Page 1

Hello, I’m Billy Mercury. I am catholic farmer in Ireland. I made a time capsule to remember the life in the 18 century. My life in this time it’s very rough, an extraordinary climatic shock, destroyed my family.


RESEARCH ORGANIZER

Name: _Albano, Eva, Lourdes, Nerea__ Role: A catholic farmer in Ireland

Date: 2-12-2010 Group: 7

Surf the Net a find out about the most relevant aspects of the 18 th century in Ireland. URL: http://www.semp.us/publications/biot_reader.php? BiotID=442

URL: http://www.semp.us/publications/biot_reader.php? BiotID=442

An extraordinary climatic shock—the Great Frost— struck Ireland and the rest of Europe between December 1739 and September 1741, after a decade of relatively mild winters. Its cause remains unknown.

The municipal leaders (mostly Protestant merchants and members of the landed gentry), however, paid closer attention to the state of urban and rural artisans and trades people because of their salutary affect on the commercial economy on which the landowners depended. These leaders knew from experience that “an unemployed or hungry town often became a sickly town and such sickness might be no respecter of class or wealth.” This exactly happened to Ireland as the Frost continued.

Indoor values during January 1740 were as low as 10 degrees Fahrenheit. The one outdoor reading that has survived was 32 degrees Fahrenheit, not including the wind chill factor, which was severe. This kind of weather was “quite outside British or Irish experience,” notes Dickson. Ireland was locked into a stable and vast highpressure system which affected most of Europe. Rivers, lakes, and waterfalls froze and fish died in these first weeks of the Great Frost. People tried to avoid hypothermia without using up winter fuel reserves in a matter of days In Ireland the ice-bound quays and frozen coal yards temporarily froze trade. As a result, the abrupt weather change disrupted craft employment and food processing. The intense cold even snuffed out the oil lamps lighting the streets of Dublin, plunging her into darkness. The Protestants were the governing class who owned land. They distrusted the Catholic rural majority because of their disloyalty towards the Hanoverian state, and “their apparent lack of enthusiasm for the kinds of improved farming that promised to raise the future value of landed property.

The propertied classes began to respond to fuel and food shortages when the Frost was about two weeks old. The Church of Ireland parish clergy and the Established Church solicited donations, which they converted into free rations in the city parishes, distributing nearly 80 tons of coal and ten tons of meal just four weeks into the Frost.

A government official, the Duke of Devonshire, in an unprecedented move on January 19, 1740, prohibited export of grain out of Ireland to any destination except Britain.


DECISION MAKING: RELEVANT ASPECTS AND OBJECTS FOR THE CAPSULE Role: _________________________________ Group: ______________________________ Date: __________________

Relevant aspect and object

#1 (object) thermometer

An extraordinary climatic shock—the Great Frost— struck Ireland and the rest of Europe between December 1739 and September 1741, after a decade of relatively mild winters. Its cause remains unknown.

Your writing

The Great Frost was very important because destroyed many houses and many people suffered accidents.

#2 (object) vegetable

The Protestants were the governing class who owned land. They distrusted the Catholic rural majority because of their disloyalty towards the Hanoverian state, and “their apparent lack of enthusiasm for the kinds of improved farming that promised to raise the future value of landed property.

The Protestants governed the lands, and they decided the things.


#3 (object)

There was a great deal of dire poverty in Ireland. This disaster killed hundreds of thousands of people.

In the 18th century, famine killed many people because they had no land to plan your food.

#4 (object) blanket

Ireland was locked into a stable and vast highpressure system which affected most of Europe. Rivers, lakes, and waterfalls froze and fish died in these first weeks of the Great Frost. People tried to avoid hypothermia without using up winter fuel reserves in a matter of days

The people of Irlanda didn’t use the fuel because had to save reserves for the rest of winter. For example used the blankets.

#5 (object) grain

A Duke of Devonshire prohibited the export of grain. A government official, the Duke of Devonshire, in an unprecedented move on January 19, 1740, prohibited . export of grain out of Ireland to any destination except Britain.

IMAGES FOR THE VIRTUAL TIME CAPSULE AND THE BANNER Role: ________________________________

CONTAINER

Group: _____________________

Date: ________________________

OBJECT 3: _____________________________


OBJECT 1: thermometre

OBJECT 4: blankets

OBJECT 2: vegetable

OBJECT 5: grain

time capsule  

trabajo de inglés

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you