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In this issue

Challenges in Albanian fisheries are being addressed The fisheries and aquaculture sector in Albania has seen signs of development recently, which suggest that over the next few years production and exports are likely to increase. These positive changes include the work being done towards identification of allocation sites for aquaculture, a reduction in some IUU fishing as inland fishermen take over the job of patrolling their waters, and closer collaboration between international suppliers and local companies in the fish farming sector. In addition, the country’s international trade in fish and seafood products has shown an impressive increase over the last five years with growth in both imports and exports. Challenges do remain; among others the ban on the export of bivalves to the EU for food safety reasons, and the limit on duty free seafood products that may enter the EU from Albania, but the progress being made on other fronts will hopefully lead to increased growth and greater sustainability across the sector. Read more on page 22 The Seafood Expo in St Petersburg in September featured a Eurofish-organised business platform hosting Turkish fish farming companies interested in the Russian market. Trout, seabass and seabream are species that are produced in large volumes in Turkey and exports to Russia increased significantly between 2012 and 2014, though they have fallen back slightly since then. Seafood consumption in Russia is slightly below internationally recommended levels creating an opportunity for Turkish exports. The companies at the Eurofish Business Platform had beneficial meetings with several potential partners and left St Petersburg confident that deals would materialise. Read more on page 20 Today, by-products and waste from fish processing companies are considered a valuable resource. This is perhaps not surprising considering that this material includes a high proportion of compounds like proteins and fat, minerals, vitamins and enzymes which are highly useful. Extracting them reduces costs and protects the environment making the process chain more sustainable. These extracts can be put to a variety of uses – including in the pharmaceutical, nutraceutical, and cosmetics industries. In addition, they can be used in the production of animal feed, biodiesel, and biogas. Other leftovers from fish processing operations such as backbones and heads can be used for human consumption. Ground up fish bones added to flours can provide important nutritional supplements to low-income people around the world. Other useful products include fish skin which is a source of gelatine and can also be made into leather. In short, by-products and their exploitation, are an industry in themselves. Read Dr Manfred Klinkhardt’s article on page 40 Fishing quotas in the EU strive to find a balance between the interests of the industry and the sustainability of stocks. Theoretically both should be in harmony, in practice opinions on what is sustainable and what is not, tend to vary. Defining the allowable catch is based on a multi-stage process involving different institutions that results in peer-reviewed advice. Observers from industry and NGOs also participate in this process. The advice is distilled into a number representing the allowable catch following a political negotiation between European institutions and is typically a compromise between scientific rigour and political acceptability. Read more about the process of setting quotas from page 44 A revolution is sweeping across the logistics business propelled by the spread of technology. RFID chips, data loggers, GPS, and the ubiquitous smart phone are revolutionising the way consignments are registered and traced. It is now possible to follow in real time the progress a package makes to its destination, an ability which reduces the risk of a package going astray in the first place, and makes it much easier to find, if it does. Tracking and tracing enables food to be recalled from supermarket shelves, maintains the integrity of sustainability labels, and contributes to the fight against IUU fishing, among many other applications. As the technology has become better, cheaper, and more widespread a whole industry has developed around tracking and tracing providing hardware and software solutions that range from the simple to the highly sophisticated. Read more on page 58 

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Profile for Eurofish

Eurofish Magazine 5 2017  

Featuring Albania's fisheries and aquaculture sector, this issue also looks at EU and Japan's trade agreement while the fisheries section co...

Eurofish Magazine 5 2017  

Featuring Albania's fisheries and aquaculture sector, this issue also looks at EU and Japan's trade agreement while the fisheries section co...

Profile for eurofish