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EUNSU KIM PORTFOLIO Master in Landscape Architecture 2019, Harvard Graduate School of Design eunsu.sue@gmail.com


INDEX ACADEMIC 1. Everyday Spectacle 2. Aquifer Recharge 3. Traces of Memories 4. Lines and Spaces 5. Nodes and Pauses 6. Living Edge

PROFESSIONAL 7. Global Engineering Center


EUNSU KIM Master in Landscape Architecture 2019, Harvard Graduate School of Design eunsu.sue@gmail.com

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Everyday Spectacle ; what defines ambience and value of spaces Spring 2018 _2018.01 - 2018.05 _Academic_Team Professor: Allen Sayegh

Commercial value is integrally related to context, association, and place. Thus by siting the installation in the Frances Loeb Library, books become the project’s primary commodity of focus. As a site-specific approach, this installation pairs Kinect motion-tracking with projected videos to construct a new area of perceived value within the Loeb Library shelves. Three rows of books on the back aisle are uniformly wrapped in white paper, rendering a homogenous mass stripped of any previous associations. As such, the books are each assigned an equal value. When approached, however, a curious animation of spliced videos begins to shine on selective groups of books. This in turn instigates a hierarchy of interest. When the user attempts to interact directly with these highlighted portions, the animation immediately shifts away, setting in motion a fruitless chase. This act as a whole is emblematic of the inherent value associated with rare and unattainable goods. By projecting abstract value onto objects, we can thus start to manipulate their perceived value.

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Everyday Spectacle / Frances Loeb Library / 2018


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zone1

zone2

zone3

zone4

2

3

zone5 BOOK SHELF 1

zone1

zone2

zone3

zone4

2

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zone5 BOOK SHELF

2ft 2ft

The program itself divides the shelf into five vertical columns, each associated with a given section of books. Using data from the kinect, we are then able to track exactly when a body enters a particluar column. At that moment, a video change is triggered, and the projection then reshuffles to the next set of spliced slides.

5ft

KINECT PROJECTOR

5ft

KINECT PROJECTOR

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When people get closer to the books, (1) it gets darker and only the white covers are highlighted. (2) the video is projected over the book covers—the value of things are not created in and of themselves, but are created externally by the needs of commercial and capitalism. (3) When someone tries to reach to the ‘valuable’ book, the location of projection changes.

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Montage in the Park ; rearragment of emotion Fall 2016 _2016.09 - 2016.12 _Academic_individual

Our life is divided into segmented nodes. The film cuts and pastes these nodes to increase or shorten the moment to represent people’s lives and to indirectly convey the feelings being experienced. A montage in a movie is an array of different scenes. The meaning of each shot is not definitively implied, but is represented by different ideas, meanings and emotions depending on how they are combined and juxtaposed. Our lives are also expressed through the process of a collage. In addition to having the event itself, the events and the emotions that occur every moment differ according to their placement. Choices, fragmentary memories, and the surrounding environment are expressed through an expansion or reconstruction of the collage. They are transformed and restructured properties by projecting each other according to their arrangement.

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Fluctuating Emotion, the RED CARPET Wood/ 210x660 / 2016

Creating a platform is to communicate and share visitors’ thoughts. The experience in the park is determined by a montage of their choosing—through a sequencing of the paths that lead to the feeling of different emotions—and differentiated by their placement. The elements experienced on the road are fixed but not deterministic. The experiential boundaries disappear, users create their own experiences, and the boundaries of diversity expand endlessly through juxtaposition. The visitor decides which montage to make and this creates curiosity for future visitors about another combination in the boundary of the indefinite experience. This selective path, which is physically defined, is simple in its structural dimensions, but infinitely proliferates in the empirical dimension. Through this proliferation process, users of the park will have a new experience not only during the festival period but also in their routine visits to the park.


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STRATEGY_PATH OF EMOTION

shortening a whole life expanding a moment of life

a story in our life the story is divided by scenes scenes are diveded by shots

FEAR

JOY

LOVE

SURPRISE SADNESS

connected paths of emotions

The film expands a part of life or shows a very long time implicitly. The film is divided into scenes, and these scenes are divided again into shots. Just as the montage in the movie determines its meaning through the placement of these shots, the significance of our emotions and personal events is determined by how they are arranged in our lives. I tried to express human emotions - which can be divided into six parts - on the road and make the arrangement a personal experience.

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ANGER


STRATEGY_RED CARPET

SMALL

city + RED CARPET

MEDIUM

LARGE

park + RED CARPET

XLARGE

plaza + RED CARPET

lake + RED CARPET

outdoor stage connected with performance hall rooftop stage outdoor theater

ticket box infomation center souvenir shop indoor small theater

plaza connected with park

This red structure symbolizes the park, as well as the facilities needed for the film festival and the facilities that the park should have as a platform for filmmakers. It is diversified by its size and relationship with surrounding environment and ground facilities.

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bridge waterfront cafe


EXPECTED EXPERIENCE

intrinsic features in the park elements of the park and paths

TOPOGRAPHY

FACILITY

flat

PAVING

light sound environment planting

light sound environment planting

character of path

JOY

SADNESS

narrow/wide

SURPRISE

light sound environment planting

ANGER

light sound environment planting

FEAR

hilly/dent

annoying

soil

creepy shape

factors of influence

happy interested proud accepted

final determination of meaning and result

diversified personal experience

powerful peaceful intimate optimistic

The application of this park recommends a movie complementing the emotion flow in a way similar to how the user has just experienced the park. Conversely, the app also recommends paths of the park similar to movies chosen by the users. In this way, lonely guilty way. they are able to experience their favorite movies in a special bored

light sound environment planting

unexpected

configuration paths of emotions

none

colored

fragrant

colored peaceful dark

gloomy

comfortable

TREE

arranged

wonderful shape

bright

surprising

hopeful

LIGHT

SOUND

* light, sound, paving, facility, topography, planting

determined according to individual’s experience

abandoned despair depressed

ashamed ignored

startled confused amazed excited

dismayed perplexed astonished awe

critical distant frustrated mad aggressive

hateful threatened hurt violated

humiliated rejected submissed insecure

recommendedanxious movies scared worried inferior

big data of flows of movie scenarios light sound environment planting

LOVE

the routes are converted to movies also, films are converted to the routes

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PATHS OF EMOTIONS affection lust longing adoration

fondness

small private liking theater caring compassion

outdoor theater


EXPECTED EXPERIENCE_PLAYFUL SOCIAL INTERACTION

The attempt for applying this method to a social game is to facilitate interaction on emotions between the players. People have different ways of perceiving this subtle change, and this is the moment when the misunderstanding and empathy arise. The players share the story of emotions according to the series of events through the conversation about the various layouts of subjects/objects and events as well as the process of explaining the emotions and the reasons behind them. This whole process of communicating is the purpose and the pursuit of this game.

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Traces of memories ; overlapping the past and the present Fall 2016 _2016.10 - 2016.11 _Collaborative work (in charge of ideation, idea development, and installation)

People encounter the concerns of the past, and the past became the present again. The place of the past, which used to lead them to deep contemplation, is the same as it is now, but it is also changing continuously. The place itself exists, but is constantly interacting with changing surroundings. The place is shaped by the events happening there and the accumulation of memories. When the past memories face the present ones, the past make up the present ones again, and build the person’s own character. These interactions between the present and the past are constantly repeating and affecting the individual experience.

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Traces of memories Wood, Steel pole, Web camera, Gear, Monitor / 4.3x2.9x3.0 m / 2016

The present does not exist alone, but rather always coexists and interacts with the past. When a past memory resurfaces, it forces the subject to think and reason in the present while confronting the past. This encounter is not a simple meeting of a past fragment with a present event, but rather an instantaneous confrontation of the complete past. The past coexists with the present in every moment. The past is a living part of the present, as well as the basis for the present, and therefore, the boundaries of time disappear.


photos taken with webcams

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floor plan

Encounters with past memories are a constantly engaged series of processes shaped like a wooden wheel. Past and present time come together to face one another through the medium of the camera. The memory in the past is reflected against a screen, and this memory of the past is reflected on the camera installed on the wheel, together with the piece of memory. This continuous process shows the breaking down of the boundary of time by interacting with the past and present.

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Aquifer recharge ; rainfall and drought Spring 2018 _2018.01 - 2018.05 _Academic_Team Professor: Danielle Choi

Under the Cuban revolutionary government, dams and irrigation channels were actively constructed to control water supply for agriculture and to minimize water shortage in the dry seasons. In spite of the instant satisfaction to the water demand, it has extensively intervened in the original water system. It caused the decline in the volume of groundwater held in aquifers, given that these dams divert the surface water into the massive reservoir. In this region, karst aquifers are composed of limestone and have many voids and spaces in their geology. These holes can be filled with groundwater. However, as the main source of groundwater is rainfall, water table levels have lowered down during the drought seasons. Consequently, available groundwater for water supply decreases. While the water level of reservoir is fluctuating depending on the rainfall and drought condition, the water table in the aquifer keeps steady for stable water supply.

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JAIBO CHANNEL IN CUBA

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CHANNEL AND DROUGHT

Since the water flows fast through the channel without its infiltration to the soil, a large amount of water just run out. We are proposing slowing down the water flow to take enough time to recharge the aquifer. By cutting out the part of channel wings, water can be captivated in the clayland and poreland located along the channel.

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STRATEGY_RECHARGING AQUIFER

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Nodes and Pauses ; escape from habituation Fall 2016 _2016.09 - 2016.11 _Individual All present moments coexist simultaneously with the past as a whole. Time is continuously beginning at the present, even though the present time cannot exist as time perpetually moves away from the present. The past should not be segmented as fragments of memories, but rather it should be perceived as an accumulated time that flows into the past from the present. All of these function as landmarks, but the way of connecting them only exists as a space of passage. In routine environments, people’s memories become habitual and the flow of these memories remains locked in the consciousness and in the form of another axis. The transformed axes in these historical gaps have been superimposed again with fragments of past memories. The buoys of memory created in the course of this superposition are represented by nodes and landmarks. These nodes break the current and past boundaries by pausing the present, and induce dishabituation in this already habituated space. It appears as a new superposition in the form of an organic axis breathing with the periphery. The destroyed boundaries of time also break down the axis of people’s flow, allowing people to rearrange and extend the realm of perception to the periphery. This extended range of memories is another flow in and of itself, repeating habituation, dishabituation, and reterritorialization.

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Nodes and Pauses Plaster, styrofoam / 900x1800x1800 / 2016

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Under ‘habituation’ we do not remember all of the roads and events. In our ‘habituated’ memories, there are only fragmentary fragments, not whole fragments. These fragments have been superimposed over time for a long time, each of them being a patch-like memory point.

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main places on Sejong-gil

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SITE PLAN

Nodes that are made by everyday space give pause to people and interact with themselves to create an organic relationship with the surroundings. Thereby a cognitive form which is diversified and extended to the periphery is created.

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STRATEGY_NODE

Small changes are made in this space by creating nodes in forgotten spaces with habituation of passengers. By making a very ordinary space outside the cognitive area, the habituated cognitive structure will be de-habituated and newly restructured again.

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The Living Edge ; adaptive city Fall 2017 _2017.09 - 2017.12 _Academic_Team Professor: Montserrat Bonvehi

This project focuses on adapting the City of Boston to the impacts of climate change through the expansion and transformation of the edge. The edge is defined as the meeting of two conditions where the interaction between them is intensified such that a new condition emerges, unique to that edge. The idea of the rocky coast and tidal pool helped to define the pattern of the plan, and the strategy of the stormwater filtering channel system created the structure of the plan. Under this pattern and structure, different elements and infrastructures are added on top of this surface to enrich this built environment. It is maximized for the interactions of edges between soft and hard, public and private and stable and dynamic.

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Annual Precipitation

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Diane

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1955

rol( 08)

)/Ca

a(09

Edn

8T

Annual Precipitation

193

T

he

1958 Feb

44 19

1960 Mar 1960 Donna

50

19

2020

1900

2015

69

Dec

g

Do

1954

Feb

Edn

1955

Di

1958

05

20

1960 1960

78

03

19

n

Damage by hurricane

b

Damage by blizzards(inch)

ar 7 M

199

Gloria

1991 Bob

eb

Mean Sea Level Trend

Interannual Sea Level Variation

Interannual Sea Level Variation

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69

Daily Tides

Feb

20

05

1985

/F

Jan

201 3 F eb 201 2 S 20 and 11 y Ire ne

Ja

Fe

Jan

2015

Mean Sea Level Trend Daily Tides

20

2020

1900

Jan

201 3 F eb 201 2 S 20 and 11 y Ire ne

19

Jan

Dec

Jan

1900

‘16

‘00

1900

‘16

‘00

1954

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50

19

nd

44 19

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193

tA ea Gr

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CLIMATE CHANGE IN BOSTON

20

78

03

19

Ja

n

b

r

a 7 M

199

Gloria

1991 Bob

1985

eb

/F

Jan

Fe

Damage by hurricane Damage by blizzards(inch)

10ft Contours Site Boundary Stormwater Flooding Hurricane Storm Surge Boston Landmarks

Sea Level Rise 9in (2050) 21in (2075) 3ft (2100) 5 ft 7ft

Channel Sea Level Rise

10ft Contours

9in (2050)

Site Boundary Stormwater Flooding Hurricane Storm Surge Boston Landmarks

21in (2075) 3ft (2100) 5 ft

Boston is highly susceptible to the negative impacts of climate change due to its proximity SCALE 1:10,000 to the ocean and the extensive filling of wetland and coastal waters. Storm surge from hurricanes, sea level rise, and more frequent and intense rain storms threaten to flood much of the city, including our site along the Reserve Channel in South Boston.

7ft

Channel

SCALE 1:10,000

1630

1795

1880

30

1916

1950

1995


21in (2075)

Stormwater Flooding

3ft (2100)

Hurricane Storm Surge

5 ft

Boston Landmarks

7ft

Channel

SCALE 1:10,000

Annual Precipitation

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44

e Th

193

ea Gr

tA

tla

he 8T

ic nt

at Gre

ngla wE Ne

nd

CLIMATE CHANGE IN BOSTON

50

19

g

Do

e

Dian

nd ngla

d lan Eng ew

1955

1958 Feb

rea

at N

G The

1900 Annual Precipitation

re eG

ic

e Th

50

44

19

19

Jan 05

19

69

50

19

g

Do

1954

Feb

g

03

Ja

n

b

r

1955

1960 Mar 1960 Donna

e

Dian

19

69

1958 Feb

a

Daily Tides

1960 Mar 1960 Donna

03

20

Feb

19 78

n

‘00

Damage by blizzards(inch)

Jan

1900

Interannual Sea Level Variation

Ja

200cm rise

‘16

Damage by hurricane

Mean Sea Level Trend

20

05

Interannual Sea Level Variation Daily Tides

Stormwater Flooding

a 7 M

Glori

1991 Bob

1985

eb

/F

199

Jan

Jan

90cm rise 150cm rise Annual Precipitation

50cm rise

Mean Sea Level Trend Dec

Fe

195

Dec

2020

1900

Annual precipitation

Damage by blizzards(inch)

b

Jan /

Fe

Damage by hurricane

ar 7 M

199

1991 Bob

1985 Gloria

Jan

201 3 F eb 201 2 S 20 and 11 y Ire ne

Hurricane Storm Surge

69

Fe b

2015

19

e

Dian

1958 Feb

l(08 )

Caro

(09)/

4 Ed na

Feb

(08)

Carol

a(09 )/

Edn

1955

Do

20

19

78

2015

201 3 Fe 201 b 2 S 20 and 11 y Ire ne

‘16

20

2020

1900

Jan

201 3 F eb 201 2 S 20 and 11 y Ire ne

‘00 1900

Mean Sea Level Trend Interannual Sea Level Variation Daily Tides

20

05

b

7 199

r

Ma

SCALE 1:10,000

7ft

1991 Bob

Channel

7ft

Glori a

3ft (2100)

Boston Landmarks

1985

/F eb

21in (2075)

Boston Landmarks 5 ft

Fe

Jan

Stormwater Flooding

03

19 78

9in (2050)

Site Boundary

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Ja n When the edge between what is land and what is water is distorted to climate change, it Damagedue by hurricane 21in (2075) Stormwater Flooding becomes necessary to design a new edge: one that can reactDamage and adapt to change without by blizzards(inch) 3ft (2100) Hurricane Storm Surge jeopardizing those who live at the edge. 5 ft Sea Level Rise

10ft Contours

Hurricane Storm Surge

20cm rise

h 8T

2015

193

ea Gr

tA

19

44

tla

e Th

nt

ea Gr

8 193

tla tA

nt

1960 Mar 1960 Donna

ic

tN

E ew

arol( 08)

9)/C

na(0

4 Ed

195

2020

9in (2050)

Site Boundary

Dec

Jan

1900

Sea Level Rise

10ft Contours

Channel

‘16

‘00

SCALE 1:10,000

10ft Contours Site Boundary Stormwater Flooding Hurricane Storm Surge Boston Landmarks

Sea Level Rise 9in (2050) 21in (2075) 3ft (2100) 5 ft 7ft

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LANDFORM AND BUILDING TYPOLOGY

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Global Engineering Center Spring 2013 _2011.04 ~ 2013.03 _professional work(on-site) _Samsung Everland

GEC is a newly constructed building for Samsung Engineering employees, located in Sangil-dong, Seoul in Korea. We created a rooftop garden space where employees can relax inside the building. It also offers a variety of resting places for employees, such as a sunken garden, a rooftop garden on the 3rd floor with the glulem bench, an ecological pond, and the traditional garden on the 17th floor. I managed the construction as the director of construction site workers. I was mainly in charge of drawings, overall supervision of construction, and suggesting ideas to persuade the client.

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2 1

3 1. Traditional rooftaop garden 2. Glulam garden 3. Bamboo traditional rooftop garden

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EUNSU KIM Master of Landscape Architecture1 AP at Harvard University Bachelor of Landscape Architecture at University of Seoul +1-617-909-6553 eunsu.sue@gmail.com

EDUCATION Master of Landscape Architecture 1 AP; Sep. 2017 - May. 2019 Harvard Graduate School of Design, MA, United States Bachelor of Landscape Architecture; Mar. 2006 – Feb. 2011 University of Seoul, Seoul, Republic of Korea PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCES SAMSUNG C&T, Landscape Business ; Feb. 2011 - Jun. 2017 Assistant Manager / Department of Estimation Staff / Department of Construction Green Buffer Zone in Gangdong-gu Office Building of Samsung Engineering Blue Network System in Paju U-City

SAMSUNG EVERLAND, Seoul, Republic of Korea ; Jan. 2010 - Feb. 2010 Intern / Department of Environment & Assets ISU Landscape Design Office, Seoul, Republic of Korea ; Aug. 2009 Intern / Designer AWARDS AND HONORS The 6th National Exhibition of Korean Landscape Architecture Won a prize for Cinema Park Merit-Based Scholarship, University of Seoul Scolarship for volutary service, University of Seoul PROFESSIONAL SKILLS Adobe Illustrator Adobe Photoshop Adobe Indesign Adobe AfterEffect Auto CAD Rhino 3D / Grasshopper Unity Microsoft Office Word/Excel/Powerpoint

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VOLUNTEER WORK School Construction Project, Nongbua, Laos, 2016 Organized fundraising activities Participated in construction of the school Mentoring Low-Income Students April 2008 – December 2008 Taught essential subjects and career planning to low-income high school students ADDITIONAL ACADEMIC EXPERIENCES Global Leadership Experiences, Common Purpose, 2018 Participating in the program for improving leadership skills and global senses In-house Reporter, Samsung C&T, 2015-2017 Reporting in-house news on the PR broadcasting team HPAIR, Harvard Project for Asian and International Relations, Singapore, 2010 Theme: Sustaining Momentum Participated in a conference with a focus on “Environmental issues” Winter Session in Urban Studies, San Francisco State University Completed courses focused on urban studies LICENSE AND CERTIFICATION National Technical Qualification of Landscape Architecture, Republic of Korea Japanese Language Proficiency Level 2, the Japan Foundation

LANGUAGE SKILLS Korean / native English / fluent Japanese / basic

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Eunsu Kim  

Eunsu Kim

Eunsu Kim  

Eunsu Kim

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