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East Yorkshire to emphasise their local-ness rather than alternativeness. Defensive localism can result as incumbent farmers attempt to protect themselves from new developments such as AFNs, and to emphasise differing aspects of quality. New food geographies are always situated within existing systems and these contingencies are important and inflect particular understandings in specific places. Presentation 5 Author(s): Annalisa Colombino (University of Graz, Austria) and Paolo Giaccaria (University of Turin, Italy) Title: Quality, embeddedness and biopolitics in Alternative Food Networks. Some reflections on the Piedmontese beef Abstract: Several academic works on AFNs seem to suggest a sort of thaumaturgic effect between physical proximity and quality, embeddedness and opposition, which are often assumed as the main features of AFNs. Such a perspective is grounded on a dichotomous understanding of the tensions between ‘short commodity chain’ and ‘long commodity chain’, between the ‘local’ and the ‘global’, between ‘specialty’ and ‘commodity’, between ‘Alternative Food Networks’ and ‘Conventional Food Networks’. This binary view of ‘(Alternative) Food Networks’ seems to be related to an ideological grasp of ‘territorialisation’ and ‘local development’, rather than to an analytical appraisal of the on-going processes that we term “Alternative” Food Networks. Drawing on Actor-Network Theory and focusing on the (Slow Food and Coalvi) valorisation of the Piemontese cattle breed and beef, our paper aims at deconstructing and mobilizing the notions of ‘territorialization’, ‘embeddedness’, ‘quality’, and the ‘local’. In particular, we focus on the biopolitical dimension of breeding the ‘right’ and ‘true’ Piedmontese breed/beef, in order to challenge the the discourses that describe AFNs as “natural”, “traditional” and “genuine”.

Session code: Session title:

Organizer(s):

S02 – Room B2 Beyond fortress Europe? Bordering and crossbordering processes along the EU external frontiers Filippo Celata, University of Rome La Sapienza (Italy) Raffaella Coletti, University of Rome La Sapienza (Italy) James W. Scott, University of Eastern Finland (Finland)

Slots and abstracts:

SLOT 1: Reconceptualising post-Westpahlian borders (Parallel Session 1) Chair: Filippo Celata, University of Rome La Sapienza (Italy) Presentation 1 Author(s): James W. Scott, University of Eastern Finland Title: Border Ethics and the Liberal Dilemma. A Critical View from EU-Europe Abstract: Border studies research has interrogated the problematique of bordering liberal societies. Simply put, this involves border control and security practices that promote the flourishing of national societies but that at the same time, invoke the police powers and violence of the state. The violence of liberal states, furthermore, is not limited to their own territorial borders but is often extended to areas far beyond (Elden 2009, Jones 2012). Another liberal dilemma is that of the selective international mobility engendered by visa and border regimes of individual states (Mau et. al. 2012). Nevertheless, no feasible alternatives have emerged to replace liberal notions of an “exclusive” but selfdefined community as a necessary precondition of local democracy. To quote Judy Batt (2002, p. 1): “ democratic self-government presupposes the existence of a consensual community with shared understandings not only of what the state is for and how it is to function, but also of where its borders are and who it is for – who belongs to the community to which it is to be held accountable”. A major challenge to liberal democracy will be the democratic governance of its borders and openness to cultural difference. However, it is also evident that “culture wars” have been fought and continue to rage over national identity within the context of liberal democracy. One question that arises is the extent to which the European Union, despite its contradictions and the selective permeability of its borders, might provide scenarios of democratic forms of border governance and regulation. Presentation 2 Author(s): Matthew Longo, Yale University (USA) Title: Trends in Bordering: The United States and Europe Compared 73

Rome Eugeo 2013 Programme and Abstracts  

Programme and Abstract of Rome EUGEO 2013 Congress (5-7 Setp. 2013) www.eugeo2013.com www.eugeo.org

Rome Eugeo 2013 Programme and Abstracts  

Programme and Abstract of Rome EUGEO 2013 Congress (5-7 Setp. 2013) www.eugeo2013.com www.eugeo.org

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