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Edited by Pieter BergĂŠ, Klaas Coulembier Kristof Boucquet, Jan Christiaens

Programme

Leuven

2014

Euro MAC

Eighth European Music Analysis Conference 17-20 September 2014


Organization Committee

Serafina Beck (Catering Services) Pieter Bergé (President) David Burn (Coordinator Students’ Team) Kristof Boucquet (Co-edition Programme & Asbtracts) Jan Christiaens (Co-edition Programme & Abstracts) Klaas Coulembier (General Assistant) Christine Dysers (Public Relations) Pieter Herregodts (Finances) Katherina Lindekens (Book Fair)

Student Team

Lieselotte Bijnens, Dieter Blarinckx, Aurélie Buti, Lieze Depuydt, Yarrid Dhooghe, Nelle Houwen, Lonne Maris, Karen Schets, Suzan Sempels, Zimcke Van de Staey, Katrien van den Hurk, Ilse Vanholder, Lora-Elly Vannieuwenhuysen, Cindy Ysewyn

Scientific Committee

Pieter Bergé (VvM), president Alessandro Cervino (SBAM) Ildar Khannanov (OTM) Nicolas Meeùs (SFAM) Egidio Pozzi (represented by Catello Gallotti) (GATM) Gesine Schröder (GMTh) Kenneth Smith (SMA)

Presidents of the International Reading Committee Pieter Bergé (VvM) Julian Horton (SMA) Marie-Noëlle Masson (SFAM) Egidio Pozzi (GATM) Gilles Rémy (SBAM) Markus Roth (GMTh) Konstantin Zenkin (OTM)

SMA EuroMAC2014 Eighth European Music Analysis Conference Leuven, 17-20 September 2014 www.euromac2014.eu The conference has been realised in collaboration with the Musicology Department of the University of Leuven, and with the support of the Research Foundation Flanders EuroMAC 2014 Programme Edited by Pieter Bergé, Klaas Coulembier, Kristof Boucquet, Jan Christiaens Graphic Design & Layout: Klaas Coulembier Photo front cover: © KU Leuven - Rob Stevens ISBN 978-90-822-6150-9


Table of Contents Overview Wednesday 17 September Overview Thursday 18 September Overview Friday 19 September Overview Saturday 20 September

7 8 10 12

Keynote Lectures Guest Lectures Pre-organized Sessions Post-composed Sessions

16 18 25 85

Russian Music Theory Welcome Session Round Table

102 103

List of Contributors

105

Advertisements 113 Practical Information

119


25 years of EuroMAC 1989 Colmar (France) 1992 Trento (Italy) 1995 Montpellier (France) 1998 Rotterdam (Holland) 2002 Bristol (UK) 2007 Freiburg (Germany) 2011 Rome (Italy) 2014 Leuven (Belgium)


A Word of Welcome

received no less than 430 proposals, three quarters of which have been selected for the final program.

Leuven

EuroMAC celebrates its 25th anniversary. Ever since the first European Music Analysis Conference was organized in 1989 in Colmar, it has become an increasingly important meeting for European music theorists and analysts. Looking back at its history, we may even assume that the emergence and development of several of the European national societies for music theory and analysis was brought about – or at least precipitated – by the energy that was set free by the first EuroMAC conferences. Originally a private initiative of the Société française d’analyse musicale, EuroMAC gradually became a more comprehensive European enterprise, including societies that cover music theory and analysis in Austria, Belgium, France, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Switzerland, and the United Kingdom. However, in order for EuroMAC to become truly European, more work needs to be done. For instance, the conference is still rather poorly connected to music theory in Northern, Eastern, and most countries of Southern Europe. Therefore, it is with great pleasure that we welcome this year the new Russian Society for Music Theory as an official member of the scientific committee of our conference. We are convinced that this accession will further enrich our understanding of all sorts of music, and maybe also open doors to intensify contacts with other European countries that are not yet represented.

Euro MAC

2014

Dear colleagues and friends,

The program itself is subdivided into two main parts. On the one hand, we have the so-called Pre-organized Sessions. These sessions, which – rather unexpectedly – represent the vast majority of the program (around 70%), are conceived as coherent miniature conferences in themselves. They deal, from different perspectives, with one specific aspect of music theory and/or analysis, and they emanate – in most cases – a truly international character. On the other hand, we have a series of Post-composed Sessions, assembled on the basis of individual proposals (around 20%). The remaining 10% of the conference will be devoted to two Keynote Lectures, six Guest Lectures, and two special sessions (a Russian Music Theory Welcome Session, and a Round Table Session). * On behalf of the seven organizing European societies for music theory and analysis – and especially of the Dutch-Flemish Society for Music Theory, which has taken the presidency of this edition – I welcome you to the VIIIth European Music Analysis Conference. I would like to express my gratitude to the Musicology Department of the University of Leuven for hosting this event, and for providing an excellent team of scholars and students to steer the practical organization of this event in the right direction.

During the last decades, music theory – as all scholarly disciplines – has been confronted with an ongoing process of specialization, and an almost continuous emergence of new methodologies. One of the main tasks of EuroMAC is probably to bring this wide variety of topics and approaches together in one conference on a regular basis, and to allow scholars to immerse themselves in the tantalizing diversity of the discipline. This explains why the scientific committee decided not to impose specific conference themes for the current edition, but rather to invite sessions and individual proposals of the broadest possible variety. Many scholars seem to have been attracted by this openness, for the reading committee

Looking forward to a stimulating conference, a vigorous interaction of ideas, and a true commitment to the future of music theory and analysis, I wish you an pleasant stay in our small, but culturally rich, university town. Pieter Bergé

5


Programme

day overviews


Wednesday 17 September University Hall 09.00 Registration University Hall, Promotion Room 10.00 Opening of the conference 10.15 Keynote Lecture 1: Hermann Danuser Horizons of Metamusic: The Case of Richard Strauss

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Leuven Beer Reception 00.28

00.14

00.08

01.08

01.12

03.12

02.28

01.28

Session 6B Harmonic Plasticity and the Modelling of Musical Motion in Tonal, Post-Tonal and Jazz Idioms

Session D Harmony 19th - Early 20th Century

Session 12 Music Analysis and the Body

Session E Music Theory around 1900

Session C Schoenberg, Webern & die Folgen

Session 6C No Orientalisms! Four Regional Approaches to Harmony: Russian, Azerbaijani, Polish and Chinese

Session 10 Meter in the Moment

Session 1A Fétis and Music Theory

14.00 José Oliveira Martins Introduction: Harmonic Plasticity and the Modeling of Musical Motion in Tonal, PostTonal and Jazz Idioms

14.00 Michael Baker Some Instances of ‘Dominantized Tonics’ in Romantic German Song

14.00 Vincent Meelberg Composing the Body Electric: The Bodily Aspect of Using Software in Music Creation

14.00 Matthew Arndt A Non‐ Tonal Problem in a Piece by Schoenberg (Op. 19 Nr. 2)

15.00 Philip Ewell Octatonic or Diminished? Russian Modal Interpretations of Stravinsky’s Pitch Organization

14.00 Rowland Moseley Hypermetric Analysis, Hypermetric Performance, and the Idea of Projection

14.00 Thomas Christensen Fétis and the Origins of Tonality

14.30 Heather Platt Searching for the Tonic in Brahms’ Lieder

14.15 Stacey Sewell Embodiments of Making: Breath, Phrase and Entrainment in Electroacoustic Music

14.00 Stephan Lewandowski ‘Back to the Future’ – The Music Theorist Heinrich Josef Vincent (1819‐1901) and his Polemic against Figured Bass 14.30 David Byrne From Function to Transformation: Sigfrid Karg‐Elert (1877‐1933) as Proto‐Neo‐Riemannian

15.00 Sebastian Wedler On the Genealogy of Webern’s Lyrical Physiognomy

15.30 Imina Aliyeva Azerbaijani Modes: Their Evolution and Manifestation in Traditional and European Genres (Cognitive Approach)

14.40 John Paul Ito Nascent Hypermeter in Bach: The Development of Style and Perception

16.00 Maksim Serebrennikov Response 1

16.00 Markus Neuwirth Revisiting Hypermetrical Ambiguity: Real-time Perception and Expectancy Formation

14.30 Miguel Ribeiro-Pereira Modulatory Consciousness: A Plastic Paradigm for Understanding the Conception and Perception of Tonal Space 15.15 Daniel Moreira Harmonic Motion in PostTonal Music: Voice-Leading, Set-Class Progression and Functional Change 16.00 coffee break 16.30 Paulo Perfeito Jazz Harmony and Plasticity: Chord-Scales, Nonfunctional Progressions and Modulatory Fields 17.00 José Oliveira Martins Multi-Layered Harmony and Plasticity in 20th-Century Music

15.00 Benedict Taylor Navigating Grieg’s ‘Harmonic Dreamworld’: Tetrachordal Harmonies and Added‐Note Voice‐Leading in Haugtussa 15.30 coffee break 16.00 Damian Blättler A Voicing‐Centered Approach to Additive Harmony in Music of ‘la Belle Époque’ 16.30 Ellen Bakulina Tonal Duality and the New Russian Choral School 17.00 Olga Sologub The Slippy Slide: Reconsidering the Concept of ‘Wrong Notes’ in the Music of Sergei Prokofiev

14.30 Joshua B. Mailman Experimental Pragmatic Approaches to Interactive Music Systems Inspired by Music Analysis

14.30 Áine Heneghan Schoenberg’s Sentence

15.30 Irina Snitkova Webern’s Symphony, Op. 21: ‘Lyrical’ or ‘Symbolical’ Geometry?

15.00 Ji Yeon Lee Ernst Kurth’s Climax Theory and its Application to Wagner Analysis

16.00 coffee break 16.30 Christine Dysers A Cellular Approach to Schönberg: Bernhard Lang’s Monadologie VII … for Arnold … (2009)

14.45 Discussion 15.00 Nicholas Reyland Classing the Musical Body: Empathy, Affect and Representation in BBC TV’s The Royle Family

17.00 Bruce Quaglia Nono’s Schoenberg: Early Serial Constructs in the Variazioni Canoniche

15.15 Rebecca Thumpston The ‘Feel’ of Expansion: Embodying Musical Growth

16.15 Nikola Komatovic Response 2 16.30 coffee break 17.00 Kenneth Smith Szymanowski’s Local Mythologies 17.30 Ying Wang/Gesine Schröder The Sinicization of Riemann’s Concept of Harmony via Soviet Music Theories

15.30 coffee break

16.45 Danuta Mirka Harmonic Schemata and Hypermeter 17.30 Edward Klorman Meter as Agency: Performing Metrical Manipulations in Chamber Music 18.15 General Discussion

14.45 Rémy Campos Propositions pour une histoire des pratiques théoriques: le cas de François-Joseph Fétis 15.30 Anne-Emmanuelle Ceulemans François-Joseph Fétis et la notion de progrès en musique 16.15 coffee break 16.45 Chikako Osako Concepts of Organization in François-Joseph Fétis’ Writings on Harmony 17.30 Nathan John Martin Fétis’ Historicism 18.15 Suzannah Clark Fétis’ History of First Principles

18.00 Wei Zhang Response 3

15.30 Michael Klein Musical Affect as Vital Bodily Force in the Work of Deleuze and Guattari 15.45 Discussion 16.00 coffee break 16.30 Workshop

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Alma 1 20.00 Conference Dinner

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Thursday 18 September | 09.00 - 14.00 09.00 British Room 00.08 (livestream 00.28) | Guest Lecture SMA Jonathan Cross From the Technical to the Aesthetic: Analysing Modernism

09.00 Belgian Room 01.28 (livestream 00.14) | Guest Lecture SBAM Claude Ledoux De la trace à l’écart. À la source de nouvelles narrations contemporaines

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00.28

00.14

00.20

00.08

01.08

01.12

01.16

03.12

Session 5C Dissenters beyond the Centres: Analytical Perspectives on Greek Musical Modernism

Session I Theories & Concepts for the Analysis of 20th-Century Music

Session F Counterpoint

Session 7A Analysing Popular Music: A View from 2014

Session 2A Musical Schemata and Historically Informed Listening

Session 8A ‘Analyzing Performance and Performing Analysis’. Synergies and Interactions between Musical Analysis and Musical Performance

Session L Film and Music

Session 6D In Search for the Structural Principles of Harmony

Session 13 In the Shadow of the Pantheon. Analysing Minor Masters and Secondary Composers

10.00 Vasiliki Zlatkou Two Early Sonatinas for Piano by Nikos Skalkottas and Yannis Constantinidis: Re-Interpretation of Normative Formal Models

10.30 Pascal Decroupet Fundamentals for a Theory of Sonal Music

10.30 Maria Teresa Arfini The Musikalisches Kunstbuch of Johann Theile. A Contribution to the Reversible Counterpoint and Canon Theory

10.00 Allan Moore Introduction: Analysing Popular Music: A View from 2014

10.00 Vasili Byros/ Oliver SchwabFelisch/Jan Philipp Sprick Introduction: Musical Schemata and Historically Informed Listening

10.00 Christian Utz Introduction: What Can ‘Performing Analysis’ Mean?

10.30 Olivier Pigott Mahler – Roman ou Film?

10.00 Marina Chernaya Structural Principles of Harmony According to Yuri Kholopov

10.00 Jean-Pierre Bartoli/Jeanne Roudet Introduction; Analyse d’un genre négligé et réévaluation des modèles en cours: l’exemple de la fantaisie pour clavier; Book Presentation

10.30 Giorgos Sakallieros Dimitri Mitropoulos’s Passacaglia, Intermezzo e Fuga (1924): Introducing Musical Modernism in Greece 11.00 Eva Mantzourani Sonata Form, Sonata Cycle and Multimovement Coherence in Skalkottas’s Free Dodecaphonic Works

11.00 Manuel Farolfi Chance and Indeterminacy in Music: A New Analytical Tool to Classify Aleatoric Music Forms 11.30 Yi-Cheng Daniel Wu A Reconsideration of Interval‐Class Space through the Perspective of Joseph Straus’s Evenness and Spaciousness 12.00 Stanley Kleppinger Pitch Centricity without Pitch Centers

11.30 Costas Tsougras Kurze Variationen auf ein Bergsthema from the 32 Piano Pieces by Nikos Skalkottas: An Analytical Approach of Theme and Variations Based on Greek Folk Melodies

11.00 Luciane Beduschi Composer’s Opinions about the Multiple Solutions for their Puzzle Canons 11.30 Denis Collins Pierre Moulu’s Missa Alma Redemptoris Mater and S. I. Taneyev’s Theories of Horizontal‐Shifting Counterpoint 12.00 John Koslovsky/ Matthew Brown The Contrapuntal Legacy of the French Fin‐ de‐siècle: A Look at Dukas’s Piano Sonata in E-flat minor

10.10 Dai Griffiths Elevating Form and Elevating Modulation: So-called Popular Music as Music and as Discourse 10.40 Ruth Dockwray Signifying Space: The Sound-Box 11.10 Anne Danielsen Structure and Flexibility: Microrhythm in Groove-based Music 11.40 Questions/ Debate 12.10 lunch break

10.30 Heinz von Loesch Concepts of Form in Performance Theory and Practice of Artur Schnabel

10.30 Rolf Inge Godøy Sound and Body Motion Timescales in Musical Experience 11.00 Martin Rohrmeier Processing of Hierarchical Structure and NonLocal Dependencies in Tonal Music

11.30 Dieter Kleinrath Experiencing Performance, Analyzing Experience and Performing Analysis. On the Relationship between Musical Analysis, Musical Performance and Musical Listening, Exemplified by Pierre Boulez’ Structures Ia

11.30 Stefan Rohringer Schemata and Holism 12.00 coffee break

12.00 Tobias Janz Response to von Loesch’s, Gingras’s and Kleinrath’s Papers

13.00 Oliver SchwabFelisch Distorted Instances. Listening to Schemata in Beethoven and Schubert

12.15 Discussion

10.30 Dimitar Ninov The Diatonic-Chromatic Platform of the MajorMinor System 11.00 Mart Humal The Rising Cycle-OfFifths Progression: Its Structural and Formal Implications

11.00 Bruno Gingras Linking Analysis and Performance in an Unmeasured Prelude for Harpsichord

12.30 Stefanie Acevedo/Andrew Aziz A Romantic Turn of Phrase: Listening Beyond 18th-Century Schemata

12.00 Petros Vouvaris Issues of Melodic Structure in Nikos Skalkottas’s Post-Tonal Music

11.00 Kevin Clifton The Anatomy of Aural Suspense in Rope and Vertigo

02.28

Session M Miscellaneous 12.00 Marina Lupishko The Principle of ‘Confutatio’ in J.S. Bach’s Music and the Philosophical System of Yakov Druskin (190280): The Narratological Aspect

11.30 Ildar Khannanov The Principles of Harmony from both Philosophical and Technical Standpoints

01.28

10.30 Jean-Claire Vançon Sur la trace d’un ‘style académique’: analyser les oeuvres des lauréats du Prix de Rome à la lumière des catégories de l’Académie des Beaux-Arts (1803-1830) 11.00 Discussion 11.15 coffee break 11.45 Veijo Murtomäki Heinrich Christoph Koch, Joseph Antonín Štĕpán and the ‘Viennese’ Classical Piano school

12.30 Mike Lee Rethinking Cyclic Unity through Embodiment: Alternative Sources of Coherence in Chopin’s Preludes Op. 28

12.15 Louise Bernard de Raymond Les écrits théoriques d’Antoine Reicha à l’épreuve de l’analyse de ses quatuors : l’exemple de la ‘grande coupe binaire’

12.45 lunch break

13.30 lunch break

12.45 Discussion 13.00 lunch break

12.30 Lorenda Ramou Analytical Insights into the Performance of Nikos Skalkottas’s Piano Works (Lecture Recital) 13.10 lunch break

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Thursday 18 September | 14.00 - 22.00 00.28

00.14

00.20

00.08

01.08

01.12

01.16

03.12

Session 5C (continued) Dissenters beyond the Centres: Analytical Perspectives on Greek Musical Modernism

Session 1B Analysing Rameau Rameau Analysing

Session 2B Non-Verbal Theories: Partimento and Craft Learning in the 18th and 19th Century

Session 7A (continued) Analysing Popular Music: A View from 2014

Session 2A (continued) Musical Schemata and Historically Informed Listening

Session 8A (continued) “Analyzing Performance and Performing Analysis”.

Session 4B Form, Linear Analysis, and Interpretative Context

Session H Analyses of 20thCentury Compositions

Session 13 (continued) In the Shadow of the Pantheon. Analysing Minor Masters and Secondary Composers

15.00 Kostas Chardas Struggling for the ‘New’: Tonal/ Atonal/Twelve-Note Interactions and the Ambivalence between Formal Coherence and Fragmentation in Y. A. Papaioannou’s ‘Paradigmatic’ post1950 Greek Modernism

14.00 Birger Petersen Introduction

14.00 Markus Schwenkreis “In no art rules solely will turn you into doctors”

14.00 Ralf von Appen/Markus FreiHauenschild Corpus Analysis: Song Form and Harmony in the Repertoire of the Rolling Stones

15.15 Folker Froebe On Synergies of Schema Theory and Schenkerian Analysis. A Perspective from Riepel’s ‘Fonte’ and ‘Monte’

14.45 Bartolo Musil Sailing in Brackish Water. Text and Music in the Art Song of the Fin de Siècle: Theory and Practice

14.00 Lauri Suurpää Heroic Duty and Tragic Love in the Third-Act Quartet of Mozart’s Idomeneo

13.30 Amy Bauer Ideology, Compositional Process, Optics and Form in Georg Friedrich Haas’s In Vain

15.45 Florian Vogt Bruckner and ‘Satzmodelle’. An Analysis of the Beginning of the Seventh Symphony

15.15 Lukas Haselböck Troping Processes and Irony in Songs by Schubert, Wolf and Mahler

14.30 Janet Schmalfeldt Beethoven’s ‘Violation’: His Cadenza for the First Movement of Mozart’s D minor Piano Concerto

14.00 Richard McGregor “Die Detonation ist am Körper angekommen” ‐ Rihm’s Creative Explosion in 1981

14.30 Timothy Jackson Anton Eberl’s Innovative Conceptions of Sonata Form: the Example of the first Movements of E flat major Op. 33 and D minor Op. 34 Symphonies

15.30 Magdalini Kalopana Opposition and Symbiosis: Avant-Garde and Traditional Greek Elements in the Works for Solo Instruments of Dimitris Dragatakis: An Analytical Perspective 16.00 Anastasios Mavroudis Performing Sicilianos: An Analytical and Interpretative Approach to the Sonata for Violin and Piano, Op. 45 by Yorgos Sicilianos 16.30 coffee break 17.00 Panos Vlagopoulos Jani Christou’s Second Symphony: Monument, Crossroads, Path 17.30 Maria Yerosimou Analytical and Performative Approaches to Jani Christou’s Strychnine Lady 18.00 Danae Stefanou “Maybe a glimpse into the void beyond”: Experimentalist Paradigms and the Liminal Spaces of post1960s Greek Modernism 18.30 Piano Recital

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14.15 Théodora Psychoyou A Modern Thought for a New Music Theory: Rameau and the Authority of the ‘Anciens’ 14.40 Birger Petersen Rameau Analysing: From Lully to Corelli and back 15.05 Anne-Sophie Lahrmann Rameau vs. Kirnberger. Analytical Systems by Comparison

16.00 coffee break 16.30 David Lodewyckx/Lieven Strobbe “Tonal Tools”: an Introduction 18.30 General Discussion

14.30 Katherine Williams “This record is dedicated to me”: Rufus Wainwright’s Ego 15.00 Oliver Kautny Vocal Rhythm in Rap Music 15.30 Questions/ Debate

15.30 Discussion: Rameau and his Analytic Works

16.00 coffee break 16.30 Kenneth Smith A Neo-Riemannian Approach to Suede

15.55 coffee break 16.30 Gesa zur Nieden Reception of JeanPhilippe Rameau’s Theoretical Works in the 18th-Century German Speaking World in the Light of Language Frontiers, Material Aspects of Distribution and Ways of Reading

17.00 Justin Williams Intertextuality and Lineage in The Game’s We ain’t 17.30 André Doehring Meaning and Alternating Form and Groove in Four Tet’s Electronic Dance Music

15.45 Paulo de Assis Response to Musil’s and Haselböck’s papers

16.15 coffee break 16.30 August Sheehy Methodological Questions of Reconstructing Historical Listening

16.15 coffee break 16.45 Christian Utz Time-Space-Experience in Works for Solo Cello by Xenakis, Lachenmann, and Ferneyhough. A PerformanceSensitive Approach to Morphosyntactic Musical Analysis

17.00 Jan Philipp Sprick Historical Listening and Historically Informed Performance 17.30 Vasili Byros Response

17.15 Ellen Fallowfield A Performer’s Analysis as Part of the Interpretation Process

18.00 break 18.15 Panel Discussion: Future Research Questions

17.45 Paulo de Assis Response to Utz’s and Fallowfield’s Papers

18.00 Questions/ Debate

16.55 Sören Sönksen Deconstructing the ‘Stack of thirds’ – Aspects of the Theories of Rameau, Kirnberger and Sechter

18.15 Discussion

17.20 Roberta Vidic Rameau and the Italian Tradition

15.00 Kerri Kotta Form as Interaction between Harmonic Prolongation and Hypermeter 15.30 Discussion 15.45 coffee break 16.15 Anne Hyland ‘Form’ and ‘Formung’ in Schubert’s Variations on a French Air, D624: Voice-Leading as Structure 16.45 Peter H. Smith ‘Hausmusik’ for ‘Cognoscenti’: Some Formal Characteristics of Schumann’s LatePeriod Character Pieces for Instrumental Ensembles 17.15 Julian Horton Formal Function and Voice Leading in the First Movement of Bruckner’s Eighth Symphony 17.45 Discussion

17.45 Discussion: Rameau in Germany and Italy

14.30 Milos Zatkalik Teleological Strategies of Non‐Tonal Music: The Case of Milan Mihajlovic 15.00 Hubertus Dreyer How Ligeti Once Was Puzzled by Schubert – and a Luhmannian Response

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Parthenon room

03.18

20.00 Rusian Music Theory Welcome Session

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01.28

15.15 Florence Doé de Maindreville Pistes d’analyse autour du Premier quatuor à cordes de Saint-Saëns 15.45 Priscille LachatSarrete Analyse des concertos de l’école française de violon du début du 19e siècle 16.15 Discussion

15.30 coffee break

16.30 coffee break

16.00 Sandro Marrocu Su una ‘sola nota’: Il Terzo Periodo di Giacinto Scelsi

17.00 Muriel Boulan Analyser les petits maîtres avec les outils de Jan LaRue: ajustement d’un système de symboles à des configurations hors norme

16.30 Nicolò Palazzetti From Bartók to Darmstadt: Analysis of Bruno Maderna’s First String Quartet 17.00 coffee break 17.30 Ding Hong Sonicizing the Poetics of Illusion: Debussy’s Transformational Strategy in Prélude à l’après‐midi d’un faune 18.00 Ciro Scotto Harmonic Process and Formal Structure in Some Recent Music by Boulez 18.30 Shigeru Fujita Sur le même accord: Dutilleux’s Systematic Thinking in the Harmonic Dimension

18.15 Round Table Discussion: Analysis in the 18th Century

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17.30 Jérôme Rossi Un modèle debussyste? A propos de quelques phénomènes de duplications dans la musique de Frederick Delius 18.00 Discussion 18.15 Discussion and Round Table: L’approche étique en question/Questioning the Precedence to Etic Approaches Conclusion

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Friday 19 September | 09.00 - 14.00 09.00 French Room 00.14 (livestream 00.08) | Guest Lecture SFAM François Delalande Au-delà des notes: prémisses d’une théorie de l’analyse

09.00 German Room 01.08 (livestream 00.28) | Guest Lecture GMTh Ariane Jeßulat Polyphonic Gestures between Architecture and Interaction

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00.28

00.14

00.20

00.08

01.08

01.12

03.12

02.28

01.28

Session 5D Listening to Electroacoustic Music through Analysis

Session 4D Form/Structure and Continuity/ Discretization: What Principles for Music Analysis Today?

Session 2B (continued) Non-Verbal Theories: Partimento and Craft Learning in the 18th and 19th Century

Session 7A (continued) Analysing Popular Music: A View from 2014

Session 8B Agency in Musical Performance

Session 4A Schenker’s Formenlehre

Session 9A Computational Music Analysis

Session 7B Jazz Harmony: Theory and Practice

Session 4C Corpus Studies, Empirical Methods, and the Analysis of Musical Form

10.00 Nicolas Marty Introducion: Listening to Electroacoustic Music through Analysis

10.30 Introduction

10.00 Robert Gjerdingen Introductory Speech

10.00 Allan Moore Addressing Meaningfulness in Popular Song

10.00 Opening Discussion: “What is Agency in Music?”

10.00 Nicolas Meeùs Introduction

10.30 David Meredith Introduction

10.45 Roger Graybill Facilitative Agency in Performance

10.15 Jason Hooper An Introduction to Schenker’s Early ‘Formenlehre’

10.45 Tom Collins Inter-Opus Analyses of Beethoven’s Piano Sonatas

10.00 Barbara Bleij Welcome/Introduction: Jazz Harmony. Theory and Practice

10.00 Markus Neuwirth Introduction: Corpus Studies, Empirical Methods, and the Analysis of Musical Form

11.25 Edward Klorman Performers as Creative Agents: Mapping the Terrain

10.50 Marc Rigaudière Heinrich Schenker’s Position in the Tradition of the ‘Formenlehre’

11.15 Tillman Weyde Melodic Prediction and Polyphonic Structure Analysis

12.05 Victoria Tzotzkova Sounding Music, Cultivating Agency: Musings on Concepts, Discourses, and Practices in Present-Day Traditions of Classical Music Performance

11.25 coffee break

11.45 coffee break

11.50 Frank Samarotto The ‘Urlinie’, Melodic Energies, and the Dynamics of Inner Form

12.15 Christina Anagnostopoulou Computational Music Analysis of Children’s Keyboard Improvisations

10.30 John Dack Listening to ‘Plastic’ and ‘Musical’ Languages in Pierre Henry’s Variations pour une porte et un soupir 11.00 Lin-Ni Liao Interculturality: Intellectual Organization of the West and Spiritual Listening of the Far East in the Mixed Music of Wang Miao-Wen 11.30 coffee break 12.00 Bruno Bossis The Ambiguous Listening or the Research for Universals: The Example of Electroacoustic Vocality

11.00 Jean-Marc Chouvel Form – Structure – Cognition: The Contribution of Cognitive Analysis to the Conceptual Clarification of the Notions of Form and Structure 11.30 Nathalie Hérold Considering Form/Structure and Continuity/Discretization Dialectic from Timbral Analysis 12.00 Joseph Delaplace Dialectic Continuity/Discontinuity: An Instrument for the Analysis of 20thCentury Music? 12.30 Discussion 12.45 lunch break

12.30 Bill Brunson Triangulating Narrativity in Electroacoustic Music

11.00 Stefan Eckert Aspects of Partimento Practice in Joseph Riepel’s Anfangsgründe zur musikalischen Setzkunst 11.30 coffee break 12.00 David Lodewyckx Marpurg’s Galant Cadence: An Overlooked Cadence Type in Contemporary Schema Theory 12.30 Robert Gjerdingen The Institutionalization of Apprenticeship in the Great Conservatories: A Cognitive Interpretation of a Non-Verbal Praxis 13.00 lunch break

13.00 lunch Break

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10.30 Nicholas Baragwanath The Solfeggio Tradition in 18th-Century Europe: Preliminary Findings

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10.30 Michael Spitzer Analysing Emotion in Popular Music 11.00 Stan Hawkins Gender Performativity and Agency in Popular Song 11.30 Questions/ Debate 12.00 coffee break 12.30 Kenneth Smith Introduction to Round Table 12.45 Dai Griffiths/ Allan Moore/ Michael Spitzer/ Anne Danielsen/Stan Hawkins Discussion: Development of Popular Music Analysis

12.45 lunch break

01.16

12.25 Alessandro Cecchi Looking Beyond the Surface: Form, Structure and Force in Ernst Kurth and Heinrich Schenker 13.00 lunch break

12.45 Teppo Ahonen/ Janne Lahti/Kjell Lemström/Simo Linkola Intelligent Digital Music Score Book: CATNIP 13.15 lunch break

13.30 Discussion/ Contributions from the floor, relating to entire session

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10.15 Laurent Cugny VerticalityHorizontality; HarmonyCounterpoint; Heinrich Schenker-Brad Mehldau 10.55 Franz Krieger Harmonic Modernity in Jazz Blues: Footprints as Played by Herbie Hancock, Chick Corea and Danilo Perez, 1966–2003 11.25 coffee break 11.55 Henry Martin Expanding Jazz Tonality: The Compositions of Wayne Shorter 12.35 Keith Waters Postbop Grammars 13.15 lunch break

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10.15 Julie PedneaultDeslauriers/Nathan John Martin HalfCadence Type and Formal Function in the Mozart Sonatas 11.00 coffee break 11.15 David Sears The Classical Cadence in Context: A Corpus Study of Haydn’s String Quartets 12.00 Yoel Greenberg On the Origins of the Recapitulation: A Corpus-Based, BottomUp Approach to Musical Form 12.45 lunch break

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Friday 19 September | 14.00 - 22.00 00.28

00.14

00.20

00.08

01.08

01.12

01.16

03.12

02.28

01.28

Session 5D (continued) Listening to Electroacoustic Music through Analysis

Session 4D (continued) Form/Structure and Continuity/ Discretization: What Principles for Music Analysis Today?

Session 2B (continued) Non-Verbal Theories: Partimento and Craft Learning in the 18th and 19th Century

Session J Popular Genres

Session 8B (continued) Agency in Musical Performance

Session 4A (continued) Schenker’s Formenlehre

Session 5A Analysis Beyond Notation in 20th and 21st Century Music

Session 9A (continued) Computational Music Analysis

Session 7B (continued) Jazz Harmony: Theory and Practice

Session 4C (continued) Corpus Studies, Empirical Methods, and the Analysis of Musical Form

15.00 Joshua B. Mailman Renewing the Riverbed: Critical Aesthetic and Epistemological Purposes for Analysis, Fueled by Performative Theory

14.00 Philippe Lalitte Audio Descriptors: New Computer Tools for Stream and Segmentation Analysis

15.00 Giorgio Sanguinetti The Bolognese Partimento School and its Influence on Donizetti and Rossini

14.00 Victoria Malawey Vocal Elasticity in Aretha Franklin’s Respect

14.00 Marc Leman Agency and Musical Expression

14.45 Nicolas Meeùs ‘Formenlehre‘ in Der freie Satz: A Transformational Theory

14.00 Alessandro Bratus Kaleidoscoping the Simple. The Formal Definition of Popular Song between Analysis and Representation

14.45 Agustín Martorell Systematic Set-Class Surface Analysis: A Hierarchical Multi-Scale Approach

15.30 David Maw Chord-Voicing and Chord-Type in Oscar Peterson’s Standard Playing of 1959

15.15 David Meredith Music Analysis and Point-Set Compression

16.00 Barbara Bleij Notions of ‘Mode’ and ‘Modality’ in Jazz Harmony

14.15 Trevor de Clercq Typical Chords in Typical Song Sections: How Harmony and Form Interact in Pop/Rock Music

15.30 Eldad Tsabary Understanding Analysis of EA Music through Aural Training Pedagogy 16.00 Pascal Terrien/ Nicolas Marty The Explicitation Interview, Analyzing the Dynamics of Electroacoustic Music Listening 16.30 coffee break 17.00 Pierre Couprie New Forms of Representation to Listen, Analyze and Create Electroacoustic Music 17.30 Lasse Thoresen Aural Analysis of Emergent Musical Forms: A GestaltOriented Approach to Musical Analysis 18.00 René Mogensen Comparison of Comprehensibility of Analytical Representations of Electroacoustic Music: Pictographic versus Symbolic

14.30 Anthony Papavassiliou To Describe Continuity through Discretization in a Recorded Works Analytical Process

15.30 Marco Pollaci The Significance of Neapolitan Compositional School for 19th- Century Italian Opera Composers

15.00 Discussion

16.00 coffee break

15.15 coffee break

16.30 Job Ijzerman A New Approach to Harmony Based on Tonal Schemata

15.45 François Picard The Musical Form itself as Reflecting the Structure: A Case Study - Shifan luogu 十番鑼鼓 Music for Percussions (China) 16.15 Annie Labussière Form through Gesture: Formal Implications in the Analysis of Traditional Chant ‘à voix nue’

17.00 Gaetano Stella Partimenti in Today Schools of Music. An Experiment in Integration of Theory and Music Pedagogy 17.30 coffee break 18.00 Panel Discussion

15.30 John Cunningham The Roots of English Restoration Opera in Masque 16.00 Rebecca Herissone Matthew Locke and ‘The English Opera’

15.20 Charles J. Smith How to Select a Background? Start with Conventional Form …

15.20 coffee break 15.45 Tami Gadir Analysing Agency: Perspectives from the DJ Booth 16.25 Rolf Inge Godøy Motor Constraints Shaping Musical Experience 17.05 Lawrence Zbikowski Response 17.45 Closing Discussion 18.30 Conclusion

17.00 Bryan White Lost in Translation? Louis Grabu and John Dryden’s Albion and Albanius

16.45 Thierry Mathis The Unmeasured Prelude for Harpsichord in France in the 17th and 18th Centuries – between Continuity and Discretization – Music Analysis of Shape and Structure

15.55 Christopher Brody The Independence of Structural Parameters in Schenkerian Accounts of Tonal Form 16.30 coffee break 16.55 Steven D. Mathews Realizing Schenkerian ‘Formenlehre’ through 21st-Century Lenses 17.30 Jan Miyake Investigating Closure: Correspondences Between the EEC and Descent of the Exposition’s ‘Urlinie’ Replica 18.05 Joel Galand Some Schenkerian Implications for Sonata Theory

17.30 Katherina Lindekens “Rugged to the Reader, Harmonious to the Hearer”: A Musico-Poetic Analysis of King Arthur

18.40 Conclusions

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14.30 Enrique Cámara de Landa Beyond the Staff: ‘Alternative’ Systems in the Graphical Representation of Organized Sound 15.00 coffee break 15.30 Simon ZagorskiThomas Sex On Fire: A Case Study of how Different Forms of Graphic Representation Can Influence Analysis 16.00 Errico Pavese Interpreting and Representing MicroRhythmic Discrepancies and Spatial Dimensions in Dolcenera and A Cúmba by De André and Fossati

15.45 coffee break 16.15 Gissel Velarde/ David Meredith Melodic Pattern Discovery by Structural Analysis via Wavelets and Clustering Techniques

16.30 Walther Stuhlmacher Schemata in Jazz Compositions 17.00 Discussion

16.45 Matevž Pesek/ Aleš Leonardis/Matija Marolt Compositional Hierarchical Model for Pattern Discovery in Music

15.00 Markus Neuwirth “New Twists of the Old”: Explaining Leopold Koželuch’s Recomposed Recapitulations 15.45 coffee break 16.00 Vasili Byros Sonata Quasi Uno Schema: A Case from Beethoven 16.45 Uri Rom The Pitfall of Diachronicity: ‘Explicit’ vs. ‘Implicit’ Musical Temporality

17.15 break

17.30 coffee break

17.30 David Meredith Open Discussion 1: Evaluating Music Analysis Algorithms

17.45 Concluding Discussion

16.30 Hans T. ZeinerHenriksen The Analysis of Groove in Contemporary Pop Music 17.00 coffee break 17.30 Paolo Bravi Workshop: What You Hear and What You Get. Manual Transcription and Melodic Analysis through ‘Praat’

18.00 John Cunningham/Rebecca Herissone/Bryan White/Katherina Lindekens Round Table: Words and Music in English Restoration Opera: Analytical Perspectives

17.15 Philippe Gonin Continuity and Discontinuity in the Formal Creative Process in the Music of Pink Floyd from Atom Heart Mother to The Wall

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page 93 Session 3B Words and Music in English Restoration Opera: Analytical Perspectives

14.40 Eugene Montague Towards a Phenomenology of Agency in Performance

16.30 coffee break

17.45 Discussion

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14.30 Darryl White The Melodic Harmonic ‘Divorce’ in Jazz

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Parthenon room

03.18

20.00 Round Table

(page 103)

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Saturday 20 September | 09.00 - 14.00 09.00

Italian Room 00.20 (livestream 00.14) | Guest Lecture GATM Rossana Dalmonte Music analysis for musical grammars

09.00

Dutch Room 02.28 (livestream 00.28) | Guest Lecture VvM Michiel Schuijer Music Theorists and Societies

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00.28

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01.08

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01.28

Session 5D (continued) Listening to Electroacoustic Music through Analysis

Session 4D (continued) Form/Structure and Continuity/ Discretization: What Principles for Music Analysis Today?

Session 5B Analysing ‘Un‐ Analysable’ Art Music Since 1950

Session H (continued) Analyses of 20thCentury Compositions

Session B Music Theory Pedagogy

Session A Form Analysis

Session 6A Tonality: Recent Theoretical Models and Analytical Tools

Session 9A (continued) Computational Music Analysis

Session 9B Algebraic Combinatorics of Scales and Modes with Applications to Music Analysis

Session 3A Analyzing the Renaissance Polyphonic Mass and Office of the Dead

10.15 Leigh Landy Keynote: How Listening-based Analysis Can Aid the Appreciation and Understanding of Electroacoustic Music

10.15 Marie-Noëlle Masson Formal Analysis, Structural Analysis, Rhetorical Analysis: F. Chopin’s Nocturne Op. 27 No 1

10.00 Mark Delaere Introduction: Analysing ‘Un-Analysable’ Art Music Since 1950

10.30 David Forrest The Interplay of Tonal and Symmetrical Elements in Britten

10.00 Hans Peter Reutter Welcome

10.00 Wayne Petty Some Multimovement Designs in C.P.E. Bach’s Late Keyboard Sonatas

10.00 Introduction

11.00 Michael Clarke/ Frédéric Dufeu/Peter Manning Towards an Analysis of Trevor Wishart’s Imago: Form, Structure and Technology

10.00 David Clampitt Analytical Applications of Singular Pairwise Well-formed Scale Structures

10.00 David J. Burn/Katelijne Schiltz Welcome and Introduction

10.15 Jan Christiaens Analysis after Adorno. Towards an Epistemology for the Analysis of Recent Art Music

10.30 Alex McLean/ Alan Marsden/ Victor Padilla/Kia Ng Data for Music Analysis from Optical Music Recognition: Prospects for Improvement Using Multiple Sources

11.15 break 11.30 Elizabeth Anderson/François Delalande/Leigh Landy/Joshua B. Mailman/Nicolas Marty/Lasse Thoresen Round Table: Listening Behaviours in Music Theory and Analysis

10.45 Julie Walker Different Discretized Structures in Chopin’s Last Style 11.15 coffee break 11.30 Jean-Paul Olive Arnold Schoenberg: Musical Prose and Formal Analysis 12.00 Malgorzata Gamrat Liszt’s Conception of PoeticoMusical Cycle for Piano Solo 12.30 Discussion

10.50 Klaas Coulembier Overload or Generosity? Analyzing Brian Ferneyhough’s Time and Motion Study II 11.25 Yves Knockaert On Analysing Wolfgang Rihm’s ‘NotebookPieces’ 12.00 lunch break

11.30 coffee break 12.00 Laura Emmery In Disguise: Borrowings in Elliott Carter’s Early String Quartets 12.30 Kristina Knowles Ebb and Flow: Rhythm and Temporality in Unmetered Music by George Crumb 13.00 Joel Hunt Indeterminacy in the Music of Henry Brant: Toward a Framework for ‘Controlled Improvisation’

10.15 Nina Hildebrand Jungstudierende mit absolutem Gehör. Chancen und Herausforderungen im integrativen Hörererziehungs- und Satzlehreunterricht 10.45 Lola Dzhumanova/Elena B. Zhurova Traditions and Innovations in Music Theory Pedagogy in Russia

10.30 Alexander Morgan The Interdependence of Schemata and Form in the Motto Symphonies of Haydn 11.00 Joseph Chi‐Sing Siu Hypermetrical Shift in Haydn’s Late Monothematic Sonatas

11.15 Liudmila Kazantseva The Theory of Musical Content as a Pedagogic Tool

11.30 Matthew Boyle Textual Rotations and the Two Tempo Rondò 12.00 lunch break

10.15 Nicolas Meeùs Hiérarchisation des progressions dans la théorie des vecteurs harmoniques 10.50 Karst De Jong/Thomas Noll Fundamental Bass and Real Bass in Dialogue: Tonal Aspects of the Structural Modes 11.25 coffee break 11.50 Ariane Jeßulat Parsimonious Voice-Leading and ‘Stimmführungsmodelle’ 12.25 Hugues Seress Polarization, Modal Orientation, and Voice Leading: About Interaction between Different Hierarchical Levels of Tonal Structure

11.45 coffee break 12.00 Marina Karaseva Perceiving Music Theory by Music Ear: Innovations and Traditions in the Approach to the Intensive Ear Training

13.00 Michael Polth Einzelton und harmonischer Kontext in der Tonfeld-Theorie

12.30 Philippe Gantchoula/Hugues Seress Unités d’orientation tonale et Tonnetz néoRiemannien polarisé: deux outils didactiques pour l’analyse de la tonalité élargie

11.00 David Rizo Interactive Music Analysis 11.30 coffee break 12.00 Anja Volk Rhythmic Patterns as Constituents of the Ragtime Genre 12.30 Emilios Cambouropoulos/ Maximos KaliakatsosPapakostas/Costas Tsougras The General Chord Type Representation: An Algorithm for Root Finding and Chord Labelling in Diverse Harmonic Idioms 13.00 lunch break

13.35 lunch break

10.45 Marek Žabka Well-Formedness, Myhill’s Property and Maximal Evenness – How to Generalize Them for NonPythagorean Scales? 11.30 Jennifer Shafer Unveiling the Invisible: An Examination of Structure through Wavelet Analysis 12.15 coffee break 12.30 Norman Carey/Thomas Noll Descending Diminished Seventh Chords: Integrating Perspectives of Chordal Structure, Fundament Progression, Diatonic and Chromatic Voice Leading

10.15 John Milsom “Lux aeterna luceat eis”: Understanding Polyphonic Craft in Requiem Masses from Pierre de la Rue to Victoria 11.15 coffee break 11.45 Honey Meconi La Rue’s Requiem as Chronological Touchstone 12.15 Tess Knighton The Missa Pro Defunctis by Pedro de Escobar: Transitions and Transformations 12.45 lunch break

13.15 Jonathan Wild Scale Theory in the 16th Century — the Case of Nicola Vicentino 14.00 lunch break

13.00 lunch break

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Saturday 20 September | 14.00 - 22.00 00.28

00.14

00.20

00.08

01.08

01.12

01.16

03.12

02.28

01.28

Session 5A (continued) Analysis Beyond Notation in 20th and 21st Century Music

Session 11 Topic Theory and Music Analysis

Session 5B (continued) Analysing ‘Un‐ Analysable’ Art Music Since 1950

Session K Schenkerian Theory

Session B (continued) Music Theory Pedagogy

Session A (continued) Form Analysis

Session 6A (continued) Tonality: Recent Theoretical Models and Analytical Tools

Session 9A (continued) Computational Music Analysis

Session 9B (continued) Algebraic Combinatorics of Scales and Modes with Applications to Music Analysis

Session 3A (continued) Analyzing the Renaissance Polyphonic Mass and Office of the Dead

14.00 Mario Baroni/ Roberto Caterina/ Fabio Regazzi An Example of Sound Analysis: Perceptual Responses to Different Instrumental Mixtures

14.00 Danuta Mirka Introduction: Topic Theory and Music Analysis

14.00 Judy Lochhead Difference and Identity: Musical Sense and Music Analysis

14.00 Zachary Bernstein Some Reflections on Milton Babbitt, Schenkerian

14.30 Mathieu Giraud Can a Computer Understand Musical Forms?

14.35 Petra Philipsen “Too accessible to be comprehensible to the genuine avant-garde”. Analysing Benjamin Britten’s Music

14.30 Edward Latham ‘Beautiful Infinity’ – The Permanent Interruption as a Symbol of Romantic Distance in the Music of Robert Schumann

14.00 René Rusch Schubert’s Four-Key Expositions? Another Look at the Composer’s Sonata Form Practice through a FormFunctional Analysis of D575, i, and D667, ii

15.00 Dmitri Tymoczko A Study on the Origins of Harmonic Tonality

14.15 Danuta Mirka Topics and Meter

14.30 Hans Peter Reutter Renaissance Counterpoint as a Study of Melody or ‘The AntiGradus’

15.35 Christophe Guillotel-Nothmann Conditional Asymmetry and Spontaneous Asymmetry of Harmonic Progressions in Madrigal Cycles from Verdelot to Monteverdi (c. 15301638)

15.00 Alan Marsden Do Performers Disambiguate Structure?

16.00 Emmanuel Amiot Panel 1: Exploring Further the Torii of Phases for the Study of Chord Progressions

14.15 João Pedro d’Alvarenga Portuguese Polyphonic Settings of the Mass for the Dead from the Mid-16th to the Early 17th Century: Convention and Innovation in Style and Structure

15.00 coffee break 15.30 Marco Lutzu Representing the Performance in Ethnomusicological Studies 16.00 Stefano Lombardi Vallauri The Composition of Experience (and its Notation) in the Musical-Holistic Art of Dario Buccino 16.30 coffee break 17.00 Freya Jarman “It’s analysis, Jim, but not as we know it”: Teaching Analysis without Notation to a Class of Undergraduates with Radical SubjectSpecific Diversity 17.30 Ingrid Pustijanac New Graphic Representation for Old Music Experience: Analyzing Improvised Music

14.45 Vasili Byros Mozart’s Ironic Mask: Topics and Harmonic Schemata in the ‘Haffner’ Symphony 15.15 Lawrence Zbikowski Music and Dance in the ‘Ancien Régime’ 15.45 coffee break 16.15 Eric McKee Ballroom Dances of the Late 18th Century 16.45 Roman Ivanovitch The Brilliant Style: Illuminations, Revelations, and Force 17.15 Julian Horton Topic Theory and the Analysis of 19thCentury Music 17.45 Round Table Discussion

18.00 Olivier Koechlin Experience and Perspectives of Interactive Multimedia for Musical Analysis

15.10 Maarten Beirens Elusive Redundancy: Minimal Music’s Analytical Challenges Between Pattern, Process and Texture 15.45 coffee break 16.15 David Clarke Ambiguity and beyond: Theories of Musical Meaning and their (Non-)application to Music post-1950 16.50 Kristof Boucquet Possibilities and Limits of the Open Work. Analysing Pierre Boulez’s Third Piano Sonata 17.25 Rob Haskins Aspects of Zen Buddhism as an Analytical Context for John Cage’s Chance Music 18.00 Mark Delaere Preliminary Conclusions 19.00 break 20.00 Richard Taruskin

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15.00 Duilio D’Alfonso Unifying Schenker and Riemann 15.30 Nathan Fleshner Schumann’s Ich hab’ im Traum geweinet: A Schenkerian and Freudian Perspective page 94 Session G Western Music (Theory) in China and Japan 16.30 Wai‐Ling Cheong Reading Kurth, Hindemith and Schoenberg through Sang Tong – Modernist Theoretical Approaches in China 17.00 Wei Zhang Serial Music in China: The Development of Technique and Theory of Serial Music During the 1980s and 1990s

15.00 Robert Sholl “How do you like your counterpoint, Sir?” Music Pedagogy after Therapy 15.30 coffee break 16.00 Markus Sotirianos Between “What do I need that for?” and “Didn’t you learn that in theory class?” – Questions and Observations in German Undergraduate Music Theory Classes 16.30 Reinier Maliepaard About a Pilot Project on Music Theory 17.00 Sanja Kiš Žuvela Structural Analogies between the Arts in Teaching Music Theory 17.30 coffee break 18.00 Discussion: Education Politics

15.00 Joyce Yip The Roles of the Coda in Selected Mazurkas of Chopin 15.30 Steven Vande Moortele The Potpourri Overture as Musical Form 16.00 coffee break 16.30 Meghan Naxer Rotations, Interlacing, and Motivic Transformation in Franck’s Symphony in D minor, Op. 48 17.00 Chelsey Hamm Musical Stagnation and Expressive Failure in Smetana’s Piano Trio in G minor

16.10 coffee break 16.35 Mine DogantanDack Tonality: An Evolutionary Perspective 17.10 Jan Philipp Sprick Sequences Between Affirmation and Destruction of Tonality

15.30 coffee break 16.00 Keiji Hirata/ Satoshi Tojo/Alan Marsden/Masatoshi Hamanaka Music Analyzer that Can Handle Context Dependency 16.30 Alan Marsden Open Discussion 2: Is Analysis a Matter of Discovery of Structure, Ascription of Structure, or Negotiation of Structure?

17.30 Jessica Rudman Panel 3: Ugly Step-Sisters: A ScaleTheoretic Examination of the Greek Genera 18.15 General Discussion

17.45 Steven Rings Transformational Theory and Empirical Research on Tonality

page 86

18.00 Fabrice Fitch Ockeghem’s Requiem, and Du Fay: Response 18.30 David J. Burn/ Katelijne Schitz Closing Discussion

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20.00 Keynote Lecture 2: Richard Taruskin Is Anything Un-Analysable? (page 17)

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15.45 Antonio Chemotti Analyzing Polyphonic Settings for the Absolution

17.15 Margaret Bent Ockeghem’s Requiem, and Du Fay

Auditorium Max Weber

Belgian Beer Reception

15.15 coffee break

16.45 coffee break

18.20 Conclusions

17.30 Carissa Reddick Nested Forms and Hierarchical Function in Sonata Forms from the Late 19th Century

page 88

14.45 Bernadette Nelson ‘The Lisbon Requiem’: Contexts, Traditions, Development, Influences

16.15 Franz Körndle ‘Die Vigilie auf Römisch’: Lasso’s Second Set of Job Lessons and its Liturgical Use

18.00 Caitlin Martinkus Richard Strauss and the Classical Cadence

17.30 Chun Fai John Lam Stravinsky à Delage: Pentatonic Scales as Japonisme in Three Japanese Lyrics

page 95

14.30 Jon‐Tomas Godin Schubert and Sonata Rhetoric

16.45 Jonathan Wild/ Marek Žabka Panel 2: Fokker-Clough Chains of Generated Tone Systems; Theoretical and Computational Exploration

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Keynote & Guest Lectures


KEYNOTE LECTURES Hermann Danuser Richard Taruskin GUEST LECTURES Jonathan Cross (SMA) Claude Ledoux (SBAM) Franรงois Delalande (SFAM) Ariane JeรŸulat (GMTh) Rossana Dalmonte (GATM) Michiel Schuijer (VvM)

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Keynote Lecture 1 Hermann Danuser

Horizons of Metamusic: The Case of Richard Strauss In a year of worldwide celebration of Richard Strauss’ 150th anniversary it appears necessary to question whether the

Wednesday 17 September 10.15 | University Hall Chair

Mark Delaere

interests of music analysis and music theory do justice to the artist’s reputation, or whether one should rather speak of an explicit lack of exposure and enquire as to its reasons. Without any doubt this year’s symposia and congresses dedicated to Strauss’s music, together with the recently undertaken critical edition of his works in Munich represent important stimuli to the theoretical apprehension of his oeuvre, the results of which will be revealed in future. Undeniably, political and aesthetic reservations concerning Strauss’ character and his work – which include on one hand his national anchoring in German culture and his cooperation with national socialism, and on the other hand his connecting of symphonic music to programmatic ideas as well as the multi-mediality of the operatic genre – have

Hermann Danuser has taught at Humboldt University of Berlin from 1993 to 2014 as a professor of historical musicology. In addition, he coordinates the research of the Paul Sacher Foundation in Basel. He has been a guest professor at several universities in Europe, the United States, and China. From 1985 to 1995 he co-edited the journal Musiktheorie. His research interests include music history and historiography, aesthetics, music theory, analysis, as well as interpretative practices. In 2009 his book Weltanschauungsmusik was published by Edition Argus. The same publisher recently launched a selection of his writings in four volumes (Gesammelte Vorträge und Aufsätze (1. Theorie, 2. Ästhetik, 3. Historiographie, 4. Analyse). Currently, he is preparing a book on “Metamusik”.

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proven to be impediments to both analysis and theory. Meanwhile, I recognize another obstacle in the concept of modernity, which one-sidedly focuses on issues of musical material and compositional structure, thus neglecting the meta-musical problem of a self-referential understanding of modernity. My keynote talk will address this issue. I would like to demonstrate how the inclusion of meta-musical ideas alters the analytical perspective on musical structures, in order to show the considerable potential of such an approach for future music-theoretical research. For this I would like to take examples of Strauss’s two main genres into consideration – first, a symphonic poem, then, an opera. In Also sprach Zarathustra the focus will be on Nietzsche’s “Mitternachtslied,” since the examination of this self-referential poetry reveals analoguous musical structure in Strauss’ work. Furthermore, the significance of Strauss’ last opera Capriccio lies in its affiliation with the genre of meta-opera, which reverts back to Casti’s/Salieri’s 18th century Prima la musica poi le parole and centres around a reflection on music by the means of music.


Is Anything Unanalysable? The answer to the question posed by the title is of course no. If ‘analyzability’ is the objective, it can always be achieved. The question is, rather, what makes for an informative analysis. In answering this question, I will be considering some of the reasons why I have been referred to in print as, among other things, “the present day’s most notorious theorist-basher” (Arnold Whittall). Famous analytical cruxes in Stravinsky and Boulez will figure.

Keynote Lecture 2 Richard Taruskin Saturday 20 September 20.00 | Auditorium Max Weber Chair

Francis Maes

Richard Taruskin has been a professor of musicology at the University of California at Berkeley since 1987. He is one of the most acclaimed, controversial, and influential musicologists in the world today. His main research interests are theory of performance, Russian music, 20th-century music, nationalism, theory of modernism, and analysis.Book publications include The Danger of Music, and Other Anti-Utopian Essays (Berkeley and Los Angeles: University of California Press, 2008); On Russian Music (University of California Press, 2008) and the landmark The Oxford History of Western Music (Oxford University Press, 2005).

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Guest Lecture SMA Jonathan Cross

From the Technical to the Aesthetic: Analysing Modernism

Thursday 18 September 09.00 British room 00.08

Anxious debates surrounding the definition of musical modernism have proliferated over recent years, as exemplified

livestream European Room 00.28

the ongoing relevance (or otherwise) of the idea of modernism as a framing concept for understanding recent music.

by the 2014 round table on “Modernism and its others” published in the Journal of the Royal Musical Association. After interrogation of some of the contradictory positions, my concern in this presentation will be to attempt to evaluate

I shall take a work for ensemble and electronics by Tristan Murail, Winter Fragments (2000), as a case study via which

Chair

Julian Horton

to explore some of the ways in which a technical analysis can contribute to a wider aesthetic interpretation. That so-called spectral music emerged, at least according to its principal early protagonists, as a reaction both to the serialism that had dominated mid-century debates about musical modernism and to what the composers involved termed ‘musical postmodernism’, and yet was at the same time so closely associated with IRCAM, one of the iconic

Jonathan Cross is Professor of Musicology at the University of Oxford, and Tutor in Music at Christ Church, Oxford. He is author of numerous texts on aspects of musical modernism, including three books on Stravinsky and two on Birtwistle. For five years he served as Editor of Music Analysis, and is now an Associate Editor of Grove Music Online. In 2015–16 he will be a Research Associate investigating spectral music as a member of the “Analyse des pratiques musicales” research team at IRCAM, Paris. He was Director of the Fifth European Music Analysis Conference in Bristol in 2002.

post-war institutions of modernism, provokes important questions about the value of a monolithic idea of modernism in the late 20th and early 21st centuries, about the usefulness of received approaches to the analysis of such music, and how such readings might play into a wider understanding of the social and cultural changes of which the music was a part.

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Guest Lecture SBAM Claude Ledoux

De la trace à l’écart. À la source de nouvelles narrations contemporaines

Thursday 18 September 09.00 Belgian room 01.28

Il est largement convenu qu’une des conditions premières de la cohérence de nombreuses créations musicales écrites

livestream French room 00.14

orientation, réduisant fréquemment le contenu de ces musiques à des séries de formalisations variables. Dans le

à la charnière des 20ième et 21ième siècles réside dans l’organisation structurée de leurs composantes, selon des modèles d’intelligibilité et d’écoute critique. L’analyse de ces musiques n’a d’ailleurs cessé de confirmer cette domaine des musiques “classiques”, de récentes méthodes analytiques ont toutefois articulé le tramage des multiples sens en action à partir d’autres notions, à commencer par celles permettant d’échafauder un sens narratif induisant

Chair

Alessandro Cervino

une complicité entre le compositeur et son auditeur. Il est intéressant dès lors d’élargir ce terrain de prospection, de l’appliquer à la création vivante en intégrant dans les principes de références sous-jacentes, non pas de nouveaux revois de type culturel, mais aussi des objets “signifies” prenant racine dans l’identité même de notre image corporelle et de sa confrontation à l’espace dans lequel elle se meut. Si l’enjeu n’est guère neuf, il se dévoile de manière

Claude Ledoux is a composer and music analyst. Passionate about all kinds of sounds, he is also immensely fascinated by the Asian musical traditions. He was recently the artistic curator of the Contemporary Music Festival “Ars Musica”. Nowadays, he works as a composer as well as a music analysis professor at the CNSM of Paris and Composition professor at Arts2, Mons (Belgium). In 2008-09, he taught music analysis of contemporary music and composition at the Universities of São Paulo and Campinas (Brazil); in 2013 he was a guest professor at the Shanghai Conservatory of Music. He is a member of the “Royal Academy of Belgium”.

surprenante au creux même de la création contemporaine. De Holliger à Stefan Prins, en passant par Aperghis, la géographie des corps, leurs mouvements et les espaces inspectés dynamisent conséquemment la pensée musicale. Ils articulent un réseau complexe de relations entre l’événement sonore et les faits d’incarnation spatialisée afin d’engendrer de nouvelles narrations qui “parlent” à la sensibilité de l’auditeur d’aujourd’hui. Le voyage entre ces traces vécues par tous et les écarts par rapport à celles-ci devient alors vecteur de nouvelles formes de dramatisation du discours, une stratégie d’aujourd’hui que tentera de mettre en évidence cette intervention.

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Guest Lecture SFAM François Delalande

Au-delà des notes: prémisses d’une théorie de l’analyse

Friday 19 September 09.00 French room 00.14

Le schéma production/objet/réception proposé par Jean Molino et Jean-Jacques Nattiez a ouvert plusieurs voies à

livestream British Room 00.08

de production elles peuvent être la trace et quelles conduites de réception elles permettent de prévoir. C’est le

l’analyse. On peut aller de l’interne à l’externe, c’est-à-dire dégager des configurations remarquables dans l’objet (partition, objet sonore résultant d’une exécution ou d’une improvisation) et rechercher ensuite de quelles conduites trajet qu’a le plus souvent suivi l’analyse de la musique écrite. Mais le trajet inverse, de l’externe vers l’interne, se développe, et pour une part s’impose.

Chair

Jean-Michel Bardez

1. La première tâche est de délimiter l’objet que l’on entend analyser. C’est en général l’étude des pratiques sociales qui permet de définir les contours de l’objet que l’on souhaite analyser (ce qui en fait partie, ce qu’on exclut). C’est souvent considéré comme évident s’il s’agit d’une partition, ça l’est moins pour les manuscrits anciens, encore

François Delalande is a leading figure of the Musical Research Group (INA-GRM Paris), of which he has been, from 1970 to 2006, the director of the Science of Music Program. His main activities and intellectual interests include: electroacoustic music analysis and its theoretical extensions; musical theory in general; musical semiotics; hearing analysis; birth and development of the child musical behavior, musical pedagogy, emergence of musicality, and its anthropological implications.

moins pour les musiques non-écrites, de tradition orale ou électroacoustiques, ou populaires, qu’on doit d’abord transcrire. Que transcrire? On ne peut passer sous silence, cependant, que même une partition est “informée” par une “enquête externe” implicite. On sait par exemple que la simple lecture d’une partition baroque doit tenir compte d’informations qu’on trouve dans les traités d’époque, ce qui est une forme d’enquête externe. Quant à l’analyse d’une exécution sonore, que doit-elle inclure (que veut-on qu’elle inclue)? Les choix des interprètes, mais aussi de ceux qui produisent le “son” final : facteur d’instruments, preneur de son éventuellement? 2. Une fois les contours de l’objet établis, il reste à trouver quelles formes prend l’objet et quel sens il acquiert dans les conduites humaines qui le “construisent” - généralement, inventer, jouer, écouter- donc ce qui est pertinent dans l’objet pour décrire ou expliquer le rapport objet/sujet. On peut dégager de ces réflexions les prémisses d’une théorie de l’analyse, dans laquelle l’analyse des configurations de notes, quand il y en a, n’est qu’un moment. L’analyse de l’externe, ce qu’on projette sur l’objet pour établir les pertinences, se développe actuellement dans de nombreuses réunions scientifiques: analyse des processus de création, de l’interprétation, des gestes de l’interprète, du rapport au corps, bien sûr de la psychologie de l’écoute musicale. Ces recherches élargissent le champ de la musicologie et de l’analyse.

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Guest Lecture GMTh Ariane Jeßulat

Polyphonic Gestures between Architecture and Interaction

Friday 19 September 09.00 German room 01.08

Around 1912, Max Weber referred to counterpoint as ‘Kunstregelbau’, focusing on rational and social aspects which

livestream European Room 00.28

aspects can certainly serve as realms of analysis of musical thought as articulated in counterpoint.

he expressed using metaphors taken from architecture and craftsmanship. Although his understanding of counterpoint primarily mirrors the aesthetics of the early 20th century, these two

The importance Weber assigns to social structures as foundation of the architecture of ‘Kunstregelbau’ seems to be a

Chair

Gesine Schröder

quite modern approach, elevating elements of simple human interaction to the level of sublime, polyphonic beauty. In fact, his ideas never deviate from the regular contrapuntal pedagogic practice at the beginning of the 20th century. Therefore, the often essential role of a group whose interaction might create the polyphonic web is not taken into consideration – neither in Weber´s approach nor in any other theory of counterpoint until quite recent studies, which

Born in 1968, Ariane Jeßulat first studied music (teaching profession) and classical philology, later music theory at the Universität der Künste Berlin. From 2000 to 2004 she worked as an instructor of music theory at the Humboldt Universität Berlin, where she completed a habilitation thesis on Wagner´s Ring des Nibelungen (2011). Since 2004 she is a professor of music theory at the Hochschule für Musik Würzburg.

are based on artistic research in integrating models of polyphonic improvisation into the Renaissance and Baroque styles. Although contemporary musicology has been able to correct and modify obsolete ideas of composing as the metaphysical act of singular genius, we still find hidden traces of this structural metaphor in today’s counterpoint pedagogy, which is mostly the result of one-dimensional communication in the master-pupil model, etc. At the same time, other ideas of interaction and de-centering strategies in a group, which might open better and more fruitful analytical perspectives, are neglected. Although Weber – as many scholars of his century – held the zenith of ‘Kunstregelbau’ to be the music of Johann Sebastian Bach, this paper aims to investigate further characteristic structures of contrapuntal interaction and topoi in tonal, post-tonal, and contemporary music.

GMTh 21


Guest Lecture GATM Rossana Dalmonte

Music Analysis for Musical Grammars

Saturday 20 September 09.00 Italian room 00.20

The presentation’s main point is: all good pieces of analysis are preliminary to the recognition of a grammar. The first

livestream French Room 00.14

Part 2 deals with the different meanings of the concept ‘musical rule’, and reaches the following statement: every

part (“Analysis in the forest of musical studies”) – pinpoints the location of analytical studies in the broader field of various musical disciplines. kind of music – more or less provided with explicit compositional directions – is based on a system of rules which belongs to a grammar, common to different pieces by different composers acting in the same epoch and genre. That

Chair

Catello Gallotti

is: every piece of music belongs to a grammar of a particular style, because even in the most revolutionary piece of art, rules do exist. In part 3 the concept of ‘grammar’ is discussed. This concept is strictly related to the concept of rule because rules are the material of the grammar. The two concepts are not equivalent, however: single rules have to be ordered and

Rossana Dalmonte’s academic career began at Bologna University in 1972, as an assistant to the chair of “History of Music”, then as professor in charge of the discipline “Forms of music and poetry”. From 1987 to 2008, she was a full professor of “Musicology” at Trento University. Her principal fields of interest are: 1) Philology (two volumes in the Neue Schubert Ausgabe; one volume in the Rossini Critical Edition; two volumes in the Maderna Edition, of which she was a co-founder); 2) Theory and analysis; 3) History of music (see volumes on the madrigal, Bruno Maderna, Luciano Berio and Franz Liszt).

systematized in order to become part of a grammar. Moreover, the nature of the rules emerging from analysis (and the grammar to which they belong) must not be confused with the kind of procedures which act when the rules are concretely applied. In fact, a rule describes the functioning of a single phenomenon (that is the facet of ‘knowledge’), but also sets limits on the use of the phenomenon itself (the ‘operative’ facet). The central idea of grammar finds its realisation in a conceptual tool able to ‘describe’ and to ‘utilise’ the rules governing the coherent connections among all the elements constituting a musical unit of a higher level. So, we can say that a grammar is in itself an ordered system of rules. A grammar as a cognitive tool is an explicit and conceptual description of grammatical competence.

GATM 22


Guest Lecture VvM Michiel Schuijer Saturday 20 September 09.00 Dutch room 02.28 livestream European Room 00.28

Music Theorists and Societies What theory should music theorists teach and how? And what relation does music theory bear to other disciplines, such as performance, composition and musicology? These questions have been a source of much debate and agony within the music theory community. I have long thought that this lack of disciplinary unity was peculiar to music theory. My paper is inspired by my realization that it is not. Similar battles have been fought in other branches of professional life, such as in economics and nursing – two disciplines I will expand upon. And similarly, these battles

Chair

Barbara Bleij

find their origin in cultural and institutional differences between societies. However, this is no reason to sit back and relax. There is a vast literature on the establishment of professional authority, and there are lessons to be learned from it. I will begin by noting some parallels between the development of music theory and economics in the United States, France, and Britain, respectively. Using the

Michiel Schuijer is head of research and study leader of the Department of Composition, Conducting and Music Theory at the Conservatorium van Amsterdam. He studied music theory at the Royal Conservatoire in The Hague and musicology at Utrecht University. In 1999 he co-founded the Society for Music Theory, and from 2007 to 2011 he was editor-in-chief of the Dutch Journal of Music Theory. Schuijer focuses his own research at the juncture of music theory and historical musicology. His book Analyzing Atonal Music: Pitch-Class Set Theory and Its Contexts was published in 2008 by University of Rochester Press. He is currently working on a project that addresses the European conservatoire as a social and cultural phenomenon.

French institutional landscape of the 1990s as an example, I will distinguish between music theory as a profession and music theory as a field (which implies that there is music theory that music theorists do not profess). Subsequently I will point out the main elements of the sociological discourse on professionalization, and use these as a backdrop for a comparison of music theory and nursing. However unlikely that comparison may appear, it is instructive to see that both nurses and music theorists have claimed ownership of a field they originally shared with other groups, i.e., doctors, and performers, composers or musicologists, respectively.

VvM 23


Pre-organized Sessions


GROUP 1: MUSIC THEORISTS 1A: Fétis and Music Theory 1B: Analysing Rameau ‐ Rameau Analysing

6C: No Orientalisms! Four Regional Approaches to Harmony: Russian, Azerbaijani, Polish and Chinese 6D: In Search for the Structural Principles of Harmony

GROUP 2: PARTIMENTO & SCHEMA THEORY 2A: Musical Schemata and Historically Informed Listening 2B: Non‐verbal Theories: Partimento and Craft Learning in the 18th and 19th Centuries

GROUP 7: POPULAR MUSIC & JAZZ 7A: Analysing Popular Music: a View from 2014 7B: Jazz Harmony: Theory and Practice

GROUP 3: ANALYSIS OF EARLY MUSIC 3A: Analyzing the Renaissance Polyphonic Mass and Office of the Dead 3B: Words and Music in English Restoration Opera: Analytical Perspectives GROUP 4: FORM 4A: Schenker’s Formenlehre 4B: Form, Linear Analysis, and Interpretative Context 4C: Corpus Studies, Empirical Methods, and the Analysis of Musical Form 4D: Form/Structure and Continuity/Discretization: What Principles for Music Analysis Today? GROUP 5: ANALYSIS OF RECENT MUSIC 5A: Analysis Beyond Notation in 20th and 21st Century Music 5B: Analysing ‘Un‐Analysable’ Art Music Since 1950 5C: Dissenters beyond the Centres: Analytical Perspectives on Greek Musical Modernism 5D: Listening to Electroacoustic Music through Analysis GROUP 6: HARMONY, TONALITY & POST-TONALITY 6A: Tonality: Recent Theoretical Models and Analytical Tools 6B: Harmonic Plasticity and the Modeling of Musical Motion in Tonal, Post‐ Tonal and Jazz Idioms

GROUP 8: ANALYSIS & PERFORMANCE 8A: “Analyzing Performance and Performing Analysis”. Synergies and Interactions between Musical Analysis and Musical Performance 8B: Agency in Musical Performance GROUP 9: COMPUTATIONAL & MATHEMATICAL ANALYSIS 9A: Computational Music Analysis 9B: Algebraic Combinatorics of Scales and Modes with Applications to Music Analysis GROUP 10: METER 10: Meter in the Moment GROUP 11: TOPIC THEORY 11: Topic Theory and Music Analysis GROUP 12: MUSIC ANALYSIS AND THE BODY 12: Music Analysis and the Body GROUP 13: PROBLEMS OF “KLEINMESTER” ANALYSIS 13: In the Shadow of the Pantheon. Analysing Minor Masters and Secondary Composers


Session 1A Fétis and Music Theory Wednesday 17 September 14.00 Belgian room 01.28

Though François-Joseph Fétis’ (1784-1871) pivotal position in the history of music theory is widely acknowledged, the full scope and significance of his music theoretical work remain only partially illuminated in the scholarly literature. If his Esquisse de l’histoire de l’harmonie (1840) and Traité complet de l’harmonie (1844) are now readily available in English translation (by Mary Arlin and Peter M. Landey respectively), the original French texts nonetheless languish out of print and have never been presented in the annotated critical editions that they so clearly deserve. Despite the foundational work of Robert Wangermée (1951) and Kathryn Ellis (1995), as well as important interventions by

Session Convenor Nathan John Martin

Carl Dahlhaus (1968), Renate Grote (1983), Thomas Christensen (1996) and others, there is still no comprehensive portrait of Fétis’ engagement with music theory to be found in the secondary literature. The 2014 EuroMAC in Leuven offers a unique occasion for a comprehensive reappraisal of Fétis’ engagement with music theory. Not only will the conference take place in Fétis’ home country, some 25 kilometers from his office at the Conservatoire Royal de

Contributors

Rémy Campos Anne‐Emmanuelle Ceulemans Thomas Christensen Suzannah Clark Nathan John Martin Chikako Osako

Bruxelles, but the historical moment is equally opportune: with Robert Wangermée’s monumental 2006 edition of Fétis’ correspondence and Rémy Campos’ comprehensive intellectual biography (2013) now both available, the time is ripe to build on the achievement of the 2006 colloquium at the Koninklijke Bibliotheek van België and to bring Fétis’ music theorizing comprehensively into view while fixing its place within the multiple streams of 19th-century music theory. Accordingly, the papers in our session seek to interrogate the internal dynamics of Fétis’ thought, to situate it in relation to the chief intellectual movements in 19th-century France and Belgium, and to examine its relationship to German and Italian music-theoretical currents.

1A 26


Subsession 1

Chair: Nathan John Martin 14.00

Thomas Christensen Fétis and the Origins of Tonality

14.45

Rémy Campos Propositions pour une histoire des pratiques théoriques: le cas de François-Joseph Fétis

15.30

Anne-Emmanuelle Ceulemans François-Joseph Fétis et la notion de progrès en musique

16.15

coffee break

Subsession 2

Chair: Anne-Emmanuelle Ceulemans 16.45

Chikako Osako Concepts of Organization in François-Joseph Fétis’ Writings on Harmony

17.30

Nathan John Martin Fétis’ Historicism

18.15

Suzannah Clark Fétis’ History of First Principles

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Session 1B Analysing Rameau Rameau Analysing Thursday 18 September 14.00 French room 00.14 Session Convenor Birger Petersen

The story of Rameau reception in Germany and Italy is essentially one of many misunderstandings: The diversity of schools and traditions, differences in terminology and also language frontiers are growing factors in cultural exchange along with a specialisation in topics like harmony, analysis, and musical form. Cultural transfer seems to become unidirectional: German or Italian publications remain rather unacknowledged in French music society. The most famous element of Rameau’s theory, the ‘basse fondamentale’, is almost completely absent in the publications of German theorists such as Mattheson (1739), Sorge (1745), Daube (1756), and Marpurg (1749–50, 1755– 58). The Italian reception of French music theory is comparable – the writings of Tartini (1754, 1767) to Vallotti (1779) and Riccati (1762, 1780) show a very distinct way of reception and commentaries. The suggestion of a simple case of ignorance among German or Italian readers, however, would be a false one – most of these scholars read French and studied Rameau. In the second half of the 18th century, German theorists rather focus on empirical problems of

Contributors

Anne-Sophie Lahrmann Gesa zur Nieden Birger Petersen Théodora Psychoyou Sören Sönksen Roberta Vidic

artistic experience and practice – Italian music theory on the other hand had its roots in the compositional pedagogy of musicians where Rameau’s fundamental bass found a more secure place. Cultural transfer is a multidimensional phenomenon: How did European music theory develop while fundamental changes in speaking about music theory had their place in music theories and compositional strategies? Which use of new skills become apparent in the musical analyses of Rameau – and his contemporaries? It is necessary to examine how analysis changes in accordance to Rameau’s terminology – as well as the reaction of German and Italian theorists from Mattheson to Kirnberger and from Tartini to Azopardi.

1B 28


14.00

Birger Petersen Introduction: Analysing Rameau - Rameau analysing

1 Rameau Analysing Chair: Gesa zur Nieden 14.15

Théodora Psychoyou A Modern Thought for a New Music Theory: Rameau and the Authority of the ‘Anciens’

14.40

Birger Petersen Rameau Analysing: From Lully to Corelli and back

15.05

Anne-Sophie Lahrmann Rameau vs. Kirnberger. Analytical Systems by Comparison

15.30

Discussion: Rameau and his Analytic Works

15.55

coffee break

2 Reading Rameau Chair: Birger Petersen 16.30

Gesa zur Nieden Reception of Jean-Philippe Rameau’s Theoretical Works in the 18th Century German Speaking World in the Light of Language Frontiers, Material Aspects of Distribution and Ways of Reading

16.55

Sören Sönksen Deconstructing the ‘Stack of thirds’ – Aspects of the Theories of Rameau, Kirnberger and Sechter

17.20

Roberta Vidic Rameau and the Italian Tradition

17.45

Discussion: Rameau in Germany and Italy

18.15

Round Table Discussion: Analysis in the 18th Century

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Session 2A Musical Schemata and Historically Informed Listening Thursday 18 September 10.00 German room 01.08 Session Convenor Jan Philipp Sprick

Modelling the perception and cognition of music from the past in terms of schema theory is a truly interdisciplinary endeavor: it involves, inter alia, music perception and cognition, philosophy of history, music history and music theory. Aspects of these fields are represented in the current discourse, especially in the work of Robert Gjerdingen and Vasili Byros. The development of this area of study in the past fifteen years, however, has raised methodological questions that do not yet have definitive answers. 1. Musical schema theories have tended to focus on relatively short musical units and their combinatorial possibilities. Cognitive schemata, however, do not entail a rejection of large-scale structures; in principle, they are allowed to cover any spatial or temporal dimension. As schema theory begins to address such large-scale structures, a number of fundamental questions emerge: Are there cogent arguments for restricting the extension of musical schemata? Do large-scale schemata conflict with musical schemata of smaller dimensions? If so, can holistic and schema-based

Contributors

Stefanie Acevedo Andrew Aziz Vasili Byros Folker Froebe Rolf Inge Godøy Stefan Rohringer Martin Rohrmeier Oliver Schwab‐Felisch August Sheehy Jan Philipp Sprick Florian Vogt

approaches be reconciled? 2. Musical schemata in the sense of Leonard B. Meyer and Robert Gjerdingen are abstract configurations: they must be instantiated to function as components of musical compositions. As Gjerdingen has emphasized, the interplay between schemata and their specific instantiations is of particular importance in musical communication. Trying to analyze this interplay, however, reintroduces difficulties that the schema-based approach at first appeared to neutralize: the impossibility of direct access to aesthetic experience and procedural knowledge in historical subjects; the relationship between broader cultural meanings of historical compositions and the empirical focus on real-time perception and cognition; the historical adequacy of an analysis guided by theoretical premises and introspection. 3. Schema theory has been proposed as a means of reconstructing historical ways of listening. The historiographic framework of this enterprise, drawn largely from Foucault’s concept of archeology, historical linguistics, and historical pragmatics, brings the question of historically informed listening into dialogue with fields such as philosophy, history, and cultural studies. Further consideration of listening within this diverse and rich network of discourses seems particularly desirable now, given the tendency to position ‘historical music theory’ and ‘ahistorical’ approaches to the music of the 18th and 19th centuries as diametrical opposites. Consideration of debates around ‘historical performance practice’ in the 1980s and 1990s will help move the discussion about

2A 30

historical listening beyond questions of anachronism and toward the methodological potential for historical ethnography.


10.00

Vasili Byros/Oliver Schwab-Felisch/Jan Philipp Sprick Introduction: Musical Schemata and Historically Informed Listening

15.15

Folker Froebe On Synergies of Schema Theory and Schenkerian Analysis. A Perspective from Riepel’s ‘Fonte’ and ‘Monte’

1 Schemata and the Problem of Large-Scale Musical Coherence

15.45

Florian Vogt Bruckner and ‘Satzmodelle’. An Analysis of the Beginning of the Seventh Symphony

10.30

Rolf Inge Godøy Sound and Body Motion Timescales in Musical Experience

16.15

coffee break

11.00

Martin Rohrmeier Processing of Hierarchical Structure and Non-Local Dependencies in Tonal Music

3 Schemata and the Problem of Historically Informed Listening

11.30

Stefan Rohringer Schemata and Holism

16.30

12.00

coffee break

August Sheehy Methodological Questions of Reconstructing Historical Listening

17.00

Jan Philipp Sprick Historical Listening and Historically Informed Performance

17.30

Vasili Byros Response

18.00

break

18.15

Panel Discussion: Future Research Questions

Chair: Oliver Schwab-Felisch

2 Schemata and the Problem of Conceptualizing the Particular

Chair: Vasili Byros

Chair: Jan Philipp Sprick 12.30

Stefanie Acevedo/Andrew Aziz A Romantic Turn of Phrase: Listening Beyond 18th-Century Schemata

13.00

Oliver Schwab-Felisch Distorted Instances. Listening to Schemata in Beethoven and Schubert

13.30

lunch break

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Session 2B Non-Verbal Theories: Partimento and Craft Learning in the 18th and 19th Century

An unexpected turn in music theory studies is the recent interest in non-verbal learning and improvisation, which is currently leading to a rapidly growing literature. Craft learning, based on repetition and imitation, was central to the education of composers throughout the 18th century, and beyond. Only in the 19th century another idea emerged, that of an intellectual approach (such as the ‘science of harmony’) which eventually displaced the former from the composition teacher’s syllabus.

Thursday 18 September 14.00 Italian room 00.20 Friday 19 September 10.00 Italian room 00.20

The awareness of the historical significance of non-verbal learning has changed the landscape of music theory in a way that could not be predicted only a few years ago. From history of music theory to analysis, from musical cognition to basic music teaching, there is virtually no music theoretical left untouched. However, much work has still to be done to fully develop all implications of this new approach. The proposed session aims to account for the latest developments in this field. It takes one and a half day, and is divided in two parts: the first part is devoted to two workshops, the second one to academic papers.

Session Convenors Giorgio Sanguinetti Robert Gjerdingen

The paper session includes eight papers covering a variety of topics. Nicholas Baragwanath deals with the Neapolitan solfeggio tradition in the 18th century, and its historical and analytical implications. Stefan Eckert focuses on partimento aspects in Joseph Riepel’s treatise Anfangsgründe zur musikalischen Setzkunst (1752-68). Robert Gjerdingen’s paper is about the cognitive status of musical apprenticeship in the European conservatories, and its comparison with usage-

Contributors

Nicholas Baragwanath Stefan Eckert Robert Gjerdingen Job Ijzerman David Lodewyckx Marco Pollaci Giorgio Sanguinetti Markus Schwenkreis Gaetano Stella Lieven Strobbe

based grammars. The focus of Job Ijzerman is the relevance of tonal schemata in the music of Beethoven, Schubert and Schumann, using German, French and Italian sources. David Lodewyckx traces the history and the dissemination of a galant cadence described by Marpurg, which he suggest to label Do-Re-Do. Marco Pollaci’s paper deals with the significance of the Neapolitan training for late 19th century Italian composers such as Cilea, Puccini, Catalani and Mascagni. A similar perspective lies at the ground of Giorgio Sanguinetti’s paper, who deals with the significance of the Bolognese school of Padre Martini and Padre Mattei for early Ottocento opera composers such as Rossini and Donizetti. Finally, Gaetano Stella offers the results of an experiment in partimento teaching in a modern Italian conservatory. The workshop session consists of two workshops. The first one is a workshop in improvisation led by Markus Schwenkreis, who will use a selection of partimenti by Fedele Fenaroli as a starting point. In the second one Lieven Strobbe and David Lodewyckx will present a new approach to music pedagogy called

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‘Tonal Tools’.


Thursday 18 September

12.00

David Lodewyckx Marpurg’s Galant Cadence: An Overlooked Cadence Type in Contemporary Schema Theory

12.30

Robert Gjerdingen The Institutionalization of Apprenticeship in the Great Conservatories: A Cognitive Interpretation of a Non-verbal Praxis

13.00

lunch break

1 Seminars 14.00

Markus Schwenkreis “In no art rules solely will turn you into doctors”

16.00

coffee break

16.30

David Lodewyckx/Lieven Strobbe “Tonal Tools”: an Introduction

18.30

General Discussion

3 Afternoon Session Chair: Robert Gjerdingen

>19.00

15.00

Giorgio Sanguinetti The Bolognese Partimento School and its Influence on Donizetti and Rossini

2 Morning Session

15.30

Marco Pollaci The Significance of Neapolitan Compositional School for 19th- Century Italian Opera Composers

10.00

Robert Gjerdingen Introductory Speech

16.00

coffee break

10.30

Nicholas Baragwanath The Solfeggio Tradition in 18th-Century Europe: Preliminary Findings

16.30

Job Ijzerman A New Approach to Harmony Based on Tonal Schemata

11.00

Stefan Eckert Aspects of Partimento Practice in Joseph Riepel’s Anfangsgründe zur musikalischen Setzkunst

17.00

Gaetano Stella Partimenti in Today Schools of Music. An Experiment in Integration of Theory and Music Pedagogy

11.30

coffee break

17.30

coffee break

18.00

Panel Discussion

Friday 19 September Chair: Giorgio Sanguinetti

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Session 3A Analyzing the Renaissance Polyphonic Mass and Office of the Dead

The polyphonic mass and office of the dead are both music-analytically and music-historically special. For still unclear reasons, the liturgy of the dead suddenly began to be set in polyphony in the middle of the 15th century. Up to that point (and even after), plainchant was considered the only acceptable music for that occasion. Despite the polyphonic breach with tradition, the solemnity of the event ensured that early polyphonic settings for the liturgy of the dead tended to use specific and distinct musical styles when compared to other polyphonic music of the time:

Saturday 20 September 10.00 Belgian room 01.28

deliberately restrained, with the traditional plainchant melodies playing a central role. This session aims to analyse

Session Convenors

sacred music.

David J. Burn Katelijne Schiltz

these distinctive music-technical aspects, and relate them to music history. In so doing, it seeks to give insight into both repertory-specific issues as well as contribute to the broader discourse on analysing and historicizing renaissance The compositional specificities of stylistic sobriety and a basis in plainchant pose complex questions concerning the relationship between polyphony and the chant-models it uses: do settings faithfully reproduce the chant? To what extent do they alter it? How far do stylistic possibilities extend? Which methods of elaboration were considered legitimate, and which not? To what extent were compositional practices influenced by the genre of the chant-model,

Contributors

João Pedro d’Alvarenga Margaret Bent David J. Burn Antonio Chemotti Fabrice Fitch Barbara Haggh-Huglo Tess Knighton Franz Körndle Honey Meconi John Milsom Bernadette Nelson Katelijne Schiltz

or by its function? What stylistic differences exist between the mass and the office? Answers to these questions have an impact on the ways in which relationships between compositions are to be understood. To what extent do observable similarities arise from shared compositional methods, shared conventions, shared practices including improvised counterpoint against a chant melody, and to what extent from direct influence between specific polyphonic settings? What aspects of the settings can be considered a factor of geography (a country or region) or institution? Where can innovation and individual compositional style be located within this network? The session aims to address these questions through a combination of a broad overview, from John Milsom, a recognized pioneer in analysing renaissance music and its related compositional processes, and a number of focussed case studies. Meconi relates style to composer chronology. Knighton aims to ground the extremely prominent 16thcentury Spanish Requiem tradition through analysis of the earliest witness to this tradition, Pedro Escobar. From the early 17th century onwards, the basis of polyphonic settings for the liturgy of the dead in plainchant loosens. Two of the papers in the session, d’Alvarenga and Nelson, accordingly aim to place works in context of broader stylistic transitions, from renaissance to baroque. Chemotti and Körndle offer comparison-analysis from the office. One of the most striking and important proposals in recent times concerning the early Requiem is Margaret Bent’s, that the very first documented polyphonic Requiem, that of Guillaume Du

3A 34

Fay, is not lost, as previously thought, but rather partially preserved in Ockeghem’s Requiem. The argument is a fine example of using analytical observations, including questions of unity and structure, to draw historical conclusions. The session accordingly closes with a dialogue concerning this proposal, between its proposer and leading Ockeghem expert Fabrice Fitch.


10.00

David J. Burn/Katelijne Schiltz Welcome and Introduction

Subsession 1

Subsession 3

Chair: Barbara Haggh-Huglo 14.15

João Pedro d’Alvarenga Portuguese Polyphonic Settings of the Mass for the Dead from the Mid-16th to the Early 17th Century: Convention and Innovation in Style and Structure

Chair: Barbara Haggh-Huglo 10.15

John Milsom “Lux aeterna luceat eis”: Understanding Polyphonic Craft in Requiem Masses from Pierre de la Rue to Victoria

14.45

Bernadette Nelson ‘The Lisbon Requiem’: Contexts, Traditions, Development, Influences

11.15

coffee break

15.15

coffee break

15.45

Antonio Chemotti Analyzing Polyphonic Settings for the Absolution

16.15

Franz Körndle ‘Die Vigilie auf Römisch’: Lasso’s Second Set of Job Lessons and its Liturgical Use

16.45

coffee break

Subsession 2

Chair: Barbara Haggh-Huglo 11.45

Honey Meconi La Rue’s Requiem as Chronological Touchstone

12.15

Tess Knighton The Missa Pro Defunctis by Pedro de Escobar: Transitions and Transformations

12.45

lunch break

Keynote Session

Chair: Barbara Haggh-Huglo 17.15

Margaret Bent Ockeghem’s Requiem, and Du Fay

18.00

Fabrice Fitch Ockeghem’s Requiem, and Du Fay: Response

18.30

David J. Burn/Katelijne Schitz Closing Discussion

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Session 3B Words and Music in English Restoration Opera: Analytical Perspectives

English opera experienced more growing pains than its continental counterparts. While opera got off to a successful start in Italy and France in the 17th century, England was hesitant to welcome an all-sung form of music drama. Although a handful of through-composed works were produced – of which the only full survivors are John Blow’s Venus and Adonis, Henry Purcell’s Dido and Aeneas and Louis Grabu’s Albion and Albanius – Restoration music drama remained predominantly structured around spoken dialogue, incorporating other characteristics of continental opera,

Friday 19 September 15.30 British room 00.08 Session Convenor Rebecca Herissone

such as music, dance and the use of spectacular scenes and machines, into a fundamentally spoken form of theatre. Such hybrid works, commonly named dramatick operas today, were highly popular among contemporary audiences, but quickly fell into disrepute in the early 18th century, as all-sung opera in Italian became all the rage. The present panel session challenges the traditional conception of English Baroque opera as a failure, by analysing this repertory in terms of its inherently multimedia nature. More specifically, each of the four papers is concerned in its own way with the interaction between poetry and music in different types of music drama. First, John Cunningham

Contributors

John Cunningham Rebecca Herissone Katherina Lindekens Bryan White

examines the roots of English opera in two related genres: the play with musical interludes and the court masque. Both of these genres represent formal models that influenced the internal structure of dramatick opera. Rebecca Herissone goes on to investigate Matthew Locke’s vision for English opera as a part-sung, part-spoken genre in which the musical component was driven by structural variety rather than unity. The two remaining papers are respectively dedicated to the musico-textual analysis of the all-sung opera Albion and Albanius and the dramatick opera King Arthur, two very different but interrelated works, which were conceived simultaneously by the poet and playwright John Dryden. While Bryan White exemplifies the artistic (mis)communication between Dryden and the composer Louis Grabu through the analysis of a key scene from Albion and Albanius, Katherina Lindekens examines the structural interplay between Dryden’s lyrics for King Arthur and their musical realisation by Henry Purcell. The analytical corpus of this session ranges from the forebears of English opera in the first half of the 17th century to all-sung and dramatick operas from the Restoration period (c. 1660- c.1700). By joining a broad range of sources and perspectives around the central question of the interplay between words and music, the session will draw on a wide array of recent interdisciplinary research that has sought to question and reassess prevailing viewpoints of 17thcentury English music drama. It will use several methodologies – drawing on analytical, historical and sociological materials – in order to place our understanding of this repertory more firmly

3B 36

within the contexts of the time and thereby challenge some of the misconceptions that have long hampered the reception of 17th-century English opera.


Chair: Rebecca Herissone 15.30

John Cunningham The Roots of English Restoration Opera in Masque

16.00

Rebecca Herissone Matthew Locke and ‘The English Opera’

16.30

coffee break

17.00

Bryan White Lost in Translation? Louis Grabu and John Dryden’s Albion and Albanius

17.30

Katherina Lindekens “Rugged to the Reader, Harmonious to the Hearer”: A Musico-Poetic Analysis of King Arthur

18.00

John Cunningham, Rebecca Herissone, Bryan White, Katherina Lindekens Round Table: Words and Music in English Restoration Opera: Analytical Perspectives

>18.45

37


Session 4A Schenker’s Formenlehre Friday 19 September 10.00 Austrian room 01.12

Der freie Satz ends with a chapter entitled Form, presenting the provisional outcome of the Versuch einer neuen Formenlehre on which Schenker had been working since almost twenty years. Commentators have expressed their surprise at the brevity of this chapter and their puzzlement at the conception of form that Schenker underlines, grounded in an interdependance between foreground and background. These problems have often been dealt with in recent Schenkerian literature, without being fully solved.

Session Convenor

Now that all of Schenker’s published texts are easily available for study, either in their original German or in English

Nicolas Meeùs

translation, and that his theories can be considered from some distance, the session proposed here aims to come back on these questions, to take stock of them and, if possible, to bring new answers. It will propose a study of the sources of Schenker’s theory of form and its evolution from his earliest writings to his posthumous exposition in Der freie Satz

Contributors

Christopher Brody Alessandro Cecchi Joel Galand Jason Hooper Steven D. Mathews Nicolas Meeùs Jan Miyake Marc Rigaudière Frank Samarotto Charles J. Smith

in 1935. It will attempt an exegesis of the final but incomplete formulation of Schenker’s ‘Formenlehre’ in Der freie Satz. It will discuss this theory, both at the level of abstract concepts and at that of applied analyses. It will question the relation between tonal structure and thematic design, or the role of the background in shaping form – and of form in shaping the background. And it will envisage the possible influence of Schenker’s ‘Formenlehre’ on more recent theories of form.

4A 38


10.00

Nicolas Meeùs Introduction

1 Early Schenker and the Traditional ‘Formenlehre’ Chair: Frank Samarotto 10.15

Jason Hooper An Introduction to Schenker’s Early ‘Formenlehre’

10.50

Marc Rigaudière Heinrich Schenker’s Position in the Tradition of the ‘Formenlehre’

11.25

coffee break

3 Schenker’s ‘Formenlehre’ Then and Now (2) Chair: Steven D. Mathews 14.45

Nicolas Meeùs ‘Formenlehre‘ in Der freie Satz: A Transformational Theory

15.20

Charles J. Smith How to Select a Background? Start with Conventional Form …

15.55

Christopher Brody The Independence of Structural Parameters in Schenkerian Accounts of Tonal Form

16.30

coffee break

2 Schenker’s ‘Formenlehre’ Then and Now (1)

4 Schenker in Today’s ‘Formenlehre’

Chair: Charles J. Smith

Chair: Nicolas Meeùs

11.50

Frank Samarotto The ‘Urlinie’, Melodic Energies, and the Dynamics of Inner Form

16.55

Steven D. Mathews Realizing Schenkerian ‘Formenlehre’ through 21st-Century Lenses

12.25

Alessandro Cecchi Looking Beyond the Surface: Form, Structure and Force in Ernst Kurth and Heinrich Schenker

17.30

Jan Miyake Investigating Closure: Correspondences Between the EEC and Descent of the Exposition’s ‘Urlinie’ Replica

13.00

lunch break

18.05

Joel Galand Some Schenkerian Implications for Sonata Theory

18.40

Conclusions

>19.00

39


Session 4B Form, Linear Analysis, and Interpretative Context Thursday 18 September 14.00 Swiss room 01.16 Session Convenor Lauri Suurpää

Contributors

Julian Horton Anne Hyland Kerri Kotta Janet Schmalfeldt Peter H. Smith Lauri Suurpää

In music analysis, as in research more generally, different approaches, or different scholarly ‘paradigms’ as they have often been called following Thomas Kuhn, govern at different times. As a result, when we reflect upon the history of a given field of research, we often encounter rapidly shifting perspectives in prevailing scholarly approaches and methods. As the paradigms temporally follow one another, they might appear to be in some sense mutually exclusive; that is, when a given paradigm is losing at least some of its prominence, it may seem that a new paradigm renders obsolete the information arrived at through the prior approach. In the field of analysis of tonal music, we can oversimplify the situation of the past few decades and describe the events as follows: the 1980s were governed by Schenkerian analysis; the 1990s witnessed increasing stress on issues such as criticism, interpretation, and historical contextualization; and in the first decade of this century the study of musical form has emerged as a prevailing analytical approach. This special session addresses issues related to those three paradigms. But rather than examining their differences, the participants argue that the three may interact in a fruitful way. At its core, each paper examines interactions between the music’s formal processes and its voice leading. Yet the six papers by no means elucidate voice leading and form from the same perspective. Rather, reflecting ideas of criticism and interpretation, individual papers contextualize these approaches differently and seek to describe distinct relationships between form and voice leading. Thus one of the aims of this special session is to demonstrate the versatility of Schenkerian and formal analyses, while charting the multifaceted nature of their interaction. The session as a whole argues that, by combining various approaches and by employing them in new scholarly contexts, we gain musical insights that an individual approach alone might not provide. The presentations examine a wide variety of musical repertory, ranging from eighteenth-century opera to late nineteenth-century symphony. The interpretative contexts of analysis also vary greatly, including the following issues: relationships that musical form and voice leading have with operatic libretto; aspects of variation form; loosening of formal and tonal conventions in late nineteenth-century music; large musical dimensions of small forms; interactions between harmony, meter, and formal functions in phrase-level units; and interactions between analysis and performance.

4B 40


1 18th Century

Chair: Peter H. Smith 14.00

Lauri Suurpää Heroic Duty and Tragic Love in the Third-Act Quartet of Mozart’s Idomeneo

14.30

Janet Schmalfeldt Beethoven’s ‘Violation’: His Cadenza for the First Movement of Mozart’s D minor Piano Concerto

15.00

Kerri Kotta Form as Interaction between Harmonic Prolongation and Hypermeter

15.30

Discussion

15.45

coffee break

2 19th Century Chair: Lauri Suurpää 16.15

Anne Hyland ‘Form’ and ‘Formung’ in Schubert’s Variations on a French Air, D624: Voice-Leading as Structure

16.45

Peter H. Smith ‘Hausmusik’ for ‘Cognoscenti’: Some Formal Characteristics of Schumann’s Late-Period Character Pieces for Instrumental Ensembles

17.15

Julian Horton Formal Function and Voice Leading in the First Movement of Bruckner’s Eighth Symphony

17.45

Discussion

>18.30

41


Session 4C Corpus Studies, Empirical Methods, and the Analysis of Musical Form Friday 19 September 10.00 Belgian room 01.28 Session Convenor Markus Neuwirth

Contributors

Vasili Byros Trevor de Clercq Yoel Greenberg Nathan John Martin Markus Neuwirth Julie Pedneault-Deslauriers Uri Rom David Sears

Corpus studies employing quantitative methods, long established in linguistics, have enjoyed a recent discovery in musicological research, as exemplified by the 2013 special issue in Music Perception. While musicological corpus studies have focused primarily on one parametric dimension in isolation (e.g., harmony, melody, or rhythm), the issue of musical form has hitherto been conspicuously left out of account. This neglect might come as a surprise, since the recent revival of interest in ‘Formenlehre’ has no doubt led to a considerable refinement of the analytical apparatus and the formal models developed by scholars to examine music from the 18th and 19th centuries. However, the current state of the discipline is still characterized by some serious shortcomings regarding its empirical and scientific ambitions. (1) Many current analytical studies of form restricted the repertoire examined to the works of Haydn, Mozart, and Beethoven. The extensive contemporary output by a group of allegedly ‘minor masters’ (‘Kleinmeister’), though often times significant in historical terms, was and still is by and large neglected. Basing their studies on such a biased, nonrepresentative sample, modern analysts fail to consider the broader historical context in which the master composers’ works were produced. (2) Despite the remarkable refinements achieved during the last two decades in terms of analytical methodology (e.g., Caplin 1998, and Hepokoski & Darcy 2006), there has been no concomitant refinement of, and reflection on, the research methodologies used. Only rarely is there a precise definition and characterization of the corpus on which a given analytical study is based. Furthermore, research hypotheses regarding the employment of formal procedures (if any such hypotheses are stated explicitly at all) are rarely examined statistically, with scholars instead presenting their findings in an informal manner (‘intuitive statistics’), using qualitative terms (‘often’, ‘occasionally’, and ‘rarely’) to determine the degree of frequency with which formal options are employed. (3) Explanations, whether in terms of causal relationships or intentional goals (cf. Meyer 1989), of why composers chose certain options over others often have a certain ad-hoc character, leaving causal and intentional premises largely implicit. As a historical discipline, ‘Formenlehre’ carries with it all the limitations that are peculiar to the historical sciences in general, especially problems associated with a ‘data-poor field’ and ‘finite data’, which give rise to post-hoc theorizing and circular reasoning (Huron 1999). In an attempt to overcome these shortcomings, we aim to examine various, precisely circumscribed corpora (18thcentury as well as rock/pop music), scrutinizing explanatory hypotheses regarding correlations between various formal options and concepts. Some of the presentations will be more exploratory in nature, while others will be hypothesis-testing in the strict sense. Each presentation will demonstrate, in one way or another, the benefit gained from interpreting individual compositions and their (sometimes allegedly) peculiar or even deformational treatment of formal models against the generalized normative backdrop derived by rigid statistical analysis. Ultimately, we want to explore the extent to which the analysis of musical form can profit from the methods used in “empirical musicology” (Clarke & Cook 2004).

4C

42


10.00

Markus Neuwirth Introduction: Corpus Studies, Empirical Methods, and the Analysis of Musical Form

Subsession 1

Chair: Markus Neuwirth 10.15

Julie Pedneault-Deslauriers/Nathan John Martin Half-Cadence Type and Formal Function in the Mozart Sonatas

11.00

coffee break

11.15

David Sears The Classical Cadence in Context: A Corpus Study of Haydn’s String Quartets

12.00

Yoel Greenberg On the Origins of the Recapitulation: A Corpus-Based, Bottom-Up Approach to Musical Form

12.45

lunch break

Subsession 3

Chair: Yoel Greenberg 16.00

Vasili Byros Sonata Quasi Uno Schema: A Case from Beethoven

16.45

Uri Rom The Pitfall of Diachronicity: ‘Explicit’ vs. ‘Implicit’ Musical Temporality

17.30

coffee break

17.45

All participants Round table: Concluding Discussion

>18.15

Subsession 2

Chair: David Sears 14.15

Trevor de Clercq Typical Chords in Typical Song Sections: How Harmony and Form Interact in Pop/Rock Music

15.00

Markus Neuwirth “New Twists of the Old”: Explaining Leopold Koželuch’s Recomposed Recapitulations

15.45

coffee break

43


Session 4D Form/Structure and Continuity/ Discretization: What Principles for Music Analysis Today?

In order to define precisely what principles serve as basis for musical analysis, it is essential to understand the analytical practices in their diversity. Ian Bent proposed to define analysis in the following way: “[A]nalysis may be said to include the interpretation of structures in music, together with their resolution into relatively simpler constituent elements, and the investigation of the relevant functions of those elements. In such a process the musical “structure” may stand for part of a work, a work in its entirety, a group or even a repertory of works, in a written or

Friday 19 September 10.30 French Room 00.14 Saturday 20 September 10.15 French Room 00.14

oral tradition.”

1

Beyond a mere description of sound phenomenon, musical analysis consists, according to Bent, in identifying constituent units and in determining their role and articulation within musical ‘structures’. Schenker considers this notion of structure in a relatively different manner, for example when he writes that: “The background, in music, is represented by a contrapuntal structure that I have named fundamental structure. [...] Totality realizes itself in fundamental structure: it is this latter that is inscribed on the front of the work as an entity; [...] therein lies the perception of the whole, the resolution of all divisions in a fundamental unity.”

Session Convenors

2

In Schenkerian theory, structure

doesn’t constitute a “part of a work, a work in its entirety, a group or even a repertory of works” intended to be

Nathalie Hérold, Philippe Lalitte, Marie-Noëlle Masson, François Picard

discretized, but the result of an analytical operation which aims, amongst other things, at accounting for musical ‘form’ in its continuity. Therefore, how is it possible to consider the dialectic that establishes itself, in musical analysis, between the notions of continuity and discretization, and more generally between the underlying notions of form and structure? Their distinction is facilitated neither by the ‘classical’ meaning of form – rondo or sonata for

Contributors

Jean-Marc Chouvel Joseph Delaplace Malgorzata Gamrat Philippe Gonin Nathalie Hérold Annie Labussière Philippe Lalitte

example – nor by expressions such as ‘formal structures’. In which cases, and under which conditions, can the notions

Marie-Noëlle Masson Thierry Mathis Jean-Paul Olive Anthony Papavassiliou François Picard Julie Walker

of form and structure be distinguished? And to which extent do they correspond to principles pertaining to continuity – like directionality and process – or discretization – like division and segmentation? Such a reflection will undoubtedly lead to many terminological and conceptual propositions, including in particular gesture, motion, shape or design. Following the lead of the epistemological reflections which are now part of the work of the French Society for Musical Analysis, this session aims, throughout the diversity of musical repertoires and of analytical positions – focused, among others, on highlighting of composition material, symbolizations in written traces, perceptive identifications or performance gestures –, at questioning the analytical activity through the back-and-forth movement by which it chooses to isolate constituent elements, which can however become meaningful only through their capacity to integrate a dynamic, a trajectory, or a semantic.

4D 44

1

Ian Bent and Anthony Pople, “Analysis”, in Grove Music Online, <www.oxfordmusiconline.com>, accessed 5/12/2013. See also Ian Bent and William Drabkin, L’analyse musicale: histoire et méthodes, trans. Annie Cœurdevey and Jean Tabouret, Main d’Œuvre, [Nice], 1998, p. 9; 1st ed. 1987 entitled Analysis.  Heinrich Schenker, L’écriture libre, vol. 1, trans. Nicolas Meeùs, Mardaga, Liège, 1993, p. 20-21; 1st ed. 1935 entitled Der freie Satz. 2


Friday 19 September 10.30

Introduction

1 Conceptual Approach

3 Approach in the Frame of Specific Repertoires Chair: Marie-Noëlle Masson 15.45

François Picard The Musical Form itself as Reflecting the Structure: A Case Study Shifan luogu 十番鑼鼓 Music for Percussions (China)

Chair: François Picard 11.00

Jean-Marc Chouvel Form – Structure – Cognition: The Contribution of Cognitive Analysis to the Conceptual Clarification of the Notions of Form and Structure

16.15

Annie Labussière Form through Gesture: Formal Implications in the Analysis of Traditional Chant ‘à voix nue’

11.30

Nathalie Hérold Considering Form/Structure and Continuity/Discretization Dialectic from Timbral Analysis

16.45

Thierry Mathis The Unmeasured Prelude for Harpsichord in France in the 17th and 18th Centuries – between Continuity and Discretization – Music Analysis of Shape and Structure

12.00

Joseph Delaplace Dialectic Continuity/Discontinuity: An Instrument for the Analysis of 20th-Century Music?

17.15

Philippe Gonin Continuity and Discontinuity in the Formal Creative Process in the Music of Pink Floyd from Atom Heart Mother to The Wall

12.30

Discussion

17.45

Discussion

12.45

lunch break

2 Methodological Approach Chair: Nathalie Hérold

4 Linguistic Approach

Chair: Philippe Lalitte

Saturday 20 September

10.15

Marie-Noëlle Masson Formal Analysis, Structural Analysis, Rhetorical Analysis: F. Chopin’s Nocturne Op. 27 No 1

10.45

Anthony Papavassiliou To Describe Continuity through Discretization in a Recorded Works Analytical Process

Julie Walker Different Discretized Structures in Chopin’s Last Style

11.15

coffee break

15.00

Discussion

11.30

Jean-Paul Olive Arnold Schoenberg: Musical Prose and Formal Analysis

15.15

coffee break

12.00

Malgorzata Gamrat Liszt’s Conception of Poetico-Musical Cycle for Piano Solo

12.30

Discussion

14.00

14.30

Philippe Lalitte Audio Descriptors: New Computer Tools for Stream and Segmentation Analysis

45


Session 5A Analysis Beyond Notation in 20th and 21st Century Music Friday 19 September 14.00 Swiss room 01.16 Saturday 20 September 14.00 European room 00.28

The topic of the session is to discuss different modes of graphic representation of sound phenomena without the use of staff notation, elaborated both for composition and analytical purposes, particularly from the second half of the 20th century onwards. In recent years the increasing attention towards aspects whose representation is difficult with the standard notation, the evolution of compositional language, and the diffusion of informatics technologies have significantly modified the visual outcome of compositional thought and the analytical perspectives to deal with any form of organized sound. Graphics, diagrams, 2D and 3D representations as a result of sound analysis with digital technologies (waveforms, spectrograms etc.) are increasingly employed for the analysis of avant-garde and experimental music, as well as of popular music and musics of oral tradition. The reconfiguration of the conceptual tools of visualization reflects important aspects of the changing relationship between music, text, and performance in relation to the diffusion of recording technologies and their use for historic and ethnographic documentation or creative elaboration.

Session Convenors Alessandro Bratus Marco Lutzu

By gathering popular music scholars, ethnomusicologists and musicologists, the aim of the session is to set an agenda of shared problems, questions, as well as to propose strategies and techniques to address them across different repertoires and genres. Starting the day with a discussion of the theoretical underpinnings urging analysis to stretch

Contributors

Mario Baroni Alessandro Bratus Paolo Bravi Enrique CĂĄmara de Landa Roberto Caterina Freya Jarman Olivier Koechlin Stefano Lombardi Vallauri

its boundaries beyond notation from the vantage point of ethnomusicology, semiotics and popular music studies, we

Marco Lutzu Errico Pavese Ingrid Pustijanac Fabio Regazzi Simon Zagorski-Thomas Hans T. ZeinerHenriksen

will then move towards the benefits of representing sound in teaching, popularizing and understanding music as a result of human interactions. From the third subsession onwards, we begin to address specific questions related to the modes of conveying meaning by timbre, the relationship between performative actions and the underlying thought about music, and the representations of complex parameters such as sound and rhythm in popular music. A workshop on the comparison between manual and software-based transcription of vocal music using â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Praatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; will close this day by showing how different analytical approaches to the same object allow for a better understanding of its multifaceted complexity.

5A 46


Friday 19 September

Saturday 20 September

1 Theoretical Approaches

3 Representing Sound and Meaning

14.00

Alessandro Bratus Kaleidoscoping the Simple. The Formal Definition of Popular Song between Analysis and Representation

14.00

Mario Baroni/Roberto Caterina/Fabio Regazzi An Example of Sound Analysis: Perceptual Responses to Different Instrumental Mixtures

14.30

Enrique Cámara de Landa Beyond the Staff: ‘Alternative’ Systems in the Graphical Representation of Organized Sound

15.00

coffee break

15.00

coffee break

Chair: Mario Baroni

Chair: Enrique Cámara de Landa

4 Representing and Visualising Performance Chair: Simon Zagorski-Thomas 15.30

Marco Lutzu Representing the Performance in Ethnomusicological Studies

16.00

Stefano Lombardi Vallauri The Composition of Experience (and its Notation) in the MusicalHolistic Art of Dario Buccino

16.30

coffee break

2 Representing Recorded Sound and Rhythm

Chair: Alessandro Bratus 15.30 Simon Zagorski-Thomas Sex On Fire: A Case Study of how Different Forms of Graphic Representation Can Influence Analysis 16.00

Errico Pavese Interpreting and Representing Micro-Rhythmic Discrepancies and Spatial Dimensions in Dolcenera and A Cúmba by De André and Fossati

16.30

Hans T. Zeiner-Henriksen The Analysis of Groove in Contemporary Pop Music

17.00

coffee break

17.30

Paolo Bravi Workshop: What You Hear and What You Get. Manual Transcription and Melodic Analysis through ‘Praat’

5 Understanding Sound Chair: Marco Lutzu 17.00

Freya Jarman “It’s analysis, Jim, but not as we know it”: Teaching Analysis without Notation to a Class of Undergraduates with Radical Subject-Specific Diversity

17.30

Ingrid Pustijanac New Graphic Representation for Old Music Experience: Analyzing Improvised Music

18.00

Olivier Koechlin Experience and Perspectives of Interactive Multimedia for Musical Analysis

>18.30 >18.30

47


Session 5B Analysing ‘Un‐Analysable’ Art Music Since 1950 Saturday 20 September 10.00 Italian room 00.20 20.00 Auditorium Max Weber Session Convenor Mark Delaere

This panel aims at discussing so-called ‘un-analysable’ art music since 1950. Rather than refraining from analysis altogether in that case – as advocated by some ‘new musicologists’ –, this panel seeks to adapt existing analytical approaches and to develop new ones. It proposes to do so by discussing 3 major obstacles encountered in the analysis of this repertoire. 1. ‘Too Difficult’ to Analyse [singularity, no system/model] Given its idiosyncrasy and complexity, a significant part of recent art music seems to be impenetrable, unruly, in short: un-analysable. As a consequence, analysts have tended to concentrate more on reconstruction of the production process (sketch studies) than on analytical interpretation (selection, construction of meaning). The lack of general systems/models to interpret a particular work is considered to be one of the major stumbling blocks. Th.W. Adorno’s observation of a dialectical tension between the individual work and a systematic common ground needs to be reconsidered in view of this. Also, G. Deleuze’s proposal to replace the individual/general dichotomy by more flexible

Contributors

Maarten Beirens Kristof Boucquet Jan Christiaens David Clarke Klaas Coulembier Rob Haskins Yves Knockaert Judy Lochhead Petra Philipsen Richard Taruskin

forms of relationships could be promising. Whatever theoretical position taken, it seems unavoidable to develop new concepts and to shift the emphasis from detail towards more global processes (Gestalt, gesture, rhetoric). 2. ‘Too Easy’ to Analyse [system, no singularity] At the other extreme, compositions can also be deemed ‘too easy’ to analyse because of their alleged lack of singularity and their conformity to system constraints (such as tonality or periodicity). It will be argued that an in-depth analysis of their specificity is nevertheless possible. This may include more refined modes of perception and an alternative approach to musical scores by shifting the focus from structure (coherence) and form (functionality) towards the efficacy of musical means to reach a specific aesthetic goal (such as transparency, objectivity, or accessibility). 3. Ambiguity of the Musical Work Another complicating factor in analysing (recent) art music is the question whether the musical work is a fixed object or a mere frame for different realizations and interpretations. Analysis may vary from the reconstruction of the original meaning (‘authentic analysis practice’) to the construction of contemporary interpretations (‘presentness’). In other words: the function of reception history in defining goals and methods of music analysis has to be reconsidered. In addition, this section begs for a contribution on problems encountered

5B 48

in the analysis of aleatoric music. The session will be concluded with the keynote lecture by Richard Taruskin: Is Anything Unanalyzable?


10.00

Mark Delaere Introduction: Analysing ‘Un-Analysable’ Art Music Since 1950

1 ‘Too Difficult’ to Analyse

3 Ambiguity of the Musical Work Chair: Mark Delaere 16.15

David Clarke Ambiguity and beyond: Theories of Musical Meaning and their (Non-) application to Music post-1950

Chair: Mark Delaere 10.15

Jan Christiaens Analysis after Adorno. Towards an Epistemology for the Analysis of Recent Art Music

16.50

Kristof Boucquet Possibilities and Limits of the Open Work. Analysing Pierre Boulez’s Third Piano Sonata

10.50

Klaas Coulembier Overload or Generosity? Analyzing Brian Ferneyhough’s Time and Motion Study II

17.25

Rob Haskins Aspects of Zen Buddhism as an Analytical Context for John Cage’s Chance Music

11.25

Yves Knockaert On Analysing Wolfgang Rihm’s ‘Notebook-Pieces’

18.00

Mark Delaere Preliminary Conclusions

12.00

lunch break

19.00

break

2 ‘Too Easy’ to Analyse

Chair: Mark Delaere 14.00

Judy Lochhead Difference and Identity: Musical Sense and Music Analysis

14.35

Petra Philipsen “Too accessible to be comprehensible to the genuine avant-garde”. Analysing Benjamin Britten’s Music

15.10

Maarten Beirens Elusive Redundancy: Minimal Music’s Analytical Challenges Between Pattern, Process and Texture

15.45

coffee break

Keynote Session

[Auditorium Max Weber] Chair: Francis Maes 20.00

Richard Taruskin Is Anything Un-Analysable?

 Keynote Lecture see page 17

49


Session 5C Dissenters beyond the Centres: Analytical Perspectives on Greek Musical Modernism

The introduction and dissemination of musical modernism in Greece constitutes a compelling – but until recently underexplored – subject for both historical and analytical research. This is the first attempt by music scholars to systematically investigate the diverse aspects and compositional approaches of Greek musical modernism within a cohesive historiographical context. This one-day session offers a variety of analytical perspectives on modern Greek compositions that reflect the

Thursday 18 September 10.00 European room 00.28 Session Convenor Eva Mantzourani

diversity of structural responses to the dialectics of tradition and innovation. Through in-depth engagement and analysis of works and trends, the contributors consider the ways Euro-centric modernist notions and techniques were transplanted in Greece, and their function, incorporation, adaptation and substitution within Greek modernist works. The session is divided into two complementary sub-sessions, each comprising two panels and a recital of music relevant to the content of the papers presented. The first subsession is divided into two panels and focuses on early musical modernism as reflected in the atonal and twelve-note music of Dimitri Mitropoulos and Nikos Skalkottas. In the first panel Giorgos Sakallieros analyzes

Contributors

Kostas Chardas Magdalini Kalopana Eva Mantzourani Anastasios Mavroudis Lorenda Ramou Giorgios Sakallieros Danae Stefanou Costas Tsougras Panos Vlagopoulos Petros Vouvaris Maria Yerosimou Vasiliki Zlatkou Athina Fytiaka Fani Karagianni

Mitropoulos’s Passacaglia, Intermezzo e Fuga for piano, the first atonal work in Greek art music, while Vasiliki Zlatkou analyzes two early piano sonatinas by Skalkottas and Yanni Constantinidis. The second panel is devoted to Nikos Skalkottas. Eva Mantzourani discusses Skalkottas’s approach to sonata form and his techniques for achieving multimovement coherence in his free dodecaphonic works. Costas Tsougras examines Kurze Variationen auf ein Bergsthema for piano, and explores Skalkottas’s predilection for stylistic synthesis. Petros Vouvaris deals with melodic structures in Skalkottas’s post-tonal music. The lecture-recital on analytical insights into the performance of Skalkottas’s piano works by Lorenda Ramou rounds off the first sub-session. The second subsession explores the diverse directions that musical modernism in Greece took after World War II. In the first panel Costas Chardas investigates stylistic interactions and the ambivalence between formal coherence and fragmentation in Yannis A. Papaioannou’s ‘paradigmatic’ post-1950 Greek modernism. Magdalini Kalopana explores the symbiosis of diverse, avant-garde and traditional Greek elements in Dimitris Dragatakis’s works for solo instruments. Anastasios Mavroudis provides a performance analysis of Yorgos Sicilianos’s Sonata for Violin and Piano, Op. 45. The second panel focuses on the new musical orientations in the post-war era. Maria Yerosimou explores analytical and performative approaches to Jani Christou’s Strychnine Lady. Panos Vlagopoulos proposes a new dating of Christou’s Second Symphony, and explores the underlying unity in his oeuvre. Danae Stafanou closes the session with a re-evaluation of current analytical literature on Christou’s cross-media

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compositions, and considers methodologies for an inclusive, analytically grounded account of post-1960s Greek modernism. The session on Greek modernism culminates with a piano recital featuring work by Greek composers featured in the individual papers.


1A Early Modernism - Tradition and Continuity: The Berlin Connection

15.30

Magdalini Kalopana Opposition and Symbiosis: Avant-Garde and Traditional Greek Elements in the Works for Solo Instruments of Dimitris Dragatakis: An Analytical Perspective

Chair: Eva Mantzourani 10.00

Vasiliki Zlatkou Two Early Sonatinas for Piano by Nikos Skalkottas and Yannis Constantinidis: Re-Interpretation of Normative Formal Models

16.00

Anastasios Mavroudis Performing Sicilianos: An Analytical and Interpretative Approach to the Sonata for Violin and Piano, Op. 45 by Yorgos Sicilianos

10.30

Giorgos Sakallieros Dimitri Mitropoulos’s Passacaglia, Intermezzo e Fuga (1924): Introducing Musical Modernism in Greece

16.30

coffee break

1B Early Modernism - Diversity within the Tradition: The Schoenberg Connection

2B Post-WWII Modernism - Diversity, Self-Expression and New Directions

11.00

Eva Mantzourani Sonata Form, Sonata Cycle and Multimovement Coherence in Skalkottas’s Free Dodecaphonic Works

17.00

Panos Vlagopoulos Jani Christou’s Second Symphony: Monument, Crossroads, Path

11.30

Costas Tsougras Kurze Variationen auf ein Bergsthema from the 32 Piano Pieces by Nikos Skalkottas: An Analytical Approach of Theme and Variations Based on Greek Folk Melodies

17.30

Maria Yerosimou Analytical and Performative Approaches to Jani Christou’s Strychnine Lady

18.00

Danae Stefanou “Maybe a glimpse into the void beyond”: Experimentalist Paradigms and the Liminal Spaces of post-1960s Greek Modernism

Chair: Panos Vlagopoulos

12.00

Petros Vouvaris Issues of Melodic Structure in Nikos Skalkottas’s Post-Tonal Music

12.30

Lorenda Ramou Analytical Insights into the Performance of Nikos Skalkottas’s Piano Works (Lecture Recital)

13.10

Piano Recital 18.30

Athina Fytika Rena Kyriakou, 6 Preludes lyriques Op.12, Nos.1–3 (1936) - Yannis Constantinidis, 6 Studies οn Greek Folk Rhythms Nos. 1-3 (1958) Giorgos Koumentakis, ‘Thyme’-’Mint’-’Sage’ (from: Mediterranean Desert, 2000)

Fani Karagianni Yannis A. Papaioannou, Prelude No. 16 (1939) - Arghyris Kounadis, Three Idiomela (1956) - Yorgos Sicilianos, Eight Children’s Miniatures Op.23 (1963)

lunch break

2A Post-WWII Modernism - Continuities, Discontinuities, Traditions and Individualities within Greek Musical Modernism Chair: Danae Stefanou 15.00

Chair: Kostas Chardas

Kostas Chardas Struggling for the ‘New’: Tonal/Atonal/Twelve-Note Interactions and the Ambivalence between Formal Coherence and Fragmentation in Y. A. Papaioannou’s ‘Paradigmatic’ post-1950 Greek Modernism

>19.00

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Session 5D Listening to Electroacoustic Music through Analysis Friday 19 September 10.00 European room 00.28 Saturday 20 September 10.00 European room 00.28 Session Convenor Nicolas Marty

Contributors

Elizabeth Anderson Bruno Bossis William Brunson Pierre Couprie John Dack François Delalande Leigh Landy

Lin-Ni Liao Joshua B. Mailman Nicolas Marty René Mogensen Pascal Terrien Lasse Thoresen Eldad Tsabary

What is the purpose of analysis? When we analyze an electroacoustic work, what do we aim at? We could follow the poietic point of view and aim at uncovering the composer’s background, intentions, means, materials and methods. Or we could follow the morphological point of view and study the work ‘itself’, the components of the system and the intrinsic relations between them. Or we could study, following the esthesic point of view, the reception of the work, the processes involved for the listeners. But does the esthesic point of view offer us nothing but to study how the listeners actually perceive what they hear? After all, one analysis of a work is a point of view (of listening) in itself. It offers listeners a specific angle according to which they can apprehend the work. Since the relevant characteristics are not the same from one analysis to the other, each analysis offers listeners a new perspective on how to listen to the work. It is quite rare to find an analysis of which the grounds do not rest on a pre-conception of the work’s segmentation in components – or on a ‘right’ way to understand the work. And yet electroacoustic works often present us with conflicts as to morphological analysis – perhaps more so than ‘note music’ works, where the note easily stands as a morphological unit (or component thereof). Could we not, then, find models that might be applied to several works, and would define several ways of listening to a single work? Delalande (2013) developed this idea researching ‘listening behaviors’, and proposed three main behaviors (taxinomic, figurative and empathic) – and the three corresponding analyses – for Sommeil by Pierre Henry, and La terrasse des audiences au clair de lune by Debussy. The three behaviors were confirmed and extended by Alcázar (2011), Anderson (2011) and Marty (2012). It might be interesting to systematize analysis related to those three behaviors, but also to uncover other behaviors. Without probing them in depth, Delalande at least mentions the possibility of, for instance, an immersive behavior and a systemic behavior.  He also speculates on the role of instrumental practice as influencing approaches to listening. Methodology for such research might go from esthesic surveys to the definition of esthetic, intended behaviors – that is, listening behaviors that the analyst and/or composer would like to see in listeners, but which present little chance of manifesting themselves without giving the model to listeners. In fact, we may listen to a work of electroacoustic music through the analysis of the work, or we may analyze the listening behavior in order to find new methods of analysis. Research in such a field should thus also be concerned with how such models might be transmitted – which transcription would be fit, which pedagogy (if there needs to be one) would help the ‘communication’ of those models, etc. - How do we hear/how do we listen to electroacoustic music? - How could analysis render the diversity of our listening experiences? - How could analysis influence our listening experience? - Could graphic transcription tools be of help in influencing our listening experience? etc.

5D

52


Friday 19 September 10.00

Nicolas Marty Introducion: Listening to Electroacoustic Music through Analysis

16.00

Pascal Terrien/Nicolas Marty The Explicitation Interview, Analyzing the Dynamics of Electroacoustic Music Listening

16.30

coffee break

1 Listening to Specific Characters in Electroacoustic Music Chair: Pierre Couprie 10.30

John Dack Listening to ‘Plastic’ and ‘Musical’ Languages in Pierre Henry’s Variations pour une porte et un soupir

11.00

Lin-Ni Liao Interculturality: Intellectual Organization of the West and Spiritual Listening of the Far East in the Mixed Music of Wang Miao-Wen

11.30

coffee break

12.00

3 Listening to Electroacoustic Music through Analytical Representations Chair: Joshua B. Mailman 17.00

Pierre Couprie New Forms of Representation to Listen, Analyze and Create Electroacoustic Music

17.30

Lasse Thoresen Aural Analysis of Emergent Musical Forms: A Gestalt-Oriented Approach to Musical Analysis

Bruno Bossis The Ambiguous Listening or the Research for Universals: The Example of Electroacoustic Vocality

18.00

René Mogensen Comparison of Comprehensibility of Analytical Representations of Electroacoustic Music: Pictographic versus Symbolic

12.30

Bill Brunson Triangulating Narrativity in Electroacoustic Music

>18.30

13.00

lunch break

2 Aims and Methodologies for the Analysis of Electroacoustic Music Chair: John Dack 15.00

15.30

Joshua B. Mailman Renewing the Riverbed: Critical Aesthetic and Epistemological Purposes for Analysis, Fueled by Performative Theory Eldad Tsabary Understanding Analysis of EA Music through Aural Training Pedagogy

Round Tables & Keynote Chair: Nicolas Marty

Saturday 20 September

10.15

Leigh Landy Keynote: How Listening-based Analysis Can Aid the Appreciation and Understanding of Electroacoustic Music

11.15

break

11.30

Elizabeth Anderson, François Delalande, Leigh Landy, Joshua B. Mailman, Nicolas Marty, Lasse Thoresen Round Table: Listening Behaviours in Music Theory and Analysis

>13.00

53


Session 6A Tonality: Recent Theoretical Models and Analytical Tools Saturday 20 September 10.00 Swiss room 01.16 Session Convenor

Christophe Guillotel-Nothmann

What can recent analytical tools and theoretical models tell us about tonality? The goal of this session is to reflect on analytical methods and theoretical concepts and the different aspects of tonal functioning they emphasize. Among the fields of research emerging from these questions, three seem particularly promising and will be explored from different perspectives. 1. Several theoretical models address tonal syntax at the level of the chord, but few of them concern how chords are assembled to create larger units. This session will discuss the question of tonal coherence by examining the ways theoretical models could provide a more hierarchical understanding of tonality. Can a hierarchy of chord progressions, as sketched by Schoenberg, lead from the foreground to the background via a concept of elaboration? How do the functional modes of the musical tetractys relate to the triadic bass arpeggiation and what is the hierarchical status of these modes in the musical structure? Is it possible to integrate Neo-Riemannian analysis with harmonic or melodic

Contributors

Karst De Jong Mine Dogantan-Dack Christophe Guillotel-Nothmann Ariane JeĂ&#x;ulat Nicolas MeeĂšs Thomas Noll Michael Polth Steven Rings Hugues Seress Jan Philipp Sprick Dmitri Tymoczko

patterns that are not primarily concerned with parsimonious voice leading? How can phenomena of polarization and directed voice leading bring new solutions to the problem of the apparent irreducibility of hierarchical levels? Finally, what deductions about tonal coherence arise from the implicit premises of the Tonfeld analysis? 2. Large scale statistical analyses of repertoires, especially at the borders of tonality, help rethink tonal functioning. The empirical results lead us to reconsider the crystallization of tonality, its evolution in common tonal praxis and its changes at the start of the 20th century. One goal of this session will be to identify different aspects of tonal syntax in more detail, especially in regard to their development and theoretical meaning. The contributions will examine how preferences for harmonic units and chord progressions evolve and what can be deduced from these tendencies about tonality, its relation to modality and to the shift from diatonic to functional hierarchies. 3. Reflecting on concepts and methods allows a cultural, historical and social but also a neurological and biological account of tonal understanding. In addition to being a cultural construction, is it possible to claim an evolutionary basis for tonality? On the other hand, how and why have different aspects of tonal functioning been emphasized at different moments in the history of music and the history of music theory from FĂŠtis to today? This question will be addressed by examining how the understanding of the phenomenon of the sequence evolves in the theoretical discourse of the past and how the contemporary analytical approaches handle this paradox of tonal functioning. The session will also explore how transformational models aiming at reconstructing how aspects

6A 54

of tonal experience are part of a dialogue with empirical, historical, and corpus-based research on tonality. Finally, this dialogue will be extended through a concluding discussion that will summarize what this exchange - between the different theoretical and analytical constructions discussed earlier - can tell us about tonality.


10.00

Introduction

2 Empirical Studies and Tonal Functioning Chair: Steven Rings

1 Theoretical Models and Tonal Conceptions

15.00

Dmitri Tymoczko A Study on the Origins of Harmonic Tonality

10.15

Nicolas Meeùs Hiérarchisation des progressions dans la théorie des vecteurs harmoniques

15.35

Christophe Guillotel-Nothmann Conditional Asymmetry and Spontaneous Asymmetry of Harmonic Progressions in Madrigal Cycles from Verdelot to Monteverdi (c. 1530-1638)

10.50

Karst De Jong/Thomas Noll Fundamental Bass and Real Bass in Dialogue: Tonal Aspects of the Structural Modes

16.10

coffee break

11.25

coffee break

11.50

Hugues Seress Polarization, Modal Orientation, and Voice Leading: About Interaction between Different Hierarchical Levels of Tonal Structure

Chair: Jan Philipp Sprick

12.25

Ariane Jeßulat Parsimonious Voice-Leading and ‘Stimmführungsmodelle’

13.00

Michael Polth Einzelton und harmonischer Kontext in der Tonfeld-Theorie

13.35

lunch break

3 Contextualizing Analytical Tools and Theoretical Constructs Chair: Ariane Jeßulat 16.35

Mine Dogantan-Dack Tonality: An Evolutionary Perspective

17.10

Jan Philipp Sprick Sequences Between Affirmation and Destruction of Tonality

17.45

Steven Rings Transformational Theory and Empirical Research on Tonality

18.20

Conclusions

>19.00

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Session 6B Harmonic Plasticity and the Modeling of Harmonic Relations in Tonal, Post-Tonal and Jazz Idioms Wednesday 17 September 14.00 European room 00.28 Session Convenor José Oliveira Martins

Contributors

Daniel Moreira José Oliveira Martins Paulo Perfeito Miguel Ribeiro-Pereira

The collective work of the session advances a set of inter-related theoretical models and fosters various analytical methodologies centered on the notion of harmonic plasticity. While ‘plasticity’ is not a standard term in the current music theoretical lexicon, its informal meaning as the process of harmonic change or motion is certainly an age-old preoccupation, central to music theoretical discourse. The notion of harmonic plasticity proposed here, however, is not conceived as a resulting by-product of established pitch models (Schenkerian, transformational, voice-leading, etc.), but rather focuses on a set of specific properties aiming to reframe plasticity as a theoretical paradigm. The plastic process grounds the understanding and (phenomenological) experience of harmonic relations and motion on three key features: (a) reconfiguration between differently perceivable musical objects or agents (which can include intervals, chords of the same or different cardinalities, voice-leading relations, etc.); (b) functional change or transformation of harmonic context for a given fixed referential object or agent, resulting in a plastic process whereby that element is reinterpreted within a new context; and (c) traceability, or the cumulative effect of change of function, which explains global and systemic aspects of musical transformation and syntax. The different panel contributions explore distinct repertoires and idioms (tonal, post-tonal and Jazz) and develop distinct frameworks towards an original formulation of plasticity (the concept is also pertinent for diverse areas such as physics, neuroscience, cognition, and the fine arts). Specifically, Ribeiro-Pereira’s work proposes a new cognitive paradigm for understanding tonal motion, offering a comprehensive redefinition of the concept of modulation in music-theoretical tradition. The modulatory paradigm is interpreted in terms of cultural consciousness, and analytically animated in pieces by Bach, Beethoven and Schumann. The plastic ‘modulatory’ model, endowed with inner conflictual, dramatic qualities, is quintessentially a model of harmonic transformation, not static, that stresses becoming rather than being. Moreira proposes a theoretical model for harmonic motion in post-tonal music, in which harmonic change results from the complex interaction between voice leading, interval progression, pitch centricity and macroharmony. Drawing from recent conceptions of atonal voice leading, the model arranges the entire spectrum of all set-classes on a coherent standard of harmonic consonance, and is analytically probed in music of Schoenberg, Ligeti and Stravinsky. Perfeito proposes a framework underlying the improvisation upon a variety of non-diatonic scales in Jazz. The paper advances a cognitive-based model for the exploration of ‘chord-scale’ possibilities in a given improvisatory moment. The negotiation between a chord-scale and larger tonal context in light of past and expected tonal events is approached through an overall modulatory framework, where the key-defining tritone is an element subject to constant harmonic reinterpretation. Finally, Martins’ work advances four inter-related models of multi-layered pitch space (scalar dissonance, affinity spaces, mistuning, and transpositional networks), which interpret a variety of distinct interactions between scale-inflected materials in the music of Bartók, Stravinsky, Ravel, Milhaud, and Lutosławski. The paper shows how multi-layered harmony is not simply a coloristic superimposition, but rather participates in the construction of complex global pitch spaces and engages in coherent plasticities.

6B

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Chair: José Oliveira Martins 14.00

José Oliveira Martins Introduction: Harmonic Plasticity and the Modeling of Musical Motion in Tonal, Post-Tonal and Jazz idioms

14.30

Miguel Ribeiro-Pereira Modulatory Consciousness: A Plastic Paradigm for Understanding the Conception and Perception of Tonal Space

15.15

Daniel Moreira Harmonic Motion in Post-Tonal Music: Voice-Leading, Set-Class Progression and Functional Change

16.00

coffee break

16.30

Paulo Perfeito Jazz Harmony and Plasticity: Chord-Scales, Nonfunctional Progressions and Modulatory Fields

17.15

José Oliveira Martins Multi-Layered Harmony and Plasticity in 20th-Century Music

>18.00

57


Session 6C No Orientalisms! Four Regional Approaches to Harmony: Russian, Azerbaijani, Polish, and Chinese Wednesday 17 September 15.00 Russian room 03.12 Session Convenors Gesine Schröder Kenneth Smith

Harmony tends to be discussed as a global phenomenon which subsumes its regional varieties. Due to its significance in Western music and music theory it is generally specified historically (modal Renaissance harmony; major-minortonality and so on), sometimes classified by genre (Jazz etc.). But for centuries, individual chord-types were named after landscapes, regions, even towns or nations (the Neapolitan or the classes of augmented sixth chords, newly including the Swiss and Australian), and were often named for ease of reference rather than regional colour per se. The session No Orientalisms! is dedicated to phenomena found in the first half of the 20th century, descending from scales or harmonies that are born from an aspiration to create a regional (or even national) colour, each refusing to function as orientalisms. Ewell’s and Aliyeva’s contributions concentrate on harmonic phenomena, which are bound to scales (the application of the cognitive approach allows Aliyeva to present a conception of Azerbaijani modes like micro- and macro-schemata), while Smith demonstrates how specifically regional scales can flower into more global conceptions of harmony, along dualistic Riemannian lines. Wang & Schröder reconstruct how Riemann’s concept of harmony became the fundament for the harmony lessons in wide parts of Eastern Europe, the Soviet Union, but also in the former socialistic brother states. Using the example of China it will be shown that in the course of its sinicization,

Contributors

Imina Aliyeva Philip Ewell Nikola Komatovic Gesine Schröder Maksim Serebrennikov Kenneth Smith Ying Wang Wei Zhang

Riemann’s theory was stripped of all characteristics that discriminated it from other concepts, not least its dualistic aspects.

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Subsession 1

Chair: Gesine Schröder/Kenneth Smith 15.00

Philip Ewell Octatonic or Diminished? Russian Modal Interpretations of Stravinsky’s Pitch Organization

15.30

Imina Aliyeva Azerbaijani Modes: Their Evolution and Manifestation in Traditional and European Genres (Cognitive Approach)

16.00

Maksim Serebrennikov Response 1

16.15

Nikola Komatovic Response 2

16.30

coffee break

Subsession 2

Chair: Gesine Schröder/Kenneth Smith 17.00

Kenneth Smith Szymanowski’s Local Mythologies

17.30

Ying Wang/Gesine Schröder The Sinicization of Riemann’s Concept of Harmony via Soviet Music Theories

18.00

Wei Zhang Response 3

>18.30

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Session 6D In Search for the Structural Principles of Harmony Thursday 18 September 10.00 Russian room 03.12 Session Convenor Ildar Khannanov

Each major figure in the history of music theory claimed the discovery of the governing principle of harmony. Heraclitus and Pythagoras started the discussion. Aristoxenus seemed to be content with his explanation of the harmonic system in Harmonikon Stoikheion. St. Augustine and Boethius provided their own contributions. Several centuries later the author of Institutione harmoniche gave the world the gift of senario. Rameau and Riemann maintained their systematic understanding of the governing principle. At present, Schenker’s concept seems to be universally accepted. Yet, it is never too late to rethink the old principles and to suggest the new ones. The participants in this session have innovative ideas on harmony and tonality. Marina Chernaya presents the teaching of Yuri Kholopov — a significant development in theory of harmony in the second half of the 20th century that is yet to be discovered in the West. Dimitar Ninov proposes a different angle of the understanding of the main principle of tonality. In addition to conventional concepts based upon chords he suggests modal constitution of tonality in

Contributors

Marina Chernaya Mart Humal Ildar Khannanov Dimitar Ninov

its relatively developed chromatic form (including some typical altered chords). Mart Humal experiments with Schenkerian ideas and pushes forward with the unusual structure — the ascending fifth progression — that proves to be quite substantial and plays a significant role in the renovated concept of graphic analysis. He also suggests an important clarification of the relationship between counterpoint and harmony. Ildar Khannanov attempts to summarize the proposed innovations to the principles of harmony and to compare their technical definitions with the well-known philosophical interpretations of harmony. The ultimate conceptual and geographical diversity of approaches in this session is united by the conviction, shared by all participants, that discussion of harmony remains urgent and fruitful even after 25 centuries of its theoretical investigation.

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Subsession 1

Chair: Ildar Khannanov 10.00

Marina Chernaya Structural Principles of Harmony According to Yuri Kholopov

10.30

Dimitar Ninov The Diatonic-Chromatic Platform of the Major-Minor System

Subsession 2

Chair: Dimitar Ninov 11.00

Mart Humal The Rising Cycle-Of-Fifths Progression: Its Structural and Formal Implications

11.30

Ildar Khannanov The Principles of Harmony from both Philosophical and Technical Standpoints

>12.00

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Session 7A Analysing Popular Music: A View from 2014 Thursday 18 September 10.00 British room 00.08 Friday 19 September 10.00 British room 00.08

This session showcases a range of contemporary work on popular music analysis. Broadly speaking, such work falls into four (overlapping) categories, which have been separated out purely for purposes of clarity of presentation. The relevance to analysis of music theory is perhaps self-evident. Historically, however, fierce debates have taken place over the extent to which established music theory simply transfers to the popular domain. The first sub-session demonstrates the limitation of any simple transfer. While rhythm and harmony are, of course, key constituents of popular styles, they require some reformulation. However, since popular music is so frequently encoutered as a recorded medium, we have to take account of virtual location as an equally important musical domain. The amount of material which can legitimately, globally, be labelled ‘popular’ is huge, and growing massively every year. The very term ‘popular music’ implies the existence of some sort of unity, whether aesthetic, economic, or social, a unity which is hard to maintain in practice. Accordingly, it is necessary to seek intermediate unities in order

Session Convenor Allan Moore

to support individual analyses. These unities sometimes operate at the level of style, or genre, sometimes at the level of the individual idiolect, and sometimes elsewhere. Both stylistic and idiolectal levels are observed in the papers presented here, while discussion will again tend to focus on matters of harmony, rhythm and spatialisation.

Contributors

Anne Danielsen Ruth Dockwray André Doehring Markus Frei-Hauenschild Dai Griffiths Stan Hawkins Oliver Kautny Allan Moore Kenneth Smith Michael Spitzer Ralf von Appen Justin Williams Katherine Williams

Corpus analysis leads, inevitably, to the analysis of individual tracks. There remains substantial prejudicial resistance to this latter practice, both from musicologists (who regard the music as too simple to warrant analytical attention) and from non-musicologists (who argue against the very practice of analysis). However, even the apparently simple can often hide remarkable detail which is often not without social import, as the third sub-session will demonstrate. One lesson learnt from popular music scholars as a whole is that analysis is never sufficient unto itself. The question as to why one is making an analysis, what end it is to serve, can never be ignored. The final set of papers is intended to demonstrate some key ends to which analysis provides the means, ends which always point away from the musical experience to its embedding in a larger life experience.

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Thursday 18 September 10.00

Allan Moore Introduction: Analysing Popular Music: A View from 2014

1 Theory

Chair: Stan Hawkins

14.30

Katherine Williams “This record is dedicated to me”: Rufus Wainwright’s Ego

15.00

Oliver Kautny Vocal Rhythm in Rap Music

15.30

Questions/Debate

16.00

coffee break

10.10

Dai Griffiths Elevating Form and Elevating Modulation: So-called Popular Music as Music and as Discourse

3 Detailed Readings

10.40

Ruth Dockwray Signifying Space: The Sound-Box

16.30

Kenneth Smith A Neo-Riemannian Approach to Suede

11.10

Anne Danielsen Structure and Flexibility: Microrhythm in Groove-based Music

17.00

Justin Williams Intertextuality and Lineage in The Game’s We ain’t

11.40

Questions/Debate

17.30

12.10

lunch break

André Doehring Meaning and Alternating Form and Groove in Four Tet’s Electronic Dance Music

18.00

Questions/Debate

2 Corpus Analysis

Chair: Michael Spitzer 14.00

Chair: Dai Griffiths

>18.30

Ralf von Appen/Markus Frei-Hauenschild Corpus Analysis: Song Form and Harmony in the Repertoire of the Rolling Stones

4 Interpretation

Chair: Ralf von Appen

5 Round Table Session Chair: Kenneth Smith

Friday 19 September

10.00

Allan Moore Addressing Meaningfulness in Popular Song

12.30

Kenneth Smith Introduction to Round Table

10.30

Michael Spitzer Analysing Emotion in Popular Music

12.45

11.00

Stan Hawkins Gender Performativity and Agency in Popular Song

Dai Griffiths, Allan Moore, Michael Spitzer, Anne Danielsen, Stan Hawkins Discussion: Development of Popular Music Analysis

13.30

Discussion/Contributions from the floor, relating to entire session

11.30 Questions/Debate 12.00

>14.00

coffee break

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Session 7B Jazz Harmony: Theory and Practice Friday 19 September 10.00 Dutch room 02.28 Session Convenor Barbara Bleij

Given the importance of harmonic knowledge for the praxis of jazz, it is not surprising that almost right from the start the development of the music gave rise to a growing corpus of harmonic instructions devised for jazz, which later became known as ‘chord/scale theory’. Chord/scale theory adopted central concepts and notions from, and thereby implicitly founded jazz harmony in, functional tonality. But, mostly concerned with the ‘how’ and not so much the ‘why’, the theoretical fundaments remained fuzzy, and stylistic demarcations were largely overlooked. In addition to that, on all levels of the music, matters of counterpoint, voice leading, and even linearity in the broadest sense remained mostly unaddressed. To complicate matters further, this growing corpus of harmonic ideas started to feed back into the music itself, thus exercising an important influence on the development of jazz. Jazz, and thus jazz theory, only later became established in the academy, be it in universities, or in conservatories. Once it did, theorists started to address matters of harmony in a more fundamental way. But although much work

Contributors

Barbara Bleij Laurent Cugny Franz Krieger Henry Martin David Maw Walther Stuhlmacher Keith Waters

has been done, and jazz theory sufficiently critiqued chord/scale theory, still today in jazz the realms of the actually sounding harmony, pedagogical practice, and academic thinking do not fully correspond. For one thing, theoretically justified approaches to harmony have not completely found their way into practical pedagogy, as, for instance, more academic jazz theory is mostly embedded in other discourses, such as that of music theory at large. We may therefore conclude there are still issues to be addressed regarding the relationship between theory, practice, and pedagogy, issues that have a bearing on both academic scholarship and the practice of jazz. In this session, we will contribute to the current discourse on jazz harmony, and zoom in on some aspects of the aforementioned issues. Matters of voice leading and counterpoint will be explored, both on the level of chord voicings - focusing on notions of ‘harmony’ and ‘counterpoint’ -, on the level of schemata, and on the level of the harmonic background of chord progressions. In this context it is investigated how Schenkerian concepts can be made productive for jazz, both in tonal and in post-bop jazz. The session will also address post bop grammar from the perspective of transpositional cycles, distinguishing between ‘first’ and ‘second order’ grammars. Post-bop harmony is furthermore explored as a means to convey the esthetics of modernity. This session will bring together eight views on jazz harmony, each of them addressing different, albeit related aspects of the field. Distinguished musician-scholars read the papers in the

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session. They bring perspectives from both the continent and the US, and have a background in either academic scholarship or pedagogical practice, or both. The session promises to deliver a substantial contribution to our understanding of jazz harmony and to the practice of jazz pedagogy.


10.00

Barbara Bleij Welcome/Introduction: Jazz Harmony. Theory and Practice

Subsession 1

Chair: Karst De Jong 10.15

Laurent Cugny Verticality-Horizontality; Harmony-Counterpoint; Heinrich Schenker-Brad Mehldau

10.55

Franz Krieger Harmonic Modernity in Jazz Blues: Footprints as Played by Herbie Hancock, Chick Corea and Danilo Perez, 1966–2003

11.25

coffee break

11.55

Henry Martin Expanding Jazz Tonality: The Compositions of Wayne Shorter

12.35

Keith Waters Postbop Grammars

13.15

lunch break

Subsession 2

Chair: Karst De Jong 15.30

David Maw Chord-Voicing and Chord-Type in Oscar Peterson’s Standard Playing of 1959

16.00

Barbara Bleij Notions of ‘Mode’ and ‘Modality’ in Jazz Harmony

16.30

Walther Stuhlmacher Schemata in Jazz Compositions

17.00

Discussion

>18.00

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Session 8A ‘Analyzing Performance and Performing Analysis’. Synergies and Interactions between Musical Analysis and Musical Performance Thursday 18 September 10.00 Austrian room 01.12 Session Convenors Christian Utz Lukas Haselböck

Contributors

Paulo de Assis Nicholas Cook Ellen Fallowfield Bruno Gingras Lukas Haselböck Tobias Janz Dieter Kleinrath Heinz von Loesch Bartolo Musil Jan Philipp Sprick Christian Utz

Since at least two decades, music theory and analysis have been affected by “performative turns” in multiple ways and have subsequently developed a variety of new methodological perspectives aiming at syntheses of structuralhermeneutical, historical, perceptual and performative paradigms. The ideal type of a musical performance “derived from” structural analytical insights, favoured by some theorists throughout the 1980s (Narmour 1988, Berry 1989), had been under strong criticism since the 1990s due to its “authoritarian” impetus and has been replaced by a more balanced view of musical works as both “frameworks for a performance culture” and “objects of contemplation or critical reflection” (Cook 2005). This suggests that structural analysis should in no way be entirely thrown overboard, be replaced by a purely pragmatically oriented “performer’s analysis” (Rink 2002) or scaled down to a propaedeutic means for “problem-solving” in performance. Arguably such approaches are limited since they stick to the “false opposition” between rational and intuitive approaches to music. The challenge therefore is to develop synergies between musical analysis and performance which continuously probe the relevance of both areas for a deepened understanding of musical experience, eventually modifying the self-definition of both performers and analysts. Understanding performance not as the expression of a pre-existing structure but conceiving of structure as “performatively constituted” (Cook 1999, 243) and analysis as a “performative” act, “true through, rather than true to experience” (ibid., 252), a key challenge of an interaction between analysis and performance is to integrate performers’ “informed intuition” (Rink 2002) and implicit knowledge with perception-oriented analytical and empirical methods of research. While it is evident that no linear ties can be established between analytical findings and performance practice nor vice versa, a successful synthesis of both areas has remained a desideratum until the present. It seems exceptionally difficult to rationalize or categorize the multiple strategies in which analytical findings might be projected or communicated in performance and, conversely, the ways in which analytical methods are/were (re-)focussed in response to performances. Large parts of performance studies have evaded such questions and limited themselves to systematic technical comparisons of digitalized recordings (e.g. Loesch/Weinzierl 2011), to the historical contextualization of performance traditions (e.g. Danuser 1992, Hinrichsen 2005) or to empirical studies of performative actions (e.g. Parncutt/McPherson 2002). Only rarely have analyses as carried out by performers been documented and contextualized in scholarly publications (cf. Clarke/Cook/Harrison/Thomas 2005, Gingras/Schubert/ McAdams 2010). This session aims to establish an intensified dialogue between (perception- and performance-sensitive) musical analysis and (perception- and analysis-oriented) performance. In the presented papers, diverse branches of performancerelated music research are confronted or merged in presentations by scholar-performers or performer-scholars involved in “artistic research”. Several contributors combine (largely computer-based) methods of empirical research, ethnographical or corpus studies with structural analysis and historical interpretation. The panel, which also features three respondents and aims at invigorating discussion, therefore also attempts to bring performers’ and analysts’ voices into the field of study on an equal footing, most notably in two case studies of performer-scholardialogue.

8A

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10.00

Christian Utz Introduction: What Can ‘Performing Analysis’ Mean?

2A: Case Studies of Performance-Theory-Interaction: Fin-de-Siècle Art Song Chairs: Christian Utz/Lukas Haselböck

1 Empirically Informed Performance-Analysis – New Strategies of Interdisciplinary Music Research

14.45

Bartolo Musil Sailing in Brackish Water. Text and Music in the Art Song of the Fin de Siècle: Theory and Practice

10.30

Heinz von Loesch Concepts of Form in Performance Theory and Practice of Artur Schnabel

15.15

Lukas Haselböck Troping Processes and Irony in Songs by Schubert, Wolf and Mahler

15.45

11.00

Bruno Gingras Linking Analysis and Performance in an Unmeasured Prelude for Harpsichord

Paulo de Assis Response to Musil’s and Haselböck’s papers

16.15

coffee break

11.30

Dieter Kleinrath Experiencing Performance, Analyzing Experience and Performing Analysis. On the Relationship between Musical Analysis, Musical Performance and Musical Listening, Exemplified by Pierre Boulez’ Structures Ia

Chairs: Christian Utz/Lukas Haselböck

12.00

Tobias Janz Response to von Loesch’s, Gingras’s and Kleinrath’s Papers

12.15

Discussion

12.45

lunch break

2B: Case Studies of Performance-Theory-Interaction: Solo Cello Music after 1950 Chairs: Christian Utz/Lukas Haselböck 16.45

Christian Utz Time-Space-Experience in Works for Solo Cello by Xenakis, Lachenmann, and Ferneyhough. A Performance-Sensitive Approach to Morphosyntactic Musical Analysis

17.15

Ellen Fallowfield A Performer’s Analysis as Part of the Interpretation Process

17.45

Paulo de Assis Response to Utz’s and Fallowfield’s Papers

18.15

Discussion

>19.00

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Session 8B Agency in Musical Performance Thursday 18 September 10.00 German room 01.08

Over the last two decades, the academic study of music has seen a marked turn away from a musicology centered on composer and score. This has led to an increase in the diversity of repertoires studied and a growing interest in matters of performance. With these developments, new questions have emerged concerning the relationships between sound and performer and between performance and the practice of analysis. Behind many such questions lies the larger topic of performative agency: the control that a performer has over the music she produces. A performer is, unquestionably, primarily responsible for the physical production of sounds for the majority of music in a variety

Session Convenors Eugene Montague Victoria Tzotzkova

of styles, popular and art. However, to what extent is a performer an independent agent? How can we theorize this agency? Is this agency shared with other forces such as composer, audience, and the sound itself? And what limits, physical or otherwise, might exist on the control of the performer over music? These questions are the focus of our session.

Contributors

Thomas Fritz Tami Gadir Rolf Inge Godøy Roger Graybill Edward Klorman Marc Leman Pieter-Jan Maes Eugene Montague Victoria Tzotzkova Lawrence Zbikowski

The notion of performative agency is not new: scholars such as Burns, Godlovitch, Todd, Abbate, Monahan, Cone, Maus, and Tarasti have advanced analyses that highlight aspects of agency from a range of different musical perspectives. However, there has been little broad discussion of the nature of this agency, indeed it is often understood as a metaphor of analysis rather than a practical consideration of music-making. This aporia is the more striking given that there is lively debate on non-metaphorical agency in philosophy, neurology, and cognitive science and thus the topic offers much opportunity for cross-disciplinary interaction. This session will explore performative agency from a variety of different perspectives. Scholars of musical analysis, empirical musicology, and musical performance will address the phenomenology of such agency, explore its cognitive origins and its expressive effects, and debate the limits and constraints of agency as a concept. The goal of the session is to establish a shared understanding of this fundamental concept for the benefit of future work in music analysis and performance, and in multi-disciplinary research into music. The session will include a round-table discussion of agency in music, seven formal papers, a response to the papers from Lawrence Zbikowski, and many opportunities for discussion between presenters and audience.

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10.00

All participants Opening Discussion: “What is Agency in Music?”

1 Developing Agency: Creativity, Awareness and Control Chair: Eugene Montague

3 Delimiting Agency: Constraints and Challenges Chair: Edward Klorman 15.45

Tami Gadir Analysing Agency: Perspectives from the DJ Booth

16.25

Rolf Inge Godøy Motor Constraints Shaping Musical Experience

10.45

Roger Graybill Facilitative Agency in Performance

11.25

Edward Klorman Performers as Creative Agents: Mapping the Terrain

4 Response to the Session

Victoria Tzotzkova Sounding Music, Cultivating Agency: Musings on Concepts, Discourses, and Practices in Present-Day Traditions of Classical Music Performance

17.05

Lawrence Zbikowski Response

17.45

All participants and audience Closing Discussion

18.30

Conclusion

12.05

12.45

Chair: Victoria Tzotzkova

lunch break

2 Defining Agency: Expression and Experience

>19.00

Chair: Tami Gadir 14.00

Marc Leman Agency and Musical Expression

14.40

Eugene Montague Towards a Phenomenology of Agency in Performance

15.20

coffee break

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Session 9A Computational Music Analysis Friday 19 September 10.30 Russian room 03.12

This two-day session will be devoted to computational approaches to music analysis, focusing in particular on the development and evaluation of algorithms that automatically compute analyses of musical works (or collections of works) from musical ‘surfaces’. The session will also provide an opportunity for consideration of more philosophical issues such as explicating the goals of musical analysis and whether the discovery of musical meaning can ever be (or even should be) fully automated. Papers will present various approaches to the use of computational methods to study musical structure from perceptual or cognitive perspectives. The proposed session will provide a unique opportunity

Saturday 20 September 10.30 Russian room 03.12

for researchers to present papers and have discussions on topics including the following: - automating the discovery of musical meaning, including consideration of questions such as whether it is possible even in principle for a machine to find meaning in a musical work; - evaluation methodologies for music analysis algorithms, including the development of effective procedures and

Session Convenor

objectively evaluable tasks for measuring the quality of an analysis along with digital databases of ground-truth

David Meredith

analyses; - algorithm design, particularly the solution of time- and space-complexity problems that arise when designing

Contributors

Teppo Ahonen Christina Anagnostopoulou Emilios Cambouropoulos Tom Collins Mathieu Giraud Masatoshi Hamanaka Keiji Hirata Maximos KaliakatsosPapakostas Janne Lahti Kjell Lemström Aleš Leonardis

algorithms for music analysis; - applications of music analysis algorithms, such as automation of tasks such as authorship identification, generation

Simo Linkola Matija Marolt Alan Marsden Agustín Martorell Alex McLean David Meredith Kia Ng Victor Padilla Matevž Pesek David Rizo Satoshi Tojo Costas Tsougras Gissel Velarde Anja Volk Tillman Weyde

of editorial stemmata, completion of incomplete pieces and composition of new pieces in an established style; - automation of established analysis methods, such as Schenkerian analysis, pitch-class-set analysis or paradigmatic analysis; - proposals for new algorithmic analysis methods; and - computationally modelling the perception and cognition of musical structure. The session will serve three main purposes: 1. to raise awareness of (and interest in) computational approaches among the European music theory and analysis community; 2. to provide an opportunity for researchers in computational music analysis to meet and exchange ideas; and 3. to raise awareness among computational music analysts of current issues, methodologies and techniques used in non-computational approaches to music analysis. The session will consist of 14 oral presentations. There will also be two panel discussions on the

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following topics: 1. Evaluating music analysis algorithms 2. Is analysis a matter of discovery of structure, ascription of structure, or negotiation of structure?


Friday 19 September 10.30

David Meredith Introduction

Subsession 4

Chair: Agustín Martorell 16.15

Gissel Velarde/David Meredith Melodic Pattern Discovery by Structural Analysis via Wavelets and Clustering Techniques

16.45

Matevž Pesek/Aleš Leonardis/Matija Marolt Compositional Hierarchical Model for Pattern Discovery in Music

17.15

break David Meredith Open Discussion 1: Evaluating Music Analysis Algorithms

Subsession 1

Chair: David Meredith 10.45

Tom Collins Inter-Opus Analyses of Beethoven’s Piano Sonatas

11.15

Tillman Weyde Melodic Prediction and Polyphonic Structure Analysis

17.30

11.45

coffee break

>18.30

Subsession 2

Chair: Tillman Weyde 12.15

Christina Anagnostopoulou Computational Music Analysis of Children’s Keyboard Improvisations

12.45

Teppo Ahonen/Janne Lahti/Kjell Lemström/Simo Linkola Intelligent Digital Music Score Book: CATNIP

13.15

lunch break

Subsession 3

Chair: Kjell Lemström 14.45

Agustín Martorell Systematic Set-Class Surface Analysis: A Hierarchical Multi-Scale Approach

15.15

David Meredith Music Analysis and Point-Set Compression

15.45

coffee break

Saturday 20 September

see next page

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Session 9A (continued) Computational Music Analysis Friday 19 September 10.30 Russian room 03.12

This two-day session will be devoted to computational approaches to music analysis, focusing in particular on the development and evaluation of algorithms that automatically compute analyses of musical works (or collections of works) from musical ‘surfaces’. The session will also provide an opportunity for consideration of more philosophical issues such as explicating the goals of musical analysis and whether the discovery of musical meaning can ever be (or even should be) fully automated. Papers will present various approaches to the use of computational methods to study musical structure from perceptual or cognitive perspectives. The proposed session will provide a unique opportunity

Saturday 20 September 10.30 Russian room 03.12

for researchers to present papers and have discussions on topics including the following: - automating the discovery of musical meaning, including consideration of questions such as whether it is possible even in principle for a machine to find meaning in a musical work; - evaluation methodologies for music analysis algorithms, including the development of effective procedures and

Session Convenor

objectively evaluable tasks for measuring the quality of an analysis along with digital databases of ground-truth

David Meredith

analyses; - algorithm design, particularly the solution of time- and space-complexity problems that arise when designing

Contributors

Teppo Ahonen Christina Anagnostopoulou Emilios Cambouropoulos Tom Collins Mathieu Giraud Masatoshi Hamanaka Keiji Hirata Maximos KaliakatsosPapakostas Janne Lahti Kjell Lemström Aleš Leonardis

algorithms for music analysis; - applications of music analysis algorithms, such as automation of tasks such as authorship identification, generation

Simo Linkola Matija Marolt Alan Marsden Agustín Martorell Alex McLean David Meredith Kia Ng Victor Padilla Matevž Pesek David Rizo Satoshi Tojo Costas Tsougras Gissel Velarde Anja Volk Tillman Weyde

of editorial stemmata, completion of incomplete pieces and composition of new pieces in an established style; - automation of established analysis methods, such as Schenkerian analysis, pitch-class-set analysis or paradigmatic analysis; - proposals for new algorithmic analysis methods; and - computationally modelling the perception and cognition of musical structure. The session will serve three main purposes: 1. to raise awareness of (and interest in) computational approaches among the European music theory and analysis community; 2. to provide an opportunity for researchers in computational music analysis to meet and exchange ideas; and 3. to raise awareness among computational music analysts of current issues, methodologies and techniques used in non-computational approaches to music analysis. The session will consist of 14 oral presentations. There will also be two panel discussions on the

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following topics: 1. Evaluating music analysis algorithms 2. Is analysis a matter of discovery of structure, ascription of structure, or negotiation of structure?


Saturday 20 September Subsession 5

Subsession 8

10.30

Alex McLean/Victor Padilla/Alan Marsden/Kia Ng Data for Music Analysis from Optical Music Recognition: Prospects for Improvement Using Multiple Sources

16.00

Keiji Hirata/Satoshi Tojo/Alan Marsden/Masatoshi Hamanaka Music Analyzer that Can Handle Context Dependency

11.00

David Rizo Interactive Music Analysis

16.30

Alan Marsden Open Discussion 2: Is Analysis a Matter of Discovery of Structure, Ascription of Structure, or Negotiation of Structure?

11.30

coffee break

Chair: David Meredith

Chair: David Meredith

>17.30

Subsession 6

Chair: Alex McLean 12.00 Anja Volk Rhythmic Patterns as Constituents of the Ragtime Genre 12.30

Emilios Cambouropoulos/Maximos Kaliakatsos-Papakostas/Costas Tsougras The General Chord Type Representation: An Algorithm for Root Finding and Chord Labelling in Diverse Harmonic Idioms

13.00

lunch break

Subsession 7

Chair: Emilios Cambouropoulos 14.30

Mathieu Giraud Can a Computer Understand Musical Forms?

15.00

Alan Marsden Do Performers Disambiguate Structure?

15.30

coffee break

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Session 9B Algebraic Combinatorics of Scales and Modes with Applications to Music Analysis

The session is being organized at the initiative of the Micrologus Group. This group consists of six researchers (Emmanuel Amiot, Norman Carey, David Clampitt, Thomas Noll, Jon Wild, Marek Žabka) actively working in the field of mathematical music theory and dedicates its activity to the transdisciplinary discourse among musicians, music theorists, and mathematicians sharing a high professional expertise in each other’s domains. The group congregates in summer meetings or in connection with other academic events. A central interest of the group is the mathematical

Saturday 20 September 10.00 Dutch room 02.28 Session Convenors Thomas Noll Marek Žabka

conceptualization of musical tone relations. This includes the study of scales, modes, regions, tone-nets and their connections to other levels of description as well as to the history of ideas around these concepts within music theory. The award-winning paper “Regions: A Theory of Tonal Spaces in Early Medieval Treatises” (Journal of Music Theory, 40, 1996) together with two other seminal papers by Norman Carey and David Clampitt marks a point of departure for the unfolding discourse of the group. Several publications of group members document the continued efforts to mathematically enrich the process of music-theoretical conceptualization and to integrate the resulting new musictheoretical ideas into a coherent picture. The recent award-winning paper “Modes, the Height-Width Duality, and

Contributors

Emmanuel Amiot Norman Carey David Clampitt Thomas Noll Jessica Rudman Jennifer Shafer Jonathan Wild Marek Žabka

Handschin’s Tone Character” (Music Theory Online, 17, 2011) by David Clampitt and Thomas Noll exemplifies this research direction. Emmanuel Amiot widens the field through novel and original applications of the Discrete Fourier Transformation to various aspects of musical structure, including the study of scales, chords and even temperaments, see for example “David Lewin and Maximally Even Sets” (Journal of Mathematics and Music, 1/3, 2007) and “Discrete Fourier Transform and Bach’s Good Temperament”  (Music Theory Online,  15/2, 2009). Jon Wild, composer and music theorist, seeks to integrate the study of scales and tuning issues into the full spectrum of analytical and compositional levels. Together with Peter Schubert he connects theory, analysis and the study of performance in the article “Historically Informed Retuning of Polyphonic Vocal Performance” (Journal of Interdisciplinary Music Studies, 2/1&2, 2008). In “Well-formedness in Two Dimensions: a Generalization of Carey and Clampitt’s Theorem” (Journal of Mathematics and Music, 4/1, 2010) Marek Žabka connects two domains, which were previously rather separate working areas in theory: algebraic scale theory and the study of tone nets. This session publicly continues the ‘little discourse’ and welcomes new active participants (Jessica Rudman and Jennifer Shafer) and emphasizes analytical aspects of the various theoretical approaches and their interconnections. It consists of 5 contributed papers and a panel with the subject ‘Current

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Lines of Mathematical Thinking about Diatonicity’.


Subsession 1

Panel session

10.00

David Clampitt Analytical Applications of Singular Pairwise Well-formed Scale Structures

16.00

Emmanuel Amiot Panel 1: Exploring Further the Torii of Phases for the Study of Chord Progressions

10.45

Marek Žabka Well-Formedness, Myhill’s Property and Maximal Evenness – How to Generalize Them for Non-Pythagorean Scales?

16.45

Jonathan Wild/Marek Žabka Panel 2: Fokker-Clough Chains of Generated Tone Systems; Theoretical and Computational Exploration

11.30

Jennifer Shafer Unveiling the Invisible: An Examination of Structure through Wavelet Analysis

17.30

Jessica Rudman Panel 3: Ugly Step-Sisters: A Scale-Theoretic Examination of the Greek Genera

12.15

coffee break

18.15

All participants General Discussion

Chair: Thomas Noll

Subsession 2

Chair: David Clampitt

>19.00

Chair: Marek Žabka 12.30

Norman Carey/Thomas Noll Descending Diminished Seventh Chords: Integrating Perspectives of Chordal Structure, Fundament Progression, Diatonic and Chromatic Voice Leading

13.15

Jonathan Wild Scale Theory in the 16th Century — the Case of Nicola Vicentino

14.00

lunch break

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Session 10 Meter in the Moment Wednesday 17 September 14.00 Dutch room 02.28

Recent scholarship on meter has shifted from a paradigm of ‘end-state’ analysis - unlocking a score’s metrical structure - to ‘in-time’ analysis - modeling meter as experienced by listeners and/or performers. The most influential recent exemplar of the latter perspective is Danuta Mirka’s pathbreaking Metrical Manipulations in Haydn and Mozart, which integrates the real-time cognition of meter with historicist and stylistic perspectives, leading to a dynamic, psychologically rich account of what might be called ‘the metrical experience’. However, her focus on a relatively narrow corpus - string chamber music by Haydn and Mozart from a five-year period - leaves several unanswered

Session Convenor Edward Klorman

questions about the in-time metrical analysis of tonal music. The proposed session examines real-time metrical analysis as it relates to the following topics: (1) the historical evolution of hypermeter since the Baroque period, (2) the interaction between hypermeter and formal function

Contributors

John Paul Ito Edward Klorman Danuta Mirka Rowland Moseley Markus Neuwirth

(at small and large levels), (3) the role of schemas in the experience of hypermeter, (4) the phenomenology of and cognitive constraints on the in-time selection of preference rules by listeners, and (5) the role of performers’ agency in metrical conflicts and manipulation. With this broadened analytical purview and range of repertoire (from Bach to Brahms), we hope to advance the state of knowledge on the interstices between end-state and in-time approaches to meter in tonal music and to suggest new directions for future research.

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Subsession 1

Chair: Edward Klorman 14.00

Rowland Moseley Hypermetric Analysis, Hypermetric Performance, and the Idea of Projection

14.40

John Paul Ito Nascent Hypermeter in Bach: The Development of Style and Perception

15.30

coffee break

Subsession 2

Chair: John Paul Ito 16.00

Markus Neuwirth Revisiting Hypermetrical Ambiguity: Real-time Perception and Expectancy Formation

16.45

Danuta Mirka Harmonic Schemata and Hypermeter

17.30

Edward Klorman Meter as Agency: Performing Metrical Manipulations in Chamber Music

18.15

General Discussion

>19.00

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Session 11 Topic Theory and Music Analysis Saturday 20 September 14.00 French room 00.14

The concept of musical topics was introduced into the vocabulary of music scholars by Leonard Ratner to account for cross-references between 18th-century styles and genres. The emergence of this phenomenon followed on the heels of rapid proliferation and consolidation of stylistic and generic categories in the early 18th century. While music theorists and critics were busy classifying styles and genres, defining their affects and proper contexts for their usage, composers started crossing the boundaries between them and using stylistic conventions as means of communication with the audience. This phenomenon was particularly characteristic of the South-German instrumental style. Topic

Session Convenor Danuta Mirka

theory, developed from Ratner’s seminal insight by Wye Allanbrook, Kofi Agawu, Robert Hatten, Raymond Monelle, and others, can be considered a theory of this style. Its historical background will be clarified in the forthcoming Oxford Handbook of Topic Theory, which should become the foundational publication and basic reference for further study of musical topics. This session brings together a subset of contributors to this publication with the aim of demonstrating

Contributors

Vasili Byros Julian Horton Roman Ivanovitch Eric McKee Danuta Mirka Lawrence Zbikowski

the relevance of topic theory for music analysis. The link between the two was forged by Agawu (1991) and William Caplin (2005). Although both authors undertook important attempts to coordinate topics with musical form, in their accounts topics and form remain separated from each other. This explains why topical analysis has not been fully integrated with other methods of music analysis and why it is treated with some unease by music theorists. Though declared by Caplin “one of the success stories of modern musicology”, it remains an enclave to which they frequently pay lip service but seldom take into account in their analytical practice. Ironically, this attitude is shared by scholars in the field of historically informed music theory, although the advances of this field in the last three decades were stimulated by Ratner’s project “to approach the music and musical precepts of the 18th century in much the same way a listener of that time would have done”. But the reserved attitude toward stylistic cross-references, represented by topics, does not account for the basic premise of 18th-century music aesthetics, according to which all dimensions of musical structure stand in service of affect and character which, in their turn, are closely related to styles and genres, and it neglects the fact that topics participate in the dimensions of musical structure whose investigation forms part and parcel of every music analysis. The speakers in this session will examine the ways in which topics interact with meter, hypermeter, rhythm, phrase rhythm, harmonic schemata, tonality, and form. They will show that the concept of topics is of central importance for music analysis. Conversely, music analysis is indispensable for correct identification of topics and for making sense of their selection and succession in a musical piece.

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14.00

Danuta Mirka Introduction: Topic Theory and Music Analysis

Subsession 1

Chair: Lawrence Zbikowski/Danuta Mirka 14.15

Danuta Mirka Topics and Meter

14.45

Vasili Byros Mozart’s Ironic Mask: Topics and Harmonic Schemata in the ‘Haffner’ Symphony

15.15

Lawrence Zbikowski Music and Dance in the Ancien Régime

15.45

coffee break

Subsession 2

Chair: Danuta Mirka 16.15

Eric McKee Ballroom Dances of the Late 18th Century

16.45

Roman Ivanovitch The Brilliant Style: Illuminations, Revelations, and Force

17.15

Julian Horton Topic Theory and the Analysis of 19th-Century Music

17.45

Round Table Discussion

>18.30

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Session 12 Music Analysis and the Body Wednesday 17 September 14.00 British room 00.08 Session Convenor Nicholas Reyland

Affect and embodiment have emerged as central concerns in 21st-century arts, humanities and cultural studies research, including musicology. The recent upswing of interest in philosophical approaches to the musical body, for instance, has been paralleled by the development of new theories of gesture, metaphor, agency, force, expectation and embodied cognition. Close critical analyses are now required to complement and develop these philosophical and theoretical perspectives, via carefully contextualised work on a wide variety of repertoires. This half-day â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;conference within a conferenceâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; unites senior and emerging scholars from Europe and the USA, and also invites participation from any other interested scholars attending EuroMAC â&#x20AC;&#x201C; in order to make a contribution to this important frontier of musical scholarship, while presenting new perspectives on affect and representation, emotion and cognition, software and creativity, interactive music systems, breathing and phrasing, agency and embodiment.

Contributors

Michael Klein Joshua B. Mailman Vincent Meelberg Nicholas Reyland Stacey Sewell Rebecca Thumpston

Music examined will include examples drawn from popular, electroacoustic, Romantic and modernist repertoires. The first half of the session will be devoted to the presentation of short position papers (max. 15 minutes each) from each of the named participants, and brief discussions identifying areas for further discussion; the second half of the session will take the form of a workshop exploring key topics arising from the papers and, more generally, a range of issues arising through analytical, theoretical and critical engagements with music and the body. All papers will be delivered in English.

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Subsession 1

Chair: Nicholas Reyland

14.00

Vincent Meelberg Composing the Body Electric: The Bodily Aspect of Using Software in Music Creation

14.15

Stacey Sewell Embodiments of Making: Breath, Phrase and Entrainment in Electroacoustic Music

14.30

Joshua B. Mailman Experimental Pragmatic Approaches to Interactive Music Systems Inspired by Music Analysis

14.45 All Discussion

Subsession 2

Chair: Stacey Sewell

15.00

Nicholas Reyland Classing the Musical Body: Empathy, Affect and Representation in BBC TV’s The Royle Family

15.15

Rebecca Thumpston The ‘Feel’ of Expansion: Embodying Musical Growth

15.30

Michael Klein Musical Affect as Vital Bodily Force in the Work of Deleuze and Guattari

15.45 All Discussion 16.00

coffee break

Music Analysis and the Body: Workshop Chair: Michael Klein 16.30

All (including other delegates attending session) Workshop

>18.30

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Session 13 In the Shadow of the Pantheon. Analysing Minor Masters and Secondary Composers

As the theoretical literature on tonal music progresses, a canonical repertoire of musical works to which these writings refer gradually has emerged. Cases in point include the theoretical writings of Heinrich Koch, Anton Reicha, Adolf Bernhard Marx, Heinrich Schenker, Arnold Schoenberg and more recently Charles Rosen, Leonard Ratner, Robert Hatten, Kofi Agawu, Leonard Meyer, William Caplin and James Hepokoski. The majority of the examples illustrating their arguments are taken from the production of a limited number of admired composers like Handel, J. S. Bach,

Thursday 18 September 09.00 Belgian room 01.28 Session Convenors

Jean-Pierre Bartoli Louise Bernard De Raymond Muriel Boulan

Haydn, Mozart, Beethoven, Schumann, Brahms or Debussy. As soon as we focus on the music of other composers who do not belong to this musical pantheon, the limitations of these analytical approaches become apparent. This session proposes to question the common practice of music analysis when applied to the group of composers – male or female – often referred to as ‘minor masters’ or ‘secondary’ composers either because they are active outside the privileged (mainly Germanic) geographical area, or because their works did not provide examples well-suited to certain circumscribed theoretical assumptions (Ravel or Sibelius, for instance, appear less often studied than Debussy). What are the more appropriate methods in this case? Should the usual models be employed anyway, that is to evaluate tonal and formal structures in these neglected works against those of the recognised ‘great masters’,

Contributors

Jean-Pierre Bartoli Louise Bernard De Raymond Muriel Boulan Florence Doé de Maindreville Timothy Jackson Priscille Lachat-Sarrete Veijo Mürtomaki Jeanne Roudet Jérôme Rossi Jean-Claire Vançon

merely taking note only of the problematic differences? Does not this way of considering singular traits as mere deviations from a putative norm raise a problem? Would in-depth analysis of co-called ‘petits maîtres’ enable us to refine our understanding of the canonical models? Should one rather develop new analytical tools? If so, on what theoretical basis can we build them? One should also question the way the pantheon was built. Besides, the inventory of its members remains to be done. Similarly, one may wonder whether in ruling out some composers or some aesthetic trends, music theory has not contributed to an implicit value judgment of the tonal repertory and to a musicological discourse based on biased choices that should be examined. This session will concern repertories from the end of the 18th century to the beginning of the 20th. The session will take the form of individual or collective communications of 20 to 45 minutes each, followed by a discussion at the end of each series of papers. It will conclude with a round table discussion between its participants and the audience with very short prepared interventions.

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1 L’Approche émique en question/Questioning the Precedence to Emic Approaches

Chair: Muriel Boulan 10.00 Jean-Pierre Bartoli/Jeanne Roudet Introduction Analyse d’un genre négligé et réévaluation des modèles en cours: l’exemple de la fantaisie pour clavier (Book Presentation) 10.30

Jean-Claire Vançon Sur la trace d’un ‘style académique’: analyser les oeuvres des lauréats du Prix de Rome à la lumière des catégories de l’Académie des Beaux-Arts (1803-1830)

2 L’approche étique en question/Questioning the Precedence to Etic Approaches (1) Chair: Louise Bernard de Raymond 14.30

Timothy Jackson Anton Eberl’s Innovative Conceptions of Sonata Form: the Example of the first Movements of E flat major Op. 33 and D minor Op. 34 Symphonies

15.15

Florence Doé de Maindreville Pistes d’analyse autour du Premier quatuor à cordes de Saint-Saëns

15.45

Priscille Lachat-Sarrete Analyse des concertos de l’école française de violon du début du 19e siècle

11.00

Discussion

11.15

coffee break

16.15

Discussion

11.45

Veijo Murtomäki Heinrich Christoph Koch, Joseph Antonín Štĕpán and the ‘Viennese’ Classical Piano school

16.30

coffee break

12.15

Louise Bernard de Raymond Les écrits théoriques d’Antoine Reicha à l’épreuve de l’analyse de ses quatuors: l’exemple de la ‘grande coupe binaire’

12.45

Discussion

13.00

lunch break

3 L’approche étique en question/Questioning the Precedence to Etic Approaches (2) Chair: Jean-Pierre Bartoli 17.00

Muriel Boulan Analyser les petits maîtres avec les outils de Jan LaRue: ajustement d’un système de symboles à des configurations hors norme

17.30

Jérôme Rossi Un modèle debussyste? A propos de quelques phénomènes de duplications dans la musique de Frederick Delius

18.00

Discussion

18.15

Round Table: L’approche étique en question/Questioning the Precedence to Etic Approaches

Conclusion

>19.00

83


Post-composed Sessions


SESSION A: FORM ANALYSIS Subsession 1: 1750-1800 Subsession 2: 1800-1850 Subsession 3: 1850-1900

SESSION I: THEORIES & CONCEPTS FOR THE ANALYSIS OF 20th-CENTURY MUSIC

SESSION B: MUSIC THEORY PEDAGOGY

SESSION K: SCHENKERIAN THEORY

SESSION C: SCHOENBERG, WEBERN & DIE FOLGEN Subsession 1: Schoenberg Subsession 2: Webern Subsession 3: & die Folgen

SESSION L: MUSIC AND FILM

SESSION J: POPULAR GENRES

SESSION M: MISCELLANEOUS

SESSION D: HARMONY 19th – EARLY 20th CENTURY Subsession 1 Subsession 2 SESSION E: MUSIC THEORY AROUND 1900 SESSION F: COUNTERPOINT SESSION G: WESTERN MUSIC (THEORY) IN CHINA & JAPAN SESSION H: ANALYSES OF 20th-CENTURY COMPOSITIONS Subsession 1: German and Central European Composers Subsession 2: Italian Composers Subsession 3: French composers Subsession 4: British Composers Subsession 5: North-American Composers

85


Session A Form Analysis

1 1750-1800

Chair: Giorgio Sanguinetti

Saturday 20 September 10.00 Austrian room 01.12

10.00

Wayne Petty Some Multimovement Designs in C.P.E. Bach’s Late Keyboard Sonatas

10.30

Alexander Morgan The Interdependence of Schemata and Form in the Motto Symphonies of Haydn

Contributors

11.00

Joseph Chi‐Sing Siu Hypermetrical Shift in Haydn’s Late Monothematic Sonatas

11.30

Matthew Boyle Textual Rotations and the Two Tempo Rondò

12.00

lunch break

Matthew Boyle Jon‐Tomas Godin Chelsey Hamm Caitlin Martinkus Alexander Morgan Meghan Naxer Wayne Petty Carissa Reddick René Rusch Joseph Chi‐Sing Siu Steven Vande Moortele Joyce Yip

A 86


2 1800-1850

Chair: Lauri Suurpää 14.00

René Rusch Schubert’s Four-Key Expositions? Another Look at the Composer’s Sonata Form Practice through a Form-Functional Analysis of D575, i, and D667, ii

14.30

Jon‐Tomas Godin Schubert and Sonata Rhetoric

15.00

Joyce Yip The Roles of the Coda in Selected Mazurkas of Chopin

15.30

Steven Vande Moortele The Potpourri Overture as Musical Form

16.00

coffee break

3 1850-1900

Chair: Julian Horton 16.30

Meghan Naxer Rotations, Interlacing, and Motivic Transformation in Franck’s Symphony in D minor, Op. 48

17.00

Chelsey Hamm Musical Stagnation and Expressive Failure in Smetana’s Piano Trio in G minor

17.30

Carissa Reddick Nested Forms and Hierarchical Function in Sonata Forms from the Late 19th Century

18.00

Caitlin Martinkus Richard Strauss and the Classical Cadence

>18.30

87


Session B Music Theory Pedagogy

10.00

Saturday 20 September 10.00 German room 01.08

1 Pregraduate: Requirements and Preparations Chair: Hans Peter Reutter 10.15

Nina Hildebrand Jungstudierende mit absolutem Gehör. Chancen und Herausforderungen im integrativen Hörererziehungs- und Satzlehreunterricht/Pre-Graduate Students with Absolute Pitch. Chances and Challenges for Integrative Courses in Aural Training and Music Theory

10.45

Lola Dzhumanova/Elena B. Zhurova Traditions and Innovations in Music Theory Pedagogy in Russia

11.15

Liudmila Kazantseva The Theory of Musical Content as a Pedagogic Tool

11.45

coffee break

Contributors

Lola Dzhumanova Philippe Gantchoula Nina Hildebrand Marina Karaseva Liudmila Kazantseva Sanja Kiš Žuvela Reinier Maliepaard Hans Peter Reutter Hugues Seress Robert Sholl Markus Sotirianos Elena B. Zhurova

B 88

Hans Peter Reutter Welcome


2 Ear Training/Harmony

Chair: Mark se 12.00 Marina Karaseva Perceiving Music Theory by Music Ear: Innovations and Traditions in the Approach to the Intensive Ear Training 12.30

Philippe Gantchoula/Hugues Seress Unités d’orientation tonale et Tonnetz néo-Riemannien polarisé: deux outils didactiques pour l’analyse de la tonalité élargie/Tonal Orientation Units and Polarized Neo-Riemannian Tonnetz: Two Didactic Tools for Extended Tonality

13.00 lunch break

3 Counterpoint

Chair: Hans Peter Reutter 14.30

Hans Peter Reutter Renaissance Counterpoint as a Study of Melody or ‘The Anti-Gradus’

15.00

Robert Sholl “How do you like your counterpoint, Sir?” Music Pedagogy after Therapy

15.30

coffee break

4 Overarching Aspects

Chair: Hans Peter Reutter 16.00

Markus Sotirianos Between “What do I need that for?” and “Didn’t you learn that in theory class?” – Questions and Observations in German Undergraduate Music Theory Classes

16.30

Reinier Maliepaard About a Pilot Project on Music Theory

17.00

Sanja Kiš Žuvela Structural Analogies between the Arts in Teaching Music Theory

17.30

coffee break

5 Panel session

Chair: Hans Peter Reutter 18.00 All Discussion: Education Politics

>19.00

89


Session C Schoenberg, Webern & die Folgen

1 Schoenberg, 14.00

Wednesday 17 September 14.00 Austrian room 01.12

Matthew Arndt A Non‐Tonal Problem in a Piece by Schoenberg (Op. 19 Nr. 2)

14.30

Áine Heneghan Schoenberg’s Sentence

Chair: Mark Delaere

Contributors

Matthew Arndt Christine Dysers Áine Heneghan Bruce Quaglia Irina Snitkova Sebastian Wedler

2 Webern

Chair: Mark Delaere 15.00

Sebastian Wedler On the Genealogy of Webern’s Lyrical Physiognomy

15.30

Irina Snitkova Webern’s Symphony, Op. 21: ‘Lyrical’ or ‘Symbolical’ Geometry?

16.00

coffee break

C 90


3 & die Folgen

Chair: Tatiana Tsaregradskaya 16.30

Christine Dysers A Cellular Approach to Schönberg: Bernhard Lang’s Monadologie VII … for Arnold … (2009)

17.00

Bruce Quaglia Nono’s Schoenberg: Early Serial Constructs in the Variazioni Canoniche

>17.30

91


Session D Harmony 19th – Early 20th Century

Subsession 1 14.00

Wednesday 17 September 14.00 French room 00.14

Michael Baker Some Instances of ‘Dominantized Tonics’ in Romantic German Song

14.30

Heather Platt Searching for the Tonic in Brahms’ Lieder

15.00

Benedict Taylor Navigating Grieg’s ‘Harmonic Dreamworld’: Tetrachordal Harmonies and Added‐Note Voice‐Leading in Haugtussa

15.30

coffee break

Chair: Harald Krebs

Contributors Michael Baker Ellen Bakulina Damian Blättler Heather Platt Olga Sologub Benedict Taylor

Subsession 2

Chair: Clemens Kemme 16.00

Damian Blättler A Voicing‐Centered Approach to Additive Harmony in Music of ‘la Belle Époque’

16.30

Ellen Bakulina Tonal Duality and the New Russian Choral School

17.00

Olga Sologub The Slippy Slide: Reconsidering the Concept of ‘Wrong Notes’ in the Music of Sergei Prokofiev

>17.30

D 92


Session E Music Theory around 1900 Thursday 17 September 14.00 German room 01.08 Contributors

David Byrne Ji Yeon Lee Stephan Lewandowski

Chair: Nicolas Meeùs 14.00

Stephan Lewandowski ‘Back to the Future’ – The Music Theorist Heinrich Josef Vincent (1819‐1901) and his Polemic against Figured Bass

14.30

David Byrne From Function to Transformation: Sigfrid Karg‐Elert (1877‐1933) as Proto‐Neo‐Riemannian

15.00

Ji Yeon Lee Ernst Kurth’s Climax Theory and its Application to Wagner Analysis

>15.30

E 93


Session F Counterpoint Thursday 18 September 10.30 Italian room 00.20 Contributors

Maria Teresa Arfini Luciane Beduschi Matthew Brown Denis Collins John Koslovsky

Chair: Duilio d’Alfonso 10.30

Maria Teresa Arfini The Musikalisches Kunstbuch of Johann Theile. A Contribution to the Reversible Counterpoint and Canon Theory

11.00

Luciane Beduschi Composer’s Opinions about the Multiple Solutions for their Puzzle Canons

11.30

Denis Collins Pierre Moulu’s Missa Alma Redemptoris Mater and S. I. Taneyev’s Theories of Horizontal‐Shifting Counterpoint

12.00

John Koslovsky/Matthew Brown The Contrapuntal Legacy of the French Fin‐de‐siècle: A Look at Dukas’ Piano Sonata in E-flat minor

>12.30

F 94


Session G Western Music (Theory) in China and Japan Saturday 20 September 16.30 British room 00.08 Contributors

Wai‐Ling Cheong Chun Fai John Lam Wei Zhang

Chair: Gesine Schröder 16.30

Wai‐Ling Cheong Reading Kurth, Hindemith and Schoenberg through Sang Tong – Modernist Theoretical Approaches in China

17.00

Wei Zhang Serial Music in China: The Development of Technique and Theory of Serial Music During the 1980s and 1990s

17.30

Chun Fai John Lam Stravinsky à Delage: Pentatonic Scales as Japonisme in Three Japanese Lyrics

>18.00

G 95


Session H Analyses of 20th-Century Compositions

Thursday 18 September 1 German and Central European Composers Chair: Yves Knockaert

Thursday 18 September 13.30 Russian room 03.12 Saturday 20 September 10.00 British room 00.08 Contributors

Amy Bauer Michael Clarke Hubertus Dreyer Frédéric Dufeu Laura Emmery David Forrest Shigeru Fujita Ding Hong

Joel Hunt Kristina Knowles Peter Manning Sandro Marrocu Richard McGregor Nicolò Palazzetti Ciro Scotto Milos Zatkalik

13.30

Amy Bauer Ideology, Compositional Process, Optics and Form in Georg Friedrich Haas’s In Vain

14.00

Richard McGregor “Die Detonation ist am Körper angekommen” ‐ Rihm’s Creative Explosion in 1981

14.30

Milos Zatkalik Teleological Strategies of Non‐Tonal Music: The Case of Milan Mihajlovic

15.00

Hubertus Dreyer How Ligeti Once Was Puzzled by Schubert – and a Luhmannian Response

15.30

coffee break

2 Italian Composers Chair: Alessandro Cervino 16.00

Sandro Marrocu Su una ‘sola nota’: Il Terzo Periodo di Giacinto Scelsi

16.30

Nicolò Palazzetti From Bartók to Darmstadt: Analysis of Bruno Maderna’s First String Quartet

17.00

coffee break

H 96


3 French Composers Chair: Jean-Marc Chouvel 17.30

Ding Hong Sonicizing the Poetics of Illusion: Debussy’s Transformational Strategy in Prélude à l’après‐midi d’un faune

18.00

Ciro Scotto Harmonic Process and Formal Structure in Some Recent Music by Boulez

18.30

Shigeru Fujita Sur le même accord: Dutilleux’s Systematic Thinking in the Harmonic Dimension

>19.00

5 North-American Composers

Chair: Michiel Schuijer 12.00 Laura Emmery In Disguise: Borrowings in Elliott Carter’s Early String Quartets 12.30

Kristina Knowles Ebb and Flow: Rhythm and Temporality in Unmetered Music by George Crumb

13.00

Joel Hunt Indeterminacy in the Music of Henry Brant: Toward a Framework for ‘Controlled Improvisation’

>13.30

Saturday 20 September 4 British Composers Chair: Jonathan Cross 10.30

David Forrest The Interplay of Tonal and Symmetrical Elements in Britten

11.00

Michael Clarke/Frédéric Dufeu/Peter Manning Towards an Analysis of Trevor Wishart’s Imago: Form, Structure and Technology

11.30

coffee break

97


Session I Theories & Concepts for the Analysis of 20th-Century Music Thursday 18 September 10.30 French room 00.14 Contributors

Pascal Decroupet Manuel Farolfi Stanley Kleppinger Yi-Cheng Daniel Wu

Chair: Mario Baroni 10.30

Pascal Decroupet Fundamentals for a Theory of Sonal Music

11.00

Manuel Farolfi Chance and Indeterminacy in Music: A New Analytical Tool to Classify Aleatoric Music Forms

11.30

Yi-Cheng Daniel Wu A Reconsideration of Intervalâ&#x20AC;?Class Space through the Perspective of Joseph Strausâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Evenness and Spaciousness

12.00

Stanley Kleppinger Pitch Centricity without Pitch Centers

>12.30

I 98


Session J Popular Genres Friday 19 September 14.00 British room 00.08

Chair: Kenneth Smith 14.00

Victoria Malawey Vocal Elasticity in Aretha Franklin’s Respect

14.30

Darryl White The Melodic Harmonic ‘Divorce’ in Jazz

>15.00

Contributors

Victoriay Malawey Darryl White

J 99


Session K Schenkerian Theory Saturday 20 September 14.00 British room 00.08 Contributors

Duilio D’Alfonso Zachary Bernstein Nathan Fleshner Edward Latham

Chair: John Koslovsky 14.00

Zachary Bernstein Some Reflections on Milton Babbitt, Schenkerian

14.30

Edward Latham ‘Beautiful Infinity’ – The Permanent Interruption as a Symbol of Romantic Distance in the Music of Robert Schumann

15.00

Duilio D’Alfonso Unifying Schenker and Riemann

15.30

Nathan Fleshner Schumann’s Ich hab’ im Traum geweinet: A Schenkerian and Freudian Perspective

>16.00

K 100


Session L Film and Music

Chair: Alessandro Bratus 10.30

Thursday 18 September 10.30 Swiss room 01.16

Olivier Pigott Mahler – Roman ou Film?

11.00

Kevin Clifton The Anatomy of Aural Suspense in Rope and Vertigo

Contributors

>11.30

Kevin Clifton Olivier Pigott

L Session M Miscellaneous QR code generated on http://qrcode.littleidiot.be

Thursday 18 September 12.00 Swiss room 01.16 Contributors

Mike Lee Marina Lupishko

Chair: Ariane Jeßulat 12.00

Marina Lupishko The Principle of ‘Confutatio’ in J.S. Bach’s Music and the Philosophical System of Yakov Druskin (1902-80): The Narratological Aspect

12.30

Mike Lee Rethinking Cyclic Unity through Embodiment: Alternative Sources of Coherence in Chopin’s Preludes Op. 28

>13.00

M 101


Russian Music Theory Welcome Session Thursday 18 September 20.00 Parthenon room 03.18 Contributors

Valentina Kholopova Sergei Lebedev Grigorii Lyzhov Daniel Shutko Tatiana Tsaregradskaya Vera Valkova

Chair: Ildar Khannanov 20.00 Introduction 20.05

Sergei Lebedev Foundations of Harmony. Current Research in Ancient and Early Mediaeval Music Theory in Russia

20.12

Grigorii Lyzhov Yuri Kholopov’s Concept of Evolution of Tonal Harmony

20.35

Discussion

20.45

Tatiana Tsaregradskaya Boris Asafyev and the Ideas of Energeticism in Russian Music Theory

21.00

Daniel Shutko Tjulin, Kushnarev, Bershadskaya: Leningrad School of Music Theory

21.15

Discussion

21.25

Vera Valkova The Category of ‘Spread-Out’ Theme in Contemporary Russian Music Theory

21.40

Valentina Kholopova Aspects of Teaching of Form in Contemporary Russia

21.55

General Discussion

>22.00

102


Round Table The object of analysis – practices and theories Friday 19 September 20.00 Parthenon room 03.18 Contributors

Mario Baroni (GATM) Alessandro Bratus (GATM) Julian Horton (SMA) Francis Maes (VvM) Nicolas Meeùs (SFAM, SBAM) François Picard (SFAM) Tatiana Tsaregradskaya (OMT) Christian Utz (GMTh)

1. The object of analysis Analysis traditionally relied on the assumption that pieces of music are aesthetic objects amenable to scholarly contemplation. However, music presents itself as a plural phenomenon, consisting not only in traces (e.g. a score) but also in actions (performance, perception). Is it tenable, in these conditions, to continue assuming that musical works are objects for analysis? How can musical activities or processes be captured and rendered analytically amenable? Or can research dispense with the objectification of music? Could the aim, the scope, the nature of analysis itself be modified by the consideration of different types of musical works?

2. Historically and Culturally Informed Analysis vs Structuralism Recent trends of historically informed analysis and new repertories (non-Western music, jazz, ‘popular’ music) call for renewed approaches. To what extent do these approaches require evaluation procedures rooted in knowledge of historical and cultural contexts? Don’t they threaten the notion of the autonomy of music? And are they compatible with the idea of closure, of internal coherence, that seems inherent in a structural analysis? What can be the particular role of music theory and analysis in the investigation of the relationship between music itself and its context?

103


List of Contributors


Stefanie Acevedo, Yale University stefanie.acevedo@yale.edu

Amy Bauer, University of California, Irvine abauer@uci.edu

Matthew Brown, University of Rochester mbrown.esm@gmail.com

Teppo Ahonen, University of Helsinki teppo.ahonen@helsinki.fi

Luciane Beduschi, Skidmore College luciane.beduschi@gmail.com

Bill Brunson, Royal College of Music bill.brunson@kmh.se

Duilio D’ Alfonso, Conservatorio “O. Respighi” dalfonso@conslatina.it

Maarten Beirens, University of Leuven | University of Amsterdam maarten.beirens@kuleuven.be

David J. Burn, University of Leuven david.burn@kuleuven.be

Imina Aliyeva, Baku U. Hajibayli Academy of Music imina.alieva@gmail.com João Pedro d’ Alvarenga, Universidade Nova de Lisboa jp.alvarenga1@gmail.com Emmanuel Amiot, CPGE manu.amiot@free.fr Christina Anagnostopoulou, University of Athens chrisa@music.uoa.gr

Margaret Bent, All Souls College, Oxford margaret.bent@all-souls.ox.ac.uk Pieter Bergé, University of Leuven pieter.berge@kuleuven.be Louise Bernard de Raymond, Université François-Rabelais de Tours l_deraymond@yahoo.fr

David Byrne, University of Manitoba david.byrne@umanitoba.ca Vasili Byros, Northwestern University vasili.byros@aya.yale.edu Enrique Cámara de Landa, Universidad de Valladolid engcamara@gmail.com Emilios Cambouropoulos, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki emilios@mus.auth.gr

Elizabeth Anderson, Conservatoire Royal de Mons e.anderson@skynet.be

Zachary Bernstein, City University of New York, Graduate Center zachbernst@aol.com

Maria Teresa Arfini, Università della Valle d’Aosta arfinimt@alice.it

Damian Blättler, Rice University damian.blattler@rice.edu

Norman Carey, City University of New York, Graduate Center ncarey@gc.cuny.edu

Matthew Arndt, The University of Iowa matthew-arndt@uiowa.edu

Barbara Bleij, Conservatory of Amsterdam b.bleij@ahk.nl

Roberto Caterina, University of Bologna roberto.caterina@alice.it

Andrew Aziz, Florida State University Andrew_Aziz@brown.edu

Bruno Bossis, Université Rennes 2 bruno.bossis@uhb.fr

Alessandro Cecchi, Università di Pavia alessandroxcecchi@gmail.com

Michael Baker, University of Kentucky bakercor@aol.com

Kristof Boucquet, University of Leuven kristof.boucquet@kuleuven.be

Allessandro Cervino, LUCA - School of Arts alessandro.cervino@luca-arts.be

Ellen Bakulina, City University of New York, Graduate Center obakulina@gc.cuny.edu

Muriel Boulan, Université de Paris-Sorbonne muriel.boulan@paris-sorbonne.fr

Nicholas Baragwanath, University of Nottingham nicholas.baragwanath@nottingham.ac.uk

Matthew Boyle, Indiana University mlboyle@indiana.edu

Anne-Emmanuelle Ceulemans, Université Catholique de Louvain anne-emmanuelle.ceulemans@uclouvain.be

Jean-Michel Bardez, Conservatoire de Paris jmbardez@orange.fr

Alessandro Bratus, Università di Pavia alessandro.bratus@gmail.com

Mario Baroni, University of Bologna mario.baroni@unibo.it

Paolo Bravi, Conservatorio G. P. da Palestrina di Cagliari pa.bravi@tiscali.it

Jean-Pierre Bartoli, Université de Paris-Sorbonne jean-pierre.bartoli@paris-sorbonne.fr

Christopher Brody, Indiana University brodyc@indiana.edu

105

Rémy Campos, Haute Ecole de Musique de Genève remy.campos@hesge.ch

Kostas Chardas, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki kchardas@mus.auth.gr Antonio Chemotti, Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich antoniochemotti@hotmail.it Wai-Ling Cheong, The Chinese University of Hong Kong cheongwl@cuhk.edu.hk


Marina Chernaya, Herzen State Pedagogical University of Russia marina-chernaya@yandex.ru

Rossana Dalmonte, Istituto Liszt Bologna dalmonterossana@gmail.com

Lola Dzhumanova, Moscow Conservatory lola_dzhumanova@mail.ru

Anne Danielsen, University of Oslo anne.danielsen@imv.uio.no

Stefan Eckert, Eastern Illinois University seckert@eiu.edu

Herman Danuser, Humboldt-Universität danuser@musik.hu-berlin.de

Laura Emmery, Emory University laura.emmery@gmail.com

Paulo de Assis, Orpheus Institute Ghent paulo.deassis@orpheusinstituut.be

Philip Ewell, Hunter College pewell@hunter.cuny.edu

Trevor de Clercq, Middle Tennessee State University trevor.declercq@gmail.com

Ellen Fallowfield, Musikhochschule Basel ellen_fallowfield@yahoo.co.uk

Karst De Jong, Royal Conservatory of Den Haag karstdj@gmail.com

Manuel Farolfi, University of Bologna manuel.farolfi@yahoo.com

Pascal Decroupet, Université Nice Sophia Antipolis pascal_decroupet@hotmail.com

Fabrice Fitch, Royal Northern College of Music, Manchester fabrice.fitch@rncm.ac.uk

Mark Delaere, University of Leuven mark.delaere@kuleuven.be

Nathan Fleshner, Stephen F. Austin State University fleshnern@sfasu.edu

François Delalande, INA/GRM delalande.fr@wanadoo.fr

David Forrest, Texas Tech University david.forrest@ttu.edu

Joseph Delaplace, Université Rennes 2 joseph.delaplace@wanadoo.fr

Markus Frei-Hauenschild, University of Gießen m.fh@gmx.de

Ruth Dockwray, University of Chester ruth.dockwray@solent.ac.uk

Folker Froebe, Hochschule für Musik München f.froebe@gmx.de

Klaas Coulembier, University of Leuven klaas.coulembier@kuleuven.be

Florence Doé de Maindreville, Université Reims ChampagneArdenne florence.doe-de-maindreville@univ-reims.fr

Shigeru Fujita, Tokyo College of Music shigeru.fujita16@gmail.com

Pierre Couprie, Université de Paris-Sorbonne pierre.couprie@paris-sorbonne.fr

André Doehring, University of Gießen andre.doehring@musik.uni-giessen.de

Jonathan Cross, University of Oxford jonathan.cross@music.ox.ac.uk

Mine Dogantan-Dack, Middlesex University dogantanm@yahoo.com

Laurent Cugny, Université de Paris-Sorbonne Laurent.Cugny@paris-sorbonne.fr

Hubertus Dreyer, Robert-Schumann-Hochschule Düsseldorf hubertus@temporubato.com

John Cunningham, Bangor University else17@bangor.ac.uk

Frederic Dufeu, University of Huddersfield f.Dufeu@hud.ac.uk

John Dack, Middlesex University j.dack@mdx.ac.uk

Christine Dysers, University of Leuven christine.dysers@kuleuven.be

Jean-Marc Chouvel, Université de Reims jeanmarc.chouvel@free.fr Thomas Christensen, University of Chicago tchriste@uchicago.edu Jan Christiaens, University of Leuven jan.christiaens@kuleuven.be David Clampitt, The Ohio State University clampitt.4@osu.edu Suzannah Clark, Harvard University sclark@fas.harvard.edu David Clarke, Newcastle University d.i.clarke@ncl.ac.uk Michael Clarke, University of Huddersfield j.m.clarke@hud.ac.uk Kevin Clifton, Sam Houston State University kmc053@shsu.edu Denis Collins, University of Queensland denis.collins@uq.edu.au Tom Collins, De Montfort University Leicester tom.collins@dmu.ac.uk

106

Tami Gadir, University of Edinburgh tamigadir@yahoo.com.au Joel Galand, Florida International University galandj@fiu.edu Catello Gallotti, State Conservatory of Music “G. Martucci” catellogallotti@gmail.com Malgorzata Gamrat, University of Warsaw malgorzatagamrat@gmail.com Philippe Gantchoula, Conservatoire d’Orsay France philippe.gantchoula@bbox.fr


Bruno Gingras, University of Vienna brunogingras@gmail.com

Rebecca Herissone, University of Manchester rebecca.herissone@manchester.ac.uk

Mathieu Giraud, Centre national de la recherche scientifique giraud@lifl.fr

Nathalie Hérold, Université de Strasbourg nathalieherold@hotmail.com

Robert Gjerdingen, Northwestern University r-gjerdingen@northwestern.edu

Nina Hildebrand, Robert-Schumann-Hochschule Düsseldorf hildebrandnina@googlemail.com

Jon-Tomas Godin, Brandon University godinj@brandonu.ca

Keiji Hirata, Future University Hakodate hirata@fun.ac.jp

Rolf Inge Godøy, University of Oslo r.i.godoy@imv.uio.no

Ding Hong, The Chinese University of Hong Kong hongding.nxt@gmail.com

Philippe Gonin, Université de Bourgogne philippe.gonin@u-bourgogne.fr

Jason Hooper, University of Massachusetts Amherst hooper@music.umass.edu

Roger Graybill, New England Conservatory roger.graybill@necmusic.edu

Julian Horton, Durham University julian.horton@durham.ac.uk

Yoel Greenberg, Bar-Ilan University yoel.greenberg@biu.ac.il

Julian Horton, Durham University julian.horton@durham.ac.uk

Dai Griffiths, Oxford Brookes University dmgriffiths@brookes.ac.uk

Mart Humal, Estonian Academy of Music and Theatre humal@ema.edu.ee

Christophe Guillotel-Nothmann, Université de Paris-Sorbonne christophe.guillotel@gmail.com

Joel Hunt, University of California, Santa Barbara joelhunt@umail.ucsb.edu

Barbara Haggh-Hugol, University of Maryland haggh@umd.edu

Anne Hyland, University of Manchester anne.hyland@rhul.ac.uk

Masatoshi Hamanaka, University of Tsukuba hamanaka@iit.tsukuba.ac.jp

Job IJzerman, Conservatory of Amsterdam job.ijzerman@hetnet.nl

Chelsey Hamm, Kenyon College chelseyhamm@gmail.com

John Paul Ito, Carnegie Mellon University itojp@cmu.edu

Lukas Haselböck, University of Music and Performing Arts Vienna haselboeck@mdw.ac.at

Roman Ivanovitch, Indiana University rivanovi@indiana.edu

Rob Haskins, University of New Hampshire rob.haskins@unh.edu Stan Hawkins, Oslo University e.s.hawkins@imv.uio.no Áine Heneghan, University of Michigan heneghan@umich.edu

Timothy Jackson, University of North-Texas tjackson928@gmail.com Tobias Janz, University of Kiel janz@musik.uni-kiel.de Freya Jarman, University of Liverpool f.jarman@liv.ac.uk

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Ariane Jeßulat, Hochschule für Musik Würzburg | JuliusMaximilans-Universität Würzburg ajessulat@aol.com Maximos Kaliakatsos-Papakostas, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki maxk@math.upatras.gr Magdalini Kalopana, University of Athens alkalopana@hotmail.com Marina Karaseva, Moscow Conservatory karaseva@mosconsv.ru Oliver Kautny, University of Wuppertal kautny@uni-wuppertal.de Liudmila Kazantseva, Astrakhan Conservatory kazantseva-lp@yandex.ru Ildar Khannanov, Peabody Institute Johns Hopkins University solfeggio7@yahoo.com Valentina Kholopova, Moscow Conservatory v_kholopova@mail.ru Sanja Kiš Žuvela, Franjo Lučić School of Performing Arts sanja.kiszuvela@yahoo.com Michael Klein, Temple University michael.klein@temple.edu Dieter Kleinrath, University of Music and Performing Arts Graz dieter.kleinrath@chello.at Stanley Kleppinger, University of Nebraska-Lincoln kleppinger@unl.edu Edward Klorman, Queens College | City University of New York | The Juilliard School eklorman@qc.cuny.edu Tess Knighton, Institució Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avançat t.knighton@imf.csic.es Yves Knockaert, University of Leuven yves.knockaert@kuleuven.be


Kristina Knowles, Northwestern University klk@u.northwestern.edu

Sergei Lebedev, Moscow Conservatory olorulus@mail.ru

Marco Lutzu, Università “Ca’ Foscari”, Venezia mlutzu@livestudio.it

Olivier Koechlin, olivier.koechlin@wanadoo.fr

Claude Ledoux, Conservatoire de Paris | Arts2 Mons ledouxclaude@yahoo.com

Grigorii Lyzhov, Moscow Conservatory voxhumana2005@yandex.ru

Nikola Komatovic, University for Music and Performing Arts Vienna nikolakom@gmail.com

Ji Yeon Lee, City University of New York, Graduate Center jiyeonlee79@gmail.com

Francis Maes, University of Ghent francis.maes@ugent.be

Mike Lee, Cornell University mcl77@cornell.edu

Joshua B. Mailman, Columbia University jmailman@columbia.edu

Marc Leman, Universiteit Gent catharina.debouck@ugent.be

Victoria Malawey, Macalester College vmalawey@macalester.edu

Kjell Lemström, Laurea University of Applied Sciences kjell.lemstrom@laurea.fi

Reinier Maliepaard, ArtEZ Conservatorium Netherlands rh.maliepaard@chello.nl

Aleš Leonardis , University of Ljubljana matic@lgm.fri.uni-lj.si

Peter Manning, Durham University p.d.manning@durham.ac.uk

Stephan Lewandowski, Hochschule für Musik Franz Liszt stephan.lewandowski@hfm-weimar.de

Eva Mantzourani, Royal Welsh College of Music and Drama evaman19@hotmail.com

Lin-Ni Liao, Université de Paris-Sorbonne liaolinni@hotmail.com

Matija Marolt, University of Ljubljana matic@lgm.fri.uni-lj.si

Katherina Lindekens, University of Leuven katherina.lindekens@kuleuven.be

Sandro Marrocu, University of Rome - Tor Vergata sandro.marrocu@gmail.com

Simo Linkola, University of Helsinki simo.linkola@cs.helsinki.fi

Alan Marsden, Lancaster University A.Marsden@lancaster.ac.uk

Judy Lochhead, Stony Brook University judith.lochhead@stonybrook.edu

Henry Martin, Rutgers University-Newark martinh@andromeda.rutgers.edu

David Lodewyckx, University of Leuven david.lodewyckx@kuleuven.be

Nathan John Martin, Yale University | University of Leuven nathan.martin@yale.edu

Heinz von Loesch, Staatliches Institut für Musikforschung Berlin von.Loesch@sim.spk-berlin.de

Caitlin Martinkus, University of Toronto caitlin.martinkus@mail.utoronto.ca

Franz Körndle, University of Augsburg franz.koerndle@phil.uni-augsburg.de John Koslovsky, Conservatory of Amsterdam | Utrecht University jkoslovsky@gmail.com Kerri Kotta, Estonian Academy of Music and Theatre kerri.kotta@gmail.com Franz Krieger, University of Music and Performing Arts Graz franz.krieger@kug.ac.at Annie Labussière, Université de Paris-Sorbonne annie.labussiere@wanadoo.fr Priscille Lachat-Sarrete, Conservatoire à rayonnement départemental de Chartres priscille01@yahoo.fr Anne-Sophie Lahrmann, Johannes-Gutenberg-Universität Mainz AnneLahrmann@web.de Janne Lahti, University of Helsinki janne.lahti@helsinki.fi Philippe Lalitte, Université de Bourgogne philippe.lalitte@u-bourgogne.fr Chun Fai John Lam, The Chinese University of Hong Kong johnlam8450@gmail.com Leigh Landy, De Montfort University llandy@dmu.ac.uk Edward Latham, Temple University elatham@temple.edu

Stefano Lombardi Vallauri, International University of Languages and Media stefano.vallauri@iulm.it Marina Lupishko, University of Saarland birochek@yahoo.com

108

Agustín Martorell, Universitat Pompeu Fabra agustin.martorell@upf.edu Nicolas Marty, Université de Paris-Sorbonne nicodria@hotmail.com Marie-Noëlle Masson, Université Rennes 2 marie-noelle.masson@uhb.fr


Steven D. Mathews, University of Cincinnati steven.d.mathews@gmail.com

Daniel Moreira, King’s College London daniel.moreira.83@gmail.com

Anthony Papavassiliou, Laval University (Quebec) anthony.papavassiliou@gmail.com

Thierry Mathis, Université de Strasbourg thmathis@laposte.net

Alexander Morgan, McGill University alexanderpmorgan@gmail.com

Errico Pavese, Università di Genova erricopavese@hotmail.com

Anastasios Mavroudis, Goldsmiths, University of London aramavroudis@gmail.com

Rowland Moseley, Harvard University r.p.moseley.02@cantab.net

Julie Pedneault-Deslauriers, University of Ottawa jpedneau@uottawa.ca

David Maw, Oxford University david.maw@music.ox.ac.uk

Veijo Murtomäki, University of Arts veijo.murtomaki@uniarts.fi

Paulo Perfeito, Eastman School of Music | CITAR paulo.perfeito@fulbrightmail.org

Richard McGregor, University of Cumbria richardmcgregor1@yahoo.co.uk

Bartolo Musil, Kunstuniversität Graz bartolomusil@web.de

Matevž Pesek, University of Ljubljana matevz.pesek@fri.uni-lj.si

Eric McKee, Pennsylvania State University ejm5@psu.edu

Meghan Naxer, University of Oregon mnaxer@uoregon.edu

Birger Petersen, Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz birger@uni-mainz.de

Alex McLean, Leeds University a.mclean@leeds.ac.uk

Bernadette Nelson, Wolfson College, Oxford bernadette.nelson@wolfson.ox.ac.uk

Wayne Petty, University of Michigan pettyw@umich.edu

Honey Meconi, University of Rochester honey.meconi@rochester.edu

Markus Neuwirth, University of Leuven markus.neuwirth@kuleuven.be

Petra Philipsen, University of Leuven petra.philipsen@kuleuven.be

Vincent Meelberg, Radboud University v.meelberg@let.ru.nl

Kia Ng, Leeds University kia@kcng.org

François Picard, Université de Paris-Sorbonne francois.picard@paris-sorbonne.fr

Nicolas Meeùs, Université de Paris-Sorbonne nicolas.meeus@paris-sorbonne.fr

Gesa zur Nieden, Johannes Gutenberg University znieden@uni-mainz.de

Olivier Pigott, Conservatoire du Val d’Yerres olivier.pigott@sfr.fr

David Meredith, Aalborg University dave@create.aau.dk

Dimitar Ninov, Texas State University dn16@txstate.edu

Heather Platt, Ball State University hplatt@bsu.edu

John Milsom, Liverpool Hope University johnross.milsom@googlemail.com

Thomas Noll, Escola Superior de Música de Catalunya, Barcelona thomas.mamuth@gmail.com

Marco Pollaci, Nottingham University marcopollaci@gmail.com

Danuta Mirka, University of Southampton D.Mirka@soton.ac.uk Jan Miyake, Oberlin College Conservatory jan.miyake@oberlin.edu Rene Mogensen, Birmingham Conservatoire Rene.Mogensen@mail.bcu.ac.uk Eugene Montague, The George Washington University eugene_m@gwu.edu Allan Moore, University of Surrey allan.moore@surrey.ac.uk

Jean-Paul Olive, University of Paris 8 jean-paul.olive@univ-paris8.fr José Oliveira Martins, Eastman School of Music | Catholic University of Portugal jmartins@esm.rochester.edu Chikako Osako, Université Libre de Bruxelles tonarino11@yahoo.co.jp Nicolò Palazzetti, Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales nicolo.palazzetti@hotmail.it

109

Michael Polth, Musikhochschule Mannheim polth@o2online.de Théodora Psychoyou, Université de Paris-Sorbonne theodora.psychoyou@paris-sorbonne.fr Ingrid Pustijanac, University of Pavia ingrid.pustijanac@unipv.it Bruce Quaglia, University of Utah bruce.quaglia@gmail.com Lorenda Ramou, Conservatoire de Paris | Université de ParisSorbonne radius_music@hotmail.com


Carissa Reddick, University of Northern Colorado carissa.reddick@unco.edu

Frank Samarotto, Indiana University fsamarot@indiana.edu

Daniel Shutko, St. Petersburg Conservatory daniel.shutko@mail.ru

Fabio Regazzi, Università di Bologna fabio.regazzi@unibo.it

Giorgio Sanguinetti, University of Rome - Tor Vergata giorgio_sanguinetti@fastwebnet.it

Joseph Chi-Sing Siu, Eastman School of Music jsiu2@u.rochester.edu

Hans Peter Reutter, Robert-Schumann-Hochschule Düsseldorf hpreutter@gmail.com

Katelijne Schiltz, University of Regensburg katelijne.schiltz@gmx.de

Charles J. Smith, University at Buffalo cjsmith@buffalo.edu

Mark Reybrouck, University of Leuven mark.reybrouck@kuleuven.be

Janet Schmalfeldt, Tufts University janet.schmalfeldt@tufts.edu

Kenneth Smith, University of Liverpool kenneth.smith@liverpool.ac.uk

Nicholas Reyland, Keele University n.w.reyland@keele.ac.uk

Gesine Schröder, Universität für Musik und darstellende Kunst Wien schroeder@mdw.ac.at

Peter H. Smith, University of Notre Dame Peter.H.Smith.80@nd.edu

Miguel Ribeiro-Pereira, Catholic University of Portugal miguel.rp@me.com Marc Rigaudière, Université de Paris-Sorbonne marc.rigaudiere@gmail.com Steven Rings, University of Chicago srings@uchicago.edu David Rizo, University of Alicante drizo@dlsi.ua.es Stefan Rohringer, Hochschule für Musik und Theater München stefanrohringer@web.de Martin Rohrmeier, Massachusetts Institute of Technology mr1@mit.edu Uri Rom, Tel Aviv University urom@post.tau.ac.il Jerome Rossi, Université de Nantes je.rossi@wanadoo.fr Jeanne Roudet, Université de Paris-Sorbonne jeanne.roudet@paris-sorbonne.fr Jessica Rudman, City University of New York, Graduate Center jrudman@gc.cuny.edu Rene Rusch, McGill University rene.rusch@mcgill.ca Giorgos Sakallieros, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki sakallieros@gmail.com

Michiel Schuijer, Conservatory of Amsterdam michiel.schuijer@gmail.com Oliver Schwab-Felisch, Technische Universität Berlin oliver.schwab-felisch@tu-berlin.de Markus Schwenkreis, Schola Cantorum Basiliensis schwenkreis@bluewin.ch

Irina Snitkova, Gnesins Academy of Music Moscow irina.snitkova@mail.ru Tal Soker, Tel-Aviv University sokertal@gmail.com Olga Sologub, The University of Manchester olga.v.sologub@gmail.com

Ciro Scotto, University of South Florida cscotto1@usf.edu

Sören Sönksen, Hochschule für Musik, Theater und Medien Hannover soeren.soenksen@gmail.com

David Sears, McGill University david.sears@mail.mcgill.ca

Markus Sotirianos, Hochschule für Musik Würzburg m.soti@web.de

Maksim Serebrennikov, Rimskij-Korsakov Conservatory max.sereb@mail.ru

Michael Spitzer, University of Liverpool michael.spitzer@liverpool.ac.uk

Hugues Seress, Université de Paris-Sorbonne hseress@club-internet.fr

Jan Philipp Sprick, Hochschule für Musik und Theater Rostock jan.sprick@gmx.net

Stacey Sewell, stacey_sewell@hotmail.com

Danae Stefanou, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki dstefano@mus.auth.gr

Jennifer Shafer, Ohio State University jeshafer23@gmail.com

Gaetano Stella, Accademia Internazionale delle Arti - Rome gaetano.stella@tiscali.it

August Sheehy, University of Chicago aasheehy@uchicago.edu

Lieven Strobbe, LUCA - School of Arts strobbe.lieven@gmail.com

Robert Sholl, Royal Academy of Music and University of West London r.sholl@ram.ac.uk

Walther Stuhlmacher, Conservatory of Amsterdam walther@stuhlmacher.nl

110

Lauri Suurpää, Sibelius Academy lsuurpaa@siba.fi


Richard Taruskin, University of California taruskin@berkeley.edu

Roberta Vidic, Hochschule für Musik und Theater Hamburg roberta.vidic@hfmt-hamburg.de

Maria Yerosimou, Goldsmiths, University of London mariayerosimou@hotmail.com

Benedict Taylor, University of Edinburgh b.taylor@ed.ac.uk

Panos Vlagopoulos, Ionian University pvlag@ionio.gr

Joyce Yip, joyceyip77@gmail.com

Pascal Terrien, Université catholique de l’ouest – Conservatoire national de musique et de danse de Paris pascal.terrien@wanadoo.fr

Florian Vogt, Musikhochschule Freiburg florianvogt@gmx.net

Marek Žabka, Comenius University zabka@fphil.uniba.sk

Anja Volk, Utrecht University a.volk@uu.nl

Simon Zagorski-Thomas, University of West London simon.zagorski-thomas@uwl.ac.uk

Ralf von Appen, University of Gießen vonappen@uni-bremen.de

Milos Zatkalik, University of Arts in Belgrade mzatkali@eunet.rs

Petros Vouvaris, University of Macedonia vouvaris@uom.gr

Lawrence Zbikowski, University of Chicago larry@uchicago.edu

Julie Walker, Université de Strasbourg julie.walker@live.fr

Hans T. Zeiner-Henriksen, University of Oslo h.t.zeiner-henriksen@imv.uio.no

Ying Wang, Central Conservatory of Music Beijing christina-wy@hotmail.com

Wei Zhang, Shanghai Conservatory of Music zhangwei5541@163.com

Keith Waters, University of Colorado-Boulder keith.waters@colorado.edu

Wei Zhang, Shanghai Conservatory of Music zhangwei5541@163.com

Sebastian Wedler, University of Oxford sebastian.wedler@music.ox.ac.uk

Yelena B. Zhurova, The Rubinstein School of Music in Moscow pianoplay@mail.ru

Tillman Weyde, City University London t.e.weyde@city.ac.uk

Vasiliki Zlatkou, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki vzlatkou@hotmail.com

Lasse Thoresen, The Norwegian Academy of Music lasse.thoresen@nmh.no Rebecca Thumpston, Keele University r.m.thumpston@keele.ac.uk Satoshi Tojo, Japan Institute for Science and Technology tojo@jaist.ac.jp Eldad Tsabary, Concordia University eldad.tsabary@concordia.ca Tatiana Tsaregradskaya, Gnesins Russian Academy of Music tania-59@mail.ru Costas Tsougras, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki tsougras@mus.auth.gr Dmitri Tymoczko, Princeton University dmitri@princeton.edu Victoria Tzotzkova, Harvard University vdt3@caa.columbia.edu Christian Utz, Universität für Musik und darstellende Kunst Graz christian.utz@kug.ac.at Vera Valkova, Gnesins Russian Academy of Music veraval@yandex.ru Jean-Claire Vançon, Université Paris-Sud jcvancon@gmail.com Steven Vande Moortele, University of Toronto steven.vandemoortele@utoronto.ca Gissel Velarde, Aalborg University gv@create.aau.dk

Bryan White, University of Leeds b.white@leeds.ac.uk Darryl White, University of Arizona darryl.musico@gmail.com Jonathan Wild, McGill University wild@music.mcgill.ca Justin Williams, University of Bristol jwilli7@gmail.com Katherine Williams, Cardiff University k.williams@bristol.ac.uk Yi-Cheng Daniel Wu, Soochow University yichengwu@suda.edu.cn

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Benjamin Thigpen, Marco Stroppa, and Niels Bogaards at the Conservatorium van Amsterdam duringduring Benjamin Thigpen, Benjamin Marco Thigpen, Stroppa, Marco and Stroppa, Nielsand Bogaards Niels Bogaards at the Conservatorium at the Conservatorium van van Amsterdam Amsterdam during the 2005/06 academic year. The series was by the Nieuw and itsand artistic the 2005/06 academic the 2005/06 year. academic The series year.initiated The wasseries initiated was initiated by the Nieuw byEnsemble the Nieuw Ensemble Ensemble and its artistic itsdirector, artistic director, director, Joël Bons, partasofpart theBons, annual Componistenpracticum, which which pairs theory and theory practice inpractice a way not Joël as Bons, Joël of the as annual part of the Componistenpracticum, annual Componistenpracticum, pairs which theory pairs and and practice in ain way a waynot not found found anywhere elsefound inelse theanywhere world. The Ensemble and conductor Lucas Vis rehearsed performed anywhere in the world. elseNieuw inThe the Nieuw world. The Ensemble Nieuw Ensemble and conductor and conductor Lucas Lucas Vis rehearsed Visand rehearsed andand performed performed new pieces written by an international of composition from the Conservatorium van van new pieces written new pieces by an written international by group an international group of group composition ofstudents composition students students from from the Conservatorium the Conservatorium van Amsterdam and the Royal in Conservatoire the in Netherlands. turn, students their their Amsterdam and Amsterdam the Conservatoire Royal andConservatoire the Royal the Netherlands. in the In Netherlands. In the turn, In the turn,students thedocumented students documented documented their creative process in the seven essays included in thisincluded on Tristan creative process creative in the process seven inessays the seven included essays involume. this volume. in An thisextensive volume. An extensive Anessay extensive essay essay on Tristan onMurail’s Tristan Murail’s Murail’s compositional ideas and frequency-based originated in the lecture given by Rozalie Hirs. compositional compositional ideas and frequency-based ideas and techniques frequency-based techniques techniques originated originated in the lecture inseries the lecture series series given given by Rozalie by Rozalie Hirs. Hirs. It provides the most discussion of Murail’s workofavailable in English today. It provides theItdetailed most provides detailed the most discussion detailed discussion of Murail’s work Murail’s available work available in English in English today. today.

Jean-Philippe Guye est musicologue. Il a publié de nombreux articles, en particulier dans les revues Entretemps et Analyse musicale. Il enseigne la culture musicale (analyse, histoire) au CNR de Grenoble, ainsi que « l’Art et civilisation » au CNSMD de Lyon. Code prix : AM ISBN 978-2-7521-0020-7

The essays span aspan broad scope of acompositional involving, amongst others, frequency-based The essays The aessays broad span scope broad of compositional scope of ideas compositional ideas involving, ideas involving, amongst amongst others, others, frequency-based frequency-based techniques, acoustic modeling, set theory and permutational techniques. techniques, acoustic techniques, modeling, acoustic set modeling, theory set and theory permutational and permutational techniques. techniques.

With theWith participation of Ircam, School of the Arts (Research Group Art Practice the participation With ofAmsterdam the Ircam, participation Amsterdam of Ircam, School Amsterdam of the Arts School (Research of the Arts Group (Research Art Practice Group Art Practice and Development), Nieuw Ensemble, Conservatorium van Amsterdam, CNRS, SFAM. and Development), Nieuw and Development), Ensemble, Nieuw Conservatorium Ensemble, Conservatorium van Amsterdam, vanand Amsterdam, CNRS, and SFAM. CNRS, and SFAM.

Prix France : 28 € TTC

En couverture : Miniature d’Etienne YVER.

9 782752 100207

Référence éditeur : DLT1013 DLT1632 DLT1632 DLT1632 Prix public 23 €public TTC Prix: Prix public : 23: 23 €€ TTC TTC

ISBN9: 2-7521-0054-X ISBN ISBN : 2-7521-0054-X : 2-7521-0054-X 782752 100801

éditions Réf. DLT1824 ISBN 978-2-7521-0080-1 DELATOUR FRANCE

Editions DELATOUR FRANCE Le Vallier F-07120 SAMPZON (Tél) : 04 75 93 48 13 www.editions-delatour.com

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Martine Clouzot Juliette Séjourné Sylvain Perrot Guillaume Soulez Anne-Zoé Rillon-Marne Stéphane Metge Karol Beffa Caroline Barbier de Reulle Sarah Barbedette Hervé Lacombe Martin Guerpin Françoise Zamour Agnès Perrais Alain Masson

Le jongleur musicien au risque de l’image et du son dans les livres enluminés (1200-1330) Les caricatures de pianistes au premier XIXe siècle Du son à la pierre : trois prestations musicales dans la sculpture à Delphes Dé-concerter : Les Grandes Répétitions, une collection du service de l'ORTF Viderunt omnes, La musique à l'épreuve de l'oeil dans un manuscrit musical du XIIIe siècle « La musique elle-même est dramaturgie » (entretien) Art et littérature comme sources d'inspiration chez Ligeti Guitariste, pianiste, violoncelliste : Présence et représentation du musicien dans l’oeuvre de Salvador Dalí « Quelque chose d’enlevé et d’enlevant » : Notes sur la couleur dans Le Concert de Nicolas de Staël Penser musicalement le cinéma : Prénom Carmen de Jean-Luc Godard Musique distinguée ou musique débraillée ? : Le jazz mis en image dans Rhapsodie in Black and Blue et Symphony in Black Portrait de l’artiste en musicien : Le moment-musique dans les films de fiction Chronique d’Anna Magdalena Bach ou la chair de la musique L'Homme-orchestre Centres de Recherche (équipes d’accueil) Département d’histoire et théorie des arts de l’École normale supérieure

Collection Musique/Pédagogie dirigée par Jean-Michel BARDEZ éditions

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ISSN 2265-9471 ISBN 978-2-7521-0221-8

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Dépôt légalDépôt 2er trimestre Dépôt légal légal 2er2008 trimestre 2er trimestre 2008 2008 ISSN 1951-5812

Musique

filigrane

Esthétique

n°2

Sciences

Société

f iligrane n°2

a series of lectures and workshops byand Rozalie Hirs by and guest professors Murail, Mikhail Malt, a series of lectures a series and of lectures workshops workshops by Rozalie Hirs Rozalie andHirs guest and professors guestTristan professors Tristan Tristan Murail, Murail, Mikhail Mikhail Malt, Malt,

Philippe Gouttenoire est compositeur. Il a écrit pour des ensembles tels que l’EOC,M UMusicatreize, Quatuor SUUiE Q E le ES N S/ U iS Q U i EC NE CS E SM iUQM C i/ EES N/CCSiE C Debussy ou les Neue Vocalsolisten Stuttgart… Il enseigne l’analyse musicale au CNSMD de Lyon depuis 1993.

Collection

Sommaire

Collection

Textes réunis et édités par Philippe Gonin

Vocabulaire pratique d’analyse musicale

La musique au risque des images

DELATOUR FRANCE

The first thisThe book essays on musical works of Claude Vivier (Lonely child, 1980), Thepart firstofpart of this firstcontains book part ofcontains this bookessays contains onessays musical on musical works works of Claude of Claude Vivier Vivier (Lonely (Lonely child, child, 1980), 1980),

on frequency-based techniques and compositional employed byemployed theby composers. on frequency-based on frequency-based techniques techniques and compositional andprocesses compositional processes processes employed the bycomposers. the composers.

Vocabulaire pratique d’analyse musicale

Rozalie Hirs

Bob Gilmore

CONTEMPORARY COMPOSiTiONAL TECHNiQUES ANDAND OPENMUSiC CONTEMPORARY CONTEMPORARY COMPOSiTiONAL COMPOSiTiONAL TECHNiQUES TECHNiQUES AND OPENMUSiC OPENMUSiC Gilmore, Jean-Luc Hervé and Rozalie Hirs. authors provide detailed analyses of analyses these focusing Gilmore, Jean-Luc Gilmore, Hervé Jean-Luc and Rozalie HervéThe and Hirs. Rozalie The authors Hirs. The provide authors provide detailed detailed analyses of works, these of these works, works, focusing focusing

Philippe GOUTTENOIRE Jean-Philippe GUYE

DELATOUR FRANCE

ISSN 2105-908X

cation ISBN 978-2-7521-0151-8

Grégoire Caux et Mathias Roger

lair, Ludovic Florin, Julien Roger, Jérôme Rossi, Gaël

CONTEMPORARY CONTEMPORARY CONTEMPORARY COMPOSiTiONAL COMPOSiTiONAL COMPOSiTiONAL TECHNiQUES AND TECHNiQUES TECHNiQUES AND AND OPENMUSiC OPENMUSiC OPENMUSiC

GérardGérard GriseyGrisey (Quatre chants pour franchir le seuil, 1997-1998) and Tristan Murail (Le Lac, 2001) by Bobbyby Gérard (Quatre Grisey chants (Quatre pourchants franchir pourlefranchir seuil, 1997-1998) le seuil, 1997-1998) and Tristan and Tristan Murail Murail (Le Lac, (Le Lac, 2001) 2001) Bob Bob

The second part ofpart the book ‘OpenMusic and Contemporary Compositional Techniques’, The second Theof second the originated book part oforiginated the in book originated in ‘OpenMusic in ‘OpenMusic and Contemporary and Contemporary Compositional Compositional Techniques’, Techniques’,

pas une tâche si facile… urs, la forme, l’identité musicaux élaborés par et enfin d’en percer les d de l’œuvre musicale

Editors Editors Editors

La pratique de l’analyse musicale a suscité le développement d’un vocabulaire dans lequel étudiants, enseignants ou interprètes ont souvent peine à s’orienter. Cet ouvrage recense les termes les plus fréquemment utilisés. Il en propose des définitions OM SERiES THE THE OM BOOK THEBOOK SERiES OM BOOK SERiES simples, augmentées d’exemples, de renvois internes iNCLUDiNG AN iNTERViEW iNCLUDiNG iNCLUDiNG AN iNTERViEW AN iNTERViEW et de références bibliographiques. TRiSTAN MURAiL WiTHWiTH TRiSTAN WiTH MURAiL TRiSTAN MURAiL Accessible au plus grand nombre,Rozalie il contribue Rozalie Hirs Hirs Hirs Rozalie Bob Bob Gilmore Bobimprécises Gilmore Gilmore à ce que des notions parfois confuses ou EditorsEditors Editors deviennent des outils communs.

GOUTTENOIRE / GUYE

Analyser les musiques actuelles

Bob Gilmore Rozalie Hirs Rozalie Hirs Bob Gilmore

M UM S Ui Q E ES N SM U U i Q S U i/ QESU/CESi/ C iC EC i ENE NCSCE ESS -Interview with Tristan Murail byMurail Rozalie Hirs. --Interview Interview with Tristan with Tristan Murail by by Rozalie Rozalie Hirs. Hirs. Texts Texts by Justin Christensen, Miguelángel Clerc, Ignacio Fernández Bollo, BobBollo, Gilmore, DanielDaniel by Justin Texts Christensen, by Justin Christensen, Miguelángel Miguelángel Clerc, Ignacio Clerc, Ignacio Fernández Fernández Bollo, BobBob Gilmore, Gilmore, Daniel Gutierrez Berumen, Jean-Luc Hervé,Hervé, Rozalie Hirs, Illescas-Peláez, Chikage Imai, Andrzej Gutierrez Berumen, Gutierrez Jean-Luc Berumen, Jean-Luc Rozalie Hervé,Ernesto Hirs, Rozalie Ernesto Hirs, Ernesto Illescas-Peláez, Illescas-Peláez, Chikage Chikage Imai, Imai, Andrzej Andrzej Kwieciński. Kwieciński. Kwieciński.

TECHNiQUES AND OPENMUSiC

plus conventionnel de ne de la cadence), elle un lieu de transgression u langage musical.

Focus sur le rock en France

CONTEMPORARY COMPOSiTiONAL

mer la musique sur elleun champ de réflexions rer. Bien que le moment dentifiable, la notion de érialité (la terminaison (le geste de finition de e (la finalité de l’œuvre

CONTEMPORARY COMPOSiTiONAL TECHNiQUES AND OPENMUSiC CONTEMPORARY COMPOSiTiONAL TECHNiQUES AND OPENMUSiC

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La fin d’œuvre en musique

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776_CONTEMPORARY_2009_dos21mm.qxd:Collec musique sciences 23/10/09 12:3612:36 Page 1 Page 776_CONTEMPORARY_2009_dos21mm.qxd:Collec 776_CONTEMPORARY_2009_dos21mm.qxd:Collec musique musique sciences sciences 23/10/09 23/10/09 12:36 Page 1 1

DELATOUR FRANCE

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La musique spectraLe, une révoLution épistémoLogique

La musique au risque des images

sous la direction de

Françoise Zamour éditions DELATOUR FRANCE

soutenu,

Éditions DELATOUR FRANCE - 1888, route de la Bastide F-07120 SAMPZON - Tél. +33 (0)4 75 35 24 74

www.editions-delatour.com Philippe GOUTTENOIRE

La pratique de l’analyse musicale a suscité le développement d’un vocabulaire dans lequel étudiants, enseignants ou interprètes ont souvent peine à s’orienter. Cet ouvrage recense les termes les plus fréquemment utilisés. Il en propose des définitions simples, augmentées d’exemples, de renvois internes et de références bibliographiques. Accessible au plus grand nombre, il contribue à ce que des notions parfois confuses ou imprécises deviennent des outils communs.

DELATOUR FRANCE

ivre.fr

alyse musicale

être téléchargés dans l’onglet

Jean-Philippe GUYE

Vocabulaire pratique d’analyse musicale


Hermann Danuser Gesammelte Vorträge und Aufsätze Ed. by Hans-Joachim Hinrichsen, Christian Schaper and Laure Spaltenstein 4 volumes, 2040 pages, with numerous illustrations, examples, tables and diagrams, partially in colour. With 21 previously unpublished articles and a carefully edited index. Dark red hardcover books with pleasant nubuck feel and silver embossing, thread stitching and ribbon, printed on premium ageresistant paper, 19 × 28,5 cm, isbn 978-3-931264-78-9 | 4 volumes 198,– Euro

Further books of Hermann Danuser at Edition Argus:

Weltanschauungsmusik 504 pages, with numerous illustrations and music examples. Brown hardcover book with pleasant nubuck feel and dark red embossing, thread stitching and ribbon, printed on premium age-resistant paper, 19 × 28,5 cm isbn 978-3-931264-75-8 | 59,– Euro

Ereignis und Exegese. Festschrift für Hermann Danuser zum 65. Geburtstag Ed. by Camilla Bork, Tobias Robert Klein, Burkhard Meischein, Andreas Meyer and Tobias Plebuch 786 pages, with numerous illustrations and music examples. Green hardcover book with mold-made paper covering, printed on premium age-resistant paper, 19 × 28,5 cm, isbn 978-3-931264-77-2 | 59,– Euro

Other new publications: Uta Schmidt Kompositionen mit doppeltem Boden. Musikalische Ironie bei Erik Satie und Dmitri Schostakowitsch Kontext Musik, vol.3 392 pages with music examples, thread stitching, 19 × 28,5 cm isbn 978-3-931264-63-5 | 46,– Euro

Igor Strawinskys und Ernst Kreneks Spätwerke Ed. by Claudia Maurer Zenck Ernst Krenek Studien, vol.5 328 pages with illustrations and music examples, thread stitching 19 × 28,5 cm, isbn 978-3-931264-34-5 | 41,– Euro

An older but again topical publication, concerning music during the First World War: Von Grenzen und Ländern, Zentren und Rändern. Der Erste Weltkrieg und die Verschiebungen in der musikalischen Geographie Europas Ed. by Christa Brüstle, Guido Heldt and Eckhard Weber 372 pages with illustrations and music examples, thread stitching 19 × 28,5 cm, isbn 978-3-931264-27-7 | 43,– Euro

For detailed information see www.editionargus.de

Turmackerstraße 1 79418 Schliengen Germany

In preparation:

Metamusik

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Book Fair You are warmly invited to visit the EuroMAC2014 Book Fair. This continuous exhibition provides an excellent opportunity to discover new publications by Leuven University Press, Peeters Publishers, Brepols Publishers, and Éditions Delatour. Where? Erasmus Building, Entrance Hall When? Every day, from the first to the last coffee break

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