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EMMA VANDEWATER Architecture & Urban Planning Portfolio


Emma VandeWater

EXPERIENCE elvandewater@ku.edu (636)236-6813 https://issuu.com/evandewater/docs/portfolio www.linkedin.com/in/emma-vandewater

EDUCATION Master of Architecture University of Kansas - Class of 2022 Master of Urban Planning University of Kansas - Class of 2022 Business Minor University of Kansas - 2016 - 2019

Youtopia Designs - Design Intern St. Louis, Missouri | Summer 2020 Responsibilities included specifying materials, outfitting interiors, rendering, and creating construction documents using AutoCAD and Photoshop for residential and commercial clients. YouthBuild KCK - Design Build Studio Kansas City, Kansas | Spring 2020 Designed a Demonstration Pavilion to be constructed by members of YouthBuild KCK in the first phase of their Model Block Project as part of the Kansas City, Kansas Northeast Master Plan. Mackey Mitchell Architects - Design Student Kansas City, Kansas|Fall 2019 Worked with the Kansas State School for the Blind (KSSB) and Mackey Mitchell Architects to design both a renovation and addition to the existing Brighton Recreation Center at KSSB.

Danish Institute of Study Abroad - 2019 Summer Architecture Studio Copenhagen, Denmark

INVOLVEMENT

SKILLS

American Planning Association Student Member | January 2020- Present

Autodesk Revit, AutoCAD, Fusion 360

Student Mentor August 2019- Present Worked with students and their professors to answer questions, attend reviews, and provide guidance.

Adobe InDesign, Photoshop, Illustrator Lumion

American Institute Architecture Students Student Member | January 2019- Present

National Organization of Minority Architecture Students Student Member | August 2020- Present

Rhino Sketchup Model Building Bluebeam Microsoft Office Word, PowerPoint, Excel, Outlook

AWARDS Frances Fuehrer Architecture Scholarship Fall 2019- Present Greg Schultz Scholarship Spring 2017- Fall 2019 Professional Portfolio Review Finalist 2019, 2020 Dean’s List University of Kansas School of Architecture and Design Spring 2017, Spring 2018, Spring 2019, Fall 2019


TABLE OF CONTENTS

ARCHITECTURE BRIGHTON HALL ADDITION

03

READING PAVILION IN VESTERBRO

1 3

URBAN DWELLING

2 1

LAWRENCE CITY GARDEN

29

PADDLER’S HUT

37

URBAN PLANNING EAST LAWRENCE LAND USE PLAN CONCLUSION

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Oodi Helsinki, Finland


ARCHITECTURE


BRIGHTON HALL ADDITION Program: Black Box Addition to Brighton Recreation Center Location: Kansas State School for the Blind. Kansas City, KS Fall 2019- In Collaboration with Mackey Mitchell Architects This phase of this project included a black-box theater addition to Brighton Recreation Center. For this project the addition is made up of three distinct areas: lobby, theater, and backstage. The lobby is very open and has an emphasis on vertical circulation, and the backstage area is behind Brighton which allows the existing building to extend the back patio much further and it was turned into a green roof in order to give more opportunity for events. Finally, the theater is nestled between the lobby and the backstage area. All the exterior walls are angled to create better acoustic and lighting conditions.

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Washington Blvd

North 11th St

North 12th St State Ave

Kansas State School for the Blind Campus and Site Plan

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Performance Diagram This diagram shows how the overall form of the building was created. Starting with a simple box that breaks apart to wrap around the existing Brighton Recreation Center allowing for the addition to be accessed from the original structure in multiple ways and connect to the existing deck on the back of Brighton. Then the form was split into three areas of purpose: Entrance, Theater, and Back Stage. Each space has a different height to best suit the activity. Finally, the shapes were extended at varying angles to create additional space and accommodations for acoustics.

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Program Diagram

Lobby

Green Roof

Theater

Backstage

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Northwest Elevation- Brighton and Theater Addition Entrance

Northeast Elevation- Theater Addition

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g din uil gB tin Ex is

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Level 1 Floor Plan

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Southeast Elevation- Brighton, Green Roof, Theater Addition

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Mech. St

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Level 0 Floor Plan

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Lobby

Analysis Diagram Since many of the occupants of this building have low vision, acoustics and indirect lighting are critical for the comfort of the occupants. In order to create continuity, through a building where the different areas have varying heights, clerestories and acoustic panels follow the same angle throughout the building. This is to create a smooth flow with visual and acoustical cues to the occupant to determine their location within the building.

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Flashing Waterproof Roofing Membrane Splicing Cement 6” Insulation 4” Metal Stud Drywall Cant

1/2" Terrazo Flooring

Crack Suppression Membrane Moisture Vapor Remediation System 6” Shot-Blasted Concrete Slab

6" Insulation Vapor Barrier

Gravel

1 1

Wall Section


Metal Coping System Metal Fastner Sealant Termination J Molding Foam Tape SterraCore Panel Panel Adhesive Water and Air Resistive Barrier Substrate 4" Rigid Insulation 4" Metal Stud Drywall

Drip Cap Extrusion

Cork Flooring Vapor Barrier Concrete Slab 6" Insulation Vapor Barrier

Gravel Concrete Footing

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READING PAVILION IN VESTERBRO Program: Temporary Library Location: Litauens Plads, Copenhagen, Denmark Summer 2019 This temporary library aims to create a space that encourages reading, inspiration, and interaction. Since this side is a park and is heavily used by both people and animals, the program of the library is divided into three separate buildings in order to leave open green spaces that still feel a part of the library but do not hinder the activity that already occurs at the side. Each building has a distinct purpose and relates to a unique element on the site in order to integrate the indoor and outdoor atmospheres. This temporary structure will enhance the site by offering more to what already exists.

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East Elevation- Lecture Space and Children’s Reading Loft

West Elevation- Cafe and Children’s Reading Loft

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Lecture Space

Cafe

Children’s Library

Lecture Space

Form Diagram Unlike a traditional library, this library is broken up into three separate buildings. The purpose behind this was because this is a temporary structure that occupies a dog park. As to not hinder the current activity on the site or discourage occupants from returning to the site when the structure is taken down, the library started as a simple square and was broken into three parts to allow adequate space for the current activity to continue. Height variations also occur to better serve the purpose of each building.

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Dannesbrogsgade

Estlandsgade

Letlandsgade Dannesbrogsgade

Site Plan

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Cafe

Reading Rm

Lecture Space Children’s Loft

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Floor Plan

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Section of Cafe

The cafe is set parallel to the terrace steps to allow for elevated seating and a welcoming environment. The quiet reading space is bent around a small pond to create a peaceful scene for readers.

The location of the Children’s Loft is next to a large tree so that the children can be up near the canopy of the tree while reading.

Performance Diagram

1 8


Analysis Diagram This diagram shows the result of the experience occupants can have between the buildings creating a fourth space within the library which only enhances the current purpose of the current site.

Library and Children’s Loft

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Section of Reading Room and Children’s Loft

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URBAN DWELLING Program: Mixed-Use Housing in Lawrence, Kansas Location: 1040 Massachusetts St. Lawrence, KS Fall 2020 This Urban Dwelling is a Mixed-Use Housing Project located in Lawrence, Kansas. This complex brings a new life and green space to the corner of Massachusetts and 11th Street. Located across the street from the Douglas County Courthouse, the Watkins Museum of History, and the Japanese Friendship Garden, the form of the building allows residents to gain unique views of key elements in downtown Lawrence. Within the building there are 48 apartments made up of five different floor plans- ADA, studio, one bedroom, two bedroom, and three bedroom apartments. Every apartment has a private balcony and there are green roofs located on every floor. The facade of the building allows for the overall form to be visible, and it offers privacy and light control to the residents.

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Massachusetts St

New Hampshire St

Concept Diagram

Eleventh St

Site Plan

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West Elevation

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COTE 10 Diagram This diagram shows the AIA COTE 10 Measures that were considered when designing the building in order to create buildings that are healthy for the occupants and the environment. Integration- CLT structure is more sustainable than concrete. Community- Building is set back from Mass street. Ecosystems- Trees and green roofs. Water- Rainwater harvesting. Economy- Green roofs act as additional insulation. EnergyOne large mass helps with temperature control. Well-Being- Private balconies. Resources- CLT structure. Change- Layout can easily be renovated as a whole or incrementally over time. Discovery- Sustainable materials sets the precedent for those that come after it.

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to Garage Ramp to Ramp Underground Garage

Level 1 Floor Plan- Commercial +0’

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Studio

Level 2 Floor Plan- Residential +12’

ADA

3 BR


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Level 3 Floor Plan- Residential +24’

Green Space

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Level 4 Floor Plan- Residential +36’

1 BR

2 BR

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South Facade and Green Roof

Systems Diagram The mechanical systems for the residential part of the building include a VRF and DOAS system. Each unit has their own VRF system, located on the roof, that supplies the unit with heating and cooling. The DOAS system supplies the unit with dedicated ventilation. Private balconies provide every unit with sunlight or daylight depending on the time of day. Finally, a clerestory allows light to be brought into hallways.

Heating

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Light

Ventilation

Cooling


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Building Section of Grand Staircase

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LAWRENCE CITY GARDEN Program: Mixed-Use Housing Location: 824 New Hampshire St. Lawrence, KS Spring 2019 The mixed-use housing project aims to merge East Lawrence with downtown Lawrence, the building is at an angle to physically pull the two together. The site is currently the Lawrence farmers marker, and with this building and greenhouse it allows this community space to have permanence and operate year-round to attract visitors from all over the city. The building is equipped with a series of sustainable technologies including solar panels and rainwater harvesting to help the greenhouse function as efficiently as possible. Upstairs there is an entire single-family home for the owners and operators.

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Northwest Elevation- Entrance

Southwest Elevation

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Rhode Island St

New Hampshire St Site Plan

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Program Diagram There are three areas of purpose included in this mixed-use housing project. The lower half of the building is the public market for the community and farmers market. The South side of the building is a greenhouse so that plants can be grown year-round to ensure that the farmers market can have a yearround presence. Finally, the north side of the building is where the single-family home is located. This location of the house gives separation from the market while allowing views to the greenhouse.

Housing

Greenhouse

Market

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Natural Forces Analysis Diagram The overall layout and form of the building is a result of maintaining the greenhouse and rainwater harvesting among other sustainable features. The sloped roof and framing structure allows for rain water collection for the greenhouse and outdoor crops. Additionally, the greenhouse is located on the south side of the building to obtain maximum sunlight year-round and prevent the housing part of the structure from heating up in the summer.

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Level 0 Plan

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Interior Green House View

Kitchen

Living Room

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Level 1 Plan


Exterior Night Render of Garden

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Level 2 Plan

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PADDLER’S HUT Program: Recreational Housing Location: Along the Water Spring 2020 The paddler’s hut was designed to be constructed along the Kaw River, located in northeastern Kansas, as a place for kayakers to stop and rest during overnight trips. However, the structure can be built waterside in any location. Each unit sleeps four and is equipped with a kitchen area, solar panels, composting toilet, and a mini split to provide a comfortable, off-the-grid overnight experience. The structure is situated 10’ above normal water levels, and all exterior materials have been treated to withstand flood conditions. Windows on all four sides of the structure allows for views to any water feature no matter the location of the unit.

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Plan


Standing Seam Roofing

Solar Panel

OSB Sheathing 9" Fiberglass Insulation

2x5 Nominal Cut Lumber 2" High Density Spray Foam Insulation

Mini Split

2 1/2" Fiberglass Insulation Mullion

Moisture Barrier OSB Sheathing

Glazing

1" Structural Plywood Finish

Mullion

Steel Cable Eye Screw

Wood Cabinet

Sleep Platform

2x5 Nominal Cut Lumber HSS8x8x12

HSS6x6x12

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Short Section

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Standing Seam Metal Finish

OSB Sheathing 2" Rigid Spray Foam Insulation 9" Fiberglass Insulation between Outrunner Rafter 2x10 End Rafter OSB Sheathing

Standing Seam Metal Finish 2x8 Wood Board 2" Mullion

Structural Plywood Finish

Glazing Railing Aluminum Storefront 2" Mullion Galvanized Steel Mesh Deck HSS4x4x1/2 Welded Connection

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Long Section

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1" Structural Plywood Finish Sub - Flooring OSB Sheathing Moisture Barrier 2" High Density Spray Foam Insulation 2x10 Nominal Cut Lumber 2x8 Nominal Cut Lumber 9" Fiberglass Insulation OSB Sheathing Treated Plywood SofďŹ t

Concrete Footing

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Nyhavn Copenhagen, Denmark


URBAN PLANNING


EAST LAWRENCE LAND USE PLAN Program: Sustainable Land Use Plan Location: East Lawrence, KS Fall 2020 East Lawrence is one of the oldest neighborhoods in the city of Lawrence. However, it faces unique challenges that are not seen in the majority of Lawrence. East Lawrence is framed by Downtown Lawrence to the West and the Kansas River to the North. As a result, there are several key issues that East Lawrence faces that can be addressed through sustainable land use planning which include a lack of traditional and organic grocery options and flooding hazards. Above all the goal is to provide the community with something that they want, not something they didn’t ask for and to protect the current residents and the natural environment while providing an opportunity for growth within the community.

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East Lawrence

Ka n

sas

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500-year Floodplain

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100-year Floodplain

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Native Am

3.26

White

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Black

4.67

Other

13.75

Native Am

White

Black

Other

Native American

1.08

Lawrence Demographics White

Black

Other

Native American

Strengths

East Lawre Lawrence

East Lawrence Lawrence East Lawrence Demographics Lawrence Demographics Demographics Demographics

18.25% 12.49%

Weakness Poverty Level

Poverty Level

20.00% 18.00% 16.00% 14.00% 12.00% 10.00% 8.00% 6.00% 4.00% 2.00% 0.00%

White

WhiteWhite Black

Black

Other

Other White BlackNative American Other

Native American

Black Other Native American Native American

East Lawrence’s largest and most obvious strength Demographics that it is one of the most diverse Lawrence neighborhoods in the city of Lawrence. With a population that is 6.26% Black (city overall is 4.67) and 3.26% Native American (city overall is 1.08%). Another strength that the neighborhood of East Lawrence has is a strong sense of community, identity, and acceptance.

Lawrence

Lawrence

One of East Lawrence’s weaknesses is that it sees higher levels of poverty than the rest of Lawrence. The Census reports that 12.49% of Lawrence residents are within the poverty level and 18.25% of East Lawrence residents are within the poverty level. Additionally, residents do not have access to traditional and organic grocery stores.

Opportunities

Threats

Many opportunities can happen in the neighborhood of East Lawrence, because the residents are so willing and open to see growth, so long as it protects them. The community is already so strong that they would greatly benefit of more spaces for the community, even spaces that the entire city can be a part of. Whether that be, community centers, grocery stores, gardens, parks, etc. The neighborhood would thrive from being invested in by small businesses.

East Lawrence faces its fair share of threats. Starting with just the location of East Lawrence (see map), it sits directly South/Southwest of the Kansas river, which results in much of the neighborhood being within the 100- and 500year flood plain. Additionally, East Lawrence faces threats of gentrification from large residential developments in the warehouse district and tear downs that result in new residential builds that don’t fit the aesthetic of the historic neighborhood.

White

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East Lawrence

East Lawrence

Black

Other

Native American


Goals Create places to encourage inclusion and equity so that East Lawrence can remain the most diverse neighborhood in the city and continue to grow. Allocate land for grocery stores and for sustainable small farms or gardens that can grow produce to sell at the local grocery store. Allow and encourage the community to grow economically and socially. Prevent gentrification in East Lawrence. Protect the aesthetic of the Neighborhood. Protect residences and business from damage from natural disasters such as floods.

Objectives The overall objective is to maintain community values of inclusion and provide public space for this to occur so that East Lawrence can maintain its place as one of the most diverse neighborhoods in the City. •

By 2022 add an organic grocery store within East Lawrence.

Allocate land for a community garden and outdoor and public spaces that will give back to the community to provide produce for the grocery store and encourage investment from the rest of the city and small businesses to help grow the neighborhood and its economy over time.

Allocate land to a sustainable low-income housing project to prevent gentrification that will dedicate first floor space to small business retail.

Prevent luxury housing developments to prevent driving up the cost of living in the East Lawrence Neighborhood and diminish the aesthetics.

Increase park maintenance.

Plan for parks and green spaces within the flood plains and zone/re-zone land outside of these areas for residential or commercial use. Decrease new builds in these hazard areas.

Plant more native plant species to help with water management in the event of a natural disaster.

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0,000 Survey $10,000 5,000 Sinage $5,000 3,250 Prizes/Auct $3,250 3,250 ETC $3,250 3,000 Event Spac $3,000 $250 Flyers $250 $250 Vendor Flye $250

Public Engagement

public engagement an event will be Public Engagement Public Engagement Budget Budget For held within the community to obtain Budget

opinions for land use planning in East Lawrence. The event is farmers market, and an auction from purchases made Flyers Vendor Flyers $25,000 $25,000 from the budget. A ticket will be required Event Space Rental for attendance. Guests can obtain a $20,000 $20,000 ticket by filling out a survey regarding ETC East Lawrence land use. The survey can Prizes/Auction Material be completed before or during the event $15,000 $15,000 to allow residents to voice their opinion on the land use in the neighborhood Signage $10,000 $10,000 and interact with small businesses. The event will be promoted beforehand with flyers and social media. At the events $5,000 $5,000 there will be booths where guests can go to obtain more information about the Survey $0 $0 survey and the proposed land use. See below Flyers for scheduling. Sinage Survey Prizes/Auction SinageMaterial Prizes/Auction ETC Material Event Space ETC Rental Event Flyers Space Rental VendorGANNT Flyers Flyerschart Vendor

$30,000

$30,000

Month Jan. Week Initial Meeting to Determine Goals Prepare Survey Questions Plan Event Rent Site Create Initial Flyer Advertisment Distribute Flyer Reach Out to Vendors Invite Vendors Finalize Vendors Finalize Survey Questions Create Flyer Advertisement Listing Vendors Send Out Updated Flyer Layout Vendors Placement on Lot Send Out Survey Link to Community Event Week Obtain Walk Up-Surveys Analyze Results

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Feb.

Mar.

Apr.

May

Jun.

Jul.

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Nov.

Dec.

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Projects and Policy

Project 1 is to provide East Lawrence with an all organic community garden to promote and educate both sustainable and organic farming techniques while also provide residences with produce for their grocery store. The goal is to complete this project by 2022. To start a community garden, it costs between $4,000 to $7,500. Larger community gardens can cost up to $30,000. This community garden can be planned out to grow overtime.

Project 2 is to provide East Lawrence with an organic grocery store. Through sustainable use land planning, land will be allocated for an organic grocery store where produce from the community gardens can be sold along with other healthy options. The project is to be completed by 2023. This specific location would not be as large as other grocery stores in the area and can function at 12,000 square feet and would cost $384,000.

Project 3 is both a project and a policy and it is to plant native plant species throughout the East Lawrence Neighborhood. In doing so it will promote habitats for native bird, insect, and other species as well as air quality. In the event of flooding the plants will help with water management and water run-off and because they are native to the area, they require less maintenance and serve a variety of purposes.

Policies to assist these projects include prohibiting specific new-builds within the 100and 500-year floodplains as the frequency of flooding will only increase over time. New builds would only experience repetitive damage in these locations which is costly to the owners and the city. Builds that can happen in these locations must be industrial related. Similar to the Lawrence Wastewater treatment plant, Lawrence Compost Factory, and a concrete factory located along the river. Policy 2 is to bring green space back to sites that the footprint of a new build takes up. What this means for new builds is that 35% of green space that is taken up needs to be replaced elsewhere on the building through green walls or green roofs. Not only does this bring green space back to the land but lowers energy costs of buildings because it doubles as insulation.

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THANK YOU


EMMA VANDEWATER elvandewater@ku.edu

Profile for Emma_VandeWater

Portfolio  

Emma VandeWater- Academic Portfolio December 2020

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Emma VandeWater- Academic Portfolio December 2020

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