Page 1

Eugénie SENTUCQ ERASMUS

17035172

U B L M G 3 - 4 5 - 3 University of the West of England

PERFORMING ART CENTRE IN BATH Design portfolio MAY 2018


ÂŤ Be honest first and if you are honest you will be beautiful, but do not attempt to be beautiful and dishonest.Âť Sir Owen Williams


CONTENT

Introduction Context

of

Development

Context of the city Context of the site Planning / policy context Key strengths Key problems Key recommendations

Key

objectives

Illustrative

of

the

page

page

10 14 16 18 19 20

Design Process Set of Drawings Vertical circulation Fire escape strategy Space continuity, soft transitions Auditorium Materiality Structural Intentions Details

page

46 47 61 62 63 64 68 70 71

page

21

Environmental Design

page

75

18

page

page page page page

masterplan

page

9

page

25 27 28 29 30 31 32

Project Concept

page

35

Context inclusion Understanding Performing arts Typical timetable Programme Schedule of Accomodation Design inspirations

page

Bath aerial picture Masterplan proposal Celebrating the Georgian city of Bath Enhancing the riverfront Ensuring the site vitality Creating permeabilies and enabling movement 3D views

44

page

page

masterplan

7

Design Development

page

page page page page page page

page page page page page

36 38 39 40 41 42

Ventilation and lighting Water supply

Design

process

review

page page page page page page page

page

76 78

page

81

page


Introduction Context of Development Illustrative masterplan Project

Concept

Design Development Environmental Design


INTRODUCTION

Client :

‘Les électrons Libres’ artists organisation Project :

Performing Art Centre, Bath

Who are ‘Les électrons libres’ ? ‘Les électrons libres’ (the free electrons) are an organisation of fifteen members which gathers artists who want to promote performance arts. Within the organisation, all members share the same passion : performing. Seven of them are specialised in Improvisational theatre performances and the six others are art performers (contemporary dancers and poets). They think that performance arts are spirit liberator by the mimetic relationship developed by the spectator in front of show. They all gathered to create the Performing Art Centre in the mythic city of Bath in order to convey what really matters to their mind : enabling the free-expression thanks to arts.

Walcot Street redevelopment is fundamental to Bath’s strategic ambition to attract businesses within the city centre, and to overcome the post-war historic breakage between Bath and the River Avon embodied by the multi-storey car park in the area. The Performing Art Centre will have a central role in achieving this objective. As a home for performing arts, it will gather communities around a shared vital interest which is the free expression of the body, the voice and the spirit. Development can be delivered against the strategic objectives for the site and the wider area. The masterplan proposal offers the opportunity to create a mixed-use area fronting the River Avon and Walcot Street. It would offer a wonderful promenade along the river, a better frame for Saturday cattlemarket, a unique selection of ground floor shops and restaurants on the East side of the river which will attract people from Bath and beyond. In the process, the cattlemarket site will be transformed from an urban ‘backland’ into a thriving mixed-use environment set within a high quality public realm.

This document consists of five major sections : C o n t e x t o f D e v e l o p m e n t : an in depth analysis and representation of findings relevant in understanding the city of Bath that the site lays within. This section will also compile the supporting statements for the proposal, based and justified against planning policy. I l l u s t r a t i v e M a s t e r p l a n : contains the masterplan proposal for the site. P r o j e c t C o n c e p t : explains the programme proposal reasoning D e s i g n D e v e l o p m e n t : describes the design through a set of drawings, diagrams and visuals.w E n v i r o n m e n t a l D e s i g n : explains the environmental strategy used for the design project.

INTRODUCTION

7


Introduction Context of Development Illustrative masterplan Project

Concept

Design Development Environmental Design


CONTEXT OF THE CITY Bath

overview

location

map

Superficy 2

gh

Ed

im

r bu

0m 25

B

2

m 10 1 l to ir s

B

rd Bo

Bath is located on main axis embodied by the M4 motorway which links London, Bath, Bristol, Cardiff and Swansea.

10

INTRODUCTION

at

eaux 49m

h 29 m2

2

Bath superficy is comparable to its french twin city Bordeaux which was also developed in the 18th century by l’Intendant Tourny under the reign of Louis XV.The two cities had a radiocentric development from their medieval centre.


Morphogenesis

and

Typological Analysis

The medieval City

The Development of the Medieval City followed the lines of Roman Bath after the Saxon rebuilding of the City wall, which revived the South, West and North Gates of the Roman City. Densely populated, the city only crossed the river at one point. The City has always suffered from flooding and flooding up the Roman drain from the River Avon made the eastern “range” extremely difficult. At that time, Walcot Street was a road outside of the City wall, going from the North Gate of Bath to London.

The Georgian City, 1725

John Wood the Elder and John Wood the Younger went to develop Bath into the unique Georgian city that set the ambition and trajectory of the City towards its World Heritage Site status. The pieces of Georgian Bath they set (Queen’s Square, North and South Parades, Duke Street, The Crescent, ...) broke from the informality and density of Medieval Bath and established a pattern of formal terrace frontages, the façades designed in detail by the architects, but the plots developed independently by small builders, resulting in very dynamic, varied and informal backs. Walcot Street was integrated into the City boundaries at that time with the city sprawling.

The contemporary City

Georgian terraced house set back from the street and access diagram

Georgian terraced house flushed to the street and access diagram

The Contemporary City has continued to develop along the lines of the Georgian City, in some cases through infilling and in other cases, through demolition and rebuilding large swathes of the city. Rather than taking the grain of the existing city and continuing or restoring the street pattern through similar scale infills, these sites have typically been developed as full plots, maximising internal floor areas to fill the skin which has been placed around the plot. A typical example of this fact is the Hilton Hotel building. The city has very little aspirational contemporary design and would benefit greatly from an ambitious scheme which achieves a quality of design which can compliment the Georgian city.

Georgian corner terraced house set back from the street

Hilton Hotel Building, built in the second half of the 20th century, breakage with the Georgian typical street pattern

CONTEXT OF DEVELOPMENT

11


Commuting

in

Bath

Where local residents work

Where local workers live South Gloucester

South Gloucester

4%

Elsewhere

4%

12%

7% Bristol

Bristol

71%

7%

6%

16%

Whiltshire

5% Elsewhere

North East Somerset Source - Bath and North East Somerset Local Plan 2007

This diagram suggests that about 1/3 of Bath residents work in another place. Bath is a residential city.

INTRODUCTION

54% live in Bath

North East Somerset

12

4%

work in Bath

5%

Whiltshire

Source - Bath and North East Somerset Local Plan 2007

This diagram suggests that about half of the people working in Bath work in another place. Bath is also a hub for people living in its county and other places.


Landscape

of

the

city

Bath has an unique relationship with its surrounding landscape. The balance and clarity of this relationship contribute to the Outstanding Universal Value attributed to Bath. The sitting, form and orientation of the city relative to the landscape are important for both the city looking out and the landscape looking in. The continuity of the materiality of the built city of Bath reads like a landscape, tones of Bath stone, tones of slate and metal roof.

A South West vew of the City of Bath, published by R.Richards in 1787

Perspective of the Great Pulteney Street

Circus formal front Georgian façade typology designed in detail by the architects

Saint Michael’s Church perspective from High Street

Informal back façades of the Royal Crescent building from the Royal Crescent Hotel garden

Circus formal front Georgian façade patterns and mascarons developed independently by small builders

Sketch drawn on my first visit of Bath in September, from Walcot Street

Pulteney Bridge, from High Street and Bridge Street intersection

View from the Skyline, picture taken on the Skylin website, photographer unknown

Topography Map of Bath involving its street perspectives to the green hills

CONTEXT OF DEVELOPMENT

13


ot Wa lc

Mo rfo r

dS tr ee t

Ball ance

Burlington Street

Stre

e

Ga te

t

sdo La n

ne a

La

ne

wn Road

CONTEXT OF THE SITE

Gu

i

Rivers Street

R

Historic promenade through the site

AERIAL 2000

St

Jo hn 's

Mews Circus

S tree t

Street

Road

Alfred

St Jo hn's e tt

l Bart

Str eet

9

t Stree

6

7

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8

e r ad Pa

t Henrietta S

et Stre

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5

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3

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th

St r

ee t

Chea

eet p Str

1

W

et estgate Stre

Yo rk

Westga i ng te Build

Extract from the engraved map by John Pine in 1736 thanks to John Wood survey

© Getmapping Plc Contains OS data © Crown copyright and database right 2018

s

0 No rt h

Kingsmead

Street

Aerial picture of the site (1) Bath Abbey, (2) Guildhall Market, (3) Tk Max, (4) Bath CenScale 1:2000 200 m tral Library, (5) Hilton Hotel, (6) Cattlemarket area, (7) YMCA place, (8) Saracen Street, Projection: British National Grid (9) Class 2 Cornmarket building 20

40

60

80

100

120

140

160

180

Avon Stre et

Indication written on John Pine’s map : «The Buildings are of Free Stone erected in a Magnificent manner. There are pleasant Walks and every thing that renders the City Entertaining and Delightful. And as of late many Familys of Distinction have settled here, so the City is now become one of the most Polite and Agreeable Places in Europe.»

H

Bro ck

Gay

The chosen site for the Theatre is located between Saracen Street (8) and a pretty little place facing the YMCA, accessible through stairs from Walcot Street and through an alley from Broad Street. This little place and its two access paths seems to be there since the Medieval Time. On the John Pine engraved map of 1736, we can see that at this time, the street was called ‘Gracious Street’ and there was a street widening in its middle.

Qu ee

As represented on the plan diagram, the site goes from Bath Abbey esplanade, includes Bath Guildhall market (2) and goes through Walcot Street and Broad Street until the Cattlemarket area (6). The site includes the Broad Street place - also called YMCA place in the report - (7) located just on the north side of Saracen Street (Art Performance Promoting Centre). As you walk from the Abbey (1) to the Art Centre by High Street, you pass the Guildhall (2) and the Bridge Street intersection. After this point, the walk becomes sadder : Walcot Street is busy, the Tk Max building (3) and Bath Central Library building (4) fabric are feeble replications of the Georgian façade built with no style or character. But the worst is still to come. The 70’s Hilton Building (5) has no relationships with its context, it stands like an eyesore in the Walcot Street landscape, and presents a abominable multistorey slabs carpark lasagne to the river Avon. Actually, it exists a little (1,5 meters wide in average) path which goes from Pulteney Bridge to the Cattlemarket site (used as an open carpark on weekdays, and only as a market place on saturdays) but it’s stuck between huge multistorey carparks and a poorly maintained riverfront. Moreover, the façade offered by the Pulteney Bridge is sloppy. The other side of Walcot Street is much more poetic : with its loads of independent shops and retails, it offers the big potential of making Walcot Street becoming in all its length a worthy extension of the old City centre of Bath.

Ki ng

st on

R

ad

o

14

CONTEXT OF DEVELOPMENT


Building depth analysis

The majority of the terraced form given by Georgian Bath sits within the 12-16m, 16-20m and 20-25m building depth zones.

7

5

YMCA place from the YMCA

Aside few public buildings, or buildings of Civic importance like the Abbey or the Empire Hotel which predominantly feature within the 2540m , buildings above a 25m depth on the whole tend to be modern large scale buildings the Hilton Hotel Building, the Library, TK Max building and even the offices and housing buildings on the East side of the river The footprint of these buildings is out of scale with the urban grain of Bath. The subtlety of threshold, entrance and how they address the street is at odds with the buildings of Georgian Bath.

0-7m

Back faรงade of the Hilton Hotel Building facing the riverfront

7 - 10 m 10 - 12 m 12 - 16 m 16 - 20 m 20 - 25 m

8

Saracen Street view from Hilton Hotel, Pig&Fiddle Pub on the left

25 - 40 m Plan diagram showing the building depth survey

CONTEXT OF DEVELOPMENT

15


PLANNING / POLICY CONTEXT National Planning Policy Framework (march 2012) The NPPF sets suggest certain points of consideration for promoting healthy communities such as my proposal. The following points are particular objectives extracted from the NPPF which are supported by my development proposal and my masterplan. • Point 1 NPPF : ‘Building a strong competitive economy’ My proposed masterplan and project proposal will participate strengthening the British economy by creating new rooms for retails, offices alongside the river and by promoting the art in an ambitious cultural centre. • Point 2 NPPF : ‘Ensuring the vitality of town centres (...) by retaining and enhancing existing markets’ The masterplan proposes to redevelop the cattlemarket area and to refurbish the former cornmarket listed building. Moreover, the masterplan proposes to replace the Hilton Hotel building by a new building typology allowing the quays development and a lovely promenade along the river. The Cultural centre will play a vital role into the enhancement of this area, organising events all the year. • Point 7 NPPF : ‘Requiring good design’ The Art Performance Promoting Centre (APPC) will have a scale which will respect its surrounding Georgian building.

16

CONTEXT OF DEVELOPMENT

Its shape and façades will celebrate the Georgian architecture and will allow unprecedent opportunity of view from its rooftop to the green hills.

prise Zone to create new areas of attractive and productive townscape and an improved relationship between the city and its river.

• Point 8 NPPF : ‘Promoting healthy communities’ The APPC will constitute a healthy community by gathering the people around a shared vital interest which is the free expression of the body, the voice and the spirit. Indeed as Aristote used to say, theatre enables people to experience a catharsis ‘purging the human soul of its excessive passions’

8. Tourism, Culture and Sport d. Enable the provision for a new cultural/ performance/arts venue within the Central Area.

9. Public Realm a. Facilitate enhancement of the public realm of the Central Area and delivery of a Way finding and City Information System in line with the Public Ream and Movement Strategy.

Bath & North East Somerset Core Strategy (July 2017) The Bath spatial strategy also defines few points that the development proposal will inform.

East riverside buildings flushed to the river, in the shadow of the out of scale Hilton hotel building and Library building

North façade of Pulteney Bridge turning its back to the north

Abandonned former Cornmarket building

Bath library façade on Walcot Street, poor design, feeble pastiche of Georgian architecture

1. Natural and Built Environment Sustain and enhance the significance of the city’s heritage assets and green infrastructure, including: a. The Outstanding Universal Value of the City of Bath World Heritage Site and its setting. b. Listed buildings, the Bath conservation area and their settings. 5. Previously developed land a. Regenerate and repair a number of areas within the Central Area and Enter-


Central Area and Walcot Street/Cattlemarket Policy SB1 Core Strategy (July 2017) The Bath & North East Somerset Core Strategy has special requirements for the development. The points listed below are emphatised by the council and informed the planning development proposal. 1. Provide a grained, mix of uses that reflect the diverse and varied nature of Walcot Street, containing units of varied size and tenure. This is to comprise: a. Retail space that reinforces the important character of Walcot Street. c. A3 food and drink uses, including creating opportunities for outdoor tables and chairs, which may be particularly suited to the Cornmarket building and associated vaults. e. The retention of adequate and suitable space for use by a market, if viable. f. Other city centre uses that contribute to the rich mix of uses in the area. 2. Repair the broken street frontage of Walcot Street by re-establishing the historic building line. Behind the Walcot Street frontage, developers are invited to provide an engaging and varied architectural response that enhances the diverse built character and riverside setting of the area.

5. Respond to the important views related to the site and to the general character of the area. An analysis is therefore required to inform the height, massing and design of buildings. The Bath Building Heights Strategy should be used as part of the evidence base and the starting point for this analysis. This identifies this site as being within zone 1 – the Georgian City, and recommends that for new development ‘the overall height should not be less than or exceed the overall prevailing height of nearby Georgian buildings.’ (Note that this is a recommendation for the general height only and is subject to modifications). This Bath Building Heights Strategy will apply in particular to the frontage of this site, and the appropriate building heights elsewhere will be informed by the analysis described above. 6. Conserve and retain the whole Cornmarket Building, and provide a public space adjacent to it. This public space should relate to, and interact with the ground floor of the Cornmarket building and uses within, and have a positive but sensitive relationship with the vaults beneath part of the Cattlemarket Site, and with the river corridor. 11. Explore the potential of a new pedestrian and cycling bridge over the River Avon to provide additional choice of routes through the city which will be supported in principle.

West access to the YMCA place from Broad Street

East access to the YMCA place from Walcot Street

Walcot Street view from Hilton Hotel building

YMCA place from the South side

Cattlemarket area, carpark on weekdays

Walcot Street, on the right the Hilton Hotel Building

CONTEXT OF DEVELOPMENT

17


KEY STRENGTHS

18

CONTEXT OF DEVELOPMENT

Topography allowing views

Short walking distances

Medieval Wall - World Heritage Site

SITE SCALE

CITY SCALE

Green and blue infrastructure

Markets

Punctuating landmarks


KEY PROBLEMS

Lack of clear pedestrian routes

The city turns its back to the North side of the river

Place and spaces unequivalently spread out in the City

Traffic dominant in the site

Uncontinuous active front in the site

SITE SCALE

CITY SCALE

Poor West-East connection

CONTEXT OF DEVELOPMENT

19


K E Y R E C O M M E N D AT I O N S

Buildings to demolish

20

CONTEXT OF DEVELOPMENT

Introducing new typologies that better define the riverfront

New active front along the riversides

Set a Streets hierarchy to reduce traffic

Planning the riverfront

Setting a new cycle path that better links the two northern sides of the Avon


Key objectives for the masterplan

• C E L E B R AT I N G T H E G E O R G I A N C I T Y O F B AT H • ENHANCING THE RIVERFRONT • C R E AT I N G P E R M E A B I L I T I E S A N D E N A B L I N G M O V E M E N T • E N S U R I N G T H E S I T E V I TA L I T Y

KEY OBJECTIVES FOR THE MASTERPLAN

21


Introduction Context of Development Illustrative masterplan Project

Concept

Design Development Environmental Design


M o nm ou th St re et

3

Henrietta Stree t North Parade

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5 2

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Street

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North Parade R

il di ate Bu Westg

Spring G ardens Road

de

Wood

15

s ng

et Stre

e Lane sonag P ar K

Road

t ee Str Henrietta

ng Plc Contains OS data © Crown copyright and database right 2018

ad

No rt h


Circus

Burlington Street

Rivers Stree t

Mews

Bal lanc

eet

eS tr

Aerial Picture Mo r fo rd St re e

t

Lan

wn Road sdo Gu

in

ea

La ne

Wa lco

St

H

en ri e

tt a

R oa d

Jo hn 's

tG a

te

Train Station

1

Bath Abbey

2

Parade Gardens

3

Guildhall

4

Roman Baths

5

Saint Nicholas Market

6

Pulteney Bridge

7

Central Library

8

Saint Michael’s Church

9

The Pig & Fiddle

10

Hilton Hotel

11

Cattle Market

12

YMCA

13

Henrietta Park

14

The Circus

15

Ro ad

St John 's Road

0

40

80

120

160

200 m

ILLUSTRATIVE MASTERPLAN

25


20

17

18

4 7 2

11

12

6 5

8

9

10

13

14

15

16

3

1

19


Masterplan

Train Station

1

Bath Abbey

2

Parade Gardens

3

Guildhall

4

Orange Grove

5

Saint Nicholas Market extension

6

High Street shared space

7

Pulteney Bridge

8

Harbor - Leisure

9

Steps to the river West orientated

10

New John Lewis Mall

11

New Hilton Hotel building

12

Restaurants / CafĂŠs

13

Saturdays Cattle market space

14

Refurbished classed building

15

Pedestrian / cycles bridge

16

Performing Art Centre

17

Saint Michael’s Church esplanade

18

Henrietta Park

19

The Circus

20

0

40

80

120

160

200 m

ILLUSTRATIVE MASTERPLAN

27


C E L E B R AT I N G T H E G E O R G I A N C I T Y O F B AT H // Reestablishing pattern

to

reduce

Georgian streets t h e t r a ff i c / /

the

Revitalising Saracen Street

area

The Performing Art Centre will sit on Saracen, infilling the gap which had been set in the 70’s with the creation of that street. It will reduce the useless traffic of this area and make it more pedestrian friendly. The building typology will better integrate the YMCA place which was named, at Georgian times ‘Gracious Street’ (see John Pine engraved map 1736). Indeed, its roof will be set as an extension of the YMCA place, enabling a pub access on the rooftop to enjoy amazing views of Bath and its surroundings. Moreover, in the same Georgian planning way, the building will involve one entrance esplanade shared with the legendary Pig and Fiddle Pub, and one service yard on Broad Street shared with a Barber Shop.

Enhancing around

the

the

traffic

Collage - J. Pine map 1736 and the Performing arts centre built on Saracen St

conditions

a bb e y

Getting rid of the round about on the back of the Abbey will allow to reduce the traffic speed an enable the area being more pedestrian friendly. The car circulation will be controlled by traffic lights. The room won from this new set of the roads will take back its Georgian former function which was to be an Orange Grove (see John Pine engraved map 1736).

Collage - Bath abbey, J. Pine map 1736 and orange grove

28

ILLUSTRATIVE MASTERPLAN


ENHANCING THE RIVERFRONT B

r i d g e

P

r o v i d i n g

a

building

typology

t h at

ter qualifies the riverfront

bet-

development

- Active

front

In order to better integrate the site with the city centre, the access to the new quays development will be enhanced from Pulteney Bridge. This access will be through an architectural well-designed public staircase. There will be a lift allowing disabled people to access the quays. The huge multistoyrey carpark will be redeveloped into a John Lewis mall. Actually, John Lewis firm is really interested in buying this mutistorey carpark in order to develop a project as the one of this masterplan.

u n p r e c e d e n t

o pp o r t u n i t i e s

o f

In addition to the view provided by the Performing Art Centre rooftop, permeabilities allowed by new fabric sit on the new quays development will give unprecedent opportunities of views. Indeed, by replacing the current eyesores on both sides of that section of the river Avon, new views will be accessible. It will repair the breakage between the city and the river.

e n

-

v i e w s

1

2 3

6

4

7

V

5

Views

High

f o r c a n o e s a n d m o to r b o at s

levis

a r k

V

river

H

t o

V

John

l e a d i n g

V

Harbour

c y c l e s

V

The Hilton Hotel Building will be demolished and replaced by a building typology in ‘U’ with a public main entrance addressed on the new quays and a humbler back entrance addressed on Walcot Street. This typology will be reused for two other buildings in a similar site context as the first one. This building typology will better define the quays, dynamising the architectural promenade with its yards colonised by a large choice of restaurants. This building typology will also allow dynamism in it heights variation. An important earthwork will be implemented, which will fix the slope issue of the site. The quays level will be 3 meters lower than the Walcot street level and two pedestrian and cycling access will be provided with sloping path.

a n d

V

Introducing

P

p e d e s t r i a n s

V

r i e t t a

f o r

along

the

quality riverfront with steps to the river

The masterplan will replace the out of scale buildings bording the river Avon. The new buildings on the East side of the river, close to Pulteney Bridge will host leisure functions, like café / bar / restaurant and canoe club using a little harbour. Ideally exposed to the Western Light, these places will be particurlarly delightful in the afternoon and early evenings. The north part of the East quays development will host housing as the Bath Core Strategy requires. Riverfront steps atmosphere Precedent - Granary square, Kings cross, London

Acme Architect, John Lewis Mall, Leeds Section on the high quality riverfront

ILLUSTRATIVE MASTERPLAN

29


E N S U R I N G T H E S I T E V I TA L I T Y

Cattlemarket rebirth Cornmarket building

Cornmarket building faรงade as it was in 1984 : now its a building endangered

The cattlemarket will still take place every Saturday on the same site as before. The air car park used on weekdays will be removed and replace by a paved flat ground. The cattlemarket will have four accesses. The former cornmarket building (classed building) will be refurbished and reused as retail building an bats preservation centre as suggested by Bath&NES Core Strategy 2017.

Providing

PAC building view from Hilton hotel building rooftop

a cutural centre

The Performing Art Centre will play a fundamental role in the dynamism of the area. Its high technological faรงade using large glazing curtain walls will celebrate its context by reflecting it and having a future optimistic relationship with it. Moreover, it will attract people from any social background interested in Art. Bath, the Georgian City, the former families of distinction residence, will now host a contemporary theatre version with exhibition room entirely dedicated to performance arts. Its site location will enable it to celebrate where the city meets the River, with steps and public art, water Feature in the Quays gardens, for formal and informal events.

Extending with Water

Food market, Temple Bar, Dublin

Courtyard in Soho, London

30

and refurbishmnent of the former

the

Guildhall

collectors

Market

to

its

courtyard

shelters

The Guildhall Market will be extended to its courtyard. A food market will sit in the courtyard every day instead of a part of the air car park, the use of water collectors will prevent from the rain. The underground car park will keep its use for the hotel and the administration workers but two underground car parks will be built outside of the site, at the entrance of the city centre area. This will be part of measures adopted to reduce considerably the traffic inside the central area.

ILLUSTRATIVE MASTERPLAN


CREATING PERMEABILITIES AND ENABLING MOVEMENT

New Bridge

linking to

H e n r i e t ta

pa r k

As suggested by the council in the Core Stategy of Bath, the masterplan will provide a new bridge for pedestrians and cyclings. The bridge will be in the direct axis of the cycle and pedestrian path which links Henrietta Park with Saint John Street.

Extend

transversal alleys

The main axis of Bath are mainly in the direction North - South with high Street, Manvers Street, Milsom Street, Broad Street and Walcot Street. Too few roads enable to go from the West to the East. Actually, the West - East axis on the site are mainly narrow streets and alleys aborted by coarse blank building faรงades such as the current Hilton Hotel one. As History witnesses, Bath narrow alleys and passages constitute a strength to the pedestrian promenade around the City. Broad Street place alley will be extended accross Walcot Street by other steps leading to the new paved place which will host the cattlemarket on Saturdays. Cycle paths will lead to Henrietta park through the new pedestrian/cycling bridge.

Passerelle Simone de Beauvoir, Paris

High Street

use changed into a shared

s pa c e

The main focus of the intervention on High Street is traffic calming. The intention is to create a balanced hierarchy that includes all modes of transport; this will be implemented through creating fully shared space in the newly enhanced High Street. This will resolve conflicts with vehicles and pedestrians. This will aim to make the city centre a more pedestrian friendly environment whilst still ensuring traffic is allowed to flow through it and new car parks can be accessed. Giving priority in the City Centre back to pedestrians and cyclists will help to reduce congestion and improve air quality in the centre. A historical promenade will be set through road signs provided to enhance public realm and to give good explanations of the history of each site. The diagrams shown here demonstrate the different types of traffic calming measures used in the design of the space.

ILLUSTRATIVE MASTERPLAN

31


3D visualisation of the masterplan

32

ILLUSTRATIVE MASTERPLAN


Intention sketch - 26/11/2017 - View from the East riverside

ILLUSTRATIVE MASTERPLAN

33


Introduction Context of Development Illustrative masterplan Project

Concept

Design Development Environmental Design


CONTEXT INCLUSION

Building on a street : raising the public use from the ground to the roof Building the development on Saracen Street constitutes an important issue regarding the change of land use from a street to a public used building. The purpose was about raising the street level from the ground floor to the rooftop floor, pedestrianising it as people can walk from Broad Street Place to the main lobby theatre and Walcot Street thanks to a lift accessible during the PAC opening hours. This has been thought in order to revitalise Broad Street Place and better including in its context.

36

PROJECT CONCEPT


In plan

In elevation

In section

lace Street P Broad 10.75 m 8.00 m 6.00 m 4.16 m

Walcot Street

et d Stre Broa

1.16 m 0.00 m

The Pig & Fiddle Pub Georgian building

Existing site - to demolish

Public Entrance Façade Walcot Street

Avenida Home Georgian building

In plan, the design proposal includes itself in the space defined by Sarcacen Street and few buildings of poor quality to be demolished. It creates public space making the promenade along Walcot Street and Broad Street more dynamic.

Development - to build

In elevation, façades are attached to its Georgian building neighbours. Roofs are designed to allow views from adjoining buildings roof ‘à la mansard’ windows. The use of roof caps enables continuity between Georgian building typologies and the façade development. Walcot Street

treet Broad S

ce treet Pla Broad S

G. Hatto Barber Shop Georgian building

Backstage Façade Broad Street

The Pig & Fiddle Pub Georgian building

In section, the stage level is 1.16m on purpose (ground floor level of the Pig and Fiddle building), level also used for all the backstage and the restaurant. The public accessible part of the roof has a slope to attach its lowest point on Broad street place (6m) to its highest point above Walcot Street. PROJECT CONCEPT

37


U N D E R S TA N D I N G P E R F O R M I N G A R T S

W h at

is a

Performing Arts Centre

for

?

The Performing Arts Centre will be a multi-use performance space intended for use by various types of the performing arts including dance and theatre. This sort of space has a long history extending to the Roman Colosseum and Greek amphitheatres. This building aims to be a cluster of performance spaces under the same roof.

Each space is designed for a specific purpose :

Performance Art

I m p r o v i s at i o n

Performance is a genre in which art is presented «live,» usually by the artist but sometimes with collaborators or performers. It has had a role in avant-garde art throughout the 20th century, playing an important part in anarchic movements such as Futurism and Dada. The most significant flourishing of performance art took place following the decline of modernism and Abstract Expressionism in the 1960s, and it found exponents across the world.

In the performing arts, improvisation is a very spontaneous performance without specific or scripted preparation.

- rooftop spaces will be used by the public and performers for every kind of performances duable in a public space.

Performance art particularly focused on the body and the voice, and is often referred to as Body art. In the 60’s it reflected the political ferment of the time: the rise of feminism (Yoko Ono Cute piece show), which encouraged thought about the division between the personal and political and anti-war activism, which supplied models for politicized art «actions.»

Performing Arts Centres

Nowadays, performers concerns have changed but are still very active. In Marseille (France), Anne Le Bâtard ‘s Company use Performance Art and dance to reenchant poor public realm areas.

- the auditorium will be used for the improvisational theatre - first floor exhibition rooms will be used for exhibition, dance, of art performances

in the world

Some examples of this type of Performing Arts Centres are the Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C., the Sydney Opera House, the Lincoln Center in New York City, the Atelier 104 in Paris and the Project Arts Centre in Dublin.

PROJECT CONCEPT

Improvisation constitutes the show essence as for la commedia dell’arte, improvisation games (see pictures) and often Street theatre. The PAC would be a home for Improv show events open to anyone. Classes would also be given in the workshop on weekdays.

The PAC would have a role of revitalising the city thanks to its company is in the same vein as Anne Le Bâtard company.

Cut Piece, Yoko Ono

38

Improvisation can be thought of as an «on the spot» or «off the cuff» spontaneous moment of sudden inventiveness that can just come to mind, body and spirit as an inspiration.

Dance and the Public Spaces, A. Le Bâtard

Improv games - French British Improv Company, London


Exhibition spaces

Restaurant

Workshop

Theatre Jam

OPEN TO PUBLIC

OPEN TO PUBLIC

Improvisation classes

Tuesday

Theatre Jam

OPEN TO PUBLIC

OPEN TO PUBLIC

Improvisation classes

Wednesday

Unscripted Players Weekly Workshop

OPEN TO PUBLIC

OPEN TO PUBLIC

Improvisation classes

Thursday

Improv’ Night

OPEN TO PUBLIC

OPEN TO PUBLIC

Improvisation classes

Friday

Improv Cup

OPEN TO PUBLIC

OPEN TO PUBLIC

Improvisation classes

Saturday

Improminots – Familial show

OPEN TO PUBLIC

OPEN TO PUBLIC

CLOSED

Theatre Jam

OPEN TO PUBLIC

OPEN TO PUBLIC

CLOSED

Monday

Auditorium

Sunday

T Y P I C A L T I M E TA B L E

Open to public

Membership required

Collage - Performing Art Centre in Bath : the City’s dance with river Avon

PROJECT CONCEPT

39


PROGRAMME

The Public part of the Performing Art Centre will gather large rooms dedicated to performances with public. The auditorium will be able to receive 227 people for Improvisational shows. The stage is voluntarily large in order to let performers free to use all the room they need. Indeed, Improvisation performances require large stages in order to let freedom to the performers. The exhibition rooms will be large and will enjoy a high ceiling height in order to provide full freedom to performers. The restaurant area will be shared by the Pig & Fiddle Pub as an extension of it and it will enjoy the typical character of the famous pub. The private part of the Performing Art Centre has smaller and more intimate rooms. The green room, located on the first floor, will be home of a kitchen, a dining room and a large living room. It will be an accommodation for performers, both actors and art performers. Its location is strategic, with a direct access to the exhibition room (through a door) and an access to the stage get-in room through the backstage staircase. The large workshop room will be located on the ground floor and will be used for performance classes provided by the artists of the PAC organisation. The other rooms of the backstage are smaller and intimate, they are dressing rooms, studios and offices. The technical room, maintaining a good building heart rate will have a strategic location because central and auditorium contiguous.

Auditorium Administration Exhibition spaces Workshop Restaurant - Pig & Fiddle

40

PROJECT CONCEPT


S C H E D U L E O F A C C O M O D AT I O N

Characteristics of the space (light, comfort, atmosphere, views, etc.)

M2

Ceiling Height

Spacious and high to enable amazing improvisations

80

9,88

790,4

60

Toilets

Ventilated

63

3

189

17 WC in building + 9 WC Pig and Fiddle

Restaurant

Pig & Fiddle Pub + in the building

216

3

648

540

Entrance hall

Natural architectural lighting thanks to glazing faรงade

130

6,85

890,5

90

Box office and lockers

IDEM

56

2,7

151,2

6

2124

118

Ceiling4Height

272 M3

Nb maxX people

Exhibition space (x3)

SCHEDULE OF ACCOMODATION - Eugenie Sentucq - 7/05/2018 SPACES

Stage

M3

Nb max people

Circulation SPACES

Three exhibition spaces : two securised access on the 354Sentucq - 7/05/2018 6 SCHEDULE OFon ACCOMODATION - Eugenie first floor and one free access the rooftop Natural architectural thankscomfort, to rooflight when no Characteristics of thelighting space (light, atmosphere, window views, etc.)

68 M2

BACKSTAGE PUBLIC CIRCULATION

PUBLIC CIRCULATION Auditorium

Access to the 227 seaths from Ground Floor and First floor

164

4,6

754,4

227

Dressing rooms Auditorium

Natural architectural lighting thanks windows Access to the 227 seaths from Ground Floortoand First floor

39 164

4,48 4,6

174,72 754,4

10 227

Stage

Spacious and high to enable amazing improvisations

80

9,88

790,4

60

Bath room Stage

Ventilated natural roof light Spacious and high to and enable amazing improvisations

24 80

4,48 9,88

107,52 790,4

6 showers 60

Toilets

Ventilated

63

3

189

17 WC in building + 9 WC Pig and Fiddle

Toilets Toilets

Ventilated and natural light from a window Ventilated

117 63

3 3

351 189

11WC WCin + building 5 DISABLE 17 +9 WC PigWC and Fiddle

Restaurant

Pig & Fiddle Pub + in the building

216

3

648

540

Green room Restaurant

NaturalPig architectural lighting thanks to windows & Fiddle Pub + in the building

93 216

2,7 3

251,1 648

15 540

Entrance hall

Natural architectural lighting thanks to glazing faรงade

130

6,85

890,5

90

Storages Entrance hall

storage rooms scattered in the buildingfaรงade Natural4 architectural lighting thanks to glazing

30 130

2,7 6,85

81 890,5

90

Box office and lockers

IDEM

56

2,7

151,2

6

Box officeroom and Technical lockers

Ventilated located IDEM in the middle of the plan

38 56

3 2,7

114 151,2

15 6

Exhibition space (x3)

Three exhibition spaces : two securised access on the first floor and one free access on the rooftop

354

6

2124

118

Exhibition space Stage get-in (x3)

Three exhibition spaces : two securised access on the Ventilated first floor and one free access on the rooftop

14 354

4 6

56 2124

14 118

Circulation

Natural architectural lighting thanks to rooflight when no window

68

4

272

X

Control room Circulation

Natural architectural lighting thanks topatio rooflight when no Ventilated and light from window

13 68

3 4

39 272

2 X

95

2,7

256,5

20

Administration

BACKSTAGE

7 offices naturally lighted thanks to windows BACKSTAGE

Dressing rooms

Natural architectural lighting thanks to windows

39

4,48

174,72

10

Workshop Dressing rooms

Theatre school workshop naturally lighted thanks to Natural architecturalwindows lighting thanks to windows

82 39

3 4,48

246 174,72

20 10

Bath room

Ventilated and natural roof light

24

4,48

107,52

6 showers

TOTAL Bath room

Ventilated and natural roof light

1676 24

4,48

107,52

6 showers

Toilets

Ventilated and natural light from a window

117

3

351

11 WC + 5 DISABLE WC

Accessible Toilets rooftop

Two accesses from Walcot Street and from Broad Street Ventilated and natural light from a window place

614,4 117

3

351

11 WC + 5 DISABLE WC

Green room

Natural architectural lighting thanks to windows

93

2,7

251,1

15

Green room

Natural architectural lighting thanks to windows

93

2,7

251,1

15

Storages

4 storage rooms scattered in the building

30

2,7

81

Storages

4 storage rooms scattered in the building

30

2,7

81

Technical room

Ventilated located in the middle of the plan

38

3

114

15

Technical room

Ventilated located in the middle of the plan

38

3

114

15

Stage get-in

Ventilated

14

4

56

14

Stage get-in

Ventilated

14

4

56

14

Control room

Ventilated and light from patio

13

3

39

2

Control room

Ventilated and light from patio

13

3

39

2

Administration

7 offices naturally lighted thanks to windows

95

2,7

256,5

20

Administration

7 offices naturally lighted thanks to windows

95

2,7

256,5

20

Workshop

Theatre school workshop naturally lighted thanks to windows

82

3

246

20

Workshop

Theatre school workshop naturally lighted thanks to windows

82

3

246

20

TOTAL Accessible rooftop

Two accesses from Walcot Street and from Broad Street place

1676

TOTAL

614,4

Accessible rooftop

1676 Two accesses from Walcot Street and from Broad Street place

614,4

PROJECT CONCEPT

41


D E S I G N I N S P I R AT I O N

Snøhetta - Oslo Opera, Oslo, Norway

ROOFTOP AS A PUBLIC PLACE

42

PROJECT CONCEPT

Sanaa - Cementery pavillion, Sonei-ji, Japan

BUFFER SPACE ON THE ROOFTOP

TNG Architects - Comercial Oficinas CONAFE, Valparaiso, Chile

FACADE


Japanese sliding boards woodwork - State Guest House, Kyoto, Japan

Taniguchi Yoshio - Suzuki Daisetz Museum, Kanazawa, Japan

NATURAL LIGHTING EFFECT WITH MULLIONS ON FACADE

Alvaro Siza - Teatro, Llinar dell Vallès, Spain

REFINING THE PLAN WITH HIERARCHY

Haworth Tompkins Architect - Everyman theatre, Liverpool, England

AUDITORIUM ATMOSPHERE

PROJECT CONCEPT

43


Introduction Context of Development Illustrative masterplan Project

Concept

Design Development Environmental Design


DESIGN PROCESS

The first idea (1) was to pedestrianise Saracen Street in order to build on it and to keep the YMCA place as big as it is. The entrances were already set as following : the public entrance of the building on Walcot Street, and the Backstage entrance on Broad Street. The auditorium was set using the slope of the site, the stage being set on the lowest point. The need of more room for the Exhibition space and for the backstage lead me to narrow the path linking Broad St to Walcot St (2). The question of the levels on the ground floor came at third stage (3). Level 0 is the lowest topographic point of the site located on Walcot street (green). Level 1 is 1.16m above the level 0 : it is the level of the Pig & Fiddle ground floor (Pub adjoining the building in the South). At fourth stage (4), I decided to chose an diagonal axis which would lead all the planning design. This enabled an easier management of the backstage rooms locations and above all, to create a really strong public entrance. The very interesting review of December (5) lead me to get rid of the path linking Broad Street and Walcot Street and to use the Pig and Fiddle pub as a shared restaurant for the Art Performance development. Stairs were supposed to lead from Walcot St to the rooftop. The last design improvements came with the adjustments of the directions lead by the diagonal and by adapting the design with elevations and sections. I got rid of the stairs which lead from Walcot St to the rooftop because the current public stairs were enough. A lift lead from the main lobby to the rooftop level.

46

DESIGN DEVELOPMENT

1

2

3

4

5

6


S U N PAT H

10:

00

AM

0 3:0

PM

6:00 PM DESIGN DEVELOPMENT

47


SET OF DRAWINGS Site

48

plan

1/500

DESIGN DEVELOPMENT


Main entrance enjoying a new public place with the Pig & Fiddle Pub terrace

DESIGN DEVELOPMENT

49


Ground Floor Plan 1/200

50

DESIGN DEVELOPMENT


Lobby with double height ceiling, lockers, box office and lift to the roof top

Lobby with buffer space with seatings at the threshold between the restaurant (Pig and Fiddle) and the lobby

The Pig & Fiddle Pub opening to the Performing Art Centre restaurant area

Backstage lobby with reception and a waiting room next to the workshop room

DESIGN DEVELOPMENT

51


First Floor Plan 1/200

52

DESIGN DEVELOPMENT


From the triangular exhibition space : accesses to the Auditorium, other exhibition room and rooftop (lift)

From the Green room kitchen : direct access to loos and to the main exhibition room

Main exhibition room : morning sunlight drawing a rectangle on the floor

Main exhibition room : warm afternoon sunlight controled by brises-soleil

DESIGN DEVELOPMENT

53


Second Floor Plan 1/200

bl

n tio bi 2 hi m ex 40 ic

Pu

54

DESIGN DEVELOPMENT

e

ac

sp


Rooftop : unprecedent opportunity of views to the hills (better without the Hilton Hotel building as the masterplan suggests)

Rooftop : unprecedent opportunity of views to the hills and Saint Michael’s Church

DESIGN DEVELOPMENT

55


Building

sections

1/200

p72

56

DESIGN DEVELOPMENT


DESIGN DEVELOPMENT

57


Walcot Street

elevation

abbey

1

Public Entrance Elevation 1/200

3

1 2

58

DESIGN DEVELOPMENT


saint michaels church

2

B a c k s ta g e E n t r a n c e E l e vat i o n 1 / 2 0 0

performing art centre

3

0.00 m

Roof Elevation 1/200

1.16 m

DESIGN DEVELOPMENT

59


Section

through

Broad Street

60

DESIGN DEVELOPMENT

river

Avon

Performing Art Centre

Walcot Street

‘U’ building typology

Avon

‘L’ building typology


V E R T I C A L C I R C U L AT I O N S

1

Main lobby stairs : links lobby // restaurant & backstage // first floor

2

Backstage lift and staircase : link all the floors

3

Glass lift - links lobby // first floor // rooftop

4

Fire exit stairecase - links the auditorium & backstage // Broad Street Place

DESIGN DEVELOPMENT

61


F I R E E S C A P E S T R AT E G Y

62

DESIGN DEVELOPMENT


S P A C E C O N T I N U I T Y, S O F T T R A N S I T I O N S

The spaces continuity at tresholds is ensured by ‘buffer’ areas.

L o bb y / / B u f f e r

space

// Seatings //

// Restaurant

Administration // Buffer // Public

a cc e s s

space

// Rooftop

exhibition

//

Detail available on page 71

DESIGN DEVELOPMENT

63


AUDITORIUM

Visual :

64

during

DESIGN DEVELOPMENT

a

show


Lighting Strategy

Ventilation Strategy

Hot air

Acoustic Strategy

Cold air

Winter scenario Radiators are also located under the seats maintaining an even distribution of heating. The auditorium employs a mechanical ventilation system thanks to roof vent.

Summer scenario During the summer months there air conditionning system is available in addition to mechanical ventilation Reverberation Absorption

DESIGN DEVELOPMENT

65


Section

through

auditorium

1/50

4

3 10

11

2

9

8

1 7

1. Walkway

6

2. Theatre decor 3. Ventilation 4. Acroterion 5. Ventilation / Heating 6. Lighting room 7. Light projector 8. Warren truss 9. Reverberating ceiling

5

13 12

10. Detail of the auditorium external walls 11. Glass railing 12. Parquet flooring 13. Oak structure

66

DESIGN DEVELOPMENT


Detail

of

the

Auditorium

external

walls

1/5

The auditorium interior walls will be made of bricks given that the framework is made of posts and beams. For the flooring, we will use parquet. Timber and bricks have warm colors, their use in the auditorium aims to provide an intimate and warm atmosphere, where the public and the performers are more willing to interact.

10

Brick Air gap Insulation I profile Vapor barrier Dry wall

DESIGN DEVELOPMENT

67


M AT E R I A L I T Y

timber All floors are parquet covered except ground floor +0.00m.

white concrete All walls excepts auditorium walls are covered with natural renders such as lime or raw white concrete in the case of walls cast in situ.

68

DESIGN DEVELOPMENT

glazing Facade on Walcot Street and Broad Street are glazing curtain wall in their entire height. Mullions and roofcap manage the sun light show.

bricks Auditorium walls and the roof emerging above the stage are covered with bricks.


white concrete All walls excepts auditorium walls are covered with natural renders such as lime or raw white concrete in the case of walls cast in situ.

bricks Auditorium walls and the roof emerging

above the stage are covered with bricks.

timber All floors are parquet covered except ground floor +0.00m.

glazing Facade on Walcot Street and Broad Street are glazing curtain wall in their entire height. Mullions and roofcap manage the sun light show.

DESIGN DEVELOPMENT

69


STRUCTURAL INTENTIONS

The PAC building framework is made of reinforced concrete columns (work well in compression) and steel beams. The columns are circular as they allow more visibility. The structural grid measures about 4m x 3m and the auditorium walls work as bracing support for the entire building. Two trusses above the auditorium support the reinforced concrete bidirectional slab that constitutes the accessible roof. Trusses span is 14m, their height is 80 cm.

Bidirectional reinforced concrete slab used for accessible roof

I profile

Double corner profile

I profile

Auditorium Warren trusses : 80 cm height x 14 m span

Round reinforced concrete columns locations is the structural grid

70

DESIGN DEVELOPMENT

Reinforced concrete posts and steel beams structure

Round reinforced concrete column


D E TA I L S Detail

of

the

concrete

staircase

,

main

l o bb y

LOBBY

1/10

BUFFER SPACE

RESTAURANT

Waxed white concrete // public

Parquet flooring // more intimate

+ 1.16 m

1 3

4 1

Parquet flooring

2

Reinforced concrete

3

Insulation

4

Thermal bridge breaker

2

+ 0.00 m

3

4

DESIGN DEVELOPMENT

71


Detail

faรงade

flat

a cc e s s i b l e

roof

and

cap

1/20

Glass railing Rainwater draining

Pavement Caillebottis (duck board) Insulation Waterproofing Concrete structure Chain leading rain to water mirror

Dirty air

High opening for stack effect

LOBBY

WALCOT STREET

Double glazing

4,4 m Water mirror

72

DESIGN DEVELOPMENT

Cool air


// Rainwater

path

//

// Inspiration //

Slope inversion Rainwater joining public network

Rainwater downspouts diagram

Rainwater drained to water mirror through chains

Rainwater draining to water mirror through a chain - Suzuki Daisetz Museum, Kanazawa, Japan

DESIGN DEVELOPMENT

73


Introduction Context of Development Illustrative masterplan Project

Concept

Design Development Environmental Design


V E N T I L AT I O N A N D L I G H T

76

ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN

Heating

Passive Strategy

Underfloor heating clipped to underside of access flooring system, provides central heating to the entire building, removing any visible sources. Thermal mass will be stored through the buildings abundance of exposed concrete. Stored during the day and released towards the evening when temperatures drop.

The main entrance lobby will be passively ventilated, using the stack effect, utilizing high faรงade windows drawing cool air through the building. Administration offices and dressing rooms areas will be passively ventilated using a single sided system.


Mecanical Ventilation

Sun light management

The exhibition spaces high footfall makes the space difficult to naturally ventilate. An air handling unit will be installed on the roof (unaccessible), with ducting travelling down a riser in the toilets. Ducting will travel underneath the access floor and both supply and extract.

Faรงades being fully glazed, the sunlight management will be done using a roofcap. The roofcap will both ensure aesthetical continuous junctions in elevation between the building and its adjoining Georgian neighbours and it will constitute a barrier for direct sun rays path through the glazing faรงade.

ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN

77


WAT E R S U P P LY

This diagrams shows the six vertical axis constituting the water network within the building.

Rooms with water supply 1. Women loos 2. Men loos 3. Workshop loos 4. Loos 5. Backstage bathroom 6. Exhibition area loos 7. Green room area loos 8. Green room kitchen 9. Administration area loos

78

ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN


DESIGN PROCESS REVIEW // Personal Critique - Strengths & Weaknesses //

Strengths of the project work The scheme as a whole is creative and ambitious. It is also unique and fully meets the requirements of my brief and its relationship to Bath. I really made the project my own piece of work as tutors in UWE leave us completely free in our design choices. I found the way architectural education is transmitted very interesting down here. It is the complete opposite of how we are used to study in France. Indeed, in France, teachers are really directive regarding their conception of what is architecture and how it should be done. In La Villette, my university in Paris, design at building scale and urban scale are the only watchword. Teachers are all very different, every studio is unique and embodies the studio leader architecture key concept. Here, everything is organised in order to leave students freedom to develop their own concepts. I think that my design in plan, elevations and sections reached a satisfactory level, thanks to the many precedents I studied in depth in France with very demanding teachers.

Weaknesses of the project work Graphic representation is a major point that all our tutors in UWE attach importance to. I’ve been struggling since september in trying to reach the graphic level required by our studio leaders. I’m still not satisfied with the drawings and visuals I’ve produced. But I’m very pleased to realise how much I progressed in representing since I arrived in UK. In France, teachers always want hand drawings and cading is forbidden until master.

Improvements with additional time I would put much more time into graphical representation, particularly for the sections, elevation and details. Regarding the design, I would put more time in refining the fire exit strategy. I would have liked to have more time to design a real brochure for my development. I regret that reinforced concrete and steel framework was imposed to us as building framework because I would have prefered to deal with sustainable materials for this building. Sustainability in good design is the direction I really want to take for my carrier.

DESIGN PROCESS REVIEW

81


« Etudier, observer, contrôler, revenir en de nombreux repentirs, afin d’atteindre une perfection certaine.» Fernand Pouillon


Thank

you

.

Design portfolio - Performing Art Centre, Bath, UK  

Masterplan Bath North Somerset analysis Art Performing Centre Improvisational theatre

Design portfolio - Performing Art Centre, Bath, UK  

Masterplan Bath North Somerset analysis Art Performing Centre Improvisational theatre

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