Page 1

Available for

to State

Correlated Standards

Grades 1–6+

SAMPLER

SAMPLER

riting. Trait W that I 6 y il Da e “I love , I appreciat do the l y a d w y h at I il Ever ver wh is all set wit o im k it e t can s tha w w ll zed ho tes ay and a d m t a x o e n als integra p. I’m easily no pre d you n a y rall . Thank his m lu u it natu e curric o use t into th pportunity t ents!” o ud for the e with our st c r u o s re

y B., —Mardte Teacher

ra First-G ina, CA Mar

• 125 trait-based lessons in each book • Weekly lessons include: teacher lesson plan, 4 reproducible student pages, writing prompt • Assessment rubric • Supports any writing program


How to Use This Book Daily 6-Trait Writing contains 25 weeks of mini-lessons divided into five units. Each unit provides five weeks of scaffolded instruction focused on one of the following traits: Ideas, Organization, Word Choice, Sentence Fluency, and Voice. (See pages 6–9 for more information about each of these, as well as the sixth trait, Conventions.) You may wish to teach each entire unit in consecutive order, or pick and choose the lessons within the unit. Each week of Daily 6-Trait Writing focuses on a specific skill within the primary trait, as well as one Convention skill. The weeks follow a consistent five-day format, making Daily 6-Trait Writing easy to use.

Teacher Overview Pages Convention Skill

Trait Skill

Reduced Pages

A specific writing skill for each trait is targeted.

Reduced student pages provide sample answers.

WEEK

1

IDEAS

Convention:

Capitalizing sentences

Choose a Topic Refer to pages 6 and 7 to introduce or review the writing trait.

DAY 1 Read the rule aloud to introduce students to the concept of topic. Then guide students through the activities. For example: • Activity A: Write the word topic on the board. Say the word aloud and have students repeat after you. Then have students trace the word. • Activity B: Read the sentences aloud. Then ask: Did the sentences tell about the beach or about a house? (the beach) The beach is the topic. Circle the word beach. Then read the question below the sentences. Return to each sentence and reread it, asking: Is this sentence about the beach? (yes) Say: All the sentences are about the same topic.

Week 1 • Day 1

Name:

Ideas

Ideas

A. Trace the word.

DAY 3

Week 1 • Day 3

Name:

A topic is what something is about.

Read the rule aloud and explain why it’s important to choose a topic before writing. (e.g., Your topic tells you what to write about.) Then guide students through the activities. For example:

Choose a topic before you write.

A. Read the story topics. Choose one to write about. Circle it.

topic

Story Topics

B. Read the sentences. Circle the topic.



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&%&!

• Activity A: Point out the web and say: This is a web. Inside the circle it says “Story Topics.â€? The lines point to the topics we can write about. As a class, choose one to write about.

"&#

The beach is fun. We swim in the water. We play in the sand. We love the beach.

beach

house

• Activity B: Say: Let’s think of sentences about our topic. What could we say about (the topic)? Have students tell a few ideas. Choose one to write as a complete sentence on the board. Have students copy the sentence onto their own papers.

Are all the sentences about the same topic?

!&

B. Write a sentence about the topic. Start the sentence with a capital letter.



   

C. Read the sentences. Circle the topic.

    

Paws is a cat. Paws eats cat food. She sleeps with me. She is very soft.

• Activity C: Repeat the process described for Activity B.

me

Are all the sentences about the same topic?



!&

 

Trace the sentence. Circle the capital letter.

Convention



A sentence begins with a capital letter.  

     

IDEAS

Convention: Ask: Can you find the capital letter at the beginning of the sentence? Have students point to it before circling it.

Paws

The robot is nice. DAY 4

     

IDEAS

DAY 2 Read the rule aloud to remind students what a topic is. Then guide students through the activities. For example: • Read the sentences aloud. Then ask: What are all the sentences about? (pizza) Pizza is the topic. • Direct students’ attention to the bird. Say: The topic is pizza. The picture shows a bird. Does the picture go with the topic? (no) • Ask: If you were writing about pizza, what could you draw? (a pizza) Convention: Read the rule. Then say: I’ll read the sentence. Can you find the capital letter at the beginning? Have students point to and circle the capital T.

Week 1 • Day 2

Name:

Week 1 • Day 4

Name:

A topic is what something is about.

Ideas

Ideas

• Model thinking of a topic. (e.g., family) Write the topic on the board for students to copy onto the first line. Have the class generate ideas of what you could draw to show the topic. (e.g., family members, trucks)

Choose a topic before you write.

Write and draw three topics.

Read the sentences. Look at the picture. Answer the questions.

Draw:

   

!$!((  &((  ((&'%% .

What is the topic of the sentences?

• For items 2 and 3, have students brainstorm topics as you write them on the board. As a class, choose one topic for each box.

  Draw:

pizza Does the picture go with the topic?



!&

Convention: Read the rule and sentence aloud. Ask: What letter should be capitalized? (h) Copy the sentence onto the board. Then show how to use proofreading marks to show that a capital letter is needed.

 2.

Draw a picture that goes with the topic.

  Draw:

3.

Convention

A sentence begins with a capital letter.

The pizza is good.

      

  Convention

Circle the capital letter.

A sentence begins with a capital letter.

IDEAS



Read the rule aloud. Explain that today the class will think of topics to write a sentence about. Then guide students through the activities. For example:

DAY 5 Read the sentence. Fix the missing capital letter.

here is my dad.

      

IDEAS



Writing Prompt

• As a class, choose a topic from the list you made yesterday. Then have students give ideas to help develop the topic. Write one or two sentences about the topic on the board. Then have students write their own sentence about the topic. • Remind students to start each sentence with a capital letter.

10

IDEAS

Daily 6-Trait Writing • EMC 6021 • Š Evan-Moor Corp.

Š Evan-Moor Corp. • EMC 6021 • Daily 6-Trait Writing

IDEAS

11

Lesson Plans

Day 5 Writing Prompt

Use the lesson plans to teach the trait and Convention skills and guide students through the activities on Days 1– 4. The plans are structured to enable you to differentiate and tailor lessons for your own class, but still provide the explanation and support you need. You may choose to have students complete the activities as a class, in small groups, or independently.

Give your students the writing prompt to apply the trait and Convention skills in their own writing. Provide students with paper, or use the page provided for Day 5 in the student practice book. You may also wish to expand the writing prompt into a more fully developed assignment that takes students through the writing process.

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Student Activity Pages Trait and Rule (Skill Summary)

Week 1 • Day 1

Name:

A topic is what something is about.

Ideas

Week 1 • Day 2

Name:

A topic is what something is about.

Ideas

A. Trace the word.

Read the sentences. Look at the picture. Answer the questions.

topic

Days 1–3 Activities

We like pizza. Friday is Pizza Day. Pizza is yummy!

B. Read the sentences. Circle the topic.

The activities on Days 1–3 provide models for students to analyze, revise, or add to. These models expose students to the traits in many forms of writing. They also provide opportunities for students to think critically about writing, enhancing students’ own proficiency.

The beach is fun. What is the topic of the sentences?

We swim in the water. We play in the sand. We love the beach.

beach

house Does the picture go with the topic?

Are all the sentences about the same topic?

yes

yes

no

no

Draw a picture that goes with the topic. C. Read the sentences. Circle the topic.

Paws is a cat. Paws eats cat food. She sleeps with me. She is very soft.

me

Paws

Are all the sentences about the same topic?

yes

12

Circle the capital letter.

Convention

no

A sentence begins with a capital letter.

IDEAS

Daily 6-Trait Writing • EMC 6021 • © Evan-Moor Corp.

© Evan-Moor Corp. • EMC 6021 • Daily 6-Trait Writing

Week 1 • Day 3

Name:

Ideas

The pizza is good.

IDEAS

Choose a topic before you write.

13

Week 1 • Day 4

Name:

Ideas

Choose a topic before you write.

Day 4 Activity

Write and draw three topics.

A. Read the story topics. Choose one to write about. Circle it.

Draw:

The Day 4 activity provides a prewriting form for the Day 5 writing prompt.

Story Topics a happy robot

a scary monster

a big fish 1. Draw:

B. Write a sentence about the topic. Start the sentence with a capital letter.

2. Draw:

Convention Activities 3.

Convention

A sentence begins with a capital letter.

14

Trace the sentence. Circle the capital letter.

The robot is nice.

IDEAS

Daily 6-Trait Writing • EMC 6021 • © Evan-Moor Corp.

Convention

A sentence begins with a capital letter.

Read the sentence. Fix the missing capital letter.

© Evan-Moor Corp. • EMC 6021 • Daily 6-Trait Writing

here is my dad. IDEAS

15

Scaffolded activities throughout the week allow students to practice the convention before using it in their own writing on Day 5.

Ways to Use There are many ways to integrate Daily 6-Trait Writing into your classroom: • Teach the lessons trait by trait.

• Use the lessons to enhance writing workshops.

• Target and practice specific skills students need help with.

• Incorporate the lessons into your other writing programs.

© Evan-Moor Corp. • EMC 6021 • Daily 6-Trait Writing

5


Introducing the Six Traits Use these ideas to introduce or review the trait at the beginning of each unit. Ideas Explain to students that good writing starts with good ideas. Say: A good idea is clear, interesting, and original. It makes the reader say, “Wow!” or “I never would have thought of that!” Without good ideas, your writing would not have much of a point. Your reader would be bored! Organization Explain to students that good writing is organized in a way that helps the reader understand the information and follow what the writer is saying. Say: The organization of your writing is what holds everything together. It puts your ideas in an order that makes sense, and it gives your writing a strong beginning, middle, and end. When your writing is not organized, your reader can grow confused and lose interest. Word Choice Explain to students that good writers choose their words carefully in order to get their ideas across. Say: When you write, choose just the right words and use them correctly. Make them fun and interesting so they help your readers “see” what you are talking about. Try not to use the same words over and over again. If you don’t choose your words carefully, your reader may not understand what you’re trying to say. Sentence Fluency Explain to students that good writers make their writing flow by using different kinds of sentences. Say: You want your writing to be easy to read and follow. It should flow so smoothly and sound so interesting that people want to read it aloud! When your sentences don’t flow, your writing sounds choppy and flat. Your reader would not want to read it aloud. Voice Explain to students that when they write, their personality, or who they are, should shine through. Say: You want your writing to sound like you, and no one else! When you write, you show who you are through words. No matter what type of writing you do, always make sure it sounds like you. Otherwise, your reader may not care about what you have to say. In fact, your reader may not even know who wrote it!

6

Daily 6-Trait Writing • EMC 6021 • © Evan-Moor Corp.


Conventions Explain to students that good writers follow all the rules, or conventions, of writing, so their readers can easily read and understand the writing. Say: Using correct grammar, spelling, and punctuation when you write is important. When you don’t follow the rules, your reader can become lost or confused. He or she may not know where one idea starts and another begins.

Using the Rubric Use the rubric on pages 8 and 9 to evaluate and assess your students’ skill acquisition. Use this scoring rubric, based on the six -traits writing model, to assess your students’ writing.

• Each week, evaluate students’ responses to the Day 5 writing prompt using the criteria that correspond to the skills taught that week.

Scoring Rubric Student’s Name

1

Ideas

Organization

• For review weeks, use all the trait criteria to assess students’ understanding of that trait as a whole. • Use the entire set of criteria to occasionally assess students’ writing across the traits. • In student- and parentteacher conferences, use the rubric to accurately and clearly explain what a student does well in writing, as well as what he or she needs to improve.

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Word Choice

2

3

4

Score

• Has few, if any, original ideas. • Lacks or has a poorly developed topic; lacks a topic sentence. • Has few, if any, details. • Has little or no focus.

• Has some original ideas. • Has a minimally developed topic; may or may not have a topic sentence. • Some details are present. • Focus strays.

• Has original ideas. • Has a fairly welldeveloped topic stated in a topic sentence. • Has some details that support the topic. • Generally maintains focus.

• Has original ideas that tie in with each other. • Has a fully developed topic and a clear topic sentence that expresses the main idea. • Has carefully selected, interesting details that support the topic. • Maintains focus throughout.

• Has little or no organization; lacks coherence. • Lacks a beginning, middle, and/or end. • Is difďŹ cult to follow. • Has no order words or phrases.

• Some organization is present. • Has a beginning, middle, and end, but may be unclear. • Is difďŹ cult to follow at times. • Has few or ineffective order words and/or phrases.

• Has logical organization. • Has a beginning, middle, and end. • Is fairly easy to follow. • Has order words and/or phrases.

• Has clear and logical organization. • Has a complete beginning, middle, and end. • Is very easy to follow. • Has appropriate order words and/or phrases.

• Has a limited range of words. • Words are not appropriate for purpose and audience. • Words are used incorrectly. • Word choice shows little thought and precision.

• Uses passive verbs. • Uses few modiďŹ ers. • Some words may not be appropriate for the audience and purpose. • A few words are used incorrectly. • Word choice includes some clichĂŠs and “tiredâ€? words.

• Uses some strong verbs. • Uses some modiďŹ ers. • Words are mostly appropriate for the audience and purpose. • Words are used correctly but do not enhance the writing. • Words show thought and precision; clichĂŠs and “tiredâ€? words are avoided.

• Has many strong verbs. • Has many strong modiďŹ ers. • Words are consistently appropriate for audience and purpose. • Words are used correctly and enhance the writing. • Word choice is thoughtful and precise and includes some ďŹ gurative language.

Sentence Fluency

Voice

Conventions

• Does not write complete sentences. • Has no variation in sentence structures and lengths. • Has no variation in sentence beginnings. • Has no cadence or ow in sentences.

• Has some incomplete sentences. • Has little variation in sentence structures and lengths. • Has little variation in sentence beginnings. • Sentences ow somewhat.

• Has 1 or 2 incomplete sentences. • Has some variation in sentence structures and lengths. • Has some variation in sentence beginnings. • Sentences ow fairly naturally.

• Has complete sentences. • Varied sentence structures and lengths contribute to the rhythm of the writing. • Varied sentence beginnings contribute to the ow of the writing. • Sentences ow naturally.

• Writing is neither expressive nor engaging. • Voice is not appropriate for the purpose, audience, topic, and/or genre. • Little evidence of an individual voice.

• Writing has some expression. • Voice is generally appropriate for the purpose, audience, topic, and/or genre. • Voice comes and goes.

• Writing is expressive and somewhat engaging. • Voice is appropriate for the purpose, audience, topic, and/or genre. • The voice is unique.

• Writing is very expressive and engaging. • Voice is consistently appropriate for the purpose, audience, topic, and/or genre. • The voice is unique, honest, and passionate.

• Has multiple errors in grammar, punctuation, and mechanics. • Poor handwriting and/or presentation makes the writing hard to read. • Illustrations, if present, do not accurately portray the main idea.

• Has some errors in grammar, punctuation, and mechanics. • Handwriting and/or presentation is fairly clear. • Illustrations, if present, portray the main idea but do not enhance it.

• Has few errors in grammar, punctuation, and mechanics. • Handwriting and/or presentation is clear. • Illustrations, if present, accurately portray the main idea and enhance it somewhat.

• Has minimal errors in grammar, punctuation, and mechanics. • Handwriting and/or presentation of the piece is attractive and easy to read. • Illustrations, if present, enhance the main idea signiďŹ cantly.

TOTAL

7


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Student’s Name

• Has some original ideas. • Has a minimally developed topic; may or may not have a topic sentence. • Some details are present. • Focus strays.

• Some organization is present. • Has a beginning, middle, and end, but may be unclear. • Is difficult to follow at times. • Has few or ineffective order words and/or phrases. • Uses passive verbs. • Uses few modifiers. • Some words may not be appropriate for the audience and purpose. • A few words are used incorrectly. • Word choice includes some clichés and “tired” words.

• Has little or no organization; lacks coherence. • Lacks a beginning, middle, and/or end. • Is difficult to follow. • Has no order words or phrases.

• Has a limited range of words. • Words are not appropriate for purpose and audience. • Words are used incorrectly. • Word choice shows little thought and precision.



• Has few, if any, original ideas. • Lacks or has a poorly developed topic; lacks a topic sentence. • Has few, if any, details. • Has little or no focus.



• Has clear and logical organization. • Has a complete beginning, middle, and end. • Is very easy to follow. • Has appropriate order words and/or phrases. • Has many strong verbs. • Has many strong modifiers. • Words are consistently appropriate for audience and purpose. • Words are used correctly and enhance the writing. • Word choice is thoughtful and precise and includes some figurative language.

• Has logical organization. • Has a beginning, middle, and end. • Is fairly easy to follow. • Has order words and/or phrases.

• Uses some strong verbs. • Uses some modifiers. • Words are mostly appropriate for the audience and purpose. • Words are used correctly but do not enhance the writing. • Words show thought and precision; clichés and “tired” words are avoided.

 • Has original ideas that tie in with each other. • Has a fully developed topic and a clear topic sentence that expresses the main idea. • Has carefully selected, interesting details that support the topic. • Maintains focus throughout.

 • Has original ideas. • Has a fairly welldeveloped topic stated in a topic sentence. • Has some details that support the topic. • Generally maintains focus.

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Use this scoring rubric, based on the six -traits writing model, to assess your students’ writing.

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Conventions

Voice

Sentence Fluency

• Has some incomplete sentences. • Has little variation in sentence structures and lengths. • Has little variation in sentence beginnings. • Sentences flow somewhat. • Writing has some expression. • Voice is generally appropriate for the purpose, audience, topic, and/or genre. • Voice comes and goes. • Has some errors in grammar, punctuation, and mechanics. • Handwriting and/or presentation is fairly clear. • Illustrations, if present, portray the main idea but do not enhance it.

• Does not write complete sentences. • Has no variation in sentence structures and lengths. • Has no variation in sentence beginnings. • Has no cadence or flow in sentences.

• Writing is neither expressive nor engaging. • Voice is not appropriate for the purpose, audience, topic, and/or genre. • Little evidence of an individual voice.

• Has multiple errors in grammar, punctuation, and mechanics. • Poor handwriting and/or presentation makes the writing hard to read. • Illustrations, if present, do not accurately portray the main idea.

• Has few errors in grammar, punctuation, and mechanics. • Handwriting and/or presentation is clear. • Illustrations, if present, accurately portray the main idea and enhance it somewhat.

• Writing is expressive and somewhat engaging. • Voice is appropriate for the purpose, audience, topic, and/or genre. • The voice is unique.

• Has 1 or 2 incomplete sentences. • Has some variation in sentence structures and lengths. • Has some variation in sentence beginnings. • Sentences flow fairly naturally.

TOTAL

• Has minimal errors in grammar, punctuation, and mechanics. • Handwriting and/or presentation of the piece is attractive and easy to read. • Illustrations, if present, enhance the main idea significantly.

• Writing is very expressive and engaging. • Voice is consistently appropriate for the purpose, audience, topic, and/or genre. • The voice is unique, honest, and passionate.

• Has complete sentences. • Varied sentence structures and lengths contribute to the rhythm of the writing. • Varied sentence beginnings contribute to the flow of the writing. • Sentences flow naturally.


Grade 1

Contents

How to Use This Book ............................................................................................ 4 Introducing the Six Traits ...................................................................................... 6 Comprehensive Teacher Rubric ............................................................................ 8 Unit 1: Ideas Week 1: Choose a Topic ..................................................................................10 Convention: Capitalizing Sentences Week 2: Make Your Topic Better .....................................................................16 Convention: Word Spacing Week 3: Add Details ........................................................................................22 Convention: Capitalizing Names Week 4: Choose Better Details ........................................................................28 Convention: Plural Nouns Week 5: Review ...............................................................................................34 Convention: Capitalizing I Unit 2: Organization Week 1: Beginning, Middle, and End .............................................................40 Convention: Beginning Sentences with Capital Letters Week 2: Put Things in the Right Order ..........................................................46 Convention: End Punctuation Week 3: Write a Complete Ending .................................................................52 Convention: Spelling to and two Week 4: Group by How Things Are the Same or Different ............................58 Convention: Capitalizing Days and Months Week 5: Review ...............................................................................................64 Convention: Capitalizing Street Names Unit 3: Word Choice Week 1: Use Action Words .............................................................................70 Convention: End Punctuation Week 2: Use Words That Describe ..................................................................76 Convention: Capitalizing Place Names

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Week 3: Use Words to Tell How You Feel ..................................................... 82 Convention: End Punctuation Week 4: Use Just the Right Word.................................................................. 88 Convention: Capitalizing Titles of People Week 5: Review ............................................................................................. 94 Convention: Plural Nouns Unit 4: Sentence Fluency Week 1: Write a Sentence .............................................................................100 Convention: Plural Nouns Week 2: Write a Sentence with Describing Words .......................................106 Convention: Possessive Nouns Week 3: Write Longer Sentences ..................................................................112 Convention: Commas in a Series Week 4: Connect Your Ideas .........................................................................118 Convention: Contractions can’t and don’t Week 5: Review .............................................................................................124 Convention: Contraction I’m Unit 5: Voice Week 1: Tell How You Feel............................................................................130 Convention: Spelling hear and here Week 2: Write How You Feel ........................................................................136 Convention: Capitalization in Friendly Letters Week 3: Create a Mood .................................................................................142 Convention: End Punctuation Week 4: Use Rhyme ......................................................................................148 Convention: Capitalization and Punctuation in Poetry Week 5: Review .............................................................................................154 Convention: Commas in Friendly Letters

Proofreading Marks ..............................................................................................160

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WEEK

1

ORGANIZATION Beginning, Middle, and End Refer to pages 6 and 7 to introduce or review the writing trait.

DAY 1 Read the rule aloud to introduce the idea that a story has three parts. Then guide students through the activities. For example: • Read the story title. Then have students look at each picture in order as you read aloud the story. Return to the first picture and say: This is the beginning of the story. It’s where the story starts. Ask: What does the beginning tell us? (that Jill has a new hat) Have students trace over the word beginning and draw a line from the picture to the word. • Repeat the process for the second and third pictures. For the second picture, say: This is the middle of the story. The middle comes after the beginning. Ask: What happens in the middle? (Jill’s hat blows away.) For the third picture, say: This is the end of the story. It is the last part. Ask: How does the story end? (The hat lands on the snowman.) Convention: Review the rule. Read the sentence aloud and point to the letter choices. Ask: Should the sentence start with a capital T or a small t? (capital T)

Week 1 • Day 1

Name:

Organization

A story has a beginning, a middle, and an end.

Read the story. Trace the words. Draw a line from the pictures to the words.

The Hat

beginning

middle

end

Jill had a new hat.

The hat flew away.

Now the snowman has a hat. Convention

A sentence begins with a capital letter.

Circle the correct letter. Write it on the line.

T

t

Corp. • EMC 6021 • Daily 6-Trait Writing 42 © Evan-Moor ORGANIZATION

T

he wind blows.

Daily 6-Trait Writing • EMC 6021 • © Evan-Moor Corp.

42

Week 1 • Day 2

Name:

Organization

A story has a beginning, a middle, and an end.

DAY 2 Read the rule aloud. Then guide students through the activities. For example: • Activity A: Read the story title. Write the words beginning, middle, and end on the board. Guide students to label the pictures in order. Then point to the first picture and ask: What is Sam doing in the beginning? (He is counting.) For the second picture, ask: What is Sam doing in the middle? (He is looking around.) For the third picture, ask: What does Jen do in the end? (She comes out from behind the tree.) • Activity B: Read the first sentence. Ask: Where did we see Jen—in the beginning, middle, or end? (end) Have students draw a line from the sentence to end. Repeat the process for each sentence.

A. Look at the pictures. They tell a story. Label the story parts.

Sam and Jen

beginning

middle

end

B. Read the sentences. Match the sentence to the story part.

Here is Jen! •

• beginning

Sam looks for Jen. •

• middle

Sam counts. •

• end

Convention

Start a name with a capital letter.

Copy each name. Start with a capital letter.

© Evan-Moor Corp. • EMC 6021 • Daily 6-Trait Writing

Sam

Sam

Jen

Jen

ORGANIZATION

43

Convention: Review the rule. Read aloud each name as students complete the activity.

Corp. • EMC 6021 • Daily 6-Trait Writing 40 © Evan-Moor ORGANIZATION

Daily 6-Trait Writing • EMC 6021 • © Evan-Moor Corp.

40


Convention:

Beginning Sentences with Capital Letters DAY 3 Week 1 • Day 3

Name:

Organization

Read the rule aloud. Then guide students through the activities. For example:

A story has a beginning, a middle, and an end.

• Copy the story map onto the board. Point to the map and say: This is a story map. You fill it in to tell what happens in the beginning, middle, and end.

Choose a story. Fill in the story map. Write what happens in the beginning, middle, and end.

Beginning

Sample Answer: Little Red Riding Hood

• As a class, choose a story that students are familiar with. Then invite volunteers to tell what happens in the beginning, middle, and end of the story. Jot notes on the story map. If students retell events out of order, use the parts of the story map to clarify what happened when.

goes to her grandmother’s house. Middle

Sample Answer: A wolf is there instead.

• Have students help you form a sentence to tell what happens in the beginning of the story. Write the sentence on the board for students to copy onto their own maps. Repeat for the middle and end of the story.

End

Sample Answer: A hunter saves Red and her grandmother. Convention

Use a capital I to tell about yourself.

Finish the sentence. Write a capital I.

Ruby and

Corp. • EMC 6021 • Daily 6-Trait Writing 44 © Evan-Moor ORGANIZATION

I

love books.

Daily 6-Trait Writing • EMC 6021 • © Evan-Moor Corp.

44

Week 1 • Day 4

Name:

Organization

• As a class, brainstorm a story about a dog that lost its bone. Use questions to prompt students, such as: What is the dog’s name? Where did he or she lose the bone? How was it found?

Sample Answers:

Fido looked for his lost bone.

• Help students work out what happens in the beginning, middle, and end of their own story. Then direct them to draw or write what happens in each part.

Middle

Rover had the bone. End

DAY 5

Fido got the bone back from Rover. © Evan-Moor Corp. • EMC 6021 • Daily 6-Trait Writing

DAY 4 Read the rule aloud. Explain that today, students will create a story of their own. Then guide students through the activity. For example:

Give your story a beginning, a middle, and an end.

Think of a story about a dog that lost its bone. Write or draw what happens in the beginning, middle, and end.

Beginning

Convention: Read the rule. Then read aloud the sentence before having students complete it with a capital I.

ORGANIZATION

45

Writing Prompt

• Model how to form sentences from the drawings. Then have students write their own sentences that tell what happens in the beginning, middle, and end of the story they planned on Day 4. • Remind students to capitalize sentences, names, and the word I.

© Evan-Moor Corp. • EMC 6021 • Daily 6-Trait Writing

ORGANIZATION

41


Week 1 • Day 1

Name:

Organization

A story has a beginning, a middle, and an end.

Read the story. Trace the words. Draw a line from the pictures to the words.

The Hat

beginning

middle

end

Jill had a new hat.

The hat flew away.

Now the snowman has a hat. Convention

A sentence begins with a capital letter.

Circle the correct letter. Write it on the line.

T

Corp. • EMC 6021 • Daily 6-Trait Writing 42 © Evan-Moor ORGANIZATION

t

he wind blows. Daily 6-Trait Writing • EMC 6021 • © Evan-Moor Corp.

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Week 1 • Day 2

Name:

Organization

A story has a beginning, a middle, and an end.

A. Look at the pictures. They tell a story. Label the story parts.

Sam and Jen

B. Read the sentences. Match the sentence to the story part.

Here is Jen! •

• beginning

Sam looks for Jen. •

• middle

Sam counts. •

• end

Convention

Start a name with a capital letter.

Copy each name. Start with a capital letter.

© Evan-Moor Corp. • EMC 6021 • Daily 6-Trait Writing

Sam

Jen ORGANIZATION

43


Week 1 • Day 3

Name:

Organization

A story has a beginning, a middle, and an end.

Choose a story. Fill in the story map. Write what happens in the beginning, middle, and end.

Beginning

Middle

End

Convention

Use a capital I to tell about yourself.

Finish the sentence. Write a capital I.

Corp. • EMC 6021 • Daily 6-Trait Writing 44 © Evan-Moor ORGANIZATION

Ruby and

love books.

Daily 6-Trait Writing • EMC 6021 • © Evan-Moor Corp.

44


Week 1 • Day 4

Name:

Organization

Give your story a beginning, a middle, and an end.

Think of a story about a dog that lost its bone. Write or draw what happens in the beginning, middle, and end.

Beginning

Middle

End

© Evan-Moor Corp. • EMC 6021 • Daily 6-Trait Writing

ORGANIZATION

45


Grade 2

Contents

How to Use This Book ..................................................................................... 4 Introducing the Six Traits ............................................................................... 6 Comprehensive Teacher Rubric ...................................................................... 8 Unit 1: Ideas Week 1: Choose a Good Topic ........................................................................10 Convention: Capitalizing Names of People and Pets Week 2: Add Details .......................................................................................16 Convention: Compound Words Week 3: Choose Better Details ........................................................................22 Convention: Plural Nouns That End in s Week 4: Stick to the Topic ...............................................................................28 Convention: Periods Week 5: Review ...............................................................................................34 Convention: Capitalizing Book and Song Titles Unit 2: Organization Week 1: Put Things in the Right Order ..........................................................40 Convention: Complete Sentences Week 2: Beginning, Middle, and End .............................................................46 Convention: Possessive Nouns Week 3: Group Together Ideas and Details ....................................................52 Convention: End Punctuation Week 4: Group by How Things Are the Same or Different ............................58 Convention: Compound Sentences with but Week 5: Review ...............................................................................................64 Convention: Using is and are Unit 3: Word Choice Week 1: Use Strong Verbs................................................................................70 Convention: Irregular Plural Nouns Week 2: Describe the Action ...........................................................................76 Convention: Capitalizing Days of the Week

2

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Week 3: Use Adjectives ................................................................................. 82 Convention: Contractions Week 4: Use Exact Nouns ............................................................................. 88 Convention: Question Marks Week 5: Review ............................................................................................. 94 Convention: Using saw and seen Unit 4: Sentence Fluency Week 1: Write a Sentence .............................................................................100 Convention: Using I and me Week 2: Write Longer Sentences...................................................................106 Convention: Commas in a List Week 3: Fix Run-on and Rambling Sentences .............................................112 Convention: Compound Sentences Week 4: Combine Choppy Sentences ...........................................................118 Convention: Compound Sentences Week 5: Review .............................................................................................124 Convention: Comparative and Superlative Words Unit 5: Voice Week 1: Use Formal and Informal Language ..............................................130 Convention: Using was and were Week 2: Use Different Writing Styles ............................................................136 Convention: Articles Week 3: Create a Mood ................................................................................142 Convention: Words That End in ing Week 4: Write from Different Points of View ...............................................148 Convention: Exclamation Points Week 5: Review .............................................................................................154 Convention: Avoiding ain’t Proofreading Marks ......................................................................................... 160

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3


WEEK

1 4

IDEAS Stick to the Topic

DAY 1 Read the rule aloud. Say: When we write, we need to be sure all our details stick to the topic. If we don’t stick to the topic and write about too many things, our reader may become confused. Read this paragraph and ask students to listen for a detail that doesn’t stick to the topic: Mercedes brought her lunch to school today. She brought an apple, crackers, and peanut butter. Last night, her baby sister had the hiccups. Mercedes packed a juice box, too. Ask: Which detail didn’t belong? (her baby sister having the hiccups) Then guide students through the activities.

Week 4 • Day 1

Name:

Ideas

Stick to the topic to make your ideas clear.

A. Read the topic. Circle the pictures that stick to the topic.

Topic: Why I Like Blue Sky Elementary School Thanks!

• Activity A: Have a student describe the first picture. Ask: Does this picture stick to the topic of liking Blue Sky Elementary? (yes) Why? (It’s about eating lunch with friends at school.) Repeat for the remaining pictures. • Activity B: Ask: Based on the pictures, why does the writer like Blue Sky Elementary? (eating lunch with friends; using computer lab) Have students write phrases describing the pictures. Convention: To review the convention of end punctuation, take one of the phrases a student wrote in Activity B and turn it into a sentence. (e.g., It is fun to eat lunch with friends in the lunchroom.) Write it on the board. Then ask: What kind of sentence is this? (telling) What end punctuation does a telling sentence have? (a period) Circle the period in the sentence.

DAY 2 Review the rule. Then say: Remember that when you write, it is important to include only details that stick to the topic. If a writer doesn’t stick to the topic, the reader may become confused. Then guide students through the activities. • Activity A: Read story 1 aloud. Ask: What is the topic of these sentences? (a quiz about a book) Which sentence doesn’t stick to the topic? (“Megan is my friend.â€?) Have students complete the activity on their own or in pairs. • Activity B: To help students generate ideas, ask: What details could we add to story 3’s topic? (e.g., woke up late; caught the bus just in time) Then say: Write a telling sentence to add to story 3. Be sure to use a period at the end. Have students share their sentences. 28

IDEAS

This is a fun activity!

Yummy, yummy, in the tummy!

B. Why does the writer like Blue Sky Elementary School? Write two reasons from the pictures.    

             30

IDEAS

Daily 6-Trait Writing • EMC 6022 • Š Evan-Moor Corp.

Week 4 • Day 2

Name:

Ideas

Stick to the topic to make your ideas clear.

A. Read each story. Cross out the detail that does not belong.

1. I read a good book. 2. Trevor brings his lunch to school. Megan is my friend. He does not bring it on Fridays. I took a quiz about the book. He has pizza on Fridays. The quiz had ten questions. His teacher is Mrs. Sey. I answered them all Pizza is his favorite lunch! correctly!

3. I was almost late for the bus. I ran out the door. Oh, no! I forgot my backpack. I went back to get it. My pink socks are new.

B. Add a detail to story 3. Write a telling sentence that sticks to the topic. Write a period where it belongs.

        

Š Evan-Moor Corp. • EMC 6022 • Daily 6-Trait Writing

IDEAS

31

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Convention:

Periods

DAY 3

Week 4 • Day 3

Name:

Ideas

Review the rule. Set the stage for the activity by asking: What could we do to help a new student feel welcome in our class? (e.g., show how to buy lunch; point out the restroom; invite to sit with us) Write students’ ideas on the board. Then guide students through the activities.

Stick to the topic to make your ideas clear.

A. Read the story. Cross out the two sentences that do not stick to the topic.

• Activity A: Have students complete the activity independently and then share which sentences they crossed out and why.

New at School My teacher says we will have a new student. Her name is Kamry. We talked about how to help her. We can show her where to put her coat. We can sit by her in the lunchroom. She can play with us on the playground. I like to sing in music class. We can show her where to line up. She can sit with me on the bus. I like math best.

• Activity B: To help students think of sentences, invite them to refer to the list of ideas on the board and use any that are not already in the paragraph. Remind students to place a period at the end of telling sentences. Then invite students to share their sentences.

B. Write two new sentences to add to the story. Make sure that they stick to the topic. Put periods where they belong.

1.

          

2.

     

DAY 4 32

IDEAS

Daily 6-Trait Writing • EMC 6022 • Š Evan-Moor Corp.

Week 4 • Day 4

Name:

Ideas

Stick to the topic to make your ideas clear.

• Then guide students to complete the graphic organizer for Day 4, using the ideas brainstormed by the class. Point out that the boxes on this page are stacked like a math problem. Direct students to write a detail in each box. Say: Make sure all your details “add upâ€? to the topic “My School Is Special.â€? Model completing the organizer on the board. (e.g., nice teachers, fun art classes, big computer lab, many field trips)

Add up the details. Think of things that make your school special. Write them in the boxes.

Detail:

Review the rule. Then say: Tomorrow’s writing activity is about our school. Can you name some details that make our school special? Encourage students to contribute ideas as you write them on the board. (e.g., class plays; art and music classes; uniforms)

        +

Detail:

     + Detail:

• Then have students exchange their papers with a neighbor. Direct them to check their neighbor’s paper for details that stick to the topic.

  

+ Detail:

    =

DAY 5

Topic:

    Š Evan-Moor Corp. • EMC 6022 • Daily 6-Trait Writing

IDEAS

33

Writing Prompt

• Write about what makes your school special. Begin with the topic. Then give details that stick to the topic. Use your ideas from the graphic organizer on Day 4. • Be sure to write a period at the end of each telling sentence.

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IDEAS

29


Week 4 • Day 1

Name:

Ideas

Stick to the topic to make your ideas clear.

A. Read the topic. Circle the pictures that stick to the topic.

Topic:L]n>A^`Z7ajZH`n:aZbZciVgnHX]dda I]Vc`h

I]^h^hV [jcVXi^k^in

Njbbn!njbbn! ^ci]Zijbbn

B. Why does the writer like Blue Sky Elementary School? Write two reasons from the pictures.

30

IDEAS

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Week 4 • Day 2

Name:

Ideas

Stick to the topic to make your ideas clear.

A. Read each story. Cross out the detail that does not belong.

. I read a good book. 2. Trevor brings his lunch to school. Megan is my friend. He does not bring it on Fridays. I took a quiz about the book. He has pizza on Fridays. The quiz had ten questions. His teacher is Mrs. Sey. I answered them all Pizza is his favorite lunch! correctly!

3. I was almost late for the bus. I ran out the door. Oh, no! I forgot my backpack. I went back to get it. My pink socks are new.

B. Add a detail to story 3. Write a telling sentence that sticks to the topic. Write a period where it belongs.

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IDEAS

31


Week 4 • Day 3

Name:

Ideas

Stick to the topic to make your ideas clear.

A. Read the story. Cross out the two sentences that do not stick to the topic.

New at School  BniZVX]ZghVnhlZl^aa]VkZVcZlhijYZci#=Zg cVbZ^h@Vbgn#LZiVa`ZYVWdji]dlid]Zae]Zg#LZXVc h]dl]Zgl]ZgZideji]ZgXdVi#LZXVch^iWn]Zg^ci]Z ajcX]gddb#H]ZXVceaVnl^i]jhdci]ZeaVn\gdjcY#>a^`Z idh^c\^cbjh^XXaVhh#LZXVch]dl]Zgl]ZgZida^cZje# H]ZXVch^il^i]bZdci]ZWjh#>a^`ZbVi]WZhi# B. Write two new sentences to add to the story. Make sure that they stick to the topic. Put periods where they belong.

.

2.

32

IDEAS

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Week 4 • Day 4

Name:

Ideas

Stick to the topic to make your ideas clear.

Add up the details. Think of things that make your school special. Write them in the boxes.

Detail:

+ Detail:

+ Detail:

+ Detail:

= Topic:

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IDEAS

33


Grade 3

Contents

How to Use This Book ............................................................................................ 4 Introducing the Six Traits ...................................................................................... 6 Comprehensive Teacher Rubric ............................................................................ 8 Unit 1: Ideas Week 1: Choosing a Strong Idea ....................................................................10 Convention: Periods Week 2: Writing a Topic Sentence ..................................................................16 Convention: Sentence Capitalization Week 3: Using the “5 Ws� to Add Details.......................................................22 Convention: Contractions Week 4: Choosing Strong Details ...................................................................28 Convention: Question Marks Week 5: Sticking to Your Topic .......................................................................34 Convention: Commas in Place Names Unit 2: Organization Week 1: Beginning, Middle, and End .............................................................40 Convention: Exclamations Week 2: Putting Things in the Right Order ....................................................46 Convention: Commas After Introductory Words and Phrases Week 3: Grouping Together Ideas and Details...............................................52 Convention: Using Their, There, and They’re Week 4: Grouping by How Things Are Alike or Different..............................58 Convention: Underline Book Titles Week 5: Choosing Which Way to Organize Your Writing .............................64 Convention: Comparatives and Superlatives Unit 3: Word Choice Week 1: Choosing Strong Verbs and Adverbs ................................................70 Convention: Using To, Too, and Two Week 2: Choosing Colorful Adjectives ...........................................................76 Convention: Commas Between Adjectives

2

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Week 3: Telling Exactly Who or What ......................................................... 82 Convention: Singular Possessive Nouns Week 4: Using Similes and Metaphors ......................................................... 88 Convention: Possessive Pronouns Week 5: Getting the Reader’s Attention ....................................................... 94 Convention: Commas in Dates Unit 4: Sentence Fluency Week 1: Varying Your Sentences ..................................................................100 Convention: Using Saw and Seen Week 2: Combining Sentences .....................................................................106 Convention: Commas in Compound Sentences Week 3: Revising Run-on and Rambling Sentences.....................................112 Convention: Comma Usage Week 4: More Ways to Combine Sentences .................................................118 Convention: Commas in Complex Sentences Week 5: Writing a Smooth Paragraph .........................................................124 Convention: Irregular Past Tense Verbs Unit 5: Voice Week 1: Examining Different Writing Voices. ..............................................130 Convention: Contractions Week 2: Using Formal and Informal Language ..........................................136 Convention: Quotation Marks in Dialogue Week 3: Creating a Mood .............................................................................142 Convention: Capitalization in Poetry Week 4: Writing from Different Points of View ............................................148 Convention: PreďŹ xes un- and disWeek 5: Developing Your Own Voice ...........................................................154 Convention: Commas in Dialogue Proofreading Marks ................................................................................................160

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3


WEEK

2

WORD CHOICE Choosing Colorful Adjectives

DAY 1 Read the rule aloud. Remind students that adjectives are words that describe nouns. They tell what kind (scary moth), how many (six legs), how much (many ants), and which one (blue butterfly). Then guide students through the activities.

Make your writing sparkle! Use colorful adjectives to describe people, places, animals, and things.

Word Choice

A. Read the adjectives in the box. Write two that describe each insect. Colorful Adjectives

• Activity A: Read the adjectives in the box. Say: These are strong, colorful adjectives. They tell us more than “tiredâ€? adjectives such as big, gross, or pretty. Direct students to look at the pictures and labels. Help them select two appropriate adjectives for each picture. For example, ask: Which word could describe how a worm looks? (wiggly) What’s another word in the box that tells about the worm? (moist) • Activity B (Convention): Write this sentence on the board: The fat, round beetle scurried away. Point out the comma and say: Sometimes, you need a comma between two adjectives. A comma helps us see that these are two separate words that tell about the beetle. Then have students complete the activity.

Week 2 • Day 1

Name:

wiggly

spiky

tiny

squishy

shiny

spotted

hungry

moist

creepy

fuzzy

" %)$%

.&)$

+#

)*

adjectives:

adjectives:

%"*

!%&

% *

#/,

adjectives:

%"!&&

+)'!##)

adjectives:

& *

'++* ' $*

B. Write a sentence about one of the bugs. Use two adjectives. Remember to use a comma between them.

" %)$ & *%"!&&*'%&! &

78

WORD CHOICE

Daily 6-Trait Writing • EMC 6023 • Š Evan-Moor Corp.

DAY 2 Read the rule aloud. Say: Sometimes, using just one adjective isn’t enough to fully describe something. Yesterday, we used pairs of adjectives to describe insects. Today, we’ll look at more ways to combine adjectives. Then guide students through the activities. • Activity A: Read the letter aloud. Explain that amber is a hard, clear, yellowish-brown piece of fossilized tree sap. It sometimes contains an insect that was trapped in the sap before it hardened and fossilized. Ask: What kind of word is each bold word in the letter? (noun) Direct students to the word present. Ask: What are the two words that describe present? (special, unique) Say: Those adjectives tell us more about the necklace. Not only is it special to Jasmine, but it is also one of a kind, or unique. Ask: What is missing between the adjectives? (a comma) Have students insert the comma and complete the activity. • Activity B: Have students think of a special present they have received. Then have them write the sentence. Make sure they use a comma between the two adjectives. 76

WORD CHOICE

Week 2 • Day 2

Name:

Word Choice

Make your writing sparkle! Use more than one adjective to describe something.

A. Read the thank-you letter Jasmine wrote. Underline the two adjectives that describe each noun in bold. Write the comma between the adjectives.

/,% )%!+/

%,)/  ),%+  %"/&,*&$, &)+ $)%"#+!*-)/ *'!#,%!(,"$% &#&-!+**&+&#%!!$.* *,)')!*+&*+ +!%/%!%+ %&!%*!+ $) %1+#!-+ $)!*$!##!&%*&/)*&# %" /&,&)*, .&%),#,%,*,#& &-)&$/&,)%! *$!%

B. Write a sentence about a special present you have received. Use two colorful adjectives to describe it. Be sure to use a comma between the adjectives.

" %)$  $(%% *$!*!

Š Evan-Moor Corp. • EMC 6023 • Daily 6-Trait Writing

WORD CHOICE

79

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Convention:

Commas between adjectives

DAY 3

Week 2 • Day 3

Name:

Read the rule aloud. Say: Using colorful adjectives can make your sentences longer and more interesting. Then guide students through the activities.

Make your sentences super! Use colorful adjectives to write longer sentences.

Word Choice

A. Write colorful adjectives to complete the chart. Then put together the words in each row to write five super sentences. The first one is done for you. Adjective

Adjective

What?

Did What?

  + +!%/

*+)!'



  

#!+

,++)#/ #!++

&-)+ !)+

%

)&%#/ 0&&$

)&**+ '&%

!(*

 

* !%/

  

'++*

 %



%"!&& $&+

!*  "%* #/

,00

• Activity A: Read aloud the words in the chart. Point out that six adjectives are missing. Help students brainstorm additional adjectives that could describe a butterfly. (e.g., yellow, unusual) Repeat for the remaining insects, making sure the first adjective in row 5 begins with a vowel.

Where?

)&,%+ #&.)*

#,++) '*++ .!%&. #%

&%$/%&*

" %)$% 1.  ++!%/*+)!',00)&,%+ #&.)*

After students have filled in their charts, read the example sentence aloud slowly. Have students point to the words in the chart as you read them. Then have students complete the activity.

2. !(*&'&&$*&&!($&$& 3. % *%$! *+!!$!%%&"!  4. '++*%"!&&!&'&&$ $&'% 5. 

!* "%** ! * !%

B. Look back at the chart. Write two more super sentences, using any of the words from each column. " %)$%

Convention: Remind students to place a comma between the two adjectives in each sentence.

1. & *&!&&&"%& &) !) 2. &'++*"%*+!!$!'  &!)$% 80

WORD CHOICE

Daily 6-Trait Writing • EMC 6023 • Š Evan-Moor Corp.

Week 2 • Day 4

Name:

Word Choice

Choose just the right adjectives to describe your topic.

• Activity B: Direct students back to the chart. Model choosing one word or phrase from each column to write a new sentence. For example: The lovely, striped dragonfly flitted over the birdbath. Then have students write their own sentences and read them aloud. DAY 4 Read the rule aloud. Then guide students through the activity.

Imagine that you are a scientist who has just discovered a new bug! Draw it in detail and label its parts. Then list adjectives to describe it. * ',%

• Brainstorm features of bugs with students. (e.g., how they eat, if they fly or walk, number of legs and wings, color, size, etc.) Then have students draw their made-up bug. When they finish drawing, demonstrate on the board how to label the parts of the bug. (e.g., wings, legs, antennae)

$) %)($*

• Have students list adjectives to describe their bugs in as much detail as possible. Remind students to use strong, colorful adjectives. !%%&(% ' 

%*

%*

%#'%*

%"$ *

&

"!%! !'%

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%$"

$' *

Š Evan-Moor Corp. • EMC 6023 • Daily 6-Trait Writing

DAY 5

WORD CHOICE

81

Writing Prompt

• Imagine that you are a scientist who has just discovered a new bug! Write a letter to another scientist, describing your bug in detail. Use your drawing and adjectives from Day 4. • Be sure to write commas between adjectives.

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WORD CHOICE

77


Week 2 • Day 1

Name:

Make your writing sparkle! Use colorful adjectives to describe people, places, animals, and things.

Word Choice

A. Read the adjectives in the box. Write two that describe each insect. Colorful Adjectives wiggly

spiky

tiny

squishy

shiny

spotted

hungry

moist

creepy

fuzzy

ldgb

adjectives:

WZZiaZ

adjectives:

aVYnWj\

adjectives:

XViZge^aaVg

adjectives:

B. Write a sentence about one of the bugs. Use two adjectives. Remember to use a comma between them.

78

WORD CHOICE

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Week 2 • Day 2

Name:

Word Choice

Make your writing sparkle! Use more than one adjective to describe something.

A. Read the thank-you letter Jasmine wrote. Underline the two adjectives that describe each noun in bold. Write the comma between the adjectives.

(((AVYnWj\AVcZ <VgYZc8^in!@H+,-)+ ?VcjVgn&,!'%%. 9ZVg6jci7ZV! I]Vc`ndjhdbjX][dgi]ZVbWZgcZX`aVXZ#>i^hVkZgn heZX^Vajc^fjZegZhZci#>adkZ^ihhd[i\daYZcXdadg#>lVh hjgeg^hZYidhZZi]Zi^cnVcX^Zci^chZXi^ch^YZi]ZVbWZg# >XVcĂ&#x2030;iWZa^ZkZi]ZVbWZg^hb^aa^dchd[nZVghdaYI]Vc` ndj[dghjX]VldcYZg[jajcjhjVa\^[i# AdkZ[gdbndjgc^ZXZ! ?Vhb^cZ

B. Write a sentence about a special present you have received. Use two colorful adjectives to describe it. Be sure to use a comma between the adjectives.

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WORD CHOICE

79


Week 2 â&#x20AC;˘ Day 3

Name:

Word Choice

Make your sentences super! Use colorful adjectives to write longer sentences.

A. Write colorful adjectives to complete the chart. Then put together the words in each row to write five super sentences. The first one is done for you. "EKFDUJWF

"EKFDUJWF

8IBU

%JE8IBU

& I]Vi i^cn

hig^eZY

WZZ

' I]Z

YZa^XViZ

WjiiZg[an [a^iiZY

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YgV\dc[an oddbZY

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( 6

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aVcYZY

dcbncdhZ

. I]Vii^cn!hig^eZYWZZWjooZYVgdjcYi]Z[adlZgh# 2. 3. 4. 5. B. Look back at the chart. Write two more super sentences, using any of the words from each column.

. 2.

80

WORD CHOICE

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Week 2 â&#x20AC;˘ Day 4

Name:

Word Choice

Choose just the right adjectives to describe your topic.

Imagine that you are a scientist who has just discovered a new bug! Draw it in detail and label its parts. Then list adjectives to describe it. Bn7j\Ă&#x2030;hCVbZ/

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WORD CHOICE

81


Grade 4

Contents

How to Use This Book ..................................................................................... 4 Introducing the Six Traits ............................................................................... 6 Comprehensive Teacher Rubric ...................................................................... 8 Unit 1: Ideas Week 1: Choosing a Strong Idea.....................................................................10 Convention: Capitalizing Proper Nouns Week 2: Writing a Topic Sentence and Supporting Details............................16 Convention: End Punctuation Week 3: Developing Character, Setting, and Plot Ideas .................................22 Convention: Punctuating Dialogue Week 4: Elaborating on Ideas and Details ......................................................28 Convention: Possessive Nouns Week 5: Keeping Your Focus ...........................................................................34 Convention: Capitalizing Proper Nouns Unit 2: Organization Week 1: Sequencing ........................................................................................40 Convention: Verb Tense Consistency Week 2: Grouping Together Ideas and Details ...............................................46 Convention: Using its and itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Week 3: Describing Things by Position ..........................................................52 Convention: Using their, there, and theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re Week 4: Grouping by How Things Are Alike or Different .............................58 Convention: Subject-Verb Agreement with is and are Week 5: Choosing Which Way to Organize Your Writing .............................64 Convention: Underlining Titles of Books and Movies Unit 3: Word Choice Week 1: Writing About Action .......................................................................70 Convention: Subject-Verb Agreement Week 2: Using Descriptive Language .............................................................76 Convention: Commas with Adjectives

2

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Week 3: Using Figurative Language.............................................................. 82 Convention: Titles of Songs, Poems, and Short Stories Week 4: Choosing Words for Your Audience ............................................... 88 Convention: Using good and well Week 5: Getting the Readerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Attention ....................................................... 94 Convention: Using your and youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re Unit 4: Sentence Fluency Week 1: Revising Run-on Sentences .............................................................100 Convention: End Punctuation Week 2: Combining Sentences with Conjunctions .....................................106 Convention: Commas in Compound Sentences Week 3: More Ways to Combine Sentences .................................................112 Convention: Conjunctions in Complex Sentences Week 4: Beginning Sentences in Different Ways .........................................118 Convention: Interjections Week 5: Writing a Smooth Paragraph ..........................................................124 Convention: Correcting Sentence Fragments Unit 5: Voice Week 1: Examining Different Writing Voices ..............................................130 Convention: Using can and may Week 2: Using Your Voice to Persuade .........................................................136 Convention: Double Negatives Week 3: Writing from Different Points of View ...........................................142 Convention: Indenting Dialogue Week 4: Using Voice in Poetry .....................................................................148 Convention: End Rhyme Week 5: Developing Your Own Voice...........................................................154 Convention: Contractions Proofreading Marks ................................................................................................160

ÂĽ&WBO.PPS$PSQr&.$r%BJMZ5SBJU8SJUJOH

3


WEEK

5

VOICE Developing Your Own Voice

DAY 1 Read the rule aloud. Then say: When you use your unique writing voice, you get your readerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s attention because you show your feelings and emotions. Your writing voice shines through in your words. Your reader might think, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Maybe that person feels the same way I do,â&#x20AC;? or â&#x20AC;&#x153;I wonder why the writer feels that way.â&#x20AC;? Then guide students through the activities. â&#x20AC;˘ Activity A: Invite two students to read aloud both speech balloons. Ask: Which person do you feel you know better? Which person shows more emotion? Which person has a stronger voice? (Adriana) Say: Adriana reveals more about herself. Her excited voice interests the reader. She shows us what she wants to be, instead of just telling us. â&#x20AC;˘ Activity B: Ask: What is something you love to do? How does it make you feel? What do you think about it? Have students write a sentence. Remind them to use their unique voice. â&#x20AC;˘ Activity C (Convention): Review how contractions are formed. Then write the contraction Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d on the board. Say: Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d is special, because it can stand for either I could or I would. Have students complete the activity. Go over the answers as a class. DAY 2 Read the rule aloud. Then guide students through the activity. â&#x20AC;˘ Say: Everybody responds to situations in different ways. No two people do or say the exact same things. The way you respond is part of your own voice. Read aloud item 1 and ask: How would you feel if you won the award? Would you feel surprised, excited, or happy? How would you express your feelings? â&#x20AC;˘ Have students write their own reactions in the speech balloon. Repeat the process for each item, emphasizing that there is no â&#x20AC;&#x153;rightâ&#x20AC;? answer; students should only worry about being honest and writing from their hearts. Convention: Have students identify the contraction in the activity. (Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d) You may also want to mention other contractions that are formed with I. (Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve)

154

VOICE

Week 5 â&#x20AC;˘ Day 1

Name:

Voice

Interest your reader by showing who you really are. Use your unique voice to explain your feelings.

A. Read what each student says. Choose the quotation that is more interesting. Underline the details that explain the characterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s feelings.

"     !      !    "     

 "    ! ! "    !    "#   ""!#   #



 

 

B. Write a sentence about something you love to do. Use your own unique voice.

$(,'(, ""+'. C. Reread the quotations in Activity A. Find the three different word pairs that could be made into contractions. Write them on the lines. Then write the contractions for those words. Word Pairs

1.

  

2. 3. 156

Contractions

+ ,%*" %*"

VOICE

1+ 1 1

Daily 6-Trait Writing â&#x20AC;˘ EMC 6024 â&#x20AC;˘ Š Evan-Moor Corp.

Week 5 â&#x20AC;˘ Day 2

Name:

Voice

Write honestly. Use your unique writing voice to let your readers get to know the real you.

Read each situation and complete the sentence. Be sure to use your own unique voice.

1. If I won the Student of the Year award, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d say:

%,$1)" + )

2. If someone stole my lunch money, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d say:

.%)%%!#.#%$. ,$))%!$%,' )$%,

3. If I told my favorite joke, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d say:

) %$,""(.)%)%)' /).%*)) %'$'0

4. If my friend was sick, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d say:

$).%*$.) $ %.%*,$)#)%))$*'(

Š Evan-Moor Corp. â&#x20AC;˘ EMC 6024 â&#x20AC;˘ Daily 6-Trait Writing

VOICE

157

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Convention:

Contractions

DAY 3

Week 5 â&#x20AC;˘ Day 3

Name:

Voice

Read the rule aloud. Then guide students through the activity.

Use your unique voice to tell about personal experiences.

â&#x20AC;˘ Go through the topics in the box. For example, ask: Did something ever happen at home thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s made you laugh? Maybe a pet or a brother or sister did something unusual?

Draw a comic strip that tells about a personal experience youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve had. Use the ideas in the box to think of a good topic. Then draw what happened in the boxes. â&#x20AC;˘ Use a speech balloon to show what was said. â&#x20AC;˘ Use a thought bubble to show what was thought. Topic Ideas a funny moment â&#x20AC;˘ a scary moment

â&#x20AC;˘ Model turning an experience into a comic strip. For example, say: I can write about my dog chasing his tail. I can split the event into four parts: seeing the dog, telling my mom what happened, my mom laughing, and me laughing. Model writing a thought in a thought bubble and what was said in a speech balloon. Be sure to remind students that they may use stick figures as illustrations in their comics.

an embarrassing moment â&#x20AC;˘ being proud of yourself meeting a new friend â&#x20AC;˘ winning or losing a game



', $(, ""+'.#&" %$)$))%&" $%-(



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DAY 4 158

VOICE

Review the rule. Then guide students through the activity.

Daily 6-Trait Writing â&#x20AC;˘ EMC 6024 â&#x20AC;˘ Š Evan-Moor Corp.

Week 5 â&#x20AC;˘ Day 4

Name:

Voice

Use your unique voice to tell about personal experiences.

If you had to write a journal entry about how this year has been, what would you tell about? Answer the questions to help you think of ideas.

#&" $(,'(

â&#x20AC;˘ Read aloud the first question. Use the sample answers to model a response. For example, say: Reading a new book was great because my cousins and I had a contest to see who would finish it first, and I won! Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s what makes it special to me. Repeat for question 2.

1. What was the best thing that happened this year? What was good about it?

'''.%))'%%! ,()2'()%$%*)%#.%*( $()%2$ ( )

2. What was the worst thing that happened this year? What was bad about it?

.#()'  # (( #"%),((%'"%$) #

â&#x20AC;˘ Give students time to answer questions 1 and 2 on their own. Circulate to assist students in giving reasons for their best and worst experiences. â&#x20AC;˘ Convention: For questions 3 and 4, review the rules for the contractions. Use the sample answers to model forming a sentence for each question, using a contraction.

3. Name three things youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve done this year. Use a contraction in your answer.

1+'$,%%!)'+")%'#$)% $%*)$,(%( 4. If you could live this year over again, what would you do differently? Use Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve or Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d in your answer.

DAY 5

1)*'$ $#.%#,%'!+'..1+"'$ #."((%$

Š Evan-Moor Corp. â&#x20AC;˘ EMC 6024 â&#x20AC;˘ Daily 6-Trait Writing

VOICE

159

Writing Prompt

â&#x20AC;˘ Use your unique voice to write a journal entry about the best and worst parts of this year. Write about what you have done and what you would do differently. Use your ideas from Day 4. â&#x20AC;˘ Be sure to spell contractions correctly.

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VOICE

155


Week 5 â&#x20AC;˘ Day 1

Name:

Voice

*OUFSFTUZPVSSFBEFSCZTIPXJOHXIPZPVSFBMMZBSF 6TFZPVSVOJRVFWPJDFUPFYQMBJOZPVSGFFMJOHT

A. Read what each student says. Choose the quotation that is more interesting. Underline the details that explain the characterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s feelings.

HX^ZcXZ^hbn[Vkdg^iZhjW_ZXi# >]VkZaZVgcZY]dlidWj^aY bdYZahd[Wj^aY^c\hVcYWg^Y\Zh# >ldjaYa^`ZidWZVhX^Zci^hi hdbZYVn>XdjaYWj^aYgZVa Wj^aY^c\hVcYWg^Y\Zh#

:kZgni^bZ>deZci]Z dkZcVcY\ZiVl]^[[d[ hdbZi]^c\hlZZi!>i]^c` d[bn\gVcYeV#=ZheZci ]djghiZVX]^c\bZ]dlid WV`Z]^h[VbdjhYZhhZgih# HdbZYVn>Ă&#x2030;aa]VkZV WV`Zgnd[bndlc#>Ă&#x2030;aa cVbZ^iEdeĂ&#x2030;hEVhig^Zh

6Yg^VcV

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B. Write a sentence about something you love to do. Use your own unique voice.

C. Reread the quotations in Activity A. Find the three different word pairs that could be made into contractions. Write them on the lines. Then write the contractions for those words. 8PSE1BJST

$POUSBDUJPOT

   156

VOICE

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Week 5 â&#x20AC;¢ Day 2

Name:

Voice

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Read each situation and complete the sentence. Be sure to use your own unique voice.

 IGIXPOUIF4UVEFOUPGUIF:FBSBXBSE IETBZ

 IGTPNFPOFTUPMFNZMVODINPOFZ IETBZ

 IGIUPMENZGBWPSJUFKPLF IETBZ

 IGNZGSJFOEXBTTJDL IETBZ

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VOICE

157


Week 5 â&#x20AC;˘ Day 3

Name:

Voice

6TFZPVSVOJRVFWPJDFUPUFMMBCPVUQFSTPOBMFYQFSJFODFT

Draw a comic strip that tells about a personal experience youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve had. Use the ideas in the box to think of a good topic. Then draw what happened in the boxes. â&#x20AC;˘ Use a speech balloon to show what was said. â&#x20AC;˘ Use a thought bubble to show what was thought. Topic Ideas a funny moment â&#x20AC;˘ a scary moment an embarrassing moment â&#x20AC;˘ being proud of yourself meeting a new friend â&#x20AC;˘ winning or losing a game

&

'

(

)

158

VOICE

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Week 5 â&#x20AC;¢ Day 4

Name:

Voice

6TFZPVSVOJRVFWPJDFUPUFMMBCPVUQFSTPOBMFYQFSJFODFT

If you had to write a journal entry about how this year has been, what would you tell about? Answer the questions to help you think of ideas.

 8IBUXBTUIFCFTUUIJOHUIBUIBQQFOFEUIJTZFBS 8IBUXBTHPPEBCPVUJU

 8IBUXBTUIFXPSTUUIJOHUIBUIBQQFOFEUIJTZFBS 8IBUXBTCBEBCPVUJU

 /BNFUISFFUIJOHTZPVWFEPOFUIJTZFBS6TFBDPOUSBDUJPOJOZPVSBOTXFS

 IGZPVDPVMEMJWFUIJTZFBSPWFSBHBJO XIBUXPVMEZPVEPEJGGFSFOUMZ  6TFIWFPSIEJOZPVSBOTXFS

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VOICE

159


Grade 5

Contents

How to Use This Book ..................................................................................... 4 Introducing the Six Traits ............................................................................... 6 Comprehensive Teacher Rubric ...................................................................... 8 Unit 1: Ideas Week 1: Choosing a Strong Idea ....................................................................10 Convention: Capitalizing Proper Nouns Week 2: Writing a Topic Sentence and Supporting Details ...........................16 Convention: Subject-Verb Agreement Week 3: Developing Character, Setting, and Plot Ideas ................................22 Convention: Contractions with have, had, and would Week 4: Elaborating on Ideas and Details .....................................................28 Convention: Double Negatives Week 5: Maintaining Your Focus ...................................................................34 Convention: Plural Nouns Unit 2: Organization Week 1: Sequencing ........................................................................................40 Convention: Homophones Week 2: Organizing Information Logically ...................................................46 Convention: Sentence Fragments Week 3: Organizing Information to Compare and Contrast ........................52 Convention: Commas in Place Names Week 4: Organizing to Persuade ....................................................................58 Convention: Interjections Week 5: Choosing Which Way to Organize Your Writing .............................64 Convention: Run-on Sentences Unit 3: Word Choice Week 1: Writing About Action .......................................................................70 Convention: Verb-Tense Consistency Week 2: Using Descriptive Language .............................................................76 Convention: Using Articles Correctly; Using lie and lay

2

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Week 3: Using Similes, Metaphors, and Personification.............................. 82 Convention: Subject-Verb Agreement Week 4: Choosing Words for Your Audience ................................................ 88 Convention: Using whose and whoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s; its and itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Week 5: Getting the Readerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Attention ....................................................... 94 Convention: Spelling Words Ending in the /er/ Sound Unit 4: Sentence Fluency Week 1: Combining Sentences with Conjunctions ......................................100 Convention: Commas in Compound Sentences Week 2: Writing Complex Sentences ...........................................................106 Convention: Commas in Complex Sentences Week 3: Parallel Structure Within a Sentence..............................................112 Convention: Pronoun Usage Week 4: Beginning Sentences in Different Ways .........................................118 Convention: Punctuation in Dialogue Week 5: Writing a Smooth Paragraph .........................................................124 Convention: Sentence Fragments Unit 5: Voice Week 1: Examining Different Writing Voices ...............................................130 Convention: Commas in a Series Week 2: Using Different Voices for Different Purposes .................................136 Convention: Possessive Nouns Week 3: Using Voice in Poetry ......................................................................142 Convention: Capitalization in Poetry Week 4: Writing from Different Points of View ............................................148 Convention: Using should have, could have, and would have Week 5: Using Voice in Persuasive Writing ..................................................154 Convention: Comma Review Proofreading Marks ......................................................................................... 160

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3


WEEK

3

WORD CHOICE Using Similes, Metaphors, and Personification

DAY 1 Read the rule aloud. Say: Similes and metaphors are tools that writers use to compare things. They create more interesting images. Then guide students through the activities. â&#x20AC;˘ Activity A: Read the poem aloud. Say: The first line uses the word like to compare leaves and cornflakes, so it is a simile. What does the next line compare cheeks to? (red roses) Say: That comparison doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t use like or as, so it is a metaphor. Have students complete the activity.

DAY 2 Read the rule aloud. Then guide students through the activities. â&#x20AC;˘ Activity A: Read aloud the description. Ask: Does the moon really â&#x20AC;&#x153;hideâ&#x20AC;?? (no, thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a human action) Say: It just changes position, so we can see only the parts that are lit up by the sun. The writer personified this action. Have students underline hides and complete the activity independently. Convention: Read the sentence â&#x20AC;&#x153;Some nights you sees her...â&#x20AC;? Ask: Is this verb correct? (no) Explain that even though you can be singular or plural, it must always have a plural verb. Have students correct the other incorrect verbs. â&#x20AC;˘ Activity B: Read aloud the example. Then have students complete the activity on their own or in pairs. Have students share what they wrote, and discuss the characteristics that were personified. 82

WORD CHOICE

Using similes and metaphors makes your writing richer. A simile compares two things using like or as. A metaphor does not use like or as.

Word Choice

A. Read the free-verse poem. Underline each simile, and circle each metaphor.

! ! 

"!(%$'!'!$ +&"$!%&$%& +%$$$"%%!""  "&&"!%"% "#'"'&" !+%! !! $! "%$",+&%!&$!&% / %)$ % '""" !(%!%#

B. Pretend you are writing about a baseball game. For each subject below, read the simile or the metaphor that has been written about it. Then write your own simile or metaphor.

# 1. Subject: baseball diamond before a game Simile: The empty diamond is like a kite lying on the ground, waiting for the wind.

â&#x20AC;˘ Activity B: Read aloud the simile for Subject 1. Say: This simile describes the shape of the diamond in an unusual way. What other things could the diamond be? (e.g., battlefield, stage) Model turning one idea into a metaphor: The diamondshaped battlefield awaits soldiers armed with bats and gloves. Have students complete the activity. Convention: Remind students that the subject of a sentence and its verb must â&#x20AC;&#x153;agree.â&#x20AC;? Point out the verb are in the fourth line of the poem. Say: The verb is plural because the subject, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Jen and Grandma Josie,â&#x20AC;? is pluralâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s two people. Have students check their similes and metaphors for subject-verb agreement.

Week 3 â&#x20AC;˘ Day 1

Name:

Metaphor: 

% #

 

2. Subject: the pitcher throwing a fastball Simile:  '$ Metaphor: The pitcher shoots a white bullet into the catcherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s glove. 3. Subject: the umpire making a call Simile: The umpire watches the ball like an eagle eyeing its prey. Metaphor: ! !!

%!

4. Subject: runner stealing a base Simile: !  !%  Metaphor: The runner is on fire, burning toward second base. 84

WORD CHOICE

Daily 6-Trait Writing â&#x20AC;˘ EMC 6025 â&#x20AC;˘ Š Evan-Moor Corp.

Week 3 â&#x20AC;˘ Day 2

Name:

Word Choice

Using personification, or giving nonliving things human form or characteristics, brings your writing to life.

A. Read the description of the moon. Underline the words or phrases that make the moon seem human. Then use proofreading marks to correct any errors in subject-verb agreement.  ""!%/%)+%!!$ !" !&%+"'

%%$%" !&%+"'"!/&" & %%% ")!"!+"')&$ ""! %&$!&%%%!&$ "%")%&& ""!

+&+)!&$&"%")")!%"&+!&$'&%# %&$"!$"%%&%+!($%&"##!!"!#"$&"""!

B. Pretend youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re writing about a street scene. Describe each subject below by writing a sentence that includes personification. Example: Subject: stop sign Description: %&"#%!%&!%&$%&$!+)&!&"" 1. Subject: traffic light

!-&"#.

#

Description:   '% %#

 2. Subject: bus shelter Description: ! ##!! # 

 3. Subject: mailbox Description: $ !#!'

  Š Evan-Moor Corp. â&#x20AC;˘ EMC 6025 â&#x20AC;˘ Daily 6-Trait Writing

WORD CHOICE

85

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Convention:

Subject-verb agreement

DAY 3

Week 3 â&#x20AC;˘ Day 3

Name:

Read the rule aloud. Then guide students through the activity.

Use similes, metaphors, and personification to make your descriptions memorable.

Word Choice

â&#x20AC;˘ Read aloud the description. Say: Jack did a great job of describing how he felt about the ride. Call studentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; attention to the simile â&#x20AC;&#x153;like a pirate walking the plank.â&#x20AC;? Say: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Like a pirate walking the plankâ&#x20AC;? describes Jackâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s false face of bravery. He wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t really feeling brave, but he pretended to be.

Read Jackâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s description of his first roller coaster ride. Then: â&#x20AC;˘ Help him finish some of the similes, metaphors, and personification by filling in the blanks. â&#x20AC;˘ Use proofreading marks to correct any errors in subject-verb agreement.

#

-"/%'#"$&"'!&!"+ .% &)$& $ )!&&"""!'& "'!/&%") +$!$"!&" + $!%" #'&"!$(#$&)!&#! %"%&$)% #!   ($+ &  ""&& +%&"  #!##!!$+!#! %) "("%$&"&$"!&"&! !&$ !

â&#x20AC;˘ Ask: What are some other similes, metaphors, and personifications we can add to the description? Read the beginning of the second paragraph aloud and help students brainstorm things that the height of the coaster could be compared to. (e.g., mountain, Eiffel Tower)

 %!! # 

#

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#!

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!+))%&&&"#$'!%'%#!"$ " !& & "$%&"$ ! )%  # !  



â&#x20AC;˘ Guide students through the rest of the description, or have them complete the activity independently or in pairs.

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-!&&""!. % -+&$. )%#$$'!!!"$&&$""  86

WORD CHOICE

â&#x20AC;˘ Convention: Review subject-verb agreement. Have students identify the errors and explain how they corrected them.

Daily 6-Trait Writing â&#x20AC;˘ EMC 6025 â&#x20AC;˘ Š Evan-Moor Corp.

Week 3 â&#x20AC;˘ Day 4

Name:

Word Choice

Use similes, metaphors, and personification to develop your ideas for a description.

A. Think of the first time you did something. Plan a description of that event. Answer the questions to help you.

  

Read the rule aloud. Then guide students through the activities. â&#x20AC;˘ Activity A: Help students brainstorm â&#x20AC;&#x153;firstâ&#x20AC;? events in their lives. (e.g., losing their first tooth, first day at a new school, riding a bike, giving a performance) Then discuss the feelings evoked by the event.

  # 

1. How did you feel before the event?

DAY 4

#

"!$  2. Write a simile that describes how you felt.

  %## '     3. How did you feel during the event?

Have students complete the activity independently. Circulate to help students as necessary.

 !  4. Write a metaphor that describes how you felt.

#%# #

â&#x20AC;˘ Activity B (Convention): Have students exchange papers to proofread for errors in subject-verb agreement.

5. What verbs could describe the event or how you felt?

& 6. What adjectives could you use to describe the event?

!  7. Write an example of personification that describes the event or how you felt.

#   !      B. Have a partner check your answers for errors in subject-verb agreement. Fix any that are found.

Š Evan-Moor Corp. â&#x20AC;˘ EMC 6025 â&#x20AC;˘ Daily 6-Trait Writing

WORD CHOICE

87

DAY 5

Writing Prompt

â&#x20AC;˘ Write a description of the first time you did something exciting or scary. Include similes, metaphors, and personification. You may use the ones you wrote on Day 4. â&#x20AC;˘ Be sure that subjects and verbs agree with each other.

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WORD CHOICE

83


Week 3 â&#x20AC;¢ Day 1

Name:

Word Choice

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A. Read the free-verse poem. Underline each simile, and circle each metaphor.

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B. Pretend you are writing about a baseball game. For each subject below, read the simile or the metaphor that has been written about it. Then write your own simile or metaphor.  4VCKFDUCBTFCBMMEJBNPOECFGPSFBHBNF  4JNJMF5IFFNQUZEJBNPOEJTMJLFBLJUFMZJOHPOUIFHSPVOE XBJUJOHGPSUIFXJOE  .FUBQIPS  4VCKFDUUIFQJUDIFSUISPXJOHBGBTUCBMM 

4JNJMF



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 4VCKFDUUIFVNQJSFNBLJOHBDBMM  4JNJMF5IFVNQJSFXBUDIFTUIFCBMMMJLFBOFBHMFFZFJOHJUTQSFZ  .FUBQIPS  4VCKFDUSVOOFSTUFBMJOHBCBTF  4JNJMF  .FUBQIPS5IFSVOOFSJTPOGJSF CVSOJOHUPXBSETFDPOECBTF 84

WORD CHOICE

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Week 3 â&#x20AC;˘ Day 2

Name:

Word Choice

6TJOHQFSTPOJGJDBUJPO PSHJWJOHOPOMJWJOHUIJOHTIVNBO GPSNPSDIBSBDUFSJTUJDT CSJOHTZPVSXSJUJOHUPMJGF

A. Read the description of the moon. Underline the words or phrases that make the moon seem human. Then use proofreading marks to correct any errors in subject-verb agreement. I]Zbddc^h[^X`aZ#H]ZĂ&#x2030;hValVnhX]Vc\^c\]Zgb^cY#HdbZc^\]ihndj hZZh]Zg!hdbZc^\]ihndjYdcĂ&#x2030;i#HdbZi^bZhh]Zhb^aZYdlcdcndjl^i]]Zg bddcWZVbh#Di]Zgc^\]ihh]Z]^YZh^ci]ZYVg`#9d\h]dlahVii]Zbddc# BVnWZi]ZnlVci]ZgidhadlYdlchdi]ZnXVcXViX]]Zg#7jih]Z`ZZe higdaa^c\VXgdhhi]Zh`n!cZkZghidee^c\^cdcZeaVXZ[dgiddadc\#

B. Pretend youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re writing about a street scene. Describe each subject below by writing a sentence that includes personification. &YBNQMF   4VCKFDUTUPQTJHO   %FTDSJQUJPOI]Zhideh^\chiVcYhi]ZgZhiZgcan!lV^i^c\idXdbbVcYĂ&#x2020;HideĂ&#x2021;  4VCKFDUUSBGGJDMJHIU   %FTDSJQUJPO

 4VCKFDUCVTTIFMUFS   %FTDSJQUJPO

 4VCKFDUNBJMCPY   %FTDSJQUJPO

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WORD CHOICE

85


Week 3 â&#x20AC;˘ Day 3

Name:

Word Choice

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WORD CHOICE

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Week 3 â&#x20AC;¢ Day 4

Name:

Word Choice

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A. Think of the first time you did something. Plan a description of that event. Answer the questions to help you. I]Z;^ghiI^bZ>

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B. Have a partner check your answers for errors in subject-verb agreement. Fix any that are found.

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WORD CHOICE

87


Grade 6

Contents

How to Use This Book ............................................................................................ 4 Introducing the Six Traits ...................................................................................... 6 Comprehensive Teacher Rubric ............................................................................ 8 Unit 1: Ideas Week 1: Choosing a Strong Idea.....................................................................10 Convention: Capitalizing Proper Nouns Week 2: Writing a Topic Sentence and Supporting Details............................16 Convention: Possessive Nouns Week 3: Developing Character, Setting, and Plot Ideas .................................22 Convention: Punctuating Dialogue Week 4: Elaborating on Ideas and Details ......................................................28 Convention: Commas Between Adjectives Week 5: Maintaining Your Focus ....................................................................34 Convention: Commas in Dates and Addresses Unit 2: Organization Week 1: Sequencing........................................................................................40 Convention: Verb-Tense Consistency Week 2: Organizing Information Logically ...................................................46 Convention: Homophones Week 3: Organizing Information to Compare and Contrast ........................52 Convention: Noun-Pronoun Agreement Week 4: Organizing to Persuade ....................................................................58 Convention: Using good d and well Week 5: Choosing Which Way to Organize Your Writing .............................64 Convention: Commas in a Series Unit 3: Word Choice Week 1: Writing Precise Descriptions.............................................................70 Convention: Commas After Introductory Words and Phrases Week 2: Writing About Action .......................................................................76 Convention: Using there, their, and they’re

2

Daily 6-Trait Writing • EMC 6026 • © Evan-Moor Corp.


Week 3: Using Figurative Language.............................................................. 82 Convention: Subject-Verb Agreement Week 4: Choosing the Right Words for Your Audience ............................... 88 Convention: Correcting Run-on Sentences Week 5: Getting the Reader’s Attention ....................................................... 94 Convention: Plural Nouns Unit 4: Sentence Fluency Week 1: Combining Sentences .....................................................................100 Convention: Commas in Compound Sentences Week 2: Writing Complex Sentences ...........................................................106 Convention: Commas in Complex Sentences Week 3: More Ways to Combine Sentences .................................................112 Convention: Compound Subject-Verb Agreement Week 4: Varying Sentence Beginnings .........................................................118 Convention: Comma Review Week 5: Writing a Smooth Paragraph ..........................................................124 Convention: Correcting Run-on Sentences Unit 5: Voice Week 1: Identifying Different Writing Voices ..............................................130 Convention: Double Negatives Week 2: Using Different Voices for Different Purposes ................................136 Convention: Commas in a Series Week 3: Using Voice in Poetry .....................................................................142 Convention: Homophones Week 4: Writing from Different Points of View ...........................................148 Convention: Using 1st-, 2nd-, and 3rd-Person Pronouns Week 5: Using Voice in Persuasive Writing..................................................154 Convention: Using could have, should have, and would have

Proofreading Marks ..............................................................................................160

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3


WEEK

3

SENTENCE FLUENCY

DAY 1 Read the rule aloud. Review the definition of subject and explain that a compound subject is two or more subjects joined by a conjunction. Then guide students through the activities.

Week 3 • Day 1

Name:

Sentence Fluency

Make your writing flow by combining short, choppy sentences into sentences with compound subjects.

A. Read this personal narrative. Then: • Underline the sentences that could be combined into new sentences with compound subjects. • Circle the subjects of the sentences you underlined.

• Activity A: Read the narrative aloud. Have students identify the sentence that already has a compound subject. (“Marcos and Amy thought...) Then return to the second sentence. Ask: What is the subject? (My sister) r What is the subject of the next sentence? (My brother) r Say: Both sentences are about the same action, so they could be combined. What would the compound subject of the new sentence be? (My sister and brother) r

• Rewrite the underlined sentences by combining their subjects. In the Spotlight Auditioning for our school musical, Grease, was one of the scariest things I have ever done. My sister has been in a play. My brother has been in a play, too. But I am the shy one in the family! Still, I love to sing. So when auditions were announced, I decided to go for it. My friend d Marcos auditioned for a part. My friend Amy also auditioned for a part.. I thought the others were better than I was. Marcos and Amy thought the others were better than they were. The next day, the results were posted. As we approached the board, I saw my name. Marcos saw his, too. We both got parts! Amy didn’t get a part.. I felt bad about that. Marcos did, too. But then we found out that Amy is going to be the assistant director. She’ll be telling us what to do!

1.

Sample Answers:

My y sister and brother have been in p plays. y

y friends Marcos and Amy y both auditioned for parts. p 2. My

Point out that there is often more than one way to combine sentences by using words not in the original sentences. Direct students to sentences 9 and 10. Say: One of these already has a compound subject, but the sentences can still be combined. Brainstorm ways to do so, such as by changing the subject to We all. Then have students complete the activity. • Activity B (Convention): Point out sentences 2 and 3 of the narrative. Say: If you combined these sentences to form a compound subject, the verb should have become plural to match. What should it be? (have been) Have students complete the activity.

g the others were better than we were. 3. We all thought pp the board,, Marcos and I saw our names. 4. As we approached y not g getting g a part. p 5. Marcos and I felt bad about Amy B. Complete each sentence with the correct form of the verb.

114

1. (has / have)

The actors and the director

2. (is / are)

Jorge and Samantha

SENTENCE SENTEN E FLUENC F UE CY

are

have

been rehearsing.

in charge of props. Daily 6-Trait Writing • EMC 6026 • © Evan-Moor Corp.

Week 3 • Day 2

Name:

Sentence Fluency

Make your writing flow by combining sentences with the same subjects.

Read this restaurant review. Then: • Use proofreading marks to correct the two errors in subject-verb agreement. • Underline five pairs of sentences with the same subject that could be combined into new sentences. • Combine the pairs to write five new sentences.

DAY 2 Read the rule aloud. Then guide students through the activity. y

Lulu’s Rocks Around the Clock! If you haven’t been to Lulu’s, you should check out this old-fashioned 1950s-style diner. Cars drive up to Lulu’s. Cars park outside. Then the customers wait in their cars as servers and the manager skates es around the lot greeting people. When a customer rolls down the car window, a teenage girl skates up to the car. She hooks a tray y to the car door. She takes the

• Convention: Have students read the review. Then point out the fourth sentence. Say: “...the manager skates...” may sound OK on its own, but remember, the whole subject is servers and the manager. So, what should the verb be?? (skate)

order. A few minutes later, the server returns. She brings g the food. Friday nights are especially fun at Lulu’s. Every week, the Howard Middle School Drama Club performs to raise money. The students sing songs from the 1950s. The students also dance to the songs. Customers love singing along to “Rock Around the Clock.” They also enjoy “Hound Dog.” For the final song, a girl and a boy performs ms with the owner of Lulu’s. There isn’t a better show in town! Lulu’s is definitely the place to be on Friday nights this summer.

1. Cars drive up to Lulu’s Lulu s and park outside.

• Reread the first three sentences aloud. Ask: Which sentences have the same subject?? (2 and 3) Say: We can combine these into one sentence with a compound predicate, e or two actions joined by a conjunction. (“drive up to Lulu’s and park outside”) Use the sample answers on the reduced page to discuss other ways to combine sentences. Then have students complete the activity. 112

SENTENCE SENTEN E FLUENC F UE CY

2. She hooks a tray to the car door and takes the order.

m nutes later, the server returns w with th the food. 3. A few minutes 4. The students sing and dance to songs from the 1950s.

s ng ng along to “Rock Rock Around the Clock” Clock and 5. Customers love singing “Hound Dog.” © Evan-Moor Corp. • EMC 6026 • Daily 6-Trait Writing

SE ENTENCE TENCE FLUENCY UE CY

115

Daily 6-Trait Writing • EMC 6026 • © Evan-Moor Corp.


Convention:

Compound subject-verb agreement

DAY 3

Week 3 • Day 3

Name:

Read the rule aloud. Then guide students through the activity.

Use compound subjects, compound predicates, and other phrases with conjunctions to make your writing flow.

Sentence Fluency

• To activate prior knowledge, you might want to discuss different types of fundraisers that students have seen or participated in, such as bake sales, car washes, or special performances. Then have two students read the interview aloud.

Read this interview about the drama club’s fundraiser. Then write a short article about the fundraiser, based on details given in the interview. Include sentences with compound subjects, compound predicates, and other phrases containing conjunctions. Reporter: What is the Howard Middle School Drama Club doing this summer? Troy:

Every Friday night, we perform a fifties revue at Lulu’s Drive-In. We sing songs from the fifties. We dance. It’s a lot of fun for us. It’s fun for the customers, too.

Reporter: Does everyone participate? Troy:

Of course! All of the boys sing “Earth Angel.” We also sing “Rock Around the Clock.” Then the girls dance on roller skates to “Hound Dog.” They sing while they skate. Two standout performers are Kayli and Thalia. Kayli sings “Mr. Sandman.” Thalia sings with her. Our drama coach, Ms. Chandler, walks around the cars to collect donations. Ms. Stewart helps her.

• Direct students to Troy’s first response. Ask: What verbs could you combine in Troy’s answer to form a compound predicate? (sing and dance) What nouns could you combine to form the object of this sentence: “It’s a lot of fun for ”? (students and customers)

Reporter: About how much money do you raise each night? Troy:

We raise about fifty dollars a night. The money goes toward costumes. It also helps pay production costs for our annual play. Sample Answer:

Every Friday Fr day n night, ght, the Howard M Middle ddle School Drama Club lub performs a f fifties ft es revue at Lulu Lulu’ss Dr Drive-In. ve In. Members of the club ssing ng and dance to songs from the fifties. f ft es. It provides prov des a lot of fun for students and customers al alike. ke. The he boys ssing ng “Earth Earth Angel” ngel and “Rock Rock Around the Clock.” lock. Then hen the g girls rls ssing ng “Hound Hound Dog Dog” wh while le danc dancing ng on roller skates. Two wo standout performers, Kayl Kayli and Thalia, hal a, ssing ng a duet of “Mr. Mr. Sandman.” Sandman. Throughout hroughout the performance, the drama coach and h her assistant ass stant collect donat donations ons from the audience. aud ence. This h s raises ra ses about fifty f fty dollars a night. n ght. The he club then uses the money for costumes and other production product on costs for the club’s club s annual play. 116

SENTENCE SENTEN E FLUENC F UE CY

Daily 6-Trait Writing • EMC 6026 • © Evan-Moor Corp.

Week 3 • Day 4

Name:

Sentence Fluency

Use compound subjects, compound predicates, and other phrases with conjunctions to make your writing flow.

Sample Answer:

Different dining areas

Review the rule. Guide students through the activities. • Activity A: Brainstorm unique restaurants in your area or ones that students have been to. For students who do not know any restaurants well enough to write about, have them work with a partner, asking questions to help the partner brainstorm details to write in the web.

adults get bandanas

Free stuff

can eat around fake campfire

Restaurant:

kids get cowboy hats

The Chuckwagon ervers sing cowboy y songs

s’mores

Food

spicy baked beans

Entertainment

served on tin plates

• Convention: Have students check each other’s articles for correct subject-verb agreement. DAY 4

A. Plan a review of a restaurant. Why do you like going there? Complete the web by filling in details about the food, the atmosphere, the servers, and any entertainment or other special features.

can eat in covered wagon

• Have students imagine that they are writing a brief newspaper article to tell people about the fundraiser. Remind students that an article should have a serious, formal-sounding voice. Then have students complete the activity in pairs or individually.

give square-dancing lessons on Fridays

• Activity B: Invite a volunteer to share the details from his or her web. Have the class brainstorm sentences that the student might write, using compound subjects and predicates. Then have students write their own sentences.

Sample

B. Write two sentences about the restaurant. Write one sentence with a Answers: compound p subject. j Write the other sentence with a compound p p predicate.

Both kids and adults get special things to wear to make their 1. experience more fun!

square dancing lessons. 2. The servers sing songs and give square-dancing

© Evan-Moor Corp. • EMC 6026 • Daily 6-Trait Writing

SE ENTENCE TENCE FLUENCY UE CY

117

DAY 5

Writing Prompt

• Write a review of a restaurant you like, using compound subjects, predicates, and other combined phrases to make your sentences flow fluently. • Make sure that your subjects and verbs agree.

© Evan-Moor Corp. • EMC 6026 • Daily 6-Trait Writing

SE ENTENCE TENCE FLUENCY UE CY

113


Week 3 • Day 1

Name:

Sentence Fluency

Make your writing flow by combining short, choppy sentences into sentences with compound subjects.

A. Read this personal narrative. Then: • Underline the sentences that could be combined into new sentences with compound subjects. • Circle the subjects of the sentences you underlined. • Rewrite the underlined sentences by combining their subjects. In the Spotlight Auditioning for our school musical, Grease, was one of the scariest things I have ever done. My sister has been in a play. My brother has been in a play, too. But I am the shy one in the family! Still, I love to sing. So when auditions were announced, I decided to go for it. My friend Marcos auditioned for a part. My friend Amy also auditioned for a part. I thought the others were better than I was. Marcos and Amy thought the others were better than they were. The next day, the results were posted. As we approached the board, I saw my name. Marcos saw his, too. We both got parts! Amy didn’t get a part. I felt bad about that. Marcos did, too. But then we found out that Amy is going to be the assistant director. She’ll be telling us what to do!

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. B. Complete each sentence with the correct form of the verb.

114

1. (has / have)

The actors and the director

2. (is / are)

Jorge and Samantha

SENTENCE SENTEN E FLUENC F UE CY

been rehearsing. in charge of props. Daily 6-Trait Writing • EMC 6026 • © Evan-Moor Corp.


Week 3 • Day 2

Name:

Sentence Fluency

Make your writing flow by combining sentences with the same subjects.

Read this restaurant review. Then: • Use proofreading marks to correct the two errors in subject-verb agreement. • Underline five pairs of sentences with the same subject that could be combined into new sentences. • Combine the pairs to write five new sentences. Lulu’s Rocks Around the Clock! If you haven’t been to Lulu’s, you should check out this old-fashioned 1950s-style diner. Cars drive up to Lulu’s. Cars park outside. Then the customers wait in their cars as servers and the manager skates around the lot greeting people. When a customer rolls down the car window, a teenage girl skates up to the car. She hooks a tray to the car door. She takes the order. A few minutes later, the server returns. She brings the food. Friday nights are especially fun at Lulu’s. Every week, the Howard Middle School Drama Club performs to raise money. The students sing songs from the 1950s. The students also dance to the songs. Customers love singing along to “Rock Around the Clock.” They also enjoy “Hound Dog.” For the final song, a girl and a boy performs with the owner of Lulu’s. There isn’t a better show in town! Lulu’s is definitely the place to be on Friday nights this summer.

1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

© Evan-Moor Corp. • EMC 6026 • Daily 6-Trait Writing

SE ENTENCE TENCE FLUENCY UE CY

115


Week 3 • Day 3

Name:

Sentence Fluency

Use compound subjects, compound predicates, and other phrases with conjunctions to make your writing flow.

Read this interview about the drama club’s fundraiser. Then write a short article about the fundraiser, based on details given in the interview. Include sentences with compound subjects, compound predicates, and other phrases containing conjunctions. Reporter: What is the Howard Middle School Drama Club doing this summer? Troy:

Every Friday night, we perform a fifties revue at Lulu’s Drive-In. We sing songs from the fifties. We dance. It’s a lot of fun for us. It’s fun for the customers, too.

Reporter: Does everyone participate? Troy:

Of course! All of the boys sing “Earth Angel.” We also sing “Rock Around the Clock.” Then the girls dance on roller skates to “Hound Dog.” They sing while they skate. Two standout performers are Kayli and Thalia. Kayli sings “Mr. Sandman.” Thalia sings with her. Our drama coach, Ms. Chandler, walks around the cars to collect donations. Ms. Stewart helps her.

Reporter: About how much money do you raise each night? Troy:

116

We raise about fifty dollars a night. The money goes toward costumes. It also helps pay production costs for our annual play.

SENTENCE SENTEN E FLUENC F UE CY

Daily 6-Trait Writing • EMC 6026 • © Evan-Moor Corp.


Week 3 • Day 4

Name:

Sentence Fluency

Use compound subjects, compound predicates, and other phrases with conjunctions to make your writing flow.

A. Plan a review of a restaurant. Why do you like going there? Complete the web by filling in details about the food, the atmosphere, the servers, and any entertainment or other special features.

Restaurant:

B. Write two sentences about the restaurant. Write one sentence with a compound subject. Write the other sentence with a compound predicate. 1. 2.

© Evan-Moor Corp. • EMC 6026 • Daily 6-Trait Writing

SE ENTENCE TENCE FLUENCY UE CY

117


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