light well

light well

museum/ path up lobby museum/ path up

Ground Floor / lobby, cafe, gift shop

Second Floor / museum path

NYPL

NYPL

branch library

branch library


museum/ path up

library/ reading area

library reading area

light well

library desk

light well

library/ stacks

library/ stacks

museum/ path up

reading area reading area

Third Floor / museum path - library

Fourth Floor / museum path - library

NYP L

NYPL

branch library

branch library


061


063


065


067


069

124 st.

123 st.

temporal unit semi-permanent unit permanent unit


071


073


075


07 7


arch technology V ultrareal rendering

craft in the digital age


spring 2 12 - Arch. tech v

079

Plan A-04 Roof 1/16”=3’-0” 270’-0” 7’

5’

30’-0”

1

30’-0”

30’-0”

4

3

30’-0”

30’-0”

6

5

30’-0”

30’-0”

30’-0”

9

8

7

5’

7’

10

A

UP

UP

30’-0”

DN

DN

DN

B

30’-0”

UP

5’

communal area

C

7’

Y. Konstantinidis E. Remington A. Paukman

YEA

5’

7’

2

30’-0”

Manufacture / Studio A-03 Typical 1/16”=3’-0”

date 4.30.12

5’

30’-0”

30’-0”

30’-0”

3

2

30’-0”

4

30’-0”

30’-0”

7

30’-0”

30’-0”

9

8

5’

10

loading dock

A

UP UP

30’-0”

UP

5’

30’-0”

B

C main entrance

7’

A -101

30’-0”

6

5

7’

1

5’

scale noted

title

Architectural Plans

270’-0” 7’

Floor / Showroom A-02 Ground 1/16”=3’-0”

7’


A-05 Exploded Atrium Detail

ATRIUM GLAZING 1” THICK 2’-9” x 5’-11” 3” x 8” KAWNEER MULLION ATRIUM 6’ C/C 4” x 12” STEEL BEAMS BOLTED TO PARAPET WALL 1/8” OVER 1’ SLOPED CONCRETE PARAPET WALL

1/2” HANDRAIL 3/8” CLEAR TEMPERED GLASS 5” x 6” STEEL PLATES (bolted to slab or stringer) 12” x 2” RECT. TUBE STEEL STRINGER 1” STEEL C-BRACKET WELDED TO STRINGER 1” STRUCT. GLASS LANDING/STEP

date 4.30.12 scale NTS

A -201

title

Exploded Axon

Y. Konstantinidis E. Remington A. Paukman

A-05 Atrium Stair Detail

YEA

STEEL SECTION GLASS SUPPORT

A-05 Building Exploded Axon


081

3/4” ENGINEERED HARDWOOD FLOORING

Roof 116’-0”

VAPOR BARRIER 1/2” STRUCTURAL GLASS BALUSTRADE

1-1/4” BLACK CLOSED CELL RIGID FOAM INSULATION

1/8” OVER 1’ SLOPE

16” 7th Floor 88’-0”

12”

9”

VAPOR BARRIER

1-1/4” BLACK CLOSED CELL RIGID FOAM INSULATION

18”

2nd Floor 18’-0”

5’

6”

7’

12’

A-04 Column Head / Cantilever Section

VAPOR BARRIER

VAPOR BARRIER

Ground Floor 0’-0” GRAVEL BACKFILL

3’-6”

9’-6”

date 4.30.12

C-08 Building Section

scale noted

O.D.

F.H./M.L.

R.D. R.D.

DLO

DLO O.D.

F.H./M.L.

164-252 HORIZONTAL 128-112 #12 X 1-1/2” P.H.S.T. 164-011 1” GLASS STOP 163-314 PERIMETER FILLER 164-009 COVER

1/2” 1-1/8”

2-1/4”

1/4” [6mm]

PANEL DIM

1” X 1” ANGLE BY KALWALL

PANEL DIM

DAYLIGHT OPENING DIM DAYLIGHT OPENING DIM

BACKER ROD AND SEALANT KAWNEER 1600 MULLION SYSTEM

2-1/4”

1/2” 1-1/8”

A-05 Column / Footing Section

1/4” [6mm]

A -301

title

Section Details

Y. Konstantinidis E. Remington A. Paukman

YEA

2” CONCRETE PAVER

C-08 Column / Footing Axon Cutaway

A-01 SS Balustrade Mounting Bracket

A-02 Mullion Detail / KALWALL

A-03 Mullion Detail / KAWNEER


manufacturing

manufacturing date 4.30.12

Y. Konstantinidis E. Remington A. Paukman

manufacturing

scale nts

office

A -401 title

YEA

office

Long. & Lat. Sections

office


083


085


087


089

spring 2 13 - craft in the digital age


091

spring 2 13 - craft in the digital age 17”

30-1/2”

17”

18”


093


Di-An chair


sutton terrace multi-purpose room renovation

design developement/constr. documents


Finalportfoliogsapp2013  

Evan Remington Portfolio of Design Work GSAPP 2010-2013

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