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No 300 / Winter Trends Guide 2015

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It’s forever...and ever

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EDITOR’S LETTER

MAKING A BIG DIFFERENCE

A

s I jot down these words, I am sitting in a bus that is winding its way through the picturesque jungle forests of northern Thailand. After having attended GIT 2014 (the Gem & Jewelry Institute of Thailand’s 2014 gem conference)—where I gave a presentation on the trends and colours in jewellery for 2015—I joined a group of gemmologists and geologists for the postconference excursion to visit deposits of sapphire and spinel in the area. My report on both the conference and the excursion will follow later, but for now, I wanted to share with you a wonderful example of how some individuals in our industry are making a big difference in the lives of others. When in the planning stages for the conference and deciding on a logo design for the GIT 2014, Dr. Pornsawat Wathanakul, GIT director, and her team chose a theme that is dear to the hearts of the Thai people. The logo not only reflects the beloved Asian elephant, but it was actually painted by a real elephant. Yes, you read right. The logo was actually painted by a living elephant.

Here I am with one of the elephants at the Thai Elephant Conservation Center. 04

Dr. Wathanakul had sent her team to the Thai Elephant Conservation Center (TECC), near the city of Chiang Mai, to have three logos painted by their elephants, from which the final was chosen to represent the conference. During GIT 2014, the three original paintings were auctioned off to raise money for the TECC and the very valuable work that it does in helping the nation’s elephants. In addition to the winning bids, other participants donated money to this worthy cause, with the proceeds given to the TECC officials during our visit to the center as part of the group excursion. Back to my bus ride. The group has just left the conservation center where we could see first-hand the work the TECC does in helping these magnificent animals as well as witnessing for ourselves how they amazingly put paint to canvas. The TECC was founded in 1993 under Royal Patronage and now cares for more than 130 elephants, including ten white elephants belonging to the Royal Family, which are housed in the Royal Elephant Stables. Activities promoted by the center include various shows, bathing, and a homestay program where visitors can live with the trainers and trek on elephants through the forest. On a different note, the TECC also conducts research in reproduction and the biomechanics of how elephants move. It also operates an onsite hospital and man-

ages Thailand’s first mobile clinic, treating elephants free of charge. Although a visit to the hospital was not generally on the tour, we were allowed to stop there for a few moments. Among the various patients was an elephant that had stepped on a landmine and had been brought in by local villagers. So sadly, these horrors still exist in some areas near Thailand’s northern borders and wreak havoc on animals as well as people. All of us were deeply moved by what we saw, especially when one of the hospital staff said the animal’s future was uncertain. (thailandelephant.org) This issue is our 2015 Trends Guide, where we present the trends in jewellery design and fashion colours for the upcoming year. We also offer a series of interviews on such diverse topics as the rise of bitcoin as a payment option for retailers, the latest in social marketing, and what’s new in gemstone treatments, among others. As usual, we also feature profiles and interviews with up-and-coming designers and brands as well as jewellery showcased at the world’s most important trade fairs. Happy Reading and a Very Happy and Prosperous New Year to you all.

Cynthia Cynthia Unninayar Editor-in-Chief CIJ Trends & Colours


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IN THIS ISSUE No 299 / Summer 2014

O N TH E C OVE R

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A selection of precious jewellery by Lydia Courteille. A French jewellery designer based in Paris, Lydia Courteille is fond of iridescent gems such as opal, moonstone, and cat’s eye. She combines these stones with her unique designs, playing with light to create a unique and mysterious atmosphere. www.lydiacourteille.com -

t        Illustration by Natalie Shau

E D ITO R’S LETTE R

50

33

04

Making a Big Difference

08 10 15 35 40

45 Bizzotto Gioielli Mokoso Atelier – Beyond Amazing Muzo International – Mining and More Berr & Partners SA in the Kingdom of the Golden Pagodas Emotion France – France at Baselworld 2015

21

TO P TE N TR E N D S I N J EWE LLE RY D E S I G N

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Top Ten Fashion Colours for Spring 2015

12 42 56 58 60

Caroline C – Elegant Simplicity, Eternal Colour Your World with Diamonds Trends in Gemstones and Treatments The Rise of Bitcoin Forget Public Relations – The Real Game Is Social Relations

62 64 66 68

If It Ain’t Baroque, Don’t Fix It Dazzling Diamonds Opposites Attract Radiant Rainbows

D E S I G N E R PR O FI LE S

DAILY ON

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News, dazzling jewellery, trends & colours

TO P TE N FAS H I O N C O LO U R S

I NTE RVI EWS

TR E N D S & C O LO U R S

MAR KETPLAC E

76

37

70 74 77 80

Beautiful in Bangkok Hong Kong – Where the World Meets It’s Gold Silver Time in Warsaw Intergem Marks 30 Years of Uniqueness

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I N D EX

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Editor-in-Chief: Cynthia Unninayar • Contributors: Diana S. Zimmerman, T. R. Flora, Barbara Wheat, Antonella Scorta, • Advertising Contacts: Nathalie Glattfelder nglattfelder@europastar.com, T +41 22 307 7832; Italy - Alessandra Arati, aarati@studioarati.it, T +39 024 851 7853; Spain - Carles Sapena csapena@europastar.es, T +34 93 112 7113; Asia - Maggie Tong, maggietong@europastar.com, T + 852 9658 1830; India - Bhupal Potdar, bhupalpotdar@gmail.com, T +91 98 2115 1035; USA - Karen Nuckols, knuckols@CIJintl.com, T +1 610 986 7285 Managing Director: Philippe Maillard • Website: www.CIJintl.com. Published by Europa Star HBM SA, 25 Route des Acacias, 1227 Carouge, Geneva, Switzerland, T +41 22 307 7837; Fax: +41 22 300 3748; Email: contact@CIJintl.com

Printed in Geneva by SRO-Kundig • Copyright 2014 by Europa Star • www.europastar.com All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced in any form without the written permission of CIJ Trends & Colours. A JEWELLERY SPECIAL BY EUROPA STAR 06


THE FIRMAMENT COLLECTION, The Mysterious Charm of a Starry Sky

Bizzotto Gioielli introduces a unique collection that perfectly combines the sparkle of diamonds and the softness of gold chains intricately interwoven into celestial jewelry that transport you to a magical star-studded evening sky. Every piece from the Firmament collection is light, smooth and soft to the touch: bracelets, rings and earrings crafted in 18 Kt. yellow and rose gold –satin-finished for a delicate effect; each piece is embellished with sparkling diamonds. An original, refined and delicate jewelry collection that touches the skin in a tender caress.

THE GOLDEN BUCKLE Unique belts for the wrist

Belt Buckle collection by Bizzotto Gioielli, skillfully handcrafted in the true nature of Made in Italy, has an exclusive design that makes every piece sophisticated and fun at the same time. The luxurious elegance of 18Kt. gold buckle set with diamonds encircles the wrist in a shimmering hug.


PROFILE MOKOSO ATELIER

BEYOND AMAZING By DIANA S. ZIMMERMAN

SUDDENLY YOU STOP. THERE IT IS. THE MOST REMARKABLE PIECE

OF JEWELLERY YOU’VE EVER SEEN. PERFECT FOR HER.

o

PERFECT FROM HIM.

nce in a while, a jeweller escapes the trajectory of mere beauty to elevate its art to an entirely new dimension. The innovatively brilliant designs of MKS Jewelry International, under its house brand, Mokoso Atelier, go beyond amazing. They continually surpass the expectations of even the most discerning clients. The Mokoso brand stands at the pinnacle of aesthetic achievement, unparalleled craftsmanship, technical mastery, and poetic imagination. This is not jewellery you simply wear. This is jewellery you experience on every emotional level. From internal feelings of ultimate luxury and fascination to the undeniable intrigue of enviable onlookers, Mosoko jewels evoke feelings so enchanting they’re almost magical.

Three and a half decades ago, MKS began captivating minds and hearts with its highly original designs. Today, celebrities and royals across the globe collect Mokoso’s award-winning pieces. And it’s no wonder. Every collection endeavours to capture the illusive nature of life—some in articulated three-dimension. Others intrigue with settings of invisibility, or captivate with precious jewels that rotate 360 degrees. And still others inspire imagination with the majestic fluttering of butterfly wings. The master craftsmen at MKS bring each designer’s artistic inspiration to life with uncanny expertise and meticulous attention to detail. Front and back, every jewel personifies perfection—the unquestion10

able signature of the masterpieces that Mokoso has come to symbolize. Setting imagination free is a hallmark at Mokoso. It’s Uncaged Life™ Collection with its stylized birdcage and white and chocolate diamonds evokes the inner longing within all of us to fly forever free. Flutterfly™ captures our sense of whimsy with gold, diamond and vibrantly coloured precious gem wings that flutter. Mokoso’s unique mechanism creates the movement with such grace that one can easily imagine that these stunning butterflies really can fly. Mokoso also tempts our palate with the sheer beauty of Rock Candy—irresistible treats that sparkle like finely spun sugar crystals. Each earring, necklace, and ring bursts forth in delicious colour, as does Mokoso’s Summer Berry Sling™ collection. Featuring vibrantly fresh precious stones, these alluring jewels are a toast to fun, joy, and the finer things in life.

Mokoso also invites us to think beyond the lateral and celebrate depth in Third Dimension™. This thought-provoking collection sharpens our senses by allowing us to uncover intricate layering patterns woven throughout geometric structures. Each new glimpse reveals yet another design dimension. The intertwined nature of Mokoso’s Twist and Turn™ collection inspires the contemporary flow of our fluid lifestyles. Continuous and reinventing gold and diamondstudded lines sparkle with the excitement and vibrancy of futures untold. But what is life without dreams? Mokoso helps you capture each one in its magical Dream Catcher collection. These jewelstudded Native American-inspired talismans symbolize all that is positive, while warding off evil spirits. Close your eyes and dream—you may be surprised. With over thirty different collections and a thiry-five-year history of award-winning designs—both internally branded and manufactured for other companies— MKS along with its phenomenally successful new house brand, Mokoso Atelier, are undeniably Beyond Amazing. www.MOKOSOATELIER.com


DESIGN

INTERVIEW

CAROLINE C – ELEGANT SIMPLICITY, ETERNAL One of today’s hottest designers of fine jewellery is Caroline Chartouni. A winner of prestigious AGTA awards for three consecutive years, she originally hails from the world of fashion and art, but now creates elegant and emotional focal points for the hand, finger, ears, and neck. To learn more about this remarkably talented artist, CIJ TRENDS & COLOURS spoke with Ms. Chartouni, the creative force behind her brand, Caroline C. Interview conducted by Cynthia Unninayar CIJTC: What made you shift from art and designing fashion to creating fine jewellery? Caroline Chartouni: Fashion and jewellery are not that far apart in their expression. Both adorn us. Both surprise us. Both make a statement. Jewellery is, in fact, wearable art. Even though the material is totally different, I found it a natural progression to move into creating original works with gemstones and metal rather than fabric or paint. I might add, too, that jewellery can endure forever, handed down as cherished heirlooms from generation to generation, while fashion is more ephemeral in nature. CIJTC: Most of your pieces use coloured gemstones. Which stones do you prefer, and how do you find them? CC: We use colour because it gives depth to jewellery. It can make it soft and subtle or exuberant and bold. Colour expresses feelings—it creates feelings. When light hits a gemstone, it makes it come alive. I appreciate all gems. They have meaning and attraction, from the glimmer of spinel to the sparkle of diamond, from the radiance of sapphire to the fire of an orange spessartite, and the shimmering rainbows of opal. Having said that, one stone holds a special place in my heart—Paraiba tourmaline. The colour is incomparable and it lends itself to infinite design possibilities. As for sourcing our gems, the answer is simple—around the world. We even go directly to the mines to find the perfect stones for special custom pieces.

Caroline Chartouni

CIJTC: Since you source your own stones, do you also sell loose faceted gems to other dealers and retailers? CC: Yes. We carry of wide range of gems in a multitude of sizes, from those used in casual jewellery to very rare gems destined for collectors. This is in addition to the fine jewellery crafted by the Caroline C brand. CIJTC: What is your design philosophy? CC: Simplicity is the defining element of elegance. A perfect piece of jewellery is much more than the value of the gemstone or the metal. It has a symbolic essence. Whether a gift of romance or parental love, or something that a woman purchases for herself, jewellery is personal and must connect to the wearer. A part of this connection is ensuring that our designs evoke symmetry and fluidity, and that their beauty shines, but never overpowers the personality of the wearer. CIJTC: Who are your clientele? CC: Everyone who appreciates fine jewellery and the high quality of our workmanship, which extends equally to the back of the piece, making it as beautiful as the front. Many of our consumer clients include first-time jewellery buyers who are looking to purchase the three must-haves: a simple elegant bangle that goes with everything, day or night; a fashionable ring with a solitaire of her favourite stone; and an elegant pair of earrings that complements her face. Other clients include collectors, and we also deal with select fine retailers. CIJTC: Since your pieces are crafted in limited series and many are one-of-a-kind, do your clients purchase these high-end pieces for investment? CC: Yes. We have clients who want the perfect, rare, and collectable gemstones for investment. But, what is most important to them is that the design is equal to the seduction and sublime beauty of the jewel. They are looking for playful and highly sophisticated styles that they can enjoy. These collectors fall in love with their pieces and wear them often. (CarolineC.com)

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Th e Es s e n c e o f Ti me l e s s De s i g n 1 8Karat-Pl ati num -Fi neGems

TradeShowroom San Franci sco ( 415)6218880 j yescorp@gmai l. com www. j yescorp . com


PROFILE MUZO

M

UZO INTERNATIONAL By BARBARA WHEAT

MINING AND MORE

MUZO, COLOMBIA IS HOME TO AN EXTENSIVE AREA OF EMERALD DEPOSITS THAT HAVE BEEN

MINED CONTINUOUSLY SINCE THE MID-16TH CENTURY. ALTHOUGH THE MUZO INDIANS WERE SUCCESSFUL FOR A TIME IN KEEPING THE DEPOSITS SECRET FROM THE SPANIARDS, THE CONQUISTADORS DISCOVERED THE LOCATION OF THE LEGENDARY MINES IN 1538.

T

he lure of Muzo emeralds continues, as modern treasure hunters persist in searching the oceans for sunken sailing vessels that may have carried chests filled with the precious green Colombian stones on their voyages headed to Spain and other parts of the world long ago. Today, emeralds also encite attention on the Red Carpet and at auction houses around the world. This year’s Cannes Film Festival saw an abundance of emerald jewellery adorned by celebrities, with Muzo emeralds topping the list.

quality, clarity, and ideal colour, which ranges from saturated green to a slightly bluish-green hue. One such stone, a magnificent 12.01-carat blue-green gem, shattered the world record for carat price at a Sotheby’s auction in Geneva, garnering $119,000 per carat for a total price of $1,440,219. Another exceptional Muzo emerald sold at Christie’s for $835,682. The square-cut 9.27-carat stone is highly transparent and certified free of any type of enhancement.

THE WORLD’S MOST EXCEPTIONAL STONES When it comes to extraordinary emeralds, however, the Red Carpet and auction houses are only part of the story. Muzo mines are the source of such incredible gems as the Fura. This 15,000-carat (2.270 kg) rough emerald is five times larger than the famous Unguentarium located in the Vienna Imperial Treasury. The incredible Fura was put on public display for the first time in 2011 at the Minergemas fair in Bogotá, Colombia. While size matters, Muzo is also the home of the world’s most valuable rough emerald—the 2,000-carat Tena—named after a mythical queen from the region whose tears were said to have created the green gems. The Tena’s estimated worth, based on its exquisite colour, brightness, and size, far exceeds that of the emerald brooch once owned by Russian Empress Catherine the Great that sold at auction in 2010 for $1,650,500. Emeralds mined at Muzo come in a variety of sizes, and are prized for their

Muzo mines produce a range of sizes. Shown here is a 7.46-ct emerald, cut in Muzo Interational’s workshops from a 14.74-ct rough, mined July 12, 2-13. (Photo: ©Muzo International)

methods by which they have been mined and processed are of the highest quality. Several factors differentiate Muzo emeralds from other gemstones on the market today. In terms of quality, only non-permanent cedar oil is used for clarity enhancement of the stones when necessary. Each emerald is accompanied by a certificate confirming its origin and authenticity as a Muzo emerald from a highly respected independent gemmological laboratory in Switzerland. Muzo International ensures traceability as each emerald is individually numbered and can be traced back to the rough material it originated from. Proper disclosure is not just a standard to the company, but is an added assurance of commitment to its customers. By controlling every aspect of emerald production, from the mines through the stones’ expert cutting and polishing, right up to the final marketing of the finished gems, Muzo International not only maintains absolute control over the quality of

CONTROLLING THE VALUE CHAIN The Muzo mine is now wholly operated by Muzo International. Not only does the company mine the stones, but it also cuts and polishes every gem—all under the strict safety protocols and environmental stewardship that Muzo International has adopted as company policy. With complete control of the value chain from mine to market, Muzo International is able to ensure that both the gemstones themselves and the

A sample of a Muzo emerald in its matrix on display at one of the any events where Muzo International was exhibiting.

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its emeralds, but the company is also improving the quality of life for people in the entire region.

COMMITMENT TO THE COMMUNITY Muzo International has developed a Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) department to oversee the company’s commitment not only to its miners, but to the community as a whole and to the environment. Reforestation, improved sanitary conditions, and public health campaigns, with a focus on the control of tropical diseases through vaccination and health care, are all part of Muzo International’s overall goal to create an organizational culture committed to sustainable mining development and the promotion of personal and business growth in a responsible framework. Among its many projects over the last few years, the most recent has been a school renovation in August 2014. Muzo International completely renovated classrooms at the Institución Educativa La Floresta school, which had been deteriorating for some time. The main goal of the project was to provide improved conditions for schoolchildren and teachers in order to create a better learning environment. In a separate project in the Boyacá region, the company constructed a canteen at the Los Cristales school to provide children with meal service, an important step in providing proper nutrition and improving student concentration levels during the school day.

BEST PRACTICES Clearly proud of its commitment to the community, Muzo International also takes pride in the fact that its cutting workshops in Bogota have been awarded ISO 9001 certification. This official recognition has resulted from the company’s systematic and best practices approach to all internal processes, and includes areas such as innovation and technology, efficient process control, development of new activities, compliance with legal and contractual regulations, and the continuous improvement in the quality of services, among others. Last Year Muzo International brought renowned miner and gem dealer Ron Ringsrud on board as Director of Operations and Sales.

A 30-year veteran of the global emerald trade, Ringsrud is the author of the book, Emeralds, A Passionate Guide, one of the industry’s most comprehensive works on the green gems. After visiting the company’s cutting headquarters he commented, “I am impressed by the strong focus on technology and personnel at Muzo. They really are bringing the mine forward into the new century.” And, as Muzo International continues to move the mine forward with the production of fabulous emeralds, it is contributing so much more to the many lives it touches.

MUZOEMERALD.COM Emeralds are hand faceted and polished in Muzo International’s own cutting facilities in Bogotá. (Photo: ©Serge Sibert)

t In August 2014, Muzo International’s CSR department implemented a new renovation project at one of the local schools in the Muzo region. (Photo: ©MTC)

u A 6.87-ct emerald cut in Muzo Interational’s workshops, from a 38.16-ct rough, certified resin-free. (Photo: ©Muzo International)

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Pupils and their teacher at the Los Cristales school celebrate the new canteen that was offered by Muzo International. (Photo: ©MTC)


Th e Es s e n c e o f Ti me l e s s De s i g n 1 8Karat-Pl ati num -Fi neGems

TradeShowroom San Franci sco ( 415)6218880 j yescorp@gmai l. com www. j yescorp . com


A unique window to the universe of watches and jewellery where all key players showcase trendsetting creations and innovations. Seize this opportunity to experience passion, precision and perfection.

M A R CH 19 – 26, 2015


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Alishan

TOP TEN TRENDS By Cynthia Unninayar

1

Aaron Basha

FLORA & FAUNA Gumuchian

Perennial favourites in fine jewellery, both stylized and realistic, are those that evoke the natural world. For 2015, the most prevalent nature-inspired themes are flowers and butterflies, followed by birds, bees, snakes, and creatures of the deep. Yet, don’t count out the many frogs, cats, dogs, horses, spiders, and jungle animals that make up part of this year’s bejeweled Flora and Fauna.

Bizzotto Gioielli

Jacob & Co.

Staurino

Oscar Heyman

Misis

Monplaisir GianaMayra TTF

Jye Luxury Collection

Alessio Boschi

Jewelmer Joaillerie Outfit by Roberto Verino (photo: Mecedes Benz Fashion Week Madrid) Picchiotti Sorellina

Katherine Jetter

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By Cynthia Unninayar

TOP TEN TRENDS

Bergio

2

Lacy looks

One of the most creative counterpoints to the economic times of the day, the lacy look, with its negative spaces, evokes airy elegance in all types of metals, whether gold, platinum, silver, or palladium, by themselves or set with gemstones and diamonds, to create a luxurious look for less.

Euro Pearl

Mokoso Atelier

Jack Kelege

Jane Bohan

Angelique de Paris

Luca Carati

My Vice

Jye Luxury Collection

Andrew Hamilton Crawford Bohemme

Metalsmiths Sterling

Buccellati Supreme Jewelry

Outfit by Christophe Guillaume

22

Sergio Rossi

Xin Jewellery


“Our business relies on the greater margins we get from colored gemstone and cultured pearl sales. Other product categories the margins are razor thin. The pricing and selection we see at

Clayton Bromberg Owner Underwood Jewelers Jacksonville, Florida

GemFair Tucson allows us to bring a much greater profit to the bottom line.�

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AGTA Office: 800-972-1162


By Cynthia Unninayar

TOP TEN TRENDS Kismet

Mark Schneider

3

GEOmetrics

Anita Sondore

One of today’s most popular design directions in fashion, home decor, and designer jewellery involves geometric patterns. Anything goes, as long as the angles are sharp, defined, and aesthetically interesting. Suzanne Kalan Octium

Sharart Meghna Stephen Webster Penny Preville Lorenz Baumer

Lorenz Baumer

Elena Kriegner

Sergio Rossi Pinar Oner Outfit by Desigual (photo: Mercedes Benz Fashion Week Madrid)

H.Stern

Thistle & Bee

Carlo Moretti

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By Cynthia Unninayar

TOP TEN TRENDS

4

DIGITAL EXPRESSION

Jewels for the fingers are taking on new dimensions. Not only are rings adorning two, three, or even four fingers at a time, but designers are embellishing a single finger with precious metals, set with diamonds and gemstones. These elongated “Knuckle” or “Armour” rings offer sophisticated and creative digital expressions. Sutra Jacob & Co.

Nada G Stephen Webster

Lydia Courteille

Casato

Dada Arrigoni Djula

Mokoso Atelier

Imogen Belfield Roberto Bravo

Inbar

Meghna

Borgioni

Morphee Sylvie Corbelin Outfit by Delores Cortes (photo: Mercedes Benz Fashion Week Madrid)

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Angelique de Paris


By Cynthia Unninayar

TOP TEN TRENDS

Hoops may be the perennial favourite, followed by the more conservative studs, but increasing numbers of designers are showcasing more exotic styles. Earrings no longer simply hang down from the ear, but curve over and above it in the form of ear cuffs and climbers.These upwardly mobile pieces join their counterparts that creatively dust the shoulder and those that come together in a range of interchangeable pieces to highlight this season’s exotic earwear.

Rina Limor Kismet

Gintare Bvlgari

Sethi Couture

Carrera y Carrera

Sandy Leong

Van der Bauwede Sharart and Kavant Amali

Outfit by Slava Zaitsev (photo: Oleg Nikishin, Mercedes Benz Fashion Week Russia)

Sylvie Corbelin

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w

By Cynthia Unninayar

TOP TEN TRENDS

MVee

6

ON THE EDGE

w

The most common motif in the edgy category is the skull, followed by bones, knives, spikes, and similar symbols. Interpreted literally and figuratively in gold, silver, and other materials, gothic jewellery is so popular that even watch and eyewear companies are featuring original creations on the edge.

w

Thompson

Bohemme

Outfit by Slava Zaitsev (photo: Oleg Nikishin, Mercedes Benz Fashion Week Russia)

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Bomberg

Anthony Lent

Paolo Piovan Sicis Watches

DeGrisogono

Vida

Jade Chiu

Horsecka

Koumi Koumi


EVOLUTION T-Gold district

EXPRESSION

Packaging & Visual Merchandising district

ICON

Jewellery district

ESSENCE

CREATION

Precious Components district

ESSENCE

Gem World district

Jewellery district

LOOK

Jewellery district

CHOOSE YOUR JEWELLERY PATH. THE FUTURE. NOW. 2015

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By Cynthia Unninayar

TOP TEN TRENDS

Old World Chain

7

WINSOME WRISTWEAR

Bracelets, bangles, and cuffs are worn in a great variety of creative ways, on the wrist, combined with a ring, or as a signature piece on the upper arm. Whether thick or thin, lacy or solid, stacked or single, or made of wrapped strands of beads, chains, or gems, winsome wristwear offers the perfect way to add individuality to any ensemble.

Andrea Candela

Victor Veylan

Pinar Oner

Alisa

Ayaka Nishi Anahita

Giovanni Ferraris Hilat

Loretta Castoro Nguyen

Zorab

Outfit by Desigual (photo: Mercedes Benz Fashion Week Madrid)

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By Cynthia Unninayar

TOP TEN TRENDS

8

Meissen

TEMPTING TASSELS The tassel trend, including “Fringe” styles, continues into 2015 with an even wider variety of earrings and pendants in a multitude of coloured gemstones, rough diamonds, seed pearls, and metallic chains.

Rina Limor

Bayco

Alessio Boschi Carla Amorim

A&Furst

Stephen Webster Abellán

Goshwara

Outfit by Aristocrazy (photo: Mercedes Benz Fashion Week Madrid)

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Stephen Venezia

Mazza


PROFILE BERR & PARTNERS

BERR & PARTNERS SA IN THE KINGDOM OF THE GOLDEN PAGODAS As part of their never-ending quest to collect the most perfect and exceptional gemstones, Elke Berr and her husband, Thomas, showcase their new-found treasures embodied in a mythical and fascinating jewellery collection.

F

or more than 28 years, Elke and Thomas Berr have unearthed the crème de la crème of precious gemstones to the joy of their many clients. And, even though their company, Berr & Partners SA, is widely recognized for the exceptional quality of its natural gems, high standards of craftsmanship, and excellent customer service, the couple goes even further, promoting and upholding the professional and ethical standards of the gemstone industry. Because of their high level of expertise, Elke and Thomas are also consultants for banks, investors, and insurance companies that rely on their estimates and their knowledge in the business of “art banking.”

Himalaya Ring in 18K white gold (4.49g) set with a 3.22-ct natural royal blue Burmese sapphire and two pear-shaped white diamonds (0.37ct), surrounded by diamonds (0.14ct).

One of Burma’s most famous mining areas is Mogok, not widely open to visitors. Among the lucky few to be granted access to this mythical mine is Elke Berr. Inspired by the this region and its treasures, the designer chose Mogok as the name of her new collection. Shimmering, dazzling, elegant, unique, and one-of-a-kind pieces—Bagan, Dharma, Himalaya, and Lotus—mix vibrant natural gemstones, such as a royal-blue sapphire or a hot pink spinel, with diamonds. All mounted in original and stylish gold settings, these lovely pieces will delight the world’s most discerning and sophisticated women while offering them a timeless investment.

Elke Berr examines gemstones during a recent trip to Myanmar.

Bagan Ring in 18K pink gold (7.51g) set with a 4.89-ct natural red Burmese spinel and two white pear-shaped diamonds (0.37ct), surrounded by diamonds (0.62ct).

Always forging ahead and never looking back, Elke and Thomas set tomorrow’s trends with their collections of timeless jewellery. Sold under the brand, Elke Berr Creations, it represents the jewellery side of Berr & Partners SA. Its beautiful and original designs have attracted a wide following of clients who also request custom-made and unique pieces with special gemstones. Among the exquisite collections made by Elke Berr Creations are Aqua, Bubble, African Flame, Iris, and Icy. For her latest creations, Elke has travelled to Myanmar— previously known as Burma—to source even more beautiful and rare gems for her very special pieces.

Mogok’s Majestic Treasures Myanmar often brings to mind dreamy landscapes, graceful pagodas, and tireless fishermen. Beyond the touristic clichés, however, the nation is a wonderful source of precious gemstones such as jade, sapphires, rubies, and even pearls. It is in this ancestral and rich setting that Elke Berr’s new adventure takes place.

Lotus Ring in 18K white gold (6.89g), set with a 5.42-ct natural vivid orangy-red Burmese spinel and four round white diamonds (0.20ct), surrounded by diamonds (0.86ct).

Much more than mere jewellery, each ring evokes Elke’s incredible experiences and stories of her travels to Mogok. The new collections were presented at the Four Seasons’ Hotel des Bergues in Geneva in October 2014 to an enthusiastic audience during the prestigious Forex event accompanied by a Versace Fashion Show. Berr and Partners SA CP 1199 1211 Genève 1 +41 (0) 22 310 6110 www.ELKEBERR.com

Dharma Ring in 18K pink gold (7.53g), set with a 3.03-ct natural vivid pink Burmese spinel, surrounded by pink sapphires (1.03cts) and white diamonds (0.39ct).

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TOP TEN TRENDS By Cynthia Unninayar

9

Ca誰

Damiani

CUFFLINKS AND MORE

Mathon Paris

Traditionally, jewellery for men has tended towards the conservative side, with a watch, cufflinks, class ring, and wedding band. Earrings were once seen as a sign of rebellion and gold chains were reserved for the music scene, but those days are long gone. Today, more and more men are wearing jewellery of all kinds. Even the staple cufflink has taken on more design, whimsy, and colour.

Elke Berr Inori

Costis Coge

Zannetti

Tateossian Scott Kay Syna

Tomasc Donocik Penny Preville

Catherine Zadeh Robert Manse

Ice Link

Thompson

Outfit by Mr. Gentleman (photo: AFPBB News/JFWO/MBFWT)

37


By Cynthia Unninayar

TOP TEN TRENDS

10

Zaffiro

Zaffiro

MOONSTONE MAGIC

Surrounded by mystique and magic, this ancient gemstone has been used for thousands of years around the world. With its shimmering light connectng it to the moon, some wear moonstone for its supposed protective qualities; others appreciate its distinctive appearance. Classical varieties are almost transparent with a bluish shimmer, while the stone also comes in cream, grey, dark grey, green, brown, and orange hues. Today, more than ever, moonstone is a favourite of designers, who create their own moonstone magic.

Anzie

Anzie

Bluemoonstone Creations

Bellon

Sylvie Collection

Michael Endlich

H.Weiss

Michael John Jewelry Jochen Pohl

JJ Number 8

Just Jules

Outfit by Hiroko Koshino (photo: AFPBB News/ JFWO/MBFWT)

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Anahita

Tony Maccabi

Eichhorn


showcasing Your PASSION for

Jewelry S AV E T H E D AT E M a y

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F

RANCE

AT BASELWORLD 2015

French jewellery, watches and components manufacturers as well as gemstone and pearl dealers will be present at the Baselworld show from 19th to 26th of March 2015. Nearly 30 companies, representing more than 40 brands, will welcome you on their booth.

F FRENCH EXHIBITORS AT BASELWORLD 2015 HALL 1

HALL 2

KORLOFF - 1.1 A63 MESSIKA DESIGN - 1.1 B05 MICHEL HERBELIN - 1.1 A59 PIERRE LANNIER - 1.2 A27 SAINT-HONORÉ - 1.1 E21 SMB - 1.2 A09

BERTHET - 2.2 F38 COBRA - 2.0 B63 DODANE 1857 - 2.2 F40 FOB - 2.2 F31 GAY FRÈRES - 2.1 L70 GROUPE GL - 2.1 L02 ISABELLE LANGLOIS - 2.0 K41 HALL 3 JOÏA - 2.1 M58 ALAIN BOITE - 3.1 D25 MARCEL ROBBEZ MASSON - 2.1 A61 GARAUDE - 3.1 A09 PORCHET - 2.1 L58 MARC PRINC - 3.1 A07 SCHMITTGALL - 2.1 M58 MARCEL PONCET - 3.1 E23 PIAT - 3.1 D01 WASKOLL - 2.1 K70

HALL 4.U

ROBUR - 4.U D41 VERLUX - 4.U B23

PALACE

PÉQUIGNET - OF.5A

BEFORE THE SHOW AND THROUGHOUT THE YEAR, THE LATEST NEWS ABOUT FRENCH MANUFACTURERS ARE AVAILABLE ON

WWW.EMOTIONFRANCE.COM

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WATCHES, JEWELLERY & HIGH JEWELLERY HORLOGERIE, BIJOUTERIE & JOAILLERIE

« FRANCE » PRESS & INFORMATION MEDIA CENTER STAND 1.0 V3

www.emotionfrance.com


DIAMONDS

INTERVIEW

COLOUR YOUR WORLD WITH DIAMONDS The historic city of Antwerp is the host of the sixth annual Antwerp Diamond Trade Fair (ADTF), to be held February 1 to 3, 2015. Open exclusively to trade professionals, this edition promises to be a glittering event and includes a special festive “Antwerp Diamond Night” on February 1. Organized by the Antwerp World Diamond Centre, the representative of the Antwerp diamond sector, the location of the ADTF could not be more perfect since 84 percent of all rough and 50 percent of all polished diamonds pass through the city. To gain insight into the types of products that visitors can see at the trade fair, CIJ TRENDS & COLOURS spoke with Mike Akiki, Managing Director of Antwerp Cut (antwerpcut.be), a Natural Coloured Diamond Manufacturer since 1989. Interview conducted by Cynthia Unninayar CIJTC: Your brand, Antwerp Cut, specializes in natural colour diamonds. Why colour? Mike Akiki: When I started cutting diamonds 26 years ago, I quickly realized that for white diamonds the criteria were clearly defined, very traditional, and “closed.” From my very first encounter with natural colour diamonds, I envisioned the infinite number of possibilities of what could be done with a coloured gem. There was space for creativity and artistic expression. When I set the gems free, I want them to mesmerize, to conquer the eyes and the soul of the one looking at them. It’s the same for jewellery. It is a question of combinations: design and colour led by imagination, talent, and fantasy. CIJTC: What are the most common natural colour diamonds, and the most rare? MA: Yellow is the most common colour. A very small percentage of natural yellow diamonds have a superior tone and saturation. Sourced from the Zimmi mine in Sierra Leone, these natural yellows present a level of saturation that sets them apart from the ordinary gems. They are among the very few natural colour diamonds that can be cut into traditional round brilliants while keeping a superior level of colour. It took me years to collect more than 20 round brilliant-cut Zimmi diamonds to create a oneof-a-kind layout that we will showcase at the ADTF. In my opinion, the rarest natural colour diamonds are the violet, purple, and orange hues, although red diamonds are highly prized by collectors. CIJTC: Size aside, a “white” diamond is often valued by how colourless it is. What determines the value of a coloured diamond? MA: Two main criteria determine the value of natural colour diamonds. First is the rarity, and second is related to the hue, tone, and saturation of the stone’s colour. As opposed to white diamonds where less colour is better, in natural colour diamonds, more colour is better. CIJTC: Is there a difference in the way a natural colour diamond is cut compared to a white diamond? MA: White diamonds are mostly cut to match the specific criteria of the 4 C’s. When I cut a natural colour diamond, my main guideline is colour. It’s a very natural and organic process where I complete a stone’s journey by making the right combination between colour and cut. Each natural colour diamond has its own intricacies and needs. Patience, respect and passion are my strongest allies. Without them, I could never achieve the level of beauty, intensity, and magic that I want for my stones. CIJTC: Who is the target buyer of natural colour diamonds? MA: Everyone! Colour impacts our world, our life, every day, all day. The taste and demand for natural colour diamonds is growing and, despite the impressive prices realized at the auctions, there is a natural colour diamond for everyone! As in fashion, natural colour diamonds are a beautiful means of self-expression. CIJTC: You have been exhibiting at the ADTF since its origin. How do you find it as a venue for showcasing your stones? MA: Today, Antwerp Cut showcases one of the most important inventories of natural colour diamonds in Antwerp. Since no two are alike, “seeing is believing,” which is why trade fairs are essential. The ADTF offers its visitors the opportunty to see 90 qualified exhibitors in one place and to buy directly from the source in a comfortable and upscale atmosphere. The city is strategically located, a train ride away from Paris and London, and is a convenient stop for buyers after the Vicenza trade fair. The ADTF organizers have shown great care over the past years to improve and evolve with the needs of both the exhibitors and the buyers, including offering three nights accommodation for first-time overseas buyers, as well as transfers from nearby airports and train stations to the show. Editor's Note: Entry to the ADTF is strictly by-invitation-only. Invitations must be obtained directly from the organizer, either by recommendation from one of the exhibitors or by registering at antwerpdiamondfair.com. All buyers must produce verifiable documentation that they are qualified members of the gem and jewellery trade. (antwerpdiamondfair.com)

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Powered by the Antwerp World Diamond Centre.

n 

Exhibitors : 85 Antwerp diamond companies.

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Visitors : jeweller retailers, designers, manufacturers. By invitation only.

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www.antwerpdiamondfair.com

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By Cynthia Unninayar

TOP FASHION COLOURS

TOP TEN FASHION COLOURS FOR SPRING 2015 In this issue of CIJ Trends & Colours, our annual trends guide, we again present the top ten fashion colours for Spring 2015 as forecast by Pantone in its Fashion Color Report Spring 2015. Predicting a move toward the cooler and softer side of the color spectrum, the report states, “An eclectic, ethereal mix of understated brights, pale pastels and nature-like neutrals take centre stage as designers draw from daydreams of simpler times. Remembrances of retro delights, folkloric and floral art, and the magical worlds of tropical landscapes restore a sense of well-being as we head into warmer months.� Nanis

Lisa Nik

Inbar Leaderline

Shamila Madstone

Lorenz Baumer

Jack Kelege

Rebecca Minkoff using Pantone Strawbery Ice, a light, nurturing coral tone.

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Nar Wong

Fashion sketches, colours, and quotes are courtesy of Pantone Fashion Color Report Spring 2015.

Jessica Surloff


Leatrice Eiseman, executive director of the Pantone Color Institute®, adds, “Many feel compelled to be connected around the clock because we are afraid we’ll miss something important. There is a growing movement to step out and create ‘quiet zones’ to disconnect from technology and unwind, giving ourselves time to stop and be still. Color choices follow the same minimalistic, ‘en plein air’ theme, taking a cue from nature rather than being reinvented or mechanically manipulated. Soft, cool hues blend with subtle warm tones to create a soothing escape from the everyday hustle and bustle.” Showing the link between fashion and jewellery, these colours are brought to life by beautiful examples on the following pages.

TA N G E R I N E

STRAWBERRY ICE

Constantin Wild

Garaude Costis Bhansali

Mark Schneider

Paula Crevoshay Takayas

Tirisi

Different Gems

Meissen

Isabelle Langlois

Philip Zahm Yoana Baraschi using Pantone Tangerine, an energizing, nonjarring take on orange that adds a bold pop of color for spring.

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By Cynthia Unninayar

TOP FASHION COLOURS

Daniel Espinosa Marco Bicego Misis Stanislav Drokin Mousson Atelier

Jane Taylor

Jochen Pohl

Moraglione

Kavant Gumha Daniel Silverstain using Pantone Marsala, a compelling and cordial hue that incorporates the satisfying richness of a tastefully fulfilling meal while its grounding red-brown roots point to a sophisticated, natural earthiness.

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Brio Shoes

Fashion sketches, colours, and quotes are courtesy of Pantone Fashion Color Report Spring 2015.


Cervera Barcelona

G L A C I E R G R AY

Metalsmiths Sterling

Magerit

Adami & Martucci Dilamani Garden of Silver

Rosato

Todd Reed

Eichhorn

Shawish

Coge H. Weiss

Dennis Basso using Pantone Glacier Gray, a timeless and unobtrusive gray that adds a sense of graceful relaxation as another practical neutral.

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By Cynthia Unninayar

TOP FASHION COLOURS Lorenz Baumer GianaMayra

Lika Behar

Nouvelle Bague

Thistle & Bee

Bellari Le Vian

Shawn Ames

Sanalitro

Shawn Ames Clara Williams

Caroline C Yael Designs Barbara Tfank, using Pantone Scuba Blue, a colour that restores our sense of carefree playfulness, while invigorating the body and mind.

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Mousson Atelier

Fashion sketches, colours, and quotes are courtesy of Pantone Fashion Color Report Spring 2015.


Bavna

Bellon Color Story

CLASSIC BLUE

SCUBA BLUE

Vianna Brasil

Casato Alice K

Jewellery Theatre Buddha Mama Mokoso Atelier Omi Prive

Crivelli

Trina Turk using Pantone Classic Blue, a strong and reliable anchor and, with its waterborne qualities, is perceived as thoughtful and introspective.

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By Cynthia Unninayar

TOP FASHION COLOURS Pamela Huizenga

Dada Arrigoni Commelin

Baggins Bella Campbell

Katie Decker

Masriera Carla Amorim

Sutra

Vieri

E&V Jewellery Christian Siriano, using Pantone Lucite Green, a soft, serene green offers a fresh sense of clarity.

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Isabelle Langlois

Fashion sketches, colours, and quotes are courtesy of Pantone Fashion Color Report Spring 2015.

Omi Prive


Jacqueline Diani

LUCITE GREEN C U S TA R D

Jacqueline Diani

Brumani

Brumani

MCL

Anahita

Leyla Abdolahi

A&Furst

Luca Carati

Mattiolli

Marcia Budet

Nanette Lepore using Pantone Custard, which serves as an all-encompassing yellow for the spring palette.

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By Cynthia Unninayar

TOP FASHION COLOURS Mazza

Denny Wong

Mazza

Yael Sonia

Cornelia Goldsmith

Anthony Lent

Mathon Paris

Jochen Pohl Victor Veylan

JJ Number 8

J Jewels

Dust Kreations Danhov

Suzy Landa Pamella Roland using Pantone Aquamarine, an airy, ethereal, blue with a cool, dreamy feel that mixes well with the other blues and greens in the Top Ten.

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Fashion sketches, colours, and quotes are courtesy of Pantone Fashion Color Report Spring 2015.

Elke Berr


Andrea Li

Carberonia

Anzie

Bapalal Keshavlal

Bapalal Keshavlal

TOASTED ALMOND

AQUAMARINE

Pedro Siquiera

Lydia Courteille

Elizabeth Garvin

Elizabeth Garvin

Amali

Le Vian Stephen Venezia

Jay Godfrey using Pantone Toasted Almond, a sun-tanned neutral that offers timeless, comforting warmth.

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The

WORLD NUMBER Fine Jewellery Ev

SEPTEMBER Hong Kong Jewellery 16 - 20 September 2015

AsiaWorld-Expo • Hong Kong Diamonds, Gemstones, Pearls, Equipment and P

18 - 22 September 2015 Hong Kong Convention & Exhibition Centre Fine Finished Jewellery

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D’S R ONE vent

y & Gem Fair

Packaging


GEMSTONES

INTERVIEW

Trends in Gemstones and Treatments Prized for their unique character and intrinsic beauty, gemstones are a major part of today’s fine jewellery. They come in all types, sizes, shapes, and colours. And, sometimes to enhance their beauty, they are subjected to various types of treatments. To learn more about the ever-changing landscape of trends in gemstones and their enhancements, as well as other issues facing the industry, we visited the very modern and prestigious Gem and Jewelry Institute of Thailand (GIT, a public organization) during a recent trip to Bangkok. Here, we caught up with the very gracious and very busy Dr. Pornsawat Wathanakul, Director of the GIT. Interview conducted by Cynthia Unninayar

Dr. Pornsawat Wathanakul

CIJTC: As a gem expert yourself, and as Director of the GIT, what changes have you seen in the types of gemstones used in jewellery over the last few years? Dr. Pornsawat Wathanakul: We have seen a shift in the nature of gems being used in jewellery. The most notable is the move towards what we might call a “natural” approach to gemstones. This started with the appearance of the so-called “sliced diamonds” that came to market several years ago. Lesser quality diamonds were cut into slices that clearly showed their inclusions and other “defects.” Jewellery designers were very creative in turning these “gem lemons” into delightful and delicious lemonade by actually highlighting the inclusions as something distinctive and individual to the stone. Surrounded by other gems or diamonds, these diamond slices became quite popular and appreciated in the world of fine jewellery. Following the diamond slices, we now see more gem dealers slicing emeralds, sapphires, and other stones. These examples show the stones in their more “natural” state, you might say. Other gems moving into the world of fine jewellery are geodes, jasper, agates including dendritic agates, fossilized coral, various quartzes, and even “precious” stones in matrix set in creative designs. But, the precious and rare gems still remain highly prized by jewellers and consumers. Over the last few years, we have seen increasing interest from China, traditionally a jade market, for coloured stones, but especially Pigeon's Blood rubies and Royal Blue sapphires.

CIJTC: What gems come mostly to GIT for analysis and certification? PW: As a national institution for gem testing, we serve the entire supply chain for the gem and jewellery sector. We test all kinds of gemstones, whether rough, faceted, or mounted, as well as pearls. The majority, however, are from the corundum family, namely ruby and sapphire. GIT also tests precious metal alloys for their content and for Hallmarking purposes. CIJTC: In touring your facilities, the lab seems to be quite cutting-edge, with rooms full of advanced testing equipment… PW: The GIT was established in 1998, and is one of the world’s seven leading laboratories that are members of the Laboratory Manual Harmonization Committee (LMHC). We have advanced equipment that includes a variety of specialized instruments, spectrometers, and X-ray units that are used to distinguish between natural and synthetic gems, to grade diamonds and pearls, distinguish natural from cultured pearls, determine the geographical origin of gemstones, and detect treatments in coloured stones, diamonds, and pearls. GIT has also researched the master sets of Pigeon's Blood ruby, Royal Blue sapphire, and Cornflower Blue sapphire. The institute also conducts training in the gems and jewellery sector as well as related activities. [Editor’s note: The other six members of LMHC are CGL (Japan), CISGEM (Italy), DSEF (Germany), GIA (USA), Gübelin Gem Lab Ltd. (Switzerland), and the SSEF (Switzerland).]

GIT has an impressive array of advanced equipment in its gem testing section.

CIJTC: What is the most common type of gemstone “enhancement” and how can it be detected? PW: Hundreds of years ago, people discovered that they could change a gem’s clarity and colour by heating it. Today, the vast majority of gemstones are heated. The most common stone to undergo heat-treatment is amethyst. Pale purple amethyst can be converted to yellow-orange citrine by heating. Other stones that are heat-treated to improve quality include ruby, sapphire, morExamples of unheated rubies (left) and after heat treatment (right). ganite, kunzite, zircon, and tourmaline. After being subjected to 56


heat, tanzanite, for example, turns to a lovely purplish-blue, while aquamarine intensifies its blue hue. Sapphires are heated to intensify or lighten their colour and improve uniformity. For ruby and sapphire in particular, special heating techniques have been developed through experimentation to best suit the particular type of stone. Today, out of 1,000 sapphires, less than one is unheated, which makes the untreated gems rare and very valuable. The most important technique used to tell if a stone has been heated is by microscopic observation of its inclusion features, which are changed as a result of the heat. CIJTC: Can you elaborate on beryllium diffusion in sapphires? PW: In beryllium diffusion, sapphires are heated to high temperatures in the presence of the light element beryllium (Be), which penetrates deep into the stone and helps modify the appearance by making the colour more uniform and, in the case of dark blue sapphires, by making them lighter. This treatment is also used to introduce yellow colour into natural white sapphires by producing colour centres together with iron. This yellow has also been introduced into pink sapphires, which then take on the lovely pink-orange shades of Padparadscha. Once considered controversial, Be-diffusion is now generally accepted because of the beauty it produces in the gems and their colour stability. This treatment can be detected by analyzing the Be content in the gemstone using advanced techniques such as Laser Induced Breakdown Spectrocopy and Laser Ablation Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry. Because the stone undergoes high temperatures for a long period, its internal features will also be significantly damaged, providing additional confirmation of the Be-treatment.

As part of its mandate, GIT tests not only gems and pearls, but also precious metals.

CIJTC: We hear a lot about lead-glass filled rubies. Is there a way consumers can tell if the stones in their jewellery have been "enhanced" in this manner? PW: Glass-filled rubies have been around for decades and are now widely used for low-end jewelry products. Basically, glass mixed with lead or bismuth is filled in cavities or fissures in a ruby to disguise the imperfections and improve colour and clarity. The problem with this treatment is that the glass filler is not durable and as it deteriorates, the appearance of the stone can change. It is important that the customer be informed about this treatment and how to care for the stones. The consumer can often distinguish this treated stone with a 10x loupe. Commonly, the stone will display a very clear purplish, bluish, or pinkish flash effect while moving it. And, many flattened and trapped gas bubbles are also usually seen. The extent of the treatment varies depending on the nature of the original material. If readers are interested in this topic, they can find more information on the LMHC information sheet number 3, on the website, LMHC-gemmology.org. CIJTC: Do you find gems that are purportedly authentic, but turn out to be man-made synthetic stones? PW: Rarely, but yes. Some months ago, a client brought in two beautiful rubies that had been certified natural by another lab, but the owner still had a doubt. Our experts analyzed the rubies and found them to be, in fact, synthetic. There are also occasions when two labs will disagree on an analysis of a gemstone, and the GIT is called in to provide a third opinion. CIJTC: What are some of the other issues facing the gem industry? PW: There are the issues of synthetic diamonds being passed off as natural, and increasingly we are seeing synthetic corundum being sold as natural ruby. In some cases, the synthetic corundum has even been fracture-filled with lead glass. This may sound ridiculous at first. Who would want to go to the trouble of fracture-filling a man-made stone? But, it is a way to make people think the synthetic is a lower-quality natural stone, which is comparatively still more valuable. Unfortunately, as gemstone prices rise, there will be people who want to cheat. It is important for customers to understand what they are buying and to purchase from reputable dealers. And, it is important for dealers to disclose any treatments their stones have been subjected to. As I mentioned earlier, most gems are enhanced. This is not a bad thing as these stones provide less expensive alternatives to consumers as well as colours that don’t exist in nature. The key word is disclosure and that is good for the entire industry.

Most gemstones are treated in one form or another. Of 1,000 sapphires on the market, less than 1 are unheated. Shown here is an example of a rare unheated sapphire.

Faceted sapphires that have been beryllium-diffused to improve colour and clarity.

57


BITCOIN

INTERVIEW

THE RISE OF BITCOIN Credit card fees, charge-backs, and especially fraud are concerns for any business. A rather new "cyber-currency" called Bitcoin has garnered a lot of attention recently, both positive and negative. Could it be a viable solution to these concerns? To learn more about this new virtual money, CIJ TRENDS & COLOURS spoke with Jacques Voorhees, innovator and tech leader in the jewellery industry, founder of Polygon, and currently CEO of Verichannel. Interview conducted by Cynthia Unninayar CIJTC: Let’s start with the basics. What is Bitcoin? Jacques Voorhees: Bitcoin is a virtual currency with two aspects: a payment processing system such as PayPal, and units of measurement that are sent over that system. Bitcoin with a capital "B" refers to the payment system. A small "b" refers to the unit of measurement, or the currency. CIJTC: How did it get started and who owns it? JV: Its origins are a mystery. In 2008, programmers operating under the alias Satoshi Nakamoto published a paper describing digital currency and, in 2009, launched software that created the first Bitcoin network and bitcoin currency. It's an open source protocol, like email or the Web's HTTP. So, no one "owns" the Bitcoin system, any more than anyone owns the email system. Anyone who conforms to the rules can use it; just as anyone can use the Web. There is no company called "Bitcoin." And that’s part of its strength. Companies can fail, and just as the Internet itself kept growing despite the many dot-com failures in the late 1990s, companies in the Bitcoin space can and do fail, yet Bitcoin usage keeps growing.

Jacques Voorhees, CEO of Verichannel

CIJTC: Are bitcoins backed by anything, and what exactly can they do? JV: Think of it this way. What is a violin, a truck, or a hammer "backed by?" Nothing, because those things have intrinsic value. You need backing only if there is no intrinsic value. Bitcoins have intrinsic value, like a truck, because they can do something useful. They can move wealth across the Bitcoin payment processing system. A truck has value only because roads exist. A bitcoin has value because the Bitcoin payment system exists. And that system is the most efficient, secure, tamper-proof, instantaneous, and cost-free method of moving wealth (making payments) ever developed in human history. It is the superhighway of payments, but to use it, you need bitcoins. And because there are only a limited number of bitcoins to use on this network, the coins themselves have value. CIJTC: How does a bitcoin transaction work and are these transactions secure? JV: Bitcoins are stored in electronic "wallets," which are either online or stored on your computer or phone. To make a payment, you open the wallet and tell it to transfer a certain number of bitcoins to someone's "Bitcoin address." A Bitcoin address is like an email address, and any bitcoins sent to it will arrive to the recipient instantly anywhere in the world—just like email. In terms of security, no bitcoin transfer has ever been hacked, intercepted, or blocked. That said, it is important for users to keep their wallet file safe. Just as someone could steal your physical wallet if you left it on the street, so, too, could they steal your Bitcoin wallet if you did not protect it. So, while the payment network itself has so far been extremely secure, usage of it demands some level of user responsibility. CIJTC: What are bitcoins actually worth? JV: Bitcoin value is set in an open market, as is diamond pricing. Unlike diamonds, though, bitcoins are so new that the market does not know what they are really worth. The price fluctuations—which have been huge—are a symptom of the market trying to determine their value. Right at this moment, one bitcoin is worth US$414. But they've been valued at over a thousand dollars each, and in the beginning, a bitcoin was worth less than a dollar each. Obviously, speculating in bitcoin is not for the faint-hearted. CIJTC: Wouldn’t this price volatility be a problem for using bitcoins in commerce? JV: No, because vendors who use the Bitcoin system don't care about the value of an individual bitcoin. If you accept American Express in your store, do you care what the current share price of Amex stock is? No, because you are receiving dollars from the card, not Amex stock. Bitcoin is the same. Most vendors use the system to receive dollars. When a payment is made, the bitcoins are converted to dollars immediately by the payment processor. This means that if merchants sell an item for $5,000, they receive precisely $5,000 into their account, even though the payment was made in bitcoin. And, this is true, irrespective of any fluctuations in the bitcoin price during any part of the transaction. CIJTC: If merchants have no volatility risk in accepting Bitcoin, since they receive their asking price in dollars as in your example, what is the price fluctuation risk for the payment processor and especially for the buyer who owns the bitcoin and is thus even more susceptible to changes in its price relative to the dollar or any other currency? JV: The payment processors absorb the risk, but it’s slight for two reasons. First, they are handling large numbers of transactions and they may just as likely lose a few dollars on one as gain on another. It evens out, and is part of their cost of doing business. Secondly, their exposure time is measured in minutes, if not seconds, for each transaction, so it's a fairly trivial risk. In any case, this is their business and they know what they’re doing. As for the bitcoin owner, who pays in bitcoins, the situation does have risk, but risk exists in owning any cur58


rency. The U.S. dollar has lost 97 percent of its value since the creation of the Federal Reserve, for example. There are hyper swings in many new or small-capitalization currencies in the world today. This is why most people will keep only a small amount of their assets in that form at any given time, used for making bitcoin payments. You can transfer in and out of bitcoin, instantly, at any time, online. The people who use bitcoin are those who appreciate its advantages and believe in it. And, as the bitcoin ecosystem expands, volatility will settle down. In the meantime, it is not the vendor's problem, and can be ignored. CIJTC: How do I buy bitcoin and how do I store it? JV: The same sites that provide the sending/receiving functions also are used for exchanging normal currencies into bitcoin, and vice versa, and for maintaining "wallets" for storing your bitcoins. The best way to obtain them depends on where you live. In the USA, the two best services are Circle.com and CoinBase.com. In Europe, I would cite Safello.com. CIJTC: As a buyer, how do you pay for something in Bitcoin? JV: When you own bitcoin, you can use it to buy goods and services by going to the vendor's website and using their check-out system, and selecting Bitcoin rather than a credit card or PayPal. It is just as easy. There are online applications that let you do the same thing in a physical store. Since you don't need to provide personal credit card details, there is zero risk of identity theft, which has been such a problem with normal e-commerce using credit cards. CIJTC: Who accepts Bitcoin, and what are its advantages for the jewellery industry? JV: The list is growing daily. Over 50,000 merchants have signed up with BitPay alone [one of the payment processors]. Names include Virgin Galactic, Dish Network, Wordpress, Expedia, and TigerDirect. In the jewellery sector, Tivol, Reed’s, and Overstock.com are among a growing number to accept Bitcoin. It has several advantages. It's an alternative to credit cards; processing fees are far less; the value is received instantly; it is immune to fraud; there are no chargebacks; and you can receive payments from anywhere in the world. There is no such thing as a "high risk" territory. A Bitcoin payment from Nigeria is just as secure as a Bitcoin payment from New York. CIJTC: Apple has launched ApplyPay as a convenient payment alternative. How does Bitcoin compare to this system? JV: First of all, ApplePay is merely a payment interface, a layering of iPhone technology on existing currency and payment systems. It is a marginal improvement that does make your credit cards and bank accounts easier to use. You might call it Apple's answer to PayPal, which also requires credit cards and bank accounts. Bitcoin, by contrast, basically changes how money, payments, and trust work around the world. Secondly, ApplePay only works on Apple smartphones, which are held by a very small percentage of the global population. Bitcoin works on any computer, smart phone, and even non-smart phones. Thirdly, the two are not mutually exclusive. ApplePay can potentially cover all types of payments, including Bitcoin. It could very well be the case that, in five years, most people who pay with Bitcoin, do so using their ApplePay system. CIJTC: Are you and Verichannel involved with Bitcoin? JV: Yes, among other things, we offer services to help jewelers get on the Bitcoin bandwagon. We feel it is one of the most important cost-reduction and anti-fraud technologies ever to hit the industry.

VICENZAORO - Winter, Fall - Hall 7, French Pavilion JCK TUCSON Booth L5 BASELWORLD Hall 2 BIJORHCA September

HKG March Booth 1CON-012 JCK LUXURY (Sonette Booth) HKG September - French Pavilion

12 rue de la Paix - 75002 Paris www.isabellelanglois.com

Jacques Voorhees can be reached at Jacques@verichannel.com. 59


SOCIAL MEDIA

INTERVIEW

Forget Public Relations – The Real Game Is Social Relations Whether you are a retailer, designer, or even a blogger, you have a brand. And, if you want to advance that brand, you cannot afford to ignore social media. To learn more about this ever-evolving phenomenon, CIJ TRENDS & COLOURS caught up with the very busy master marketer or, as he is often called “Brand Architect,” Dan Scott. Dan’s marketing experience includes positions with QVC, Chanel, and Verisign, followed by a decade as Chief Marketing Officer at Scott Kay. Two years ago, he became CMO of World Trade Jewelers, where he is responsible for the global growth of billion-dollar iconic brands translated into jewelry, such as Hershey Kiss pendants, the brand’s top rated licensed product, and Hasbro’s Scrabble Jewelry, now Macy’s #1 selling initial pendant. Ranked #15 out of 5,000 CMOs in the USA and elected for the third year to the CMO North American Advisory Board, Dan utilizes social media to create intense brand awareness, build community, and to sell, but not in the way you may think. Interview conducted by Cynthia Unninayar CIJTC: Let’s start with the basics. What is a brand? Dan Scott: Simply stated, a brand is a promise. You can count on one hand how many true brands there are in the jewelry industry. That’s sad when compared to fashion or fragrance, but it’s not a lost cause. We too often call something a “brand” because it has a name, logo, slogan, or tagline. To give birth to a baby brand, however, one must carefully nurture a jewelry design or collection. Then, through the proper channels, you stand by your brand promise and deliver on it each and every day to the right audience. CIJTC: What is social media and how can it help build a brand? DS: Social media is a 24/7 cocktail party with peer-to-peer conversations that take place via text, images, Dan Scott, brand architect and marketing consultant. videos, or audio, or any combination of these. Popular channels of communication include Facebook, Instagram, Pinterest, Twitter, YouTube, and LinkedIn. The party never stops and the guest list is endless. You may invite your brand to the party, but don’t think for a moment that, because a social platform bears your brand name, you are in control. The consumer has the ultimate say. Before you type, pin, post, or tweet, visit your toughest competition and just observe. Remember, once you hit enter, it’s online forever. A strong brand or a promise never dies and there is magic in instantaneous action and reaction, but what could spread like wildfire to promote and reinvigorate your brand can also shoot to kill with as little as one bad post. CIJTC: In the ever-evolving world of social media, what’s the difference between a “like,” a “fan,” and “shares?” DS: Remember the days when people would jump for joy when their website had a million hits? We have since learned that a “hit” is somewhat meaningless. One does not know who “hit” the page. “Fans” or “likes” are, in a way, similar. You don’t know who they are, where they came from, or what, exactly, they are “liking.” Having said that, however, there is great power in numbers for the sheer attention of it all. Human nature proves that people are drawn to crowds, and thousands of Facebook fans make your brand or product look successful. “Shares” are the digital version of word of mouth. When people share, it’s a peer-to-peer endorsement, but shares can also be negative. If people have a bad experience, they tell the world. When you see those—and you may well get them—do not hit delete or block them (unless it is profane and modern filters take care of most of those). Resist the temptation to be defensive. Rather, communicate with the person, just as any great customer service person would do. The difference here is that the world is watching, and it can turn against you in a moment. Try and right the wrong, even if you are right. People who express discontent are still people who care. But, if the conversation stays negative, try and take it offline. There are ways to do this, and they are specific to each circumstance, which we can talk about offline. We should also mention “unique visitors” (UVs). They tell us that one specific visitor, on one day, from one IP address came from a completely traceable online location. This makes for a killer marketing dashboard. You can see the visitation time, duration, action taken, and so much more. UVs can produce email addresses, home addresses, and phone numbers—and other opt-in information. This is useful once it’s put into action. CIJTC: Let’s take a concrete example. Can a brand convert traffic to sales, using, for example, Facebook? DS: No, not really. Nothing that works in the physical world works in cyberspace, not promotion nor incentives nor discounts. With social media, you engage your audience. You speak around your brand and not to it or about it. An example can be seen on the Hershey Kiss Facebook page, which now has nearly 200,000 fans, with over 5,000 active interactions every few hours. One of the most popular posts—it reached 15,000 people in 15 minutes—was an adorable baby sleeping in a bed of Hershey Kiss chocolates. No jewelry. Thousands of people shared the post and the result sold more Kiss pendants than we had ever experienced. But, when we placed a hero shot with the popular kisses, we flat-lined. The baby image spoke around the product and touched a cord with the audience, without ever mentioning the product itself.

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CIJTC: What does the term “psychographics” mean and why is it so important? DS: Let me start by saying that it is extremely important to know your customer. Psychograpics is a marketing term used to identify people’s personalities, aspirations, and desires. To understand psychographics is to understand the “why” of people's purchases. It is a multi-layered evaluation of "why" someone “needs” a Rolex over a Timex. Yesterday’s marketers used only household income, age, and geography to target their customers. Today, one must get inside consumers’ minds and follow their lead. It’s their voice, their likes and dislikes that control how well a product performs. If you force-feed your brand in social media, people will be turned off. You must allow the conversation to grow organically, while carefully guiding it, and your brand will thrive. CIJTC: How does one determine which social platforms best address their target audience? DS: Studies show that Facebook is skewing 30+ with somewhat higher household income. Instagram and Twitter are more tweens, teens, and twenties. Pinterest is varied, but attracts mostly women, aged 25 to 45. Pinterest is also the best platform for click through to buy. Facebook is not—F-commerce tanked—and Instagram won’t allow you to click to buy, at least not yet. Once you identify your brand’s psychographics, you are then half way to finding the right platform to get your message out. CIJTC: You have had tremendous success with “influencers” in social marketing, so how do you leverage these people to help sell your products or services? DS: Today’s influencers, or informal “brand ambassadors,” you might say, are the fashionistas and trendsetters you never hear of, but who have millions of active followers. They are people such as Michelle Phan, a hair-and-makeup guru who, with more than seven million subscribers and one billion page views, is a certified YouTube superstar. You can cultivate your own influencer. They are out there. You just need to find them and make them a star for your brand promise.

In Social Media, it is necessary to engage your audience and speak around your brand, not about it. A good example of this strategy is the Hershey's Kiss jewellery campaign that featured a baby on a bed of chocolate kisses, but not a single piece of jewellery. The image reached 15,000 people in 15 minutes and resulted in a high volume of jewellery sales.

For more on branding and marketing in today's digital environment, Dan Scott can be reached at info@danscott.com

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Jane A. Gordon

By Cynthia Unninayar

TRENDS & COLOURS

IF IT AIN’T BAROQUE DON’T FIX IT

Pearl Paradise

In the past, pearls that were not perfect, round, or symmetrical were considered greatly inferior to their perfectly formed cousins. Today, designers are seeing their irregularities as opportunities to create beautiful and original pieces, giving these living gems a well-deserved place in the world of fine jewellery.

Liverino

Yvel

Buccellati

Imperial Sea Hunt

Yoko London

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Mario Buzzanca


Baggins

Mimi Kavant Jye Luxury Collection Utopia

Mastoloni

Emiko Pearls

Jewelmer

Caroline C

Tara 63


TRENDS & COLOURS By Cynthia Unninayar

DAZZLING DIAMONDS From rose cuts to brilliants and everything in between, diamonds come in all shapes and sizes, and, of course, colours. Fancy diamonds not only bring record prices at auction, but are dazzling in a wide variety of colourful creations.

Entice/KGK

Nar Wong

Martin Flyer

Ashi Diamonds

Carla Amorim Chimento

Jack Kelege

Outfit by Ulises Merida (photo: Mecedes Benz Fashion Week Madrid)

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Laurence Bruyninckx

H.J. Namdar


Suna

Memoire

Garrard

Bapalal Keshavlal

Crivelli

Monelle Designs

Jye Luxury Collection

Nar Wong Tasha R

Ziva

Zydo

Outfit by Venexiana (photo: Mecedes Benz Fashion Week NYC)

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By Cynthia Unninayar

TRENDS & COLOURS

S E T I S A O T P T r to create R OP A come togethpeposites ohne C t O T ents white 015.

Yoko London

Rina Limor

and for 2 her epres Black designs m, one r ile the ot d n g h ru stron nal spect olour, w r. Black a tz, c u r the to ce of all of all colo res, qua re i a n abse presence , sapph jade, nes s d d n e a on sto is th diam , agate, lar gem . e t i u wh onyx ost pop at attract , s l r m s th pea the osite g p n p o o am ing evok

Ivanka Trump

Dada Arrigoni

Andreoli

Syvlie Cox Shoes Luca Carati

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Outfit by Juana Martin (photo: Mecedes Benz Fashion Week Madrid)

Vivaan


AC

T

O P P

TR

O S I

AT

T E S

Vivaan

De Grisogono

Marcia Budet

Re’Volve

Dilamani

Nouvelle Bague

Bapalal Keshavlal

Brio Shoes Outfit by Vivienne Hu (photo: Mercedes Benz Fashion Week NYC)

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By Cynthia Unninayar

TRENDS & COLOURS Pamela Huizenga

Aaron Henry Tous Palmiero

RADIANT RAINBOWS While single colors in jewellery design are very popular, many creators are mixing things up, offering a wide variety of colour combinations, with both contrasting and complementary hues. Made with gemstones, metals, enamel, and pearls, these pieces are as lovely and luxurious as Nature’s radiant rainbows.

Evocateur

Evocateur

Philip Zahm

Mousson Atelier Stephen Webster

Outfit by Atsushi Nakashima (photo: AFPBB News/JFWO/MBFWT)

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Cornelia Goldsmith

Jacob & Co.


Versace Vianna Brasil

Effy

Roberto Bravo

Faberge Anahita

Nanis

Yael Designs

Thistle & Bee

Outfit by Agatha Ruiz de la Prada (photo: Mecedes Benz Fashion Week Madrid)

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B

MARKETPLACE BANGKOK

eautiful in

BANGKOK By CYNTHIA UNNINAYAR

POLICIES OF ZERO VAT FOR GEMSTONES AND DUTY-FREE PRIVILEGES FOR JEWELLERY, AS WELL AS A NUMBER OF BUSINESS MATCHING AND ONLINE SOURCING PROGRAMS, HELPED ATTRACT A RECORD-BREAKING NUMBER OF VISITORS WHO CAME TO SEE THE BEAUTIFUL JEWELLERY AND GEMS ON DISPLAY AT THE 54TH EDITION OF THE BANGKOK GEMS & JEWELRY FAIR,

O

HELD SEPTEMBER 9 TO 13, 2014.

r rganized by the Thai Gem & Jewelry Traders Association (TGJTA) under the theme “The Power of Free Trade, Connect the World with Free Tax,” the 54th edition of the five-day Bangkok Gems & Jewelry Fair (BGJF) offered definite tax advantages for buyers and exhibitors. “Apart from other services and facilities that enabled our visitors to enjoy the easiest business transactions possible, the TGJTA in collaboration with the Thai government unlocked the tax barrier, setting the BGJF as a duty-free zone for gems and jewellery production,” explained Somchai Phornchindarak, President of TGJTA and the Gems, Jewelry, and Precious Metal Confederation of Thailand.

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evan Dara

Duang Kaew Jewelry

COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGES Through the efforts of the TGJTA, the tax advantages of doing business in Thailand are clearly evident. In addition, the nation offers a number of other competitive advantages. First, it is the world’s largest exporter and manufacturer of silver jewellery, from simple pieces to highly sophisticated designer products. Secondly, Thailand is a global hub for coloured gemstones, importing rough from around the world and re-exporting the facetted gems to the four corners of the planet. Thirdly, the nation’s competitive labour force and quality craftsmanship attract brands from around the world, which source and manufacture their goods in the country, from simple silver pieces to sophisticated high-end gemstone-studded gold suites.


Dermond Anandara

PKL Silver

Gem Production

A large draw to the BGJF is the number and diversity of silver manufacturers. “Thailand is a good, interesting source of supply,” stated Arkadiusz Sypniewski of Polish company, A.S. Pracownia Zlotnicza, adding, “We always get new designs and suppliers always offer me new materials. I plan on increasing imports from Thailand by 25 percent this year.” Newcomer to the BGJF, Naresh Chitan, of India-based Zaveri Bros Jewellers, commented, “We plan to start importing from Thailand for hand-made silver jewellery. The BGJF offers us the opportunity to meet many suppliers in one place. It is a wonderful show.” Another major attraction is the trade in coloured gems. Simon Ghanimian, president of USA-based brand Simon G, and a frequent visitor to the BGJF, commented, “Thailand is the world capital of coloured stones, and we come here to source gems for our jewellery.” Sharing this sentiment, Lisa Wong, of USA-based brand, Nar Wong, stated, “In Thailand, we get a first look at a wide selection of gems before they will be offered at other fairs. This early advantage gives us the opportunity to purchase select stones before other companies.”

Mokoso Atelier

D Quality Jewelry Prima Gold/Pranda

IMPORTANCE OF ASEAN+6 Increased competiveness is also projected for Thailand with the formation of the ASEAN Economic Community (AEC), which is comprised of Thailand, Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines, and Singapore. The 54th BGJF was the venue for the third ASEAN+6 Gems & Jewelry Presidents’ Summit, which included the ASEAN nations plus six important trade partners (China, India, Japan, South Korea, Australia and New Zealand). Leaders from the regional ASEAN region met with other government officials and private sector representatives to discuss the challenges facing each country as part of a regional trading block. The parties came closer to forming a working relationship and agreed to continue the ASEAN Gems and Jewelry Presidents’ platform into the future. Among the impor-

Mahallati

F&R

Goldlip

71


tant issues discussed were cooperation between regional gems and jewellery trade fairs, raw material resources, and sharing of technology and knowledge. “As the AEC opens in 2015, it will be a new market of 600 million people with a very high capacity for the regional gems and jewellery industry,” commented Suttipong Damrongsakul, CEO of the BGJF Organizing Committee. He added that this market would pave the way for sales in Europe and the United States, and expressed confidence that, as part of the AEC, the BGJF would become a very effective link to the world.

PLOI THAI CREATION: THE SPIRIT OF ASEAN 2015 Known internationally as Thailand’s country brand for jewellery design, Ploi Thai features high quality and diversified fine jewellery set with gemstones faceted in Thailand. For the 54th BGJF, a design contest was open to Thai designers and brands to craft jewellery under the theme “The Spirit of ASEAN 2015.” Representing the character of the ASEAN nations, the winners of this competition were seen in a special exhibition at the show. Other examples of outstanding Ploi Thai jewellery were also featured in a special exhibition inside the fair. u

ONSITE LAB SERVICES For buyers wishing to have prospective gemstone purchases analyzed, the prestigious Gem Institute of Thailand (GIT) conducted a temporary laboratory during the BGJF. Attracting long lines of buyers wishing to reassure themselves and verify their purchases, testing was completed in generally less than an hour, at very reasonable prices. The highly rated GIT, under the directorship of Dr. Pornsawat Wathanakul is a member of the Laboratory Manual Harmonization Committee (LMHC), made up of the world’s seven leading gemmological laboratories. The next Bangkok Gems & Jewellery Fair will be held February 24 to 28, 2015, at the city’s very modern Impact Challenger Centre.

WWW.BANGKOKGEMSFAIR.COM

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Dhevan Dara

The Gemological Institute of Thailand provided lab services to buyers at the BGJF to verify gemstone purchases.

KdeCraft


h MARKETPLACE HONG KONG

ONG KONG By CYNTHIA UNNINAYAR

WHERE THE WORLD MEETS

Mousson Atelier

DESPITE POLITICAL UNREST IN THE CITY, THE

SEPTEMBER 2014 EDITION OF THE HONG KONG

JEWELLERY & GEM FAIR ATTRACTED A RECORD NUMBER OF EXHIBITORS AND BUYERS FROM AROUND THE WORLD, REINFORCING ITS ROLE AS A GLOBAL MEETING PLACE FOR JEWELLERY, DIAMONDS, PEARLS, AND GEMSTONES.

O

rganized by UBM, the seven-day HKJGF closed on September 21, 2014 with record-breaking results. Some 3,695 exhibitors from 49 countries and regions, divided between the Hong Kong Convention & Exhibition Centre (HKCEC) for finished jewellery and Asia World Expo (AWE) for diamonds, gemstones, and pearls, attracted 59,116 unique buyers from 157 countries and regions, a 12-percent increase over last year. “Today, the September Fair is the most influential B2B jewellery trade event where the most engaged jewellers in the industry access premium quality buyers,” commented Celine Lau, director of Jewellery Fairs, UBM Asia. “It is the ultimate platform for lobbying and agenda-setting for the industry, and for discovering the products and ideas that excite the jewellery market. The 17-percent growth in visitor numbers from Asia compared to last year’s edition tells us that the region continues to be the key driver in the world’s jewellery market.” “This edition marked the first time that the number of visitors from China (18,310) surpassed the number of Hong Kong-based visitors (17,079),” added Lau. After these two regions, most visitors, in decreasing order, came from India, USA, Taiwan, Thailand, Japan, Philippines, Korea, and Indonesia.

SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE You could find just about every type of jewellery at the HKCEC. Manufacturers, brands, and designers from around the globe showcased items ranging from very inexpensive mass-produced goods to high-end luxury products. All varieties of materials could be found—resin, silver, titanium, bronze, palladium, gold, and platinum— set with everything from crystals and glass to diamonds, pearls, and gemstones. Halls were divided by category and by regions, for ease in sourcing. The three major areas were the Hong Kong Premier Pavilion with 37 high-end local companies, the 74

International Premier Pavilion, featuring 70 up-market brands from 21 countries, and the Fine Design Pavilion where 74 global brands showcased their wares. Among others were the Antique & Vintage Jewellery, Silver Jewellery, Accessories, and Fine Asian Jewellery pavilions. The largest national pavilion was that of Thailand, featuring simple silver to sophisticated gem and gold creations. This year, the diamond pavilion at the AWE was the world’s largest. In terms of trends, it was impossible to pinpoint any major design direction given the vast number of styles at the show. Having said that, however, there were many examples of the Top Ten Trends 2014 that we predicted in our Winter issue (see CIJintl.com). Colour was everywhere. Jadeite continued to be a favourite element in jewellery, although it seemed to be eclipsed somewhat by the traditional trio of ruby, sapphire, and emerald, as featured by both local and overseas companies. Tanzanite and sky blue topaz were popular at the AWE, as was tourmaline, notably the green and pinks, although the neon-blue Paraiba varieties, from both Brazil and Africa, were not lacking.


Sarah Ho

Sawel

Okurado

The Fifth Season

MVee Ellagem

Constantin Wild

Coloured diamonds attracted a lot of attention at some of the designer booths as well as loose stones at the AWE. Honey coloured amber drew much attention from Chinese buyers. Natured-inspired pieces, mostly flowers, butterflies, and birds, satisfied the demand by Chinese buyers for flora and fauna. The decrease in the price of gold notwithstanding, lacy motifs were popular in many designs, while the edgy look, mainly skulls, continued its popularity. Knuckle rings, tassels of all sorts, and exotic earrings were showcased at many stands. A variety of the jewellery from around the world shown at the Hong Kong show is featured on these pages.

VISITOR COMMENTS “We come every year to the September fair to source high-quality gems and diamonds for our creations. The shuttle makes it easy to access the AWE, which is our main focus.” – Lisa Wong, buyer for Nar Wong (USA). “This is my sixth visit to the September fair. The fair separates loose and finished jewellery, which is a brilliant idea. The mobile

Nar Wong

app is user-friendly and helped facilitate my trip.” – Marc A. Green, vice-chairman, Lux Bond & Green (USA). “We visit this fair regularly. Services are good and we can acquire updated market trends here. The sectors make it easy for us to locate products.” – Suvarna Kadam, director, Beauty Gem, Inc (India). “I have visited the September Fair many times to meet my existing and potential new suppliers of diamonds and fine finished jewellery. It’s certainly an excellent platform to find new suppliers, market trends, and to network. The organizer’s service is great, particularly the currency exchange service.” – Simon Phillips, director, Lawrence Blunt Ltd (United Kingdom). “The September Fair always impresses me with the broad product variety and exhibitors’ profiles. I was able to find new suppliers, meet existing partners, network, and update myself with the market trends via the insightful special events. The product sectors, informative fair website, and userfriendly mobile apps assisted me in locating products.” – Alex Jeyaraj, sourcing executive, Rosy Blue (Dubai). “To see upcoming market trends and meet serious jewellery professionals, the September Fair is an event one can’t afford

ExCell

Yoko London

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to miss.” – Massimiliano Arostinin, director, Picador (Italy).

JNA AWARDS Organized by JNA (Jewellery News Asia), the third annual JNA Awards, held September 16 in conjunction with the HKJGF, honoured innovators and leaders in the jewellery industry in manufacturing, branding, retailing, best business practices, innovation, sustainability, and outstanding contributions. With strong support from its Headline Partners, Rio Tinto Diamonds and Chow Tai Fook, the JNA Awards is recognized as one of the most prestigious events in the trade. Twenty people and companies were recognized in a variety of categories. The Lifetime Achievement Award went to Anoop Mehta, president of the Bharat Diamond Bourse, while Ahmed Bin Sulayem, executive chairman of the Dubai Multi Commodities Centre, was received the Outstanding Contribution of the Year Award for his ac-

complishments at the DMCC in the global gem and jewellery trade. Other award winners included: Brand of the Year, Retail—Paspaley; Retailer of the Year—Chow Tai Fook Jewellery Group Ltd; E-tailer of the Year—Shanghai Wisdom Jewelry Trading Co Ltd (Zbird); Industry Innovation of the Year, Manufacturing, Business—Frank Wu Design; Manufacturer of the Year, Diamond Cutting and Polishing— Kiran Gems Pvt Ltd; Sustainability Initiative of the Year—Shree Ramkrishna Exports Pvt Ltd; Outstanding Enterprise of the Year, ASEAN Countries—Jewelmer Joaillerie; Outstanding Enterprise of the Year, India—Hari Krishna Exports Pvt Ltd. For a complete list of honourees, see JNAAwards.com. Next year’s show will be held September 16 to 20 at AWE, and September 18 to 22 at the HKCEC. Masaki Shimizu

JEWELLERYNETASIA.COM

Amrapali

Bellon

Green G

Mario Buzzanca

Antwerp Cut

AG Color

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Magerit


G IT’S

MARKETPLACE WARSAW

By CYNTHIA UNNINAYAR

OLD

SILVER TIME

IN WARSAW

IN A WAY, THE HISTORY OF THE JEWELLERY INDUSTRY IN POLAND FOLLOWS THE HISTORY OF THE NATION ITSELF. LIKE THE POLISH PEOPLE, IT IS AN INDUSTRY THAT HAS RISEN FROM DESOLATION AND REPRESSION TO BECOME A COMPETITIVE WORLD-CLASS CENTRE FOR DESIGN AND MANUFACTURING. THIS TRANSFORMATION COULD CLEARLY BE SEEN AT

THE RECENT EDITION OF WARSAW’S GOLD SILVER

Most of Warsaw was destroyed during WWII, including its historic Old Town, which was faithfully reconstructed from an old painting. The beautiful Palace on the Island was one of the few survivors.

TIME JEWELLERY FAIR.


T

G

he 15th edition of the Gold Silver Time (GST) jewellery fair opened its doors on a warm and sunny October 2nd in Warsaw, Poland. An enthusiastic crowd of visitors came to see the original products from a diverse range of Polish brands, designers and manufacturers. Attracting more than 6000 visitors, the three-day GST featured more than 300 exhibitors showcasing original jewellery, silverware, and watches. Products were crafted in a variety of gemstones, amber, diamonds, enamel, crystals, and metal, including silver, gold, titanium, and steel, as well as unusual materials such as acrylic and resin. In his opening remarks at the start of the show, Mr. Galimski, president of the show’s organizer, MCT International Fair Centre, emphasized the “very close relationships between the GST organizers and the jewellery community, including trade organizations, education and outreach institutions, and GST’s 15-year-long contribution to promoting jewellery art and artistic craftsmanship and to building a positive image of Polish Design.” After only a few minutes of walking the show floor, this positive image of Polish Design was more than obvious. The product offer was extensive and original, and divided into three major design directions: Classics, Fashion, and Design. The Classics comprised mainly gold with diamonds and gemstones, as well as silver with natural or synthetic gems, while Fashion followed the current trends, drawing inspiration from colour, texture, nature, geometric, and cultural motifs. The Design group featured a vast range of designers who interpret jewellery in their own manner, and whose creativity and originality attracted a lot of interest.

AND AMBER OF COURSE

SPECIAL EXHIBITIONS

Jewellery made with Baltic amber— the Gold of the North—comprised about 30-percent of the total offer at GST. Strongly associated with Poland, amber jewellery— whether designer, original, or mass-market—enjoys true international appeal and appreciation. “The global amber jewellery market, which is currently dominated by China, has forced Polish manufacturers to pay much greater attention to product quality and visual appeal,” explains Galimski. “Because the prices of raw amber have moved it into the sector of luxury gemstones, a fashion has developed for the most beautiful amber stones in luxurious, and often filigree, settings. They are no longer made only with silver, but also with gold and diamonds, and at prices reaching as much as several tens of thousands of Euros.” Galimski continues that, in the lowerpriced segments, amber cabochons and olive motifs predominate, in line with Asian customer preferences. “There is now great interest in amber by young designers, especially the alumni of the Gdansk Academy of Fine Arts, who are not afraid to experiment. They look for unusual and surprising visual effects, and sometimes combine amber with synthetic or more unusual materi materials to effectively freshen up the design and image.”

This edition of GST merged the present with the nation’s past in featuring the latest in Polish Design in jewellery and watches combined with a special exhibition entitled 25 for 25. Jewellery in the Time of Freedom, 1989–2014. This remarkable display recapped the two and half decades of freedom for Poland’s jewellery industry. “The last 25 years have been extremely interesting for Polish jewellery,” notes Monika Szpatowicz, curator of 25 for 25. “The political transformations have had a clear impact on the development of the jewellery market, while changes in the way of thinking have brought about new trends and new artists,” she adds. The commemorative 25 for 25 exhibition presented more than 100 pieces by 25 selected jewellery designers who have contributed the most significantly to its post1989 development. One of these creators, Marcin Zaremski, explains that under the Soviet era, jewellers did not have formal education in the craft. As a result, a lot of jewellery was created by artists, thus contributing greatly to the artistic development of the Polish jewellery sector. u

This year marks a dual celebration honouring the 15th anniversary of the GST show along with 25 years of hardfought Polish freedom and the remarkable jewellery designers and artists that have transformed the industry over the last quarter-century.

Jacek Ostrowski.

Agata Calka for Amber-Ring

Ewa Lewanowicz

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Rafal Galimski, president, MCT International Fair Centre


Among the Special Exhibitions was the Design Gallery. An enclave for artists and designers whose creativity goes hand-inhand with the mastery of artisanal techniques, it featured a wide diversity of ideas, materials and textures, providing insight into what Polish Design is all about. A delightful Fashion Show highlighted original jewellery by several Polish brands. The pieces demonstrated that, even though Poland’s jewellery scene has developed without constraints for 25 years and increasingly follows in the footsteps of global trends, it still retains many of the typical characteristics that make “Made in Poland” products recognizable and appreciated worldwide.

No visit to Warsaw would be complete without a trip to the Amber Collection at the prestigious Museum of the Earth of the Polish Academy of Sciences. The remarkable collection of amber and other fossil resins is one of the largest in the world and traces their formation at sites around the globe. The display adds a whole new meaning to amber’s illustrious beginning as tree sap right through to its use as decorative art. Poland is a beautiful country, rich in history, tradition, and resolve. That alone is reason to visit this remarkable land. But a trip to GST makes it the perfect getaway for both business and pleasure. And, the show’s amazing staff bends over backwards to ensure a fabulous experience for their guests. Next year’s Gold Silver Time will take place October 1 to 3, 2015.

MARKETPLACE WARSAW

Jolanta and Andrzej Kupniewscy

ZLOTOSREBROCZAS.COM Bogumil Bytomski

Arek Wolski

Pawel Kaczynski

Marcin Zaremski

Malgorzata Wasowska

Szwed Design

Marta Wlodarska / Amberwood

Motyle (photo: Norbert Piwowarczyk)

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i

MARKETPLACE IDAR-OBERSTEIN

NTERGEM

MARKS 30 YEARS OF UNIQUENESS

W

hy were the original show organizers considered to be “rebels?” Prior to the show’s start in 1984, business in the region was conducted under near-secret conditions. There was little interaction between dealers and it was difficult to imagine doing business out in the open with other firms. But, that all changed three decades ago with the creation of the first INTERGEM show. Clearly, the show was a success because, in 2014, it celebrated its 30th anniversary. On opening day, October 3, over 1,100 buyers were treated to top gemstones, carvings, jewellery, and other products featured by 130 vendors, and by the end of the threeday event, 3,500 visitors had attended, up 500 from last year. Although INTERGEM is a small show by industry standards—intentionally—it is known around the world. It is also instrumental to

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By KAREN NUCKOLS

MORE THAN 30 YEARS AGO, 26 “REBELS” PERSUADED THE GEM DEALERS AND CARVERS FROM AROUND IDAR-OBERSTEIN IN GERMANY TO HOLD A TRADE SHOW WHICH, THEY SAID, WOULD BENEFIT THEMSELVES AND THE REGION. THEY ENVISIONED A SHOW WHERE BUYERS COULD COME TOGETHER TO PURCHASE GOODS FROM A VARIETY FIRMS, OFFERING A WIDE RANGE OF PRODUCTS.

INTERGEM logo in gems by Constantin Wild

the continued success of the artisans in the Idar-Oberstein region who cherish a 500year tradition of fine cutting, carving, and jewellery making. During the 30th anniversary ceremony held in the foyer of the exhibition hall, Malu Dreyer, Prime Minister of the German state of Rhineland-Palatinate stated, “INTERGEM is a very special flagship for the region and for Rhineland-Palatinate as a whole. The trade fair and the industry display special characteristics that give them a unique position worldwide.” She applauded the foresight and courage of the organizers who made their vision come true 30 years ago, and urged participants to continue to work to make the fair even better. Jöchen Miller, president of the Diamond and Gemstone Bourse in Idar-Oberstein noted, “INTERGEM is a brilliant PR event for Idar-Oberstein and the industry, and has a much greater significance than many people might think.” Bruno Zimmer, Lord Mayor, observed,

“Visitors from all over the world treasure INTERGEM as an exclusive showcase window.” And, indeed this showcase attracted visitors from around the world. Heike Faller from Karl Faller said, “We had visitors from the USA, Great Britain, China, Portugal, and Spain.” Konrad Henn, chairman of INTERGEM Messe GmbH, was pleased to report that more international visitors came to the show this year than last, “some from as far away as Dubai and the USA.” Once a show only for regional exhibitors who belonged to the Intergem Club, INTERGEM has expanded its range to include companies from the world over. An exhibitor’s provenance no longer matters, but the quality of their goods does, and they must be approved. While most exhibitors were from Germany, there were a few notable exceptions, such as Root of Power, owned by Japanese world champion cutter Tomo Karono, and his wife, Sachiko Sasaki. They


Jutta Munsteiner

Groh + Ripp

Tomo Karono / E.W. Schreiber Jewellers

Daniela Becker

Petra Schwinn Helmut Wolf

have been exhibiting for several years and find the show a great opportunity to showcase both faceted stones and finished jewellery. A unique pair of earrings caught our eye. One earring featured a faceted peridot while the other was an amethyst, both set with diamonds. The stones were cut by Karono and set by E. W. Schreiber, a German jeweller. Several original “rebel” exhibitors marked the anniversary by displaying unique stones or objets d’art. Constantin Wild showcased a suite of over 30 stones matching the INTERGEM logo as a prize to a lucky show visitor. Wild & Petsch won a “Best of Show” award for its Paraiba tourmalines set in the shape of the original show logo. Also a “Best of Show” winner, Helmut Wolf, who returned to the show after a several-year absence, displayed a lapis lazuli bowl with a natural stone rim he carved from a 345 kg rough stone. Even though business slowed after the first day, most vendors seemed to be

pleased with the results of the show. Heike Faller commented, “We recorded a higher demand for fine individual stones.” And, stated Nicole Ripp from Groh + Ripp, “For us, the show was very profitable. The interest in natural-coloured, high-quality, exceptional stones is higher than ever.” In the end, the success of INTERGEM centres on the service the dealers provide. Achim Grimm of Hermann Grimm KG explained, “It’s all about building relationships. Seeing customers face to face is best. Anticipating what the customer will want and providing quality stones at good prices is all part of what we do.” Nicole Grimm, third-generation family member at Groh + Ripp, agreed, “Most important are trust and relationships both between our customers and us and between our suppliers and us. Staff members of our suppliers are also third generation or more so we have known each other for a long time. That is important when establishing transparency.”

Stanislav Drokin

INTERGEM 2015 - October 2 to 5 INTERGEM.DE 81


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A.Link 64 A&Furst 34, 51 Aaron Basha 21 Aaron Henry 68 Abellán 34 Adami & Martucci 47 AG Color 27, 76 AGTA 24 Alessio Boschi 21, 34 Alice K 49 Alisa 33 Alishan 21 Amali 29, 53 Amber-Ring/Agata Calka 78 Amberwood/Marta Wlodarska 79 Amrapali 76 Anahita 33, 38, 51, 69 Andrea Candela 33 Andrea Li 53 Andreoli 66 Andrew Hamilton Crawford 22 Angelique de Paris 22, 26 Anita Sondore 25 Anthony Lent 30, 52 Antwerp Cut 42, 76 Antwerp Diamond Trade Fair 42, 43 Anzie 38, 53 Arek Wolski 79 Ashi Diamonds 64 Ayaka Nishi 33 Baggins 7, 50, 63 Bangkok Gems & Jewelry 73 Bapalal Keshavlal 53, 65, 67 BaselWorld 18, 19 Bavna 49 Bayco 34 Bella Campbell 50 Bellarri 48 Bellon 38, 49, 76 Bergio 22 Berr & Partners 35 Bhansali 45 Bizzotto Gioielli 8, 9, 21 BK Jewellery 11 Bluemoonstone Creations 38 Bogumil Bytomski 79 Bohemme 22, 30 Bomberg 30 Borgioni 26 Brumani 51 Buccellati 22, 62 Buddha Mama 49 Bvlgari 29 Caï 37 Carberonia 53 Carla Amorim 34, 50, 64 Caroline C 12, 23, 48, 63 Carrera y Carrera 29 Casato 26, 49 Catherine Zadeh 37 Cervera Barcelona 47 Chimento 64 Clara Williams 48 Coge 37, 47 Color Story 49 Commelin 50 Constantin Wild 45, 75, 80 Cornelia Goldsmith 52, 68 Costis 37, 45 Couture 28 Crivelli 65, 49 D Quality Jewelry 71 Dada Arrigoni 26, 50, 66 Damiani 37

Danhov 52 Daniel Espinosa 46 Daniela Becker 81 DeGrisogono 30, 67 Denny Wong 52 Dermond Anandara 71 Dhevan Dara 72 Different Gems 45 Dilamani 47 Djula 26 Duang Kaew Jewelry 70 Dust Kreations 52 E&V Jewellery 50 Effy 69 Eichhorn 38, 47 Elena Kriegner 25 Elizabeth Garvin 53 Elke Berr 35, 37, 52 Ellagem 75 Emiko Pearls 63 Emotion France 41 Entice/KGK 64 Evocateur 68 Ewa Lewanowicz 78 ExCell 75 F&R 71 Faberge 69 Fondation Haute Horlogerie 20 Garaude 45 Garden of Silver 47 Garrard 65 Gem Production 71 GianaMayra 21, 48 Gintare 29 Giovanni Ferraris 33 GIT 4, 56, 57, 72 Goldlip 71 Goshwara 34 Green G 76 Groh + Ripp 81 Gumha 46 Gumuchian 21 H. Weiss 47 H.J. Namdar 64 H.Stern 25 H.Weiss 38 Helmut Wolf 81 Hilat 33 HKTDC 36 Horsecka 30 Ice Link 37 Imogen Belfield 26 Imperial 62 Inbar 26, 44 Inhorgenta Munich 32 Inori 37 Isabelle Langlois 45, 50 Ivanka Trump 66 J Jewels 52 Jacek Ostrowski 78 Jack Kelege 22, 44, 64 Jacob & Co. 21, 26, 68 Jacqueline Diani 51 Jade Chiu 30 Jane A. Gordon 62 Jane Bohan 22 Jane Taylor 46 JCK 39 Jessica Surloff 44 Jewellery Theatre 49 Jewelmer Joaillerie 21, 63 JJ Number 8 38, 52 Jochen Pohl 38, 46, 52 Jolanta and Andrzej Kupniewscy 79

Just Jules 38 Jutta Munsteiner 81 Jye Luxury Collection 14, 21, 22, 63, 65 Katherine Jetter 21 Katie Decker 50 Kavant 46, 63 KdeCraft 72 Kismet 25, 29 Laurence Bruyninckx 64 Le Vian 48, 53 Leaderline 44 Leyla Abdolahi 51 Lika Behar 13, 48 Liverino 62 Lorenz Baumer 25, 44, 48 Loretta Castoro 33 Luca Carati 22, 51, 66 Lydia Courteille Cover, 26, 53 Madstone 44 Magerit 47, 76 Mahallati 71 Malgorzata Wasowska 79 Marcia Budet 51, 67 Marcin Zaremski 79 Marco Bicego 46 Mario Buzzanca 62, 76 Mark Schneider 25, 45 Martin Flyer 64 Masaki Shimizu 76 Masriera 50 Mastoloni 63 Mathon Paris 37, 52 Mattiolli 51 Mazza 34, 52 MCL 51 Meghna 25, 26 Meissen 34, 45 Memoire 65 Metalsmiths Sterling 22, 47 Michael Endlich 38 Michael John Jewelry 38 Mimi 63 Misis 21, 46 Mokoso Atelier 10, 22, 26, 49, 71 Monelle Designs 65 Monplaisir 21 Moraglione 46 Morphee 26 Motyle 79 Mousson Atelier Mousson Atelier 5, 46, 48, 68, 74 Muzo International 15, 16, Back Cover MVee 30, 75 My Vice 22 Nada G 26 Nanis 44, 69 Nar Wong 44, 64, 65, 75 Nguyen 33 Nouvelle Bague 48, 67 Octium 25 Okurado 75 Old World Chain 33 Omi Prive 49, 50 Oscar Heyman 21 Palmiero 68 Pamela Huizenga 50, 68 Paolo Piovan 30 Paula Crevoshay 45 Pawel Kaczynski 79 Pearl Paradise 62 Pedro Siquiera 53 Penny Preville 25, 37 Petra Schwinn 81

Philip Zahm 68 Picchiotti 21 Pinar Oner 25, 33 PKL Silver 71 Prima Gold/Pranda 71 Re’Volve 67 Rina Limor 29, 34, 66 Robert Manse 37 Roberto Bravo 26, 69 Rosato 47 Rosy Blue 83 Sanalitro 48 Sandy Leong 29 Sarah Ho 75 Sawell 75 Scott Kay 37 Sea Hunt 62 Serafino Consoli 2, 3 Sethi Couture 29 Shamila 44 Sharart 25 Sharart and Kavant 29 Shawish 47 Shawn Ames 48 Sicis Watches 30 Sorellina 21 Stanislav Drokin 46, 81 Staurino 21 Stephen Webster 25, 26, 34, 68 Suna 65 Supreme Jewelry 22 Sutra 26, 50 Suzanne Kalan 25 Suzy Landa 52 Sylvie Collection 38 Sylvie Corbelin 26, 29 Syna 37 Szwed Design 79 Takayas 45 Tara 63 Tasha R 65 Tateossian 37 The Fifth Season 75 Thistle & Bee 25, 48, 69 Thompson 30, 37 Tirisi 45 Todd Reed 47 Tomasc Donocik 37 Tomo Karono 81 Tony Maccabi 38 Tous 68 TTF 21 UBM 54, 55 Utopia 63 Van der Bauwede 29 Versace 69 Vianna Brasil 49, 69 VicenzaOro 31 Victor Veylan 33, 52 Vida 30 Vieri 50 Vivaan 66, 67 Xin Jewellery 22 Yael Designs 69 Yael Sonia 52 Yoko London 62, 66, 75 Yvel 62 Zaffiro 38 Zannetti 37 Ziva 65 Zorab 33 Zydo 65

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7.46 ct emerald cut in our Bogotá workshops, from a 14.74 ct rough, Mined in Muzo, Colombia, July the 12th 2013.

BASELWORLD 2015 – 19-26 MARCH – HALL 3.0, BOOTH D31

www.muzoemerald.com

CIJ TRENDS & COLOURS WINTER 2015  

CIJ TRENDS & COLOURS WINTER N°300 Trends Guide 2015