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H WOR D’S MO S B AU  I  U  HOMS IN H OUNRY

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£9.99

GLOBAL STYLE CREATIVE SPACES SUPER SHEDS

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GREAT BRITISH BREAKS EXPERT GARDENING TIPS TO P 10 FAR M SHO PS


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LIFEST YLE 24

POSCARD HOM How do you bring your holidays back with you? We ask globe-trotting author and stylist Sibella Court for decorating inspiration 29

IRD BY CRAIVIY Federica Cipriani and Stefano Gambogi are an artistic couple living the dream, crafting beautiful ceramics in the Tuscan countryside 35

HOW DOS YOUR GARDN GROW? Make the most of your outdoor space with expert advice for tending everything from a vegetable patch to a wild meadow 42

SASON O H SHD Each of these stylish, contemporary garden rooms ofers much more than storage space

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2 28 ESCAPE 228

PICK O H CROP From north to south, we’ve scoured the UK to bring you our top ten farm shops 233

SAYING POWR

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Four successful hoteliers reveal their favourite things to do on the English coast

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COUNTRY HOMES 50

I IDY A charming island cottage near Copenhagen 64

UNDR H ARCHS Modernised in a sensitive manner, this Catalan retreat retains its charm 76

DOWN H GARDN PAH This waterside cabin in rural France allows its owners to escape the everyday 90

OD SOU A South African farmstead with whitewashed walls, timber beams and an indoor-outdoor feel 11 0

WHR WORDS COID A modern glass walkway serves as a portal between thatched cottage and modern living 13 0

BU IS H WARMS COOUR Designed from scratch, this capacious barn has a calming palette and views of the water 14 4

DCORAIV OURISH A historic Italian estate with an interior inspired by its leafy surroundings

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SUMMR IN PROVNC A rugged villa with a slick Nordic interior 17 2

 O  H   N D S O   H  A R  H

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Vibrant furnishings from across the globe decorate this classic Cape Dutch farmstead 18 8

SMBANC O RADIION Hidden within this 18th-century Swiss farmhouse is a modern, industrial interior 200

H GRN GRN GRASS O HOM A white-walled Danish cottage boldly decorated with bright Bolivian textiles 214

B Y  H  W A   R’ S  D G  This summer retreat is compact yet enviably cosy

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EL L E D ECO R AT I O N MICHELLE OGUNDEHIN

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W E LC O M E

PORTRAIT: SARA EKHOLM

BE IT A TINY A- FR A MED COT TAG E or an imposing

country estate, the common thread that joins the enviable abodes featured in this issue of ELLE Decoration Country is that they are all distinctly personal sanctuaries, and wondrously original as a result. For Danish editor and stylist Marie Monrad Graunbøl, weekends at her compact island summerhouse (p50) are refreshingly simple: ‘It’s quite a relief to have to adjust to such a small space,’ she says. ‘It makes you realise how little you actually need.’ Gaetano Besana’s sprawling, maximalist home (p144) in northern Italy is a diferent story altogether. Lined with an eclectic mix of botanical inspirations, it’s a fittingly immersive interior for a nature-loving former photographer who swapped the fashion industry for farm life. What’s your idea of a personal haven? If a second home or a life overhaul feels like a distant dream, don’t despair: there are plenty of ideas on the following pages that will bring you a little outdoor escapism. Channel your artistic talents into painterly planting using garden designer Luciano Giubbilei’s advice in How Does Your Garden Grow? (p35). If a backyard yoga retreat sounds like bliss, then Season of the Shed (p42) is bound to inspire. Perhaps a little sea air is the tonic you’re after, in which case check out our guide to holidaying on the English coast (p233). With address-book secrets from the UK’s top hoteliers, it made me want to head straight for Anouska Hempel’s favourite bolthole, the ‘ridiculously romantic’ Clavell Tower, a cliftop folly overlooking Dorset’s rugged Kimmeridge Bay. Longing to roam a little further afield? Take your lead from Australian interior stylist and perpetual nomad Sibella Court, who tells tales of her globetrotting adventures in Postcard Home (p24) and shares her tips on how to infuse day-to-day living with a taste of your travels. Alternatively, simply stay put, find a sunny spot or a patch of green and let us take you on a tour of some of the world’s most inspiring rural destinations instead.

TESSA PEARSON

Editor, ELLE Decoration Country


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WAY S  O  N J OY  H  N  W RU R A 

ISY 24

POSTCARD HOME Globetrotting author and stylist Sibella Court’s tips for turning inspiration into decoration 29

FIRED BY CREATIVITY Ceramicists Federica Cipriani and Stefano Gambogi discuss living the dream in Tuscany 35

HOW DOES YOUR GARDEN GROW? Expert advice for tending everything from a vegetable patch to a flower meadow 42

SEASON OF THE SHED

PICTURE: CAMERON BLAYLOCK

Stylish garden rooms that ofer much more than storage space


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POSCARD

HOM Have you ever wished you could bottle the essence of your favourite holiday and bring it back with you? Globetrotting author and stylist Sibella Court tells us how to create a house inspired by our travels Photography CHRIS COURT

n my globetrotting adventures, inspiration comes in many shapes and forms: a tuk tuk ride, a glimpse of a foreign kitchen, a leaf on a cobbled street, a shrine and its oferings, or a storm brewing over a loch. I constantly have a list of the top five places I want to travel to, with destinations jostling for position. I gather information from history books on explorers (anyone with a hint of eccentricity is a welcome find), magazines, newspapers and friends on Instagram and Pinterest. All it takes is a single new discovery – a hotel, a craftsperson, a trade fair or speciality flea market – and that’s a good enough excuse to book a ticket. For most of us, a trip abroad is a thing to cherish, so to have the threads of those memories woven into the fabric of your life at home – even the smallest incidental that makes you smile and takes you to another place – is really what it’s all about. I suggest that as soon as you arrive at your destination, you try and take in as much as possible; those first impressions are often the most impactful. Make notes and take photos to capture the things that you are attracted to on your travels. This could be anything from an old poster on a lamppost or the label of an aperitif bottle to a buoy from a lobster pot. All those little snapshots of where you were, who you were with and what you were doing become souvenirs, ripe to be translated to your interiors through colour and pattern. Every place has a scheme that’s integral to its identity. That palette can reveal itself in any number of ways: the changing of the seasons, the local architecture, textiles or food. On my trip to the Carpathian Mountains in Transylvania I found inspiration wherever I cast my eyes: the colours of the houses in the villages, the amulet decorations on the horses, fruit trees heavy with blossom and the first wildflowers of spring unfurling. These manifested in a mix of soft and muted tones in my home – mints, lichen, salmon, soft grey and duck-egg blue. Bringing your travels home is not about reproducing a theme but rather adding flavour from your adventures, displaying your memories not just with props and objects but through installation, clever styling


‘V RY P AC  H A S A PA       H A ’ S I N   G R A  O IS IDNIY’

Opposite and above Decorating inspiration drawn from Sibella’s travels to Transylvania


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and a considered edit of your existing possessions. It’s not always necessary to ship furniture home from across the globe (although this can be lovely); reminders of your travels can be referenced simply with the addition of particular colour combinations, textures and finishes, even the the way you set your table. Scent is another powerful tool. Every destination I visit has its own distinct smell – usually a mingling of elements – that has the ability to transport me straight back to a certain time and place. On my jaunt in the Scottish Highlands, tiny pink bell-heather flowers carpeted every hill as we wove our way through gullies, the wind and salty air whipped around us as we island-hopped on car ferries, the warmth and woodiness of Tobermory whisky filled the evenings and the earthy, wet lushness of green on green was everywhere. In Indochina, it was a combination of incense burning at the temples, refreshing lemongrass-scented cloths handed to us on arrival at the hotel Amansara, sweet sticky rice in soft bamboo containers and lotus petals in large clay pots of spring water. Note the scents down as you travel. Something as simple as a carefully chosen candle can conjure up fond memories of far-flung places. Whichever way you choose to do it, in filling your home with souvenirs of your adventures you create a house that tells a story, an original and truly personal space. Some of the most interesting and authentic interiors span historical eras and multiple generations, incorporating heirlooms, hand-me-downs, modern trends, period features and even just the debris of family life. Inspiration drawn from across the globe can be conceived and combined in much the same way, with tokens of your travels peppered throughout the house like stamps on a passport, the hallmarks of a life well lived. thesocietyinc.com.au


‘I N  I I NG YOU R HOM  W I  H S OU V N I R S O YOU R A DV  N  U R  S YOU C R  A  A HOUS  H A   S A S  ORY ’

Opposite and above Vibrant blues and coral reds influenced by travels along Turkey’s Aegean coastline


IR D BY CR AI V I Y Federica Cipriani and Stefano Gambogi run ceramics brand RossoRamina from their studio in the Tuscan countryside. Handcrafted and delicately embellished, all of their pieces are designed to blend beauty and functionality. Here, Federica tells us the story behind the company

Inter view TESSA PEARSON P h o t o g r a p h y FA B R I Z I O C I C C O N I/ L I V I N G I N S I D E S t y l i n g/ P r o d u c t i o n FR A N C ES C A DAVO L I


first met Stefano in 2003. I’d just finished a year’s work experience in a Florence printing house, following five years’ study at the Accademia di Belle Arti di Firenze. I had returned to my hometown of Lucca in Tuscany, where I was working on a restoration project. On one of my lunch breaks, I visited a local market and found Stefano selling his pottery. I bought a white jug with a black handle and gave it to my mother for Christmas. Today, we can’t help but laugh when we pick up that jug. He was just starting out, and you can tell because the thing is so heavy. After more than a decade at the potter’s wheel, Stefano is extremely skilled and his jugs are so light compared to that old one. We now live together with our two children, Lucio and Cesare, near Lucca in a house that used to belong to Stefano’s grandparents. Our workshop is located in a former shoe factory nearby; it’s a very green and peaceful spot. At first, Stefano continued to work on his own, selling his pottery at art and craft markets in Tuscany, while I moved between several restoration sites around Italy. It wasn’t always easy; there were times when Stefano wanted to give up everything, but I always encouraged him to hold on and keep going. He was creating beautiful pieces and I was sure he would eventually see success. Meanwhile, I had started experimenting in his workshop, decorating small objects and adding a little of my own style to his

Portrait Federica and Stefano live near Federica’s hometown of Lucca in Tuscany with their two children, Lucio and Cesare. The country house once belonged to Stefano’s grandparents

creations. Life on the construction sites was good because I got to meet people and see places, but the work itself was no longer challenging me. So, with Stefano’s support, in 2008 I gave up my old job – right after finishing my last and most important restoration project at the Tower of Pisa – and we started working together. In the beginning, I would get extremely frustrated when a piece would come out of the oven and look so diferent from when it entered. That I couldn’t control the whole creative process would drive me mad. I have learnt to live with that and it’s now a joy to be surprised by what comes out of the oven. Every time a piece is ready, it makes me happy. Pottery’s versatility is what makes us so enthusiastic about it. We can create whatever we want: a dish, a vase, a light, a necklace, a mosaic or a sculpture. I think we were always meant to create with our hands. For Stefano, the joy is in shaping the pieces, while for me it’s about decorating. We think of ourselves as ‘the arm’ and ‘the hand’, respectively. We enjoy making objects for everyday life, and we love that our pieces find their way into people’s homes. We always want to make sure that we combine both beauty and functionality in our work. rossoramina.com


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Workshop Stefano creates unique objects in the pair’s tranquil studio located in an old shoe factory. They like to give functional, everyday items such as vases and crockery a poetic touch


‘  H   US C A N C OU N  RYS I D I NS PI R  S US A  O  I N OU R WOR K . A S  H  S A S ONS C H A NG , S O D O  H  C O OU R S I N OU R PA     ’

Ceramics The couple’s pieces are mainly crafted using maiolica (Italian tin-glazed pottery). Every item is made by hand, meaning that each teapot, jug and vase is one of a kind


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HOW DOS YOUR GAR DN

ROW? We asked four gardening experts about their favourite outdoor spaces, from a tropical seaside paradise and a colour-coordinated scheme to a kitchen plot and a wild-grass meadow

Wo r d s E M M A LOV E


PA I N   R Y P O  Garden designer Luciano Giubbilei is renowned for creating timeless outdoor spaces. For the last four years, he has been collaborating on an experimental border at Great Dixter in East Sussex Creating a garden is like planning a painting; I bring together the right proportions of plants, colour, texture and light to create a pleasing composition (right; Laurent Perrier garden for Chelsea Flower Show 2014). Simplicity comes from the repetition of plants. When I completed a meadow-like garden for a private residence in Morocco (top) a few years ago, I planted 18,000 Pennisetum alopecuroides, a fountain grass with bottlebrush-like flowers. If you look closely, you can see they’re planted in squares, creating a rhythm. You always need one key plant to make a strong impact and the rest of the garden can be planned around it. Sometimes the best plant palettes use one colour. I designed a garden in London using a green lawn surrounded by a line of Carpinus betulus (hornbeam) and Taxus baccata (yew) hedges. Getting the spacing between plants right is important, because that’s where the light falls. The plants act as a beautiful framework for the light; they dictate where your eyes will rest and how you move through a space. My experimental border at Great Dixter is very colourful, but the theme is simple. I used Lupinus masterpiece, Aster, Dahlia and Phlox paniculata. Being a garden designer implies that you need to add many diferent elements to a space, but at Dixter I’ve focused on the flowers. Giubbilei’s second book, ‘The Art of Making Gardens’, is out now (Merrell; £45). lucianogiubbilei.com


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K I  C H N GA R DN Ollie Hutson manages The Pig Hotel group’s gardens, which supply most of the produce for the excellent on-site restaurants. Here, he talks about growing your own It sounds obvious, but if you have a fairly small garden, grow only what you’re going to want to eat. And avoid growing vegetables that take up too much space, such as artichokes. At The Pig, we plan the gardens a year in advance. At the start of the year, one of the first things we sow is leeks; lettuce and chard can be sown quite late into the summer; and rocket and mustard until the beginning of September. You can often manipulate the sowing date on a packet of seeds by a month or so in either direction. Successional sowing is the best way to maximise a garden’s yield. This means sowing the seeds little and often, and in batches. Use partitioned seed trays and sow a couple of seeds into each section. Don’t use the whole

packet at once, otherwise you’ll have an abundance of salads and vegetables ready to pick and eat at the same time. You can often get away with decreasing the suggested spacing between seeds. It means the plants should outcompete weeds and the added shade will reduce moisture loss, which will mean you’ll need to water your patch less frequently. Vertical gardening works especially well for urban terraces or balconies. Strawberries are a good bet because they produce runners and long shoots that leapfrog and thread through each other, allowing you to create a wall of fruit. Aromatic herbs don’t like to be waterlogged and as such, need free-draining soil. They originated in

the Mediterranean and need similar conditions to grow well. Harvest the new shoots as opposed to the more mature, woody ones and repeatedly cut back the plants so that they stay relatively compact. thepighotel.com


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C OA S A  D    N C  S Mike Nelhams’ 32-year career at the subtropical Abbey Garden on Tresco island (pictured), part of the Isles of Scilly, makes him an expert on gardening by the sea cheerful bright blooms, or Protea from South Africa, which has the most wonderful flowers (the Australian equivalent is the Banksia, with flowers that look like candles). It’s easy to create impact with plants such as the spiky Agave americana (known as the centuryplant, many species in the genus flower only once in their lifetime), the Puya chilensis from Chile, which has blue-green chunky flowers, and the Cordyline australis (cabbage palm). Whenever the weather’s damp enough, you can plant. Because we haven’t had a real frost at Tresco for so long, we plant during the winter. Generally, the best time is during mid-April when temperatures are rising and the soil is still damp. For those with a coastal garden, learn about the weather in your region and the tolerances of what will and won’t grow there. tresco.co.uk

PICTURES: JASON INGRAM

With a coastal garden, you have to take the salt spray and gales into account. You always have to put up with more wind and, depending on the direction, it afects plants diferently. A southerly wind is forceful, so it can break plants. Also, it’s not usually as cold on the coast as it is inland; we haven’t had a proper frost on Tresco Island for nearly 30 years. Start by protecting the garden without blocking the sea view using plants that don’t mind the wind. Shrubs from New Zealand, such as Pittosporums, Elaeagnus and Traversia, all make beautiful hedges and can grow to over four metres tall. Add colour with Mediterranean climate-zone plants such as Aloe striatula (Hardy Aloe) from South Africa (most of the aloes flower in winter but this one blooms in the summer), the daisy-like Arctotis (African daisy), which has lots of


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W I  D A P P R OAC H

I build up my planting schemes in three vertical layers: shorter grasses, such as Deschampsia cespitosa (tufted hairgrass), then a middle layer of plants with a long flowering season – our native Geranium pratense (meadow geranium) and Centaurea (knapweed) both work well – and, finally, two or three tall species, such as Molinia grass or Digitalis purpurea (foxglove), which stand upright to emerge through the tapestry of greenery. Choose a range of different flower shapes that will not only make a visually pleasing composition, but also attract small visitors – what looks good to us tends to look good to wildlife, too. Naturalistic planting is so well loved because it’s usually accompanied by butterflies and bees. Many grasses are perennial so your garden will be full of colour most of the year round. The North American Olympic garden was based on prairie plants including Panicum (panicgrass), which turns glowing

shades of yellow and deep orange in the autumn. These grasses look striking when paired with elegant Verbena hastata (blue vervain) and Echinacea (coneflower); both plants have near-black seed heads in winter. I designed a space for gardening charity Thrive in Battersea Park. The Old English Garden (above) was in a space that has both sunlight and shade, so I used plants that would tolerate both conditions. Coppergreen Stipa arundinacea grasses were partnered with bright magenta Geranium ‘Patricia’, while Helleborus orientalis (green hellebore) was added to provide much-needed early colour, and Valeriana oicinalis (valerian) to create a high froth of white flowers in early summer. The elegant, shrubby Rosa mutabilis (China rose) was positioned in loose groupings for its delicate blooms. It’s important to create continuity, even if the conditions are varied, because it enhances the atmosphere. sarahpricelandscapes.com

PICTURE: MARIANNE MAJERUS/MMGI (PHOTOGRAPHY), SARAH PRICE (DESIGN)

Sarah Price co-designed the meadow-like 2012 Gardens at the Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park and is currently working on a project for The Whitworth Art Gallery in Manchester


S E A S O N O F T H E S H E D The garden shed has officially gone luxe. More than just a place to store your tools, it should be a pleasant, stylish space that maximises comfort and offers a sense of escape. Here are five of our favourite creative cabins to inspire you Wo r d s SA R A H S L A D E


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THE OPEN -AIR SHELTER Enjoy your garden to its fullest with a cabin that celebrates the view Belgian designer Filip Janssens created this outdoor room in the grounds of his home (filipjanssens.be). Eschewing the usual spot at the bottom of the garden, he positioned his stylish studio in the middle of the lawn so that when its two glass doors are rolled back, he can enjoy views in both directions. Furnished with a daybed, built-in storage cupboards and a decked seating area, it has a deluxe lounge appeal. An excellent of-the-peg alternative is the ‘Zen Light XL double’ modular pavilion by Ludovica and Roberto Palomba for Exteta (£42,746; exteta.it). It comes with solid wood floors, but the slatted Canadian red cedar wall and roof panels have completely open sections for an airy efect; the ready-made space can be furnished with the brand’s own elegant outdoor furniture and even a kitchen.


THE ‘SHADOW SHED’ The ultimate garden retreat is a multifunctional sanctuary During the day, the owners of this bespoke glass and timber ‘Shadow Shed’ use it as a consultation space and children’s playroom, while at night it functions as a yoga studio. Neil Dusheiko Architects has achieved a calming atmosphere using wrap-around windows and pinhole fibre-optic lights, arranged in a constellation pattern on the ceiling (neildusheiko.com). Located in a conservation area in London, it has a charred cedar wood façade, blackened using the ancient Japanese wood-burning technique shou sugi ban to help it blend in with the shadows of the trees. You can buy decay- and fire-resistant charred timber cladding to replicate this look yourself (from approximately £144 per square metre; shousugiban.co.uk). Ecospace can create a similar custom design (from £12,000; ecospacestudios.com).


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THE CREATIVE CABIN Wait for inspiration to strike in a stylish refuge tucked amongst the trees

PICTURES: AGNESE SANVITO, CAMERON BLAYLOCK

A glass door and a clever angled skylight in the ‘Writing Pavilion’ designed by Architensions invite sunshine inside, casting dappled patterns on its plywood interior (architensions.com). Even in this busy Brooklyn setting, visitors are able to watch the gentle swaying branches above and switch of from urban life. Furnished simply, the space feels beautifully relaxed. For a ready-made solution, consider a garden studio by architect James Risebero for Mökki (from £6,950; mokki.co.uk). Built from sustainable Siberian larch and birch plywood with double-glazed windows, the Mökki design is fully insulated and is based on a modular panel system that can be configured in 30 diferent ways. Another option is a garden cabin by Pod Space – windows and doors can be positioned to make the most of the light, and cosy underfloor heating comes as standard (from around £13,000; pod-space.co.uk).


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THE GARDEN LIBR ARY Dedicate a place to display your favourite collections, be it artworks, music or books This outdoor reading room by 3rd Space is made from glass and black-stained Thermowood. With floor-toceiling bookshelves and integrated blinds for protecting books from the sun in brighter weather, the whole thing can be taken apart if you decide to move (£24,290 including sockets, lighting and shelving; 3rdspace. co.uk). Try adding a comfy armchair and lamp so that it feels like home after sunset. An alternative is a madeto-measure design by IQ Glass (from approx £3,500 per square metre; iqglassuk.com), which has modern features such as solar-control glass (that lets light in and keeps heat out) and remote-controlled doors.

PICTURES: WILL AUSTIN

W H A YO U N   D  O K N OW Most reputable ready-to-buy garden rooms will meet permitted development rules, which means that unless you live in a conservation area, a listed building, or if your garden belongs to flats, planning permission isn’t usually required. However, you should always check with your local authority before going ahead. For full advice visit the Planning Portal (planningportal.gov.uk).


THE PRACTICAL POOLHOUSE Transform your shed from functional to party mode in an instant Situated in a Seattle garden, this bespoke potting shed by Shed Architecture & Design is kitted out with an industrial-style workbench, integral basin and useful shelving (shedbuilt.com). A huge sliding door opens the entire space right up on to the pool area, so that when the mood strikes, it can assist with outdoor entertaining long into the night. The double-sided design allows for a second separate storage space, which the family use to stash bikes and sporting equipment. Discuss a similar solution designed for your needs with an architect (findanarchitect.com).


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 H  WOR D’ S MO S BAU  I  U 

OU NRY

HOMS


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I DY  This simple summer cottage, situated on the tiny island of Øro, is the perfect slow-paced weekend retreat for one Danish stylist and her family Wo r d s M E T T E M A R I E S V E N D S E N P h o t o g r a p h y M I K K E L T J E L L ES E N / L I V I N G I N S I D E St yling M ARIE MONRAD GRAUNBØL


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itted out with a compact sofa upholstered in coarse linen, an old table with a terrazzo top, and a double bed tucked in the eaves, this tiny A-frame cottage belongs to Copenhagen-based editor and stylist Marie Monrad Graunbøl, her husband and their two daughters, who spend weekends throughout the summer here. Surrounded by a dense garden filled with blackberry bushes and larch trees, the house features only the bare necessities, all carefully picked to fit its sharp angles and 45-square-metre proportions. ‘It is quite a relief to have to adjust to such a small space. It makes you realise how little you actually need,’ says Marie. ‘We had to come up with a few resourceful solutions, such as the portable hotplates in the kitchen that are meant for camping, but this just adds to the place’s charm.’ The couple purchased the 1970s summerhouse ten years ago on their first visit to the tiny island of Orø, which is located just an hour’s drive and a quick cable ferry ride from their Copenhagen home. ‘We immediately fell in love with the towering trees and the untamed garden: it’s like a thicket encircling the house. As soon as I’m on the island I leave my work behind; both my mind and my eyes can rest.’


A COLOUR SCHM O W HI, GRY AND ARHY ONS MAKS H INRIOR L L I G H  A N D S PAC I O U S


H CABIN IS ILLD WIH SIMPL AND  U NC  IONA L V I N AG  I N D S , SUC H A S A 19 6 0 S R A D I O A N D H A R D W  A R I N G U   N S I L S


‘I’S QUI A RLI  O H AV   O A D J U S  O SUCH A SMA S PAC  . I  M A K  S Y O U R A LIS HOW LI L YO U AC  UA L LY N   D ’


 V  RY  H I NG H A S B N C A R  U L LY PICKD O I TH ANGLS O  H I S 4 5 - S Q UA R  - M   R  R   R  A


UNDR H ARCHS Soft materials and touches of rugged opulence lift the earthy architecture of this restored Catalan cottage Wo r d s T ES S A P E A R S O N P h o t o g r a p h y M O N T S E GA R R I GA G R AU/ P H OTO F OY E R


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urrounded by vineyards and rolling fields, this 18th-century stone cottage is located in Empordà, a historic, rural region of northeast Catalonia. It belongs to Spanish antiques expert and interior designer Eduardo Arruga, whose respectful renovation has injected new life into the old building. Carefully modernised, the house is now a much-frequented second home for the city-based designer, who has enjoyed a 25-year career heading up Barcelona antiques emporium Lucca. He enlisted Spanish architect Javier Claros to help with the project, as well as garden designer Pepote Comella, who was responsible for creating the outdoor area, where crumbling stone and wild native plants add charm to the sheltered dining table and plunge pool. Inside, the property is split into three levels. The ground floor comprises two bedrooms, a bathroom and a terrace; upstairs there is a dining room, kitchen, bathroom and a living room, which leads out to the peaceful garden. The main bedroom, complete with en suite, is spread across the whole top floor, ofering beautiful views of the countryside. Much care was taken to preserve the soul of the building, with many of the original structural features still in place. The interior has been designed to complement these and furnished mostly with custom furniture created by Eduardo, or unique pieces sourced from his store. The result is an air of measured eclecticism and quiet elegance, fusing past and present with aplomb. eduardoarruga.com


M U C H C A R  WA S  A K  N  O PR  SRV   H  S OU  O  H IS 18  H - C  N  U R Y C O  AG 


H CAMING INRIOR HAS AN AIR O QUI GANC AND MASURD CCICISM


D O W N

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This inviting cabin has everything its busy owners need for a relaxing weekend away – a stone’s throw from their home Wo r d s S A R A H M O R G A N Photography GAELLE LE BOULICAUT P roduct ion JEREMY C ALL AG HAN


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his one-bedroom cabin, just 52 square metres in size, is a convenient home-from-home for owners Fabrice Le Roux and Jean-Eric Lafargue. Situated on the edge of a coastal nature reserve in southwest France, the summerhouse is just metres away from the couple’s main property – they use it as a weekend escape and a place to entertain. ‘We’ll often spend a few nights down here, so we feel like we’re on holiday,’ says Fabrice. The hut’s laid-back design, created by interior designer Dominique Cha (pictured), reflects its beguiling setting. Clad in the same local pine as the boardwalks found in the nature reserve, it has picket fencing inspired by the enclosures used to protect sand dunes in the area, and a simple shelter on the terrace made from bamboo poles and sailcloth. Inside, many of the furnishings are handmade, including a sisal pendant light, raia shelves and bright patterned tiles. Clever storage ensures the cabin feels spacious and yet equipped with everything needed for a longer stay. Kitchen appliances are concealed behind linen curtains, and a wardrobe and bedside tables are carved into the dividing wall between the bedroom and bathroom. The most streamlined element, though, has to be the living-room window – ‘it’s my favourite feature,’ says Fabrice. Flanked by builtin shelving, it opens by sliding into the surrounding wall, letting in fresh air without disrupting the view across the fields. dominiquecha.com


‘OUR CABIN IS SIMPLE, QUIET AND CONTEMPOR ARY – IT’S THE PERFECT PL ACE TO COME AND RECHARGE’


IN THE GALLEY KITCHEN, APPLIANCES ARE CONCEALED BY L I N EN CU RTA I NS A N D MO RO CC AN TI LES L I N E T H E FLO O R


STREA MLINED STOR AGE INCLUDES A WARDROBE A N D B E D S I D E TA B L E S C A RV ED I N TO T H E D I V I D I N G WA L L


THE TERRACE IS SHADED WITH SAILCLOTH IN A NOD TO TH E CABIN’S CHAR MING COA STAL SET TIN G


OD SOU Built just eight years ago, this traditional-style South African home is designed around an internal courtyard and offers uninterrupted views of the vineyard Wo r d s K E R RY N FI S C H E R Photo g r a p h y EL SA YO U N G

P r o duct ion R E T H A ERI CH S EN/FR A N K FE AT U RES


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estled in the slopes of South Africa’s breathtaking Blaauwklippen Valley just outside the town of Stellenbosch, this house is redolent of a South American hacienda. With thick whitewashed walls, shuttered windows and exposed wooden beams, it looks as if it has been part of the landscape for generations – so much so that it’s something of a surprise to discover that it is a new build. Just eight years old, the property was designed and built by owners Libby de Villiers, an actress, and her engineer husband Gerard. The couple have turned what was once an old fruit farm – with an incredible position but no farm buildings to speak of – into a flourishing winery and a four-bedroom home. Laid out over two levels, the farmhouse has a flexible layout centred around an internal courtyard. As a working farm, the property has distinct public and private areas, with the kitchen and mezzanine library functioning as the welcoming heart of the house. A verandah leading of the family’s living space faces Heldeberg Mountain and the vineyard that runs alongside the property. ‘We spend a lot of time out here,’ says Libby. It’s quiet and secluded and I never get bored of the views.’ kleinood.com


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‘ W  WA N   D  O C R  A    A R G  S H U    R  D S PAC  S  H A W  C O U  D U S  A   Y  A R R O U N D , PA R  I C U  A R Y I N S U M M  R ’


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‘B O  H GR A R D A N D I  OV  A SNS O DR A M A A N D A PPR  C I A  PI  C  S  H A A R  I  H R ROUG H - H  W N OR B O D’


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 H  A R M H O U S  H A S D I S  I N C  P U B  I C A N D P R I VA   A R  A S , W I  H  H  K I  C H  N A N D  I BR A RY A  H  H  A R O  H  HOM 


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W I  H W H I   WA S H  D WA   S , A R C H  D W I N DOWS A N D X P OSD BA MS ,  H  HOUS I S R  D O  N  O A S O U  H A M  R I C A N H AC I  N DA


W H E R E

W O R L D S

C O L L I D E

A contemporary glass walkway connects this original 17th-century thatched cottage in the Cotswolds with a modern extension clad in reclaimed stone. Inside, vintage furniture and natural materials abound Wo r d s/S t y l i n g A L I H E AT H Photography EMMA LEWIS


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aving sold their Majorcan home and everything in it, Anthony and Karen Cull moved back to England seven years ago to make a fresh start and to set up their antiques business, Anton & K. ‘Originally from Gloucestershire, we found our cottage online while we were still abroad. We loved the time-worn beauty of its thick stone walls, thatched roof, inglenook fireplace and period details,’ says Karen. Five years on and after much discussion, the couple drew up plans to add a reclaimed stone extension, which would be linked to the original 17th-century timber-framed property by a contemporary glass walkway. A staircase with a vaulted glass roof extends up from the entrance hallway, linking the new master suite with the two bedrooms and bathrooms that are housed in the original cottage. The key to this modern home’s palpable sense of history is its authentic materials – worn wood, aged paint veneers, weathered ceramics, foxed mirrors and natural linens abound. Antique cheeseboards line the floors of the original living room and dining room and the covetable vintage furniture and decorative accessories are united by their faded, raw appeal. ‘We wanted to create a simple and pared-back space that celebrates the appeal of natural imperfections,’ says Karen. ‘It has a depth and longevity that is very calming.’ antonandk.co.uk


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‘WE LOVE THE TIME-WORN BEAUT Y OF THE C OT TAG E’ S T H I C K S TO N E WA L L S, T H ATC H E D ROOF A N D P E R I O D D E TA I L S’


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THE RECL AIMED STONE EXTENSION IS CONNECTED TO THE ORIGINAL C OT TA G E BY A G L A S S WA L K WAY


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THE KEY TO THIS MODERN HOME’S PA L PA B L E S E N S E O F H I S TO RY I S I T S M I X O F R A W, A U T H E N T I C M A T E R I A L S


B  U  I S  H  WA R M  S 

OOUR The creative owners of this capacious family home have designed it from scratch , choosing a palette of soft blue walls, shiny brass finishes and pale wood floors to create a calming yet contemporary atmosphere Wo r d s K AT R I N E M A R T E N S E N - L A R S E N Photography MIKKEL ADSBØL/HOUSE OF PICTURES


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onging to get closer to nature and tired of their life in the city, Danish photographer Mikkel Adsbøl and his wife Mette decided that the time was right to abandon their urban existence and seek out a quiet rural spot in which to build their dream home. ‘It wasn’t enough just to visit the countryside for a weekend. We wanted to be there full time. We wanted our children [Karl, three, and August, seven] to grow up with open spaces and views of the fields,’ say Mikkel and Mette. The couple spent three years searching for the perfect property, but to no avail. ‘We never thought we were going to build or live in a new house,’ admits Mikkel, ‘but we just couldn’t find anything that met our requirements, which included a good school for the boys, a forest location and a view of the water.’ The plot that they eventually settled on spans four acres of land in North Zealand. Here, they designed and built their 235-square-metre whitewashed property, which has views of the forest and the lake and takes inspiration from an old barn that they fell in love with a few years earlier. Inside, the house features unusually high ceilings and a dramatic beamed construction. The building’s clean lines are offset by a calming palette of blues and pinks – the perfect backdrop for Mikkel and Mette’s immaculately curated collection of classic Danish designs, including Gubi lighting and an Ole Wanscher daybed.


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 H  D SIG N O  H  BU I  DI NG A K  S I NSPI R A ION  ROM A BA R N  H A  H  O W N  R S S AW A   W Y  A R S  A R  I  R


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H CAN INS AND HIGH CIINGS AR OS

B Y A PA     

O  PA   B  U  S


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BRASS IINGS A N D AC C  S S OR I  S A DD I N   R  S   O  H  PA S    COOUR SCHM


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D E C O R AT I V E

F LO U R I S H

Ornately furnished and brimful of eclectic charm, the interior of this historic home in the Italian countryside is inspired by its lush and leafy surroundings Wo r d s T ES S A P E A R S O N P h o t o g r a p h y DAV I D E LOVAT T I/ L I V I N G I N S I D E


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round 40 kilometres north of Milan in the hillside village of Sirtori lies this impressive abode. It belongs to former fashion photographer Gaetano Besana, who moved here from the city 15 years ago. Part of a 3,000-square-metre 18th-century property that’s been in the Besana family for generations, the house was substantially renovated by his father in 1980. Once the work was finished, Gaetano and his three siblings were each given an apartment to put their own stamp on. ‘My idea was to create the same atmosphere inside as the garden outside,’ he says. ‘I love plants and flowers so I lined the walls with work by Basilius Besler [a German botanist and engraver from the 16th century, who created one of the first illustrated collections of herbs and plants ever recorded]. I also had the great fortune to meet an American decorator who frescoed the walls in a style inspired by the Medici gardens, which were created around 1500.’ The family’s collection of Faenza plates are displayed on the wall, hung to look as if they are part of the fresco itself. Now, Gaetano focuses his energies on his organic farm and guesthouse, Oasi di Galbusera Bianca, which is surrounded by 20 hectares of biodynamic farmland, woods, vineyards and orchards. ‘For me, living in the country means sharing the rhythms of nature and being deeply connected to the cycles of life,’ he says. oasigalbuserabianca.it


‘ I WA N T E D TO CRE ATE TH E SA M E ATMOSPH ERE INSIDE AS THE GARDEN OUTSIDE’


‘LIVING IN THE COUNTRY MEANS SHARING THE RHY TH MS O F N ATU RE A N D BEING CONNECTED TO THE C YCLES O F LIFE‘


SUMMR IN PROVNC Once a run-down farmhouse, this French country pile has been restored and updated over the course of five years to give it a Nordic edge with a muted monochrome palette Wo r d s/ P r o d u c t i o n A N J A B O E M A N L E Y P h o t o g r a p h y J E S P E R R A Y/ H O U S E O F P I C T U R E S


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ating back to 1800, this rural estate is home to Danish designer Hanne, her farmer husband Gilles and their three children. In 2008, the couple bought two hectares of land near Gordes, a well-preserved village that ofers breathtaking views across the Luberon valley in Provence-Alpes-Côte d’Azur. On the picturesque plot sat an old tannery and a 150-square-metre stone farmhouse that the family restored and expanded into a 300-square-metre country home. It took five years to complete the project, with the help of skilled masons and local craftspeople. But for Hanne, the interior is still a work in progress. ‘Nothing is ever finished here,’ she laughs. ‘I never sit down.’ She designed and produced much of the furniture herself; other key pieces were sourced at the Maison & Objet design fair in Paris, which she attends twice a year. A wraparound mezzanine level overlooks the open-plan living area, where a huge sofa – reupholstered in alpaca wool – ofers ample space for informal gatherings. Outside, a covered dining space looks out over the property’s expansive garden, which is planted with pear and almond trees and set amongst olive groves and fields of fragrant lavender.


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 H  A S   U  , M U   D COOUR SCHM IS A NORDIC BND O B AC K , W H I   A N D GR  Y


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O H NDS O H ARH Sourced from all over the world, the furniture and accessories in this sun-drenched South African homestead represent an artful blend of cultures and styles Wo r d s C H A R LOT T E B R O O K Ph oto g r a p h y G R EG COX /GA P I N T ERI O RS/B U R E AUX


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he table is from China, the distressed cabinet from Czechoslovakia, and the pendant lights were handmade in Jaipur,’ says interior designer Sumari Krige, surveying the open-plan kitchen in this summerhouse on the Western Cape. ‘The property’s owners are Swedish and the house was built in the 17th-century Cape Dutch style (the architectural aesthetic derived from South Africa’s first settlers, who predominantly came from the Netherlands).’ With high ceilings and walls painted in brilliant white, the vast rooms of this South African farmhouse render its diverse mix of furnishings and accessories beautifully coherent. Slick furniture transferred from the family’s previous city apartment, and favourite ceramics

from their native Sweden, are teamed with items sourced by Sumari on buying trips across the world, and sculptures created by local artists. Hardwearing jute bouclé rugs protect the floors from the owners’ children and dogs, who run freely through the house and out to the sweeping, 35-metrelong terrace, which overlooks the mountains. Outside, majestic matt-black nickel lights from India hang above a wicker sofa adorned with dove-grey and mustard-yellow cushions. ‘As much thought went into the outdoor spaces as the interior,’ says Sumari. When you’re blessed with a climate that allows al fresco dining for nine months of the year, it’s not hard to see why. lagrangeinteriors.co.za


HIGH CIINGS AND BRIIAN W H I   WA   S R  N D  R  H  D I V  R S  M I X O  U R N I  U R  A N D AC C  S S OR I  S B  AU  I  U  Y C O H  R  N 


 ROM  H  P O O A N D A   R  S C O DI N I NG A R  A ,  H  OW N RS N JOY S U N N I NG RU R A  V I WS


SMBANC O RADIION Inside the rustic shell of this cavernous Swiss farmhous sits a modern industrial-style family home, completely detached from the original architecture so as to preserve it in its entirety Wo r d s T ES S A P E A R S O N Photography THOM AS BACH St yling/Production ANNE BECKWILM


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rumbling, cavernous and lacking any modern conveniences, this 18th-century Swiss farmhouse was near derelict when current owners Gian-Marco and Francesca discovered it back in 2006. A listed building with elements dating back to 1731, the property is located in a small village near Bern. Used only as a cattle stable by local farmers, it had lain uninhabited for three decades before the pair bought it. Captivated by the building’s charm, the couple enlisted architect Adrian Wiesmann of W2 Architekten Bern to transform what was left of the farmhouse into a home. With strict building restrictions to accommodate, Adrian’s solution was to construct an internal ‘cube’ in the former hayloft, where Gian-Marco, Francesca and their four children could live comfortably while the rest of the building was renovated. This space, which now comprises six bedrooms, is completely detached from the roof and the façade of the house in order to protect the building’s structure. Below lies a strikingly modern kitchen, a dining room and a minimalist living area – complete with a floor-to-ceiling glass window overlooking the gardens, which were designed by Francesca. ‘This house was a really romantic project for us,’ says GianMarco. ‘It’s like a small paradise in the middle of an increasingly hectic world. We feel very privileged to live here.’ w2-architekten.ch


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O P  N S H  V I N G A N D PN Y O W I N DOWS M A K   H  MOS O H HIGH CIINGS IN H MODR N K ICHN


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D AC H  D  ROM  H  OR IGI NA  WO ODN A Ç A D  ,  H  N  W INR IOR COMPR ISS IVING ARAS AND SI X BDROOMS


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‘  H I S H O U S  WA S A R  A  Y R OM A N  I C PROJC OR US. I’S IK A SMA PA R A D I S  I N H MIDD O A H  C  IC WOR D’


THE GREEN GREEN GRASS OF HOME Settled within a tight-knit creative community on a rambling Danish farm, this all-white abode is a welcoming retreat for its globetrotting owner Wo r d s T ES S A P E A R S O N Ph oto g r a p h y M O RT E M H O LT U M S t y l i n g LY K K E F O G E D


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y house is not furnished with expensive things. It’s a home filled with pieces collected on my travels, and treasured gifts from friends,’ says Danish textiles importer Mia Rünitz of her farm cottage, located near a small lakeside village in central Jutland. Mia’s company sells hand-knitted fabrics produced in Bolivia, where she supports over 100 women through her work. ‘Because I travel a lot, I really appreciate living here. I love to come home after a long day, make a big bonfire, cook with my neighbours and relax with my kids,’ she says, speaking warmly of the small community on the farm. ‘It’s a very communal existence. We have a big kitchen garden that provides fruit and greens all summer.’ The farm is a Mecca for visiting craftspeople and designers, who congregate in the on-site carpenter’s workshop. ‘We are always surrounded by interesting people, which inspires me a lot,’ says Mia, whose house is painted brilliant white to showcase her collection of colourful textiles, some of which are antique pieces sourced from Bolivia and Vietnam. The interior teams vintage finds – like the chaise longue and graphic Chinese and Vietnamese propaganda posters – with modern pieces such as occasional tables and dining chairs by Danish outdoor furniture brand Houe. The kitchen table was designed and made by Mia with the help of a carpenter friend. ‘I never planned to create a certain style,’ she says of the home’s cheerful interior, ‘it just happened. The look is a little bohemian, but more than anything it’s a house filled with memories.’ chola.dk


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‘ TH E VI N TAG E P OS TERS I N TH E K ITCH EN A N D I N THE LIVING ROOM ARE FROM VIETNAM AND CHINA. I ’M FA S C I N AT E D BY P R O PAGA N DA A R T ’


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T H E H O U S E I S PA I N T E D W H I T E TO S H O W C A S E M I A’ S C O L L E C T I O N O F C O L O U R F U L T E X T I L E S, SOURCED FROM BOLIVIA AND VIETNAM


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‘I N E VER BUY SPECIFIC PIECES FO R MY H O USE, I J U S T T E N D TO FA L L I N LOV E W I T H T H I N G S I F I N D O N MY T R AV E L S’


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BY

T H E

WAT E R ’ S

E D G E

Every summer, this nature-loving family – and dog Hertta – escape to their compact wooden summerhouse on the quiet shores of a Finnish lake Wo r d s/ P r o d u c t i o n /S t y l i n g J O N N A K I V I L A H T I Ph oto g r a p h y K R I S TA K ELTA N EN/L I V I N G I N S I D E


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ituated just 14 kilometres from their home in the Finnish city of Vaasa, Tomi and Jenny Vuollet’s lakeside retreat consists of two dark-stained wooden buildings surrounded by lush greenery. Every year, the couple relocate here for the summer with their four children – Fanny (15), Ellen (13), Linus (11) and Alfons (five) – and dog Hertta. Despite spanning only 26 square metres, the cottages manage to comfortably accommodate the family of six, with the smaller of the buildings containing the girls’ bedroom, a sauna and a bathroom. The larger property houses the main living area, kitchen and a loft where Tomi, Jenny and the boys sleep. An outdoor kitchen and a patio link the two structures, forming the heart of the house. Inside, the spaces are simply furnished, mostly with secondhand finds sourced by Jenny and pieces picked up on travels around the world – one cupboard came all the way from the couple’s previous home in China. The round dining table is positioned right by the corner window, afording uninterrupted views of the lake when the owners are inside. But this is a family that prefer to be out in the fresh air rather than cooped up – they’re happiest swimming in the calm waters and making the most of this secluded spot’s wild and beautiful surroundings.


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THE LARGE CORNER WINDOW IN THE DINING AREA AFFORDS UNINTERRUPTED VIEWS OF THE LAKE


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D ES P I T E S PA N N I N G J U S T 2 6 S Q UA R E M E T R E S, T H E C O S Y C O T TA G E S CO M F O R TA B LY S L E E P A FA M I LY O F S I X


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T H E R O O M S A R E S I M P LY F U R N I S H E D, M O S T LY W I T H S ECO N D H AN D FI N DS SO U RCED BY TH E OWN ERS


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I D A S ,  S  A P S A N D A DV  N  U R  S

PICTURE: GETTY

X POR 

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PICK OF THE CROP

S TAY I N G P OW E R

Indulge in the finest produce fresh from the fields at the UK’s top ten farm shops

Discover the best of Britain, as four successful hoteliers reveal their favourite things to do on the English coast


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P I C K

O F

T H E

C R O P

Whether local to you or further afield, a well-stocked farm shop is always a joy to behold. We’ve scoured the country, north to south, to bring you ten of the UK’s finest purveyors of seasonal produce and gourmet delicacies Wo r d s M E G A B B OT T

ritish food has come a long way in the past few years. Now, more than ever, we’re reaping the benefits of organic farming and locally sourced produce, recognising that naturally farmed ingredients provide richer, more decadent flavours and are higher in nutrients than any alternative. Head chefs and home cooks alike are singing the praises of the Great British outdoors, with our crisp, frosty winters bringing juicy beetroot and sweet chestnuts and our moody autumns ofering up plump artichokes and sumptuous figs. In the spring and summer months, the land is bursting with cooling mint, crunchy radishes, succulent strawberries and tender fennel. And, when the desire strikes to get creative with these seasonal oferings, the nation’s finest farm shops are on hand to help.

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H O PE TO U N FA R M S H O P WEST LOTHIAN, SCOTL AND The pride and joy of Hopetoun Farm is its butchery. Hopetoun Estate is made up of 6,500 acres of woodland and arable land, with an abundance of game. Its Gold Taste Award-winning venison is steeped in the gamey, wild flavours that can only be found in meat of this quality. Hopetoun also specialises in rabbit, pheasant, woodpigeon and partridge. At the shop, you can get your hands on hampers brimming with luxury oils, chocolates, chutneys and wines. shop.hopetoun.co.uk BO D N A N T FA R M S H O P C O N W Y, W A L E S Set on the River Conwy in the northern reaches of Wales, Bodnant Welsh Food Centre comprises a celebrated cookery school, a carefully curated farm shop showcasing the region’s finest produce, and The Hayloft Restaurant. Inside the shop, Bodnant Bakery can be found alongside a butcher’s and a delicatessen selling everything from award-winning pies and olives to freshly baked bread and cheeses made in the on-site dairy. bodnant-welshfood.co.uk/farm-shop

LOW S IZE RG H BA R N FA R M S H O P CU M B RI A

Low Sizergh Barn’s farm trails trace vegetable plots, apple orchards and fields studded with cattle, culminating at its shop, which is housed within a 17th-century Westmorland stone barn. Produce is created with loving commitment. Eggs with rich, dark-yellow yolks sit beside fresh bread and creamy milk, as well as generous cuts of rare pork and fine beef, seasonal vegetables and fruits. The cheese counter (above) was recently named one of the top 200 in the country at the British Cheese Awards. Three Kendal cheeses – the pride of the selection – are made using milk from the Low Sizergh Barn herd ( lowsizerghbarn.co.uk).

While many venture to Chatsworth to marvel at the Duke and Duchess of Devonshire’s grand stately home, the attached farm shop attracts a good deal of attention as well. The Duke and Duchess opened the shop in 1977 as a way of selling game and beef from the estate to discerning locals. Now, it is one of the most respected in the county and half of all its merchandise is produced on Chatsworth land. Think bouncy loaves baked at the crack of dawn, Chatsworth jams and over 100 cheeses. chatsworth.org/plan-your-visit/shopand-eat/chatsworth-estate-farm-shop

PICTURES: TIM JAMES/MABEL GRAY

C H ATS WO RTH H O US E FA R M S H O P D ERBYSH I RE


BACK TO THE GARDEN NORFOLK

Back to the Garden is applauded for its meticulous attention to provenance. Inside a stunning farmhouse, the deli offers lamb, chicken, turkey and goose reared on its 1,000-acre organic farm, which stretches out across the Swanton Novers Nature Reserve. Carefully selected products line the shelves, all fulďŹ lling the same commitment to quality. Choose from locally brewed beers, wild foods and lovingly grown veg like rainbow chard and squash ( back-to-the-garden.co.uk).


THE GOODS SHED KENT

The Goods Shed (below) opened its daily farmers’ market back in 2002, selling seasonal veg, fresh fish and traditionally reared meat from neighbouring farms. Fourteen years on, the market is still going strong. It now plays host to a bevy of local producers, including a Canterbury-based charcuterie, a fresh pasta stall, Enzo’s Italian bakery and an artisanal cheese seller. It has also expanded into a sprawling food hall complete with a bottle shop, a wine specialist, and the Wild Goose cocktail bar, which serves tipples inspired by the British garden alongside tapas-style dishes (thegoodsshed.co.uk).

SHEEPDROVE O RGA N I C FA R M BUTCHER’S LO N DO N Sheepdrove Organic Farm is the work of farmers and environmental campaigners Peter and Juliet Kindersley, who fell in love with an old farmhouse in the romantic Berkshire Downs over 40 years ago. The spoils of Sheepdrove’s landscape are available to buy in London at its classic family butcher’s shop in Maida Vale (above). As well as Sheepdrove honey and organic preserves, the store has become iconic in the capital for its masterful cuts of grass-fed beef, lamb and mutton, as well as freerange poultry, gammon, pork, and sausages made using their own unique recipes. sheepdrove.com


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E D I N G TO N FA R M S H O P AT T H R E E DAG G E R S W I LTS H I R E

Three Daggers is a beloved village pub with a twist. Defying the questionable British pub food of days gone by, it serves modern European dishes created using locally sourced ingredients. It even has its own on-site microbrewery, producing craft beers and ales. As well as feeding and watering committed locals in the pub, Three Daggers’ Edington Farm Shop (above) stocks the produce of nearby Priory Farm: homemade apple juice, pure honey, eggs, fresh bread, condiments and a kaleidoscope of seasonal fruit and vegetables (threedaggers.co.uk/farm-shop).

PICTURES: ARTOGRAPHY/A TUCKER, JEROME DUTTON

DA RTS FA R M S H O P DEVON Voted Best Farm Shop in the UK at the FARMA Awards 2015, Darts is part of a sprawling shopping village, comprised of a food hall, cider works and ale house, fish shed, butcher’s and a restaurant set among the lush vegetable fields. The farm shop sells the fresh fruit and vegetables of the day, plucked from the surrounding land each morning (right). For a true taste of the region, take a sip of Green Valley Cyder, made on site. dartsfarm.co.uk

GA R L I C FA R M S H O P ISLE OF WIGHT In the kitchen, garlic is one of the first things most cooks reach for. It is the staple ingredient for endless cuisines, prized for its delicate, heated flavour and wealth of nutrients. Little wonder, then, that Garlic Farm Shop has become such a prized spot on the Isle of Wight’s culinary map. The garlic experts here grow every possible variety in their sweeping fields, selling a giant array of products from oak-smoked garlic butter and toasted garlic mayonnaise to beef biltong with chilli and garlic, and garlic sea salt with black pepper. There is even a black garlic beer on ofer. For anyone who treasures this earthy bulb, this place is nothing short of a joy. thegarlicfarm.co.uk


SAY I NG

POW R From pop-up beach feasts in Cornwall and wild running in Norfolk to the most romantic hideaway in the country, four top hoteliers give us their favourite tips for an idyllic holiday on the English coast

PICTURE: ALAMY

Wo r d s K A R A O ’ R E I L LY


O GA P OI I ON C O R N WA   Olga Polizzi is the deputy chairman and director of design for Rocco Forte Hotels. She also runs two hotels of her own: Devon’s Hotel Endsleigh (hotelendsleigh.com) and Cornwall’s Hotel Tresanton (tresanton.com)

came to Cornwall quite late in life when I met my husband, William. He’d been every year during his youth; his parents had a house in St Mawes, which is where we now stay. When I first visited, I was just amazed by the area – it’s like another country. It’s an extremely relaxing place, I think because of the sea. There are wonderful things to see. I love The Lizard peninsula, because it’s so mysterious and slightly spooky. St Ives is full of good art galleries: I visit the Barbara Hepworth Museum and Sculpture Garden (above; tate.org.uk) time and again. Newlyn Art Gallery

I

(newlynartgallery.co.uk) shows young Cornish artists, and Truro has Lemon Street Gallery (lemonstreetgallery.co.uk), which sells contemporary art. There are great places to eat, too. The Hidden Hut (below; hiddenhut.co.uk) on Porthcurnick Beach throws pop-up feast nights and if you don’t book tickets in the first half hour they’re on sale, you miss out. Of course there’s also Rick Stein (rickstein.com) in Falmouth. We like to take the ferry across to have dinner there. I took an Italian architect friend to St Ives recently. The plan was to walk across the beach to Porthminster Cafe (porthminstercafe.co.uk). However, the tide had just gone out and I hadn’t realised how soggy it would be. By the time we arrived, his nice Gucci loafers were ruined, but the lovely people at the cafe poured us each a cold glass of white wine and we sat outside eating mackerel. It really was as good as anything you could think of.


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ROBI N H U SON ON NOR  OK Robin Hutson worked at some of Britain’s best-known hotels, including Claridges, before creating the Hotel du Vin boutique hotel chain. In 2011, he launched the first Pig Hotel: the fifth one opens this year (thepighotel.com)

y family went on a boat trip on the Norfolk Broads (pictured) when I was a child, but it was many years before I rediscovered the area. Now, The Gunton Arms (theguntonarms.co.uk) has become a regular holiday destination for us. We first stayed there years ago on the recommendation of chef Mark Hix,a good friend of mine who consulted on the food there. It has some simply stunning bedrooms and is owned by contemporary art dealer Ivor Braka, but it’s still very much a local pub – with a TV in the corner – which I like. The Gunton Arms is also where I ate the most amazing Cromer crab that I have ever tasted in my life. The town of Holt has some truly excellent antique and vintage shops. Shirehall Plain Antiques Centre (shirehallplainantiques.co.uk) isn’t massive, but the dealers have a good eye and we’ve bought a lot from them. The Norfolk Painting School (norfolkpaintingschool.com) is also a place worth knowing about. It’s run by an expert artist who will teach you how to paint using oils. He will also create artworks to order ‘in the style of’. He painted some moody Turner-esque seascapes for us that are just brilliant. Occasionally, when I feel I need to do some exercise, I will head out fora run, and Holkham beach (holkham.co.uk) is fabulous for this. It’s very beautiful and not at all scarred by any nods to the modern day – even the car park is kept well back from the beach. There is nothing better than being absorbed in your thoughts without the distraction of technology – a solitary run is a moment of peace that you rarely get in modern life.

PICTURES: TATE © BOWNESS, GETTY MOMENT, ALAMY

M

‘ I  ’ S V  R Y B  AU  I  U  A N D N O  A A   S C A R R  D B Y A N Y N O D S  O  H  M O D  R N DAY ’


K I K MP ON H NW OR S Kit Kemp is co-owner and design director of Firmdale Hotels, which owns eight hotels in London, including Number Sixteen and The Soho Hotel, as well as Crosby Street Hotel in New York (firmdalehotels.com)

he New Forest is near where I’m from, so for me it’s a home from home. We rented a property on the Solent Estuary (above), which looks across to the Isle of Wight, for years before we finally bought our own place. Nearby was The Master Builder’s hotel (below left; hillbrookehotels.co.uk) on the Beaulieu River, where I sometimes go for breakfast or to look at the yachts. One of the wonderful things about the New Forest is that you have all the woodland but it’s also right by the sea. From Lymington, there is a wonderful walk along the sea wall and you can go for miles to Hurst Point and Milford on Sea. Lymington Sea Water Baths (lymingtonseawaterbaths.org.uk) is one of the oldest lidos in the country and is right at the beginning of the walk; it’s filled by seawater, so can be quite cold. When I go to the New Forest, it’s for R&R. I learnt to horse ride with my children – it’s great to fulfil a childhood ambition when you’re older. I have my own horse and we’re quite sedate in the way we go round the Forest, but we’ll sometimes have a gallop down the beach.

Not that long ago, I was out riding when I suddenly came across a stag sitting in some leaves, lit up by a shaft of sunlight. It was the most incredible sight. As far as I’m concerned, you can keep the Mediterranean – I’d always rather be in the New Forest.


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A NOUSK A H M P ON DORS Anouska Hempel is the hotelier and designer behind the legendary Blakes Hotel and The Hempel. Her eponymous interior design company is currently working on projects in Abu Dhabi and Dubai, as well as Blakes in Singapore and The Franklin in London (anouskahempeldesign.com)

‘I’S A SA P AC  I  Y O U WA N  O B W ID’

’m going to share with you the most ridiculously romantic, striking place: Clavell Tower (above) near Wareham by Kimmeridge Bay. It only sleeps two and it’s wickedly lovely. It’s a safe place if you want to be wild. The decor is a bit mumsy but that doesn’t matter, as it is what it is. It’s hidden, but up high; like a baby lighthouse surrounded by sea and sky. I’m very taken by the building. The charming four-storey tower is a folly that was built in 1830 and it overlooks the English Channel. You can rent it from the Landmark Trust (landmarktrust.org.uk), which is really worth looking at; its website is a great resource for finding these kinds of interesting places all over England. For me, the Jurassic Coast (right; jurassiccoast.org) is one of the most glorious stretches of coastline on Earth. A UNESCO World Heritage Site, it’s stunningly wild. When the sea is rough, it’s wonderful; when it’s calm, it’s heaven. I became particularly interested in the area because I use Purbeck stone all the time in my work, and have got to know a lot about it; it’s just lovely. The tower isn’t, strictly speaking, a bed and breakfast, so you have to do your own thing for food. But if you need somewhere to eat, then Clavell’s Cafe (clavellscafe.co.uk), in the idyllic village of Kimmeridge, has a field-to-fork ethos. The family has farmed there for generations and the meat really does taste superior. Lovely Corfe Castle (nationaltrust.org.uk) is also not too far away, so you can head there and take a picnic.

PICTURES: ALAMY, GETTY/ROBERT HARDING WORLD IMAGERY

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PICTURE: ALAMY

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