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Lopez Lomong One Of The Lost Boys of Sudan

K9 THOR Begins New Phase in Life

Vegetarian Fest

Etown • 227 W. Broadway • Enid, OK 73701

PAID

Permit No. 2000 Oklahoma City, OK

PRSRT STD U.S. Postage

with Ken Helms

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Dr. Lahoma Schultz Dr. Lahoma Schultz is seven-eighths Muscogee Creek, one-eighth Seminole and full-blood Native American. She joins three hundred thousand Native Americans residing in Oklahoma. However she is one of the few American Indians that’s also studied to become a psychologist. For the last several years she’s been using her talents, skills and credentials to give back to the Ponca tribe right here in the area.

Lahoma grew up in Oklahoma City in a semi-traditional home. “We pretty much did everything except speak the language,” remembers Lahoma. “I’m really close to my native people.” She lived in Oklahoma most of her life until she met her husband, Bobby Schultz. Bobby works as a Boy Scout Executive, a job that takes them all over the country. A little more than four years ago it brought the Schultz family here to Enid. Lahoma took a job with the Veteran’s Affairs Hospital in Muskogee, working with soldiers who had post-traumatic stress disorder or traumatic brain injuries. “Some of them were pretty severe… very difficult to work with. Then there were those that were just chronic PTSD. They could function but it

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interfered with their ability to actually work,” explains Lahoma. She still treasures her Military Order of the Purple Heart Certificate of Appreciation for the work she did there. After two years with the VA, Lahoma moved her clinic to begin helping the Ponca Tribe in Ponca City. Depression, substance abuse, as well as PTSD are a few of the cases Lahoma treats regularly. “Over the years the tribe has experienced a lot of discrimination. Their reservation is povertystricken and there aren’t a lot of jobs available to them. They’re violently depressed and that carries over to the children who turn to drugs or alcohol.” Lahoma is making a difference among the Ponca Tribe. As a


psychologist she not only partakes in counseling but also has the credentials to administer psychological tests and make diagnosis. Through her work with the Ponca Tribe, Lahoma has been instrumental in obtaining hundreds of thousands of extra funds from the federal government, money that goes to programs for the youth. She also is training the next generation of psychologists. Each year Lahoma takes several graduate students into her practice so that they may learn and earn credit towards their degree. When asked about these students she speaks warmly and proudly of their accomplishments. This year the Oklahoma Federation of Indian Women honored Lahoma with the Mary Townsend Crow Service Award for going above and beyond the call of duty. In 2009, Northeastern State University American Indian Alumni Association presented her with the Distinguished Native American Alumni Award and even the Boy Scouts bestowed the North Star Award for her volunteer work that she continues to do with them. Lahoma is incredibly proud of her Native American culture and the heritage that made her who she is today. When Lahoma was a little girl her family bestowed the Native American nickname “kote kvrpe” (translation is “skinny frog”). She says she was a skinny kid who leapt around and was involved in everything. Today, that name holds true, as Lahoma makes leaps and bounds in the clinical and psychological world of Native Americans in Oklahoma.

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Hospice Circle of Love Kentucky Derby Mint Julep Photos Provided 1. Renee Trace & Lori Leap 2. Susie Edwards & Carolyn Blankenship 3. Lora Whitehead, Lisa Dillingham & Katrina Winter 4. Rachel McVay 5. Kristi Fossett & Lori Leap 6. Abbey & Jimmy Stallings 7. Sara Habibi, Elizabeth Reynolds, Whitney Olivo, Matt Habibi, Lyndsay Hughes & Sara Covey

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E contents

August/September 2013

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Mission to Serve: The Enid Community Clinic and Charity Ball

Since 1995 the Enid Community Clinic has been providing health care services to medically underserved individuals within Garfield County.

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Integris.....Our New Leader

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Tour De Trykes

Settling into his new role as president of INTEGRIS Bass Baptist Health Center is, for Eddie Herrman, as much about multi-tasking as a day in the life of a dad with three kids, which Herrman also happens to be.

Whether watching a child take his first steps or walking a daughter down the aisle, important moments in our lives are often intertwined with movement; movement that is often taken for granted since it comes so easily for most.

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Vegetarian Dinner

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From working to retirement: K9 thor begins new phase in life

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lopez lomong

Ken Helms, Enid’s own Fire Marshal, did it after he saw a picture of himself in the paper. Ken’s wife, Tina, did it because she loves animals. Kevin Winter did it to improve his overall health.

Only a few police officers can say their partners are so eager to go to work every day that they spin in circles, jump, and whine…and that is without having their morning coffee.

Kyle Brownlee read Lopez Lomong’s book, Running for My Life, in two or three sittings. Lomong’s story captivated Brownlee and he wanted to bring Lomong to Enid so he could share the story in Enid.

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August/September 2013 Volume 7, Number 4 Managing Director Art Director Project Coordinator Etown Promotions Director Writers

Photographers

Account Executives Cover

Frank Baker Theotis Pace Lynne Benkendorf Cathy Nulph Trina Walker Candace Krebs Molly Helm Carrie Vega Jacque Hine Liz Cady Cathy Nulph

Trina Walker Muncy Photography Nancy Killam Cammeron Kaiser

Cathy Nulph Model: Yvette Lopez Photographer: Dawn Muncy

SUGGESTIONS

Do you have an idea for future stories for Etown? We’re always looking for good ideas of people and places to feature. If you have a suggestion give us a call at 580-548-8186 or e-mail fbaker@eaglemkt.com.

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Sorupski 40th Annivarsary Party Photos by Nancy Killam

1. Micah 2. Joseph, Pamela Skorupski with Danell, Michael & Bella Harrison 3. Bella Harrison 4. Cynthia & Mica Nicholson

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Summer Is For Families

The Enid community is built on a foundation of families and homes. The Realtors at Paramount Homes RE and their families are proud to call Enid home.

Our kids enjoy all the activities from the splash pads & walking trails to the organized activities of various organizations. Our families here at Paramount Homes RE love to support the activities of our community. We invite you & your families to join us and celebrate all Enid has to offer. If you’re interested in buying or selling in our Enid community, please call one of our outstanding agents at Paramount Homes RE. 580-237-6200 • paramounthomesre@suddenlinkmail.com

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Paramount Homes Wordsearch ADVENTURE BALL DIVING FAMILY FIREWORKS FRIENDS GAME GAMES GOLF HOMES JET OUTDOORS PARAMOUNT POOL RELAXATION SANDALS SKI SUMMER SWIMMING TENNIS VACATION

www.ParamountHomesRE.com

Since 1971, the Hackett family has invested in the lives of seniors in Enid and northwest Oklahoma. As a gerontologist and General Manager of Greenbrier Village, Lori Hackett-Long has applied her training, expertise and talents to every aspect of the family business. Under her leadership the Hackett family has created four distinct levels of “home” that provide up-to-date services and amenities in beautifully comfortable settings. Designer shows are all the rage because homes need to be updated from time to time. For the last year each of the facilities in the Village has been given a fresh new look. Lori Long assembled teams from the staff at each facility and the girls from 3 Girls and a Paintbrush as well as experts in the field of interior design to complete the amazing transformation. Molly Player, with Molly Player Interior

Design, assisted Lori in the selection of color schemes and furnishings that have given each home setting a fresh new look. Molly and Lori then furnished the public living areas with furniture pieces that are functional, comfortable and pleasing to the eye. Flooring has been replaced using the latest technology in flooring. Services and amenities at each Village facility have been enriched for both current and future generations to come. An “event coordinator” has been added to the staff at Burgundy Place and Greenbrier Assisted Living. Jeanice Grajales and Abbey Grey plan themed parties and dinners, arrange for special speakers and entertainment and plan outings for the residents to enjoy. These services are in addition to the normal day-to-day activities provided by the activity departments at each of these facilities.

Etown Sponsor Content

Menu style dining has been available at “The Four Seasons” at Greenbrier Assisted Living and “The Rose Garden Cafe” at the Homes of Greenbrier and this dining option is now being offered at Burgundy Place’s “Cafe Burgundy”. Under the supervision of Gina Howe, a wide variety of menu items are now available to meet the wants and needs of Burgundy residents and their guests. The dining experience at each of these locations is truly an enjoyable experience. Beauty, comfort, dedicated and experienced staff, services, amenities and enhanced social opportunities are all reasons why residents are living life to the fullest at Greenbrier Village.

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Mission to Mission to Serve:

The Enid Community Clinic and Charity Ball By Liz Cady Photos by Nancy Killam

Since 1995 the Enid Community Clinic has been providing health care services to medically underserved individuals within Garfield County. Individuals without health care insurance and those with household incomes at or below 185% of the federal poverty level can receive primary care, medications and patient education at the Enid Community Clinic. In 2012 alone, the Enid Community Clinic served around 2,000 patients. While the parameters in which individuals qualify to receive care at the Enid Community Clinic are relatively static, the demographic that meets these requirements is rapidly changing due to budget cuts, job losses, business closures and retirements. These individuals, who

all of their lives and always had insurance and doctors. Now, they are 45 to 50 years old, and they just don’t know. If you don’t need us, you don’t know, which is why we need to create more awareness,” explains Janet who, despite “semi-retiring” seven and a half years ago, personally shares the mission of the Enid Community Clinic. One event that has helped raise much awareness about the Community Clinic is the Enid Charity Ball, an event since 1997 that raised over $60,000 in 2012. Thanks to fundraising from previous charity balls, the clinic is able to continue its operations, and the long-term goal is to build an endowment

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have always been covered by health insurance, are now finding themselves without the coverage they were so used to having. This is why getting the information out about the Enid Community Clinic is so important; people, who never knew that they needed a community clinic’s services, need to know that care is readily available. Janet Cordell, board chair and nurse coordinator for the Enid Community Clinic, says that most people don’t even know where the Community Clinic is, because they believe they don’t need to use it. However, as Janet attests, it is important to educate those people, who have never thought twice about needing a community clinic, about the health care system. “These are people who have worked

large enough for the clinic to operate off of the interest earnings. Many donors and sponsors of the event have been involved since the beginning, making it an annual event that has a loyal base and only grows in size each year, last year hosting more than 130 people. Todd and Cindy Earl, co-chairs of the Enid Charity Ball and by extension, the Enid Community Clinic, used to live down the street from the Enid Community Clinic and saw the lines of people wrapping the block on Tuesday nights. “We knew little about the Clinic but became more aware, because we saw the need being met. Knowing that so many people were giving their time and re-

sources to serve others made us want to give our support too. It is a wonderful example of how a community can serve those among us with the greatest needs,” details Todd. Both hospitals in Enid, INTEGRIS Bass Baptist and St. Mary’s Regional Medical Center, not only are involved with the Enid Charity Ball but also are integral in the day-to-day running of the Enid Community Clinic though their generosity. INTEGRIS Bass Baptist Director of Public Relations Anita Luetkemeyer explains how support for the Enid Community Clinic actually prevents emergency situations by giving people access to primary health care: “Our mission, as a


to Serve: hospital, is to improve the health of the people and communities that we serve. By supporting the clinic, INTEGRIS is supporting access to primary medical care, medications, patient education and assistance with conditions such as heart disease, diabetes and more.” Janet adds, “The Enid Community Clinic is fortunate to have the support of both hospitals; we really couldn’t do it without them. Our goal at the clinic is to keep people out of the emergency room and hospital as much as possible.” Patient education is a big part of helping people control illnesses and diseases, which is why Janet enjoys the ability to connect with pa-

tients during the Thursday clinic. “We started a Thursday clinic run only by nurses, where we check blood pressure, order labs, do finger sticks and build relationships. People change when you develop a relationship, and we want to educate them for future health,” Janet explains. A registered dietician is also on-hand during the Thursday clinic, which is key for those patients with diabetes in learning how to eat right and learn how to control the disease rather than let the disease control them. It is thanks to volunteers, such as Janet, that the Enid Community Clinic can make those relationships with patients. Often, these

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volunteers are working other jobs while pursuing their passion of helping others. Bob Taylor is one such individual who works fulltime at Walgreen’s as a pharmacist and has always made time for the Community Clinic. “He will work all night, and then, stop by the clinic on his way home to fill medications. Those of us involved here have quite a commitment, and we are always trying to get more volunteers,” explains Janet. Other volunteers involved, who have made the clinic what it is today, are Jessica Cash, Dr. Brian Whitson, Maxine Turner, board chairs and numerous others. While the Enid Community Clinic’s goal

is to provide the best health care they can to as many people who need it, Janet has even bigger goals on the horizon. “My dream is to get a women’s clinic started as there is currently no place where a well woman can go to receive preventative care.” Pursuing her passion is an act that constantly pays it forward, and the Enid Community Clinic will only continue to grow and be able to better serve Garfield County. As more and more sponsors and donors learn of the excellent way in which the Enid Community Clinic serves Garfield County, Janet’s goal can become a reality. Anita adds,” I would encourage anyone who is

interested in the Enid Community Clinic to reach out by making a tax-deductible financial donation, by volunteering time to help or even just being an ambassador by spreading the word. Of course, the Enid Charity Ball is the highlight for supporting the Community Clinic and will do so with style and entertainment. It will be held August 24, 2013 at 6:30 p.m. at the Oakwood Country Club.

Enid Community Clinic 1106 E. Broadway • 233-5300

Hours of service: Tuesday evening 5:00 - ? pm (usually around 8:00) Volunteer physicians available Thursday mornings 9:00 - 11:00 am Nurses/Dietician available for consultations Other specialty clinics by appointment only 12


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Grace ( grās )

a: unmerited divine assistance given humans for their regeneration or sanctification b: a virtue coming from God -- Webster Dictionary If Chris and Tawnya Myers had to sum up Emmanuel Baptist Church in one word it would be grace. “It was very evident that there was a very deep rooted underlying spirit of grace that just flowed through the people,” remarks Chris. Chris goes on to say Emmanuel offered them grace at the exact time they needed it most. Chris was raised in Enid but left to attend a small Christian university in Bartlesville, Oklahoma. That’s where he met and married Tawnya. A few short years later the two had moved to North Dakota, Tawnya’s home state. Chris went into criminal justice, working his way up the juvenile court system until he was named director of juvenile court in Minot, North Dakota. Tawnya, who is a nurse, eventually put aside her stethoscope to focus on raising their three kids. The two of them had no plans to move. That’s when they say God revealed his plan.

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“I was at a place in my personal life where I was really struggling,” admits Chris. “God took me to a place where I was completely broken and I saw more than ever my need for Him.” Through Emmanuel’s online ministry Chris and Tawnya discovered Celebrate Recovery. Celebrate Recovery is a program geared to help people work through their hurts, habits and hang-ups by turning to Christ. They began attending the program in North Dakota. “It was exactly what I needed,” says Chris. “God met me right where I was at and used my hurt to bring me closer to Him and eventually further His kingdom.” As the Myers family grew closer to God, God began working through them. Three years ago Chris and Tawnya felt called to go into ministry and to serve back here in Enid. Chris now owns a landscaping business here and is attending seminary online. Tawnya and Chris began attending Celebrate

Recovery at Emmanuel Baptist, eventually working their way into leadership. They now oversee the Celebrate Recovery programs at Emmanuel including Celebrate Recovery for adults, The Landing for youth and Celebration Station for elementary age children. Chris and Tawnya look back at the last five years of their life and are amazed where God has led them. Though they don’t know where He will take them from here, they feel they’ve been called to continue helping people turn to the Ultimate Healer to be free from pain. “Now more than ever our world is hurting,” says Chris. “People need a place where they can be safe and face the pain in their lives. Where they can open up and talk about things. Emmanuel has provided that environment. That’s what we’re being taught every week: grace. Our need for grace and our need for God.”


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Club Moe Diaster Relief Benefit Concert for Oklahoma Tornado Victims Photos Nancy Killam

The devastating twisters that hit central Oklahoma earlier this summer touched the hearts of all Okies. Shawn Mahaffey of Club Moe (which stands for Musicians of Enid) felt like most of us: we’ve got to do something. He put the word out on his Club Moe Facebook page, and the response was 3

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overwhelming “All in”. Shawn and I teamed up with some friends to put together a class act event. We contacted Global Spectrum and received an immediate yes for use of Convention Hall. Not a single local business declined when we went seeking donations. The Red Cross accepted donations at

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the door, while Club Moe t-shirts were sold and all proceeds went into a disaster relief fund. We decided to donate the money from the auction to help a former Enidite and musician who lost his home in the El Reno tornado. A big warm “thanks” to the musicians, volunteers and to everyone who attended. What a great community! As Shawn puts it “This was a great way to showcase Enid talent and make a difference”

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Cathy Nulph


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1. Gary Bangs 2. Mo Davis, Matt Gard, Jami Hogan, Alicia Dillon 3. Mike Danahay 4. Act of Arson, Dr. Bartalozi 5. Suede Panther

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6. Left to Right: Keller Taylor,

Cory Silver, Chelsi Dotson

Adrianna Seiger, Arleeta Trimbath, Shannon Appleton, Kara Bowers, Kristen Vencl, Aaron Mayfield, Emalie Johnson, Jeff Woolsey, James Morrow, Randy McClendon,

7. Tim & Shelley Larsen 8. Red Cross Volunteers 9. Tania Warnock 10. Addictions Mistress 11. Found Missing

12. Scott Carson & Billy Beck 13. Cat Fink 14. Cobe 15. Martin Henry of Suede Panther 16. Back Stage Pass 17. Emily Faith

18. Flatland Flyers 19. Chicken Fried Whiskey 20. Act of Arson, Lalani Rogers 21. Downside

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Integris.....Our New Leader By Meghan Barnes Photo by Dawn Muncy

Settling into his new role as president of INTEGRIS Bass Baptist Health Center is, for Eddie Herrman, as much about multitasking as a day in the life of a dad with three kids, which Herrman also happens to be. “I spend a lot of time at T-ball games and doing gymnastics practices,” says Herrman,

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who brought his family back to Enid after two years at INTEGRIS Southwest Medical Center in Oklahoma City. He started his new job in Enid May 20 and says the decision to come back was a no-brainer. “It’s been an easy transition for the kids,” Herrman says of his children, Amelia,

Landon and Dalton. “If you have to move your family, it’s easy to go back to a place where you already have friends.” Herrman says his family kept in touch with Enid friends while they were in Oklahoma City. It’s that close knitting that impacts Herrman’s role as president of the


2013 Jayla Alexsis Tuck Cancer Foundation Adult Co-Ed Kickball Tournament Photos Provided 1.

hospital and forces him to think about the general health of the community as well as his day-to-day duties. “Are we educating children on obesity, choosing healthy meals?” Considering the changing landscape of healthcare, Herrman’s ability to multitask will help IBBHC, a facility that he says is already prepared for the change, to meet its current demands. “We’re really set up probably better than any other hospital in our system to be able to meet that [Accountable Care Organization] model,” Herrman said. “It leaves a very big opportunity for us to be a leader in our system and community, and the future.” Herrman credits his background in nursing for preparing him for such a dynamic role. “I was a chief nursing officer, so I understand a lot of the clinical aspects and clinical operations that go on in the hospital. Understanding the clinical side is a big advantage. I can talk to physicians about why the government has made decisions to do some of the things they’ve done.” Such one-on-one interaction might not come often for hospital presidents, but Herrman plans to continue making rounds between meetings. “I get to help make decisions that determine culture and how we deal with the community in a larger perspective,” he says. “If I miss that face-to-face interaction, all I have to do is walk upstairs and knock on the door and meet with some patients, get feedback. What are we doing well and what can we do better? I want to see those people we’re doing this for.”

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1. Clint Chelf, Holly Barron, Keaton Barron (our sponsored child), Luke Barron 2. Don’t Stop Ballievin’ (The Family of Keaton Barron)

3. Half ‘N Half 2013 JATCF Adult Co-Ed Kickball Runner Up 4. Kickin’ Around for Jayla 2013 JATCF Adult Co-Ed Kickball Champions

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Tee time for Enid? I recently helped out for a few hours during Greater Enid Chamber of Commerce Expo at the new Enid Event Center downtown. I can’t tell you how refreshing it was to talk to several of the Enid businesses about all of the exciting things that are coming to Enid. It gave

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me a rejuvenation of sorts! It’s great to know there are so many new businesses cropping up in Enid, not to mention we now have a beautiful new Event Center and Convention Hall. We have great shopping, lots of fun and trendy new stores, great restaurants and a wide variety of dining options. David Allen Memorial Ball Park rocks, even if you don¹t like baseball (it¹s a good place to people- watch and check out the latest fashions) while enjoying a hot dog. At our wonderful farmers market, I purchased the cutest bag made out of burlap. That is my kind of recycling! The list goes on... the theatre, the splash pads, etc. And I’m personally excited to know that Sesame Street Live is coming to Enid. I recently heard an active Enidite mention how frustrating it was to overhear people say, “There is nothing to do in Enid.” I have a solution: a t-shirt with a map and listing of all there is to do in Enid, required to be worn for casual Fridays. If you hear someone say there is nothing to do in our town, you can just flash the back side of the stylish-yet informative-tee. Fashion CAN save the world.

For more updates, stay tuned to my Cats Fluff N Stuff Facebook page, as well as Etown.

Cathy Nulph


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June First Friday Photos by Nancy Killam

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1. Anita Wellman with Daughter Melanie 2. The Beauchamp Family 3. Barb Benson, Jackie Campbell, Paula Nightengale 4. Kim O’Neill 5. Gracelynn Self, Jonas Murray, Eden Self 6. Chelsea Callant, Caitlyn Benge 3

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7. Destiny Porter, LeVashe Porter, Johnetta Washington 8. Turbo For a Cure Walking for Survivor Shelley Rauh 9. Ambucs Members 10. Letting go of balloons – Celebrating Life


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Whether watching a child take his first steps or walking a daughter down the aisle, important moments in our lives are often intertwined with movement; movement that is often taken for granted since it comes so easily for most. However, there are many people without that mobility; people who dream of riding bikes, racing the wind and walking those excited steps to the altar. AMBUCS is a non-profit service organization dedicated to creating mobility and independence for people with disabilities, and their company AmTryke provides unique tricycles to those with restricted mobility. Recognized as the AMBUCS capital of the world with over 300 members, it is no surprise that Enid Noon AMBUCS plays host to a popular event, the Tour de Trykes, in promoting AMBUCS’ projects. It was while riding in the Tour de Meers, that Enid Noon AMBUCS members Tim DeClerck and Mike Stuber pondered why there couldn’t be a similar event in Enid. Though it started out as Bikes for Trykes in 2006, the name was changed to the Tour de Trykes and is now in its eighth year offering routes from two miles By Liz Cady

all the way up to 100 kilometers. About 300 cyclists take off from downtown Enid each year to support AMBUCS’ projects. Mike describes the appeal of riding in the event, “Riding in an organized ride is much different than riding alone or in a small group, because of the rest stops, traffic control and support. We’ve worked extremely hard to provide the safest riding environment possible and to make it as enjoyable as can be.”

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Adding an exciting and younger appeal to the Tour de Trykes day is the addition of the Twilight Criterium, a bike race held on a short course, which is now on its third year. “Criteriums exemplify the speed and technical and tactical skill of the riders, and I thought our downtown square would be a great location for a course since it would bring people downtown, would complement the Tour and spotlight the importance of

mobility,” explains Tim. Mike agreed with Tim’s thought process for the course, and the two enlisted the help of Freddie Karcher, a seasoned bicycle promoter, who helped with big races in nearby Norman, to promote the event and employ officials for the race. Not only is the race challenging in speed, but also the course provides its own set of challenges. “It is a challenging course, because of the climb up Second Street from Maine, which


follows the decline from Grand and Maine. Even at the top of the hill, some riders are travelling over 25 miles per hour,” Tim details about the race, including that riders can reach up to 35 miles per hour in some parts of the course. Both events get people active, showcase the community, and above all, support an immeasurable cause. “Imagine how those

individuals getting on an AmTryke for the first time feel being able to finally create their own speed and transportation… Perhaps the Tour and Criterium will encourage participants and spectators to assist AMBUCS in our purpose to provide mobility to those who are challenged,” Tim explains. The Tour de Trykes and Twilight

Criterium will be held on August 17, 2013 with the Tour starting at 7:30 a.m. and the Criterium starting at 5:00 p.m. Registration can be completed online or in person; details can be found at www.tourdetrykes.com. While anyone can register for the Tour, to compete in the Twilight Criterium, racers must have a USA Cycling license. Sponsors can contribute to the entire

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Tour de Trykes day, which includes both the Tour and the Criterium and proceeds benefit AMBUCS’s projects, including AmTryke and the Miracle League, which is a collaborative effort of Enid Noon AMBUCS and 4RKids to give special needs kids and adults the opportunity to play in summer t-ball games. Over the years, sponsorship has steadily increased, as well as participants. Thanks to Donna Wall, who has led the charge in making the Tour and Criterium successes over the past couple of years.  Last year the events raised

almost $22,000 after expenses.   This year, with no competing bicycling event in the region, there is hope that the success will only grow. “The Tour de Trykes is a wonderful ride for novice and expert riders alike. We hope that anyone capable of riding any distance will come out to support the event and mission of the AMBUCS,” concludes Mike.

One Final Thought Since I have been associated with the Tour, I’ve been totally in awe of how the community comes together to help us with our event. Where to begin - from the City of Enid that facilitates all the permits we need, sets up barricades, sweeps the roads for safety and much more to Chief O’Rourke & the EPD, Sheriff Niles and Sheriff Camp and their deputies for security & intersection control – we could not make this event the success it has become without them. Finally, we would not have been able to meet our goals year after year without our

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sponsors. Each year the local business community steps up to help us touch the lives of countless individuals who benefit from our programs. The fact that Tour de Trykes has grown is due, in no small part, to these business owners that generously answer our funding requests without hesitation. As chairman of the sponsorship committee, I would like to thank each and every one that contributed to our success.

Becky Allen, Enid Noon Ambucs


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Let’s Celeb Let’s Celebrate Food! By Ebby Stratton

Photos by Alan Tarin

Vegetarian Dinner

Ken Helms, Enid’s own Fire Marshal, did it after he saw a picture of himself in the paper. Ken’s wife, Tina, did it because she loves animals. Kevin Winter did it to improve his overall health. Jenny Winter did it to enhance her workout regimen. What did these four do? They switched to a vegetarian diet and they are so glad they did! All four of these individuals feel better than they have in years.

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A few months ago Ken Helms saw a picture of himself he didn’t care for. He thought he looked a little heavier than he would have liked. Unlike most of us who cringe and think it was just a bad camera angle, Ken went to his fellow firefighter, Kevin Winter, and asked for guidance. You see, Kevin had changed his diet and lost weight. Kevin’s wife, Jenny, had helped Kevin adopt this new eating style launched by Beachbody

Ultimate Reset, a 3-week eating program to cleanse and detox the body. That was the beginning of his new eating lifestyle – phasing out meats and substituting good healthy grains and vegetables! Kevin shared his experience in making the switch from beef burgers to veggie burgers. With Kevin and Jenny’s support, Ken and Tina decided to complete the Ultimate Reset diet. “Instead of just telling myself to ‘eat


brate Food

healthier’ in general, I thought a drastic and structured day-to-day menu would help me break my cycle of fatty-fast-food-junk. I knew that the program transitioned to vegetarian. That wasn’t why I tried it. I just wanted to eat healthier overall and lose some weight,” says Ken. He lost 20 lbs. during the 21-day program, and has lost an additional 10 lbs. by continuing to eat mainly vegetarian meals. Ken is still not a strict vegetarian; there

are times at meetings or as a guest where he is served meat, he will eat it. Ken did admit that giving up Diet Coke during the Reset was a bit of a challenge since he was having several 32 oz. glasses a day! He is pleased to share he hasn’t had one in 9 months. Ken and Tina work full time and live very busy lives so at times it can be a challenge to come home and cook. But with some meal planning and a well-stocked fridge, din-

ner can be prepared rather quickly. Ken is the cook in his family and loves the convenience of eating simple vegetarian meals. Breakfast is usually fruit, salad at lunch, and roasted vegetables with quinoa or tempeh, or fish for dinner. When late work gets in the way and dinner must be picked up, mexican food fits the bill. Bean, vegetable and rice dishes are always on the menu and allow them to stay with their new eating style.

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I had the pleasure of enjoying a vegetarian dinner with the Helms at the home of Kevin and Jenny Winter. When I arrived, Jenny was putting the final touches on the entrees and the men were grilling the veggie kabobs. On the menu was Tempeh Tacos with Coleslaw, Zucchini-Cashew Soup, Vegetable Kabobs and Roasted Root Medley served over Quinoa. Ken was the dessert chef for the evening and let me tell you that these were some of the freshest desserts I have ever tasted. Ken prepared Raw Apple Pie, Raw Pumpkin Pie and Raw Vegan Car-

rot Cake Cupcakes. Every dish was scrumptious and fresh. It’s great how when you eat wholesome and nourishing foods, you don’t need a lot of heavy meats to feel satisfied. Both the Helms and the Winters have embraced this new style of eating and have never felt better. Ken says, “I’m 52 now and each day I realize how important it is to develop a healthy lifestyle. When I finally retire from the fire department, I plan to be in shape to enjoy it.” Let’s all hope Ken stays at the helm of the Fire Department for many years to come!

Recipes

Raw Apple Pie Crust ingredients:

1 cup cashews (raw) • 1 cup dried, unsweetened coconut • 1/2 cup dates • 1/4 tsp sea salt

Pie filling ingredients:

3 (2 + 1) medium apples. (I like Fuji) • 1 cup dates • 2 tbsp lemon juice • 1 tsp cinnamon • 1/8 tsp sea salt

Directions: 1.) Place all crust ingredients in the food processor. Process until the mixture sticks together and the dates are well processed. (I sometimes add a couple of tbsp of honey to make it stick together better) 2.) Dump crust mixture into your pie pan/ glass dish. Press the crust firmly in your dish with your hands. 3.) Roughly chop two apples. Get rid of core/ seeds. (Leave one apple alone for now…) 4.) Place all filling ingredients (except the

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third apple) into the food processor. Process until well mixed - a wettish mixture with a few small date chunks or apple peel that might not disappear. (You might have to pause and scrape the sides and process again two or three times.) 5.) Throw wet apple mixture into a big bowl. 6.) Slice the last apple into thin slices or small chunks. Throw these apple slices/chunks into the wet apple mixture. Fold in gently. 7.) Dump apple mixture (wet + sliced apples) on top of crust. Smooth out with

spoon. 8.) Cover and put in freezer. Ready in halfan-hour. 9.) This raw apple pie recipe should always be kept in the freezer. It will get soggy in the refrigerator. If you cut it into slices the first time you serve, you can re-freeze and still easily serve individual slices. 20 sec in the microwave will soften it enough to eat. I like it best frozen! Enjoy!


Raw whipped cream 1 cup cashews • 1 cup water • 3 tbsp honey 1 tbsp lemon juice (or lime juice) 1 vanilla bean or 1 tbsp pure vanilla extract • pinch of salt 1/3 cup coconut oil (reserve - do not add to blender yet) 1 tbsp lecithin (ground up in your coffee grinder if it hasn’t been ground up already) (reserve - do not add to blender yet)

Directions:

1.) Add all ingredients except coconut oil & lecithin to the blender. Blend until smooth. 2.) Add the coconut oil and the ground lecithin (do not use chunky lecithin, grind it first!) Blend again until well distributed. 3.) Pour liquid raw whipped cream mixture into a bowl (or directly on top of the thing you want to eventually top, i.e. brownies). The whipped cream will be quite runny and it needs to be refrigerated for about 8 hours in order to solidify into a more whipped-creamy texture.

Tempeh Tacos with Coleslaw (4-6 tacos) Tacos 2 TBLS extra virgin olive oil 1 8 oz package tempeh, crumbled 3 TBLS vegan Worcestershire sauce 2 TBLS tomato paste 2 TBLS sesame seeds 2 TBLS apple cider vinegar 1 TBL agave nectar

Directions:

Heat oil in large skillet. Cook crumbled tempeh until brown, stirring frequently. In the meantime, in a small bowl, whisk the remaining ingredients. Pour over the tempeh and let it cook about 3-4 minutes.

Coleslaw

1/2 small head red cabbage, finely shredded 1/4 cup red onion, chopped 1/4 cup sliced almonds 2 TBLS dijon mustard 1 shallot, finely chopped 1 tsp agave nectar 4 TBLS red wine vinegar 3 TBLS extra virgin olive oil salt & pepper to taste

Directions:

Mix the cabbage, onion, and almonds in a medium sized bowl. Whisk the remaining ingredients and pour over the slaw. Place the tempeh mixture on a corn tortilla or romaine lettuce leave and top with the slaw. This recipe is from the cookbook The Karma Chow Ultimate Cookbook

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Story & photos by Trina Walker Only a few police officers can say their partners are so eager to go to work every day that they spin in circles, jump, and whine…and that is without having their morning coffee. Officer Justin Lamle’s K9 partner Thor, is still eager and ready for work despite his recent retirement. Thor has had great longevity as a working dog. The 11-year-old German Shepherd worked for a solid nine years, eight of which were with his partner Lamle at the Enid Police Department. Thor is Lamle’s second working dog. He wasn’t sure for the first few weeks if they were going to get along very well or not. Both stubborn and hardheaded it took some time for the two to figure out just how their partnership would play out. “We are a good match, both of us are hardheaded and I like a dog a bit tougher and harder,” he said. Other officers have asked how he puts up with Thor and his stubborn personality. Lamle says that is one of the things he likes about Thor. Thor and Lamle have been through a lot in the past eight years. While bite work tends to be a favorite part of work for the dogs, it is drug detection and search work where Thor excelled. “He has a great nose,” said Lamle. That great nose has led to the confiscation of thousands of dollars’ worth of drugs including one of the largest crack seizures in Enid during a traffic stop. The total street value of drugs seized as a result of Thor is just over $200,000. That is on top of the $43,000 in cash seized as a result of Thor. Thor has received awards and had his picture taken for the impressive work he’s done but Lamle does not look for attention.

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“I never cared about having my picture taken for awards. This is our job and we are doing what we are trained to do,” he said. Most of Lamle and Thor’s work involved apprehending the bad guys and finding drugs, however on one occasion he feels they were there just to help someone in trouble. When a young woman attempting suicide wandered off into a creek area off HW 412 a search was begun to find her. It was the middle of July and very hot. The heat combined with the pills she had ingested made

finding her a priority. Other dog and handler teams were forced to come back in after grueling hours of searching. “Working under those conditions is hard on us both. You just get caught in the brush and cut up and the dogs struggle with the heat. I remember being turned around and not even sure what direction we were going because we had been crossing back and forth. We were crawling through stuff so thick I couldn’t see five-feet in front of me,” he said.

About 30 yards out Lamle knew Thor was on the scent but even then they were almost on top of her before he could see the woman on the ground. Not sure at first if she was still alive, Lamle was able to revive her and get her up. “We were so far out it took 30 minutes to walk back,” he said. “I felt she was happy to be found. Between the heat and what was in her system she would not have lasted much longer. It felt good to be there for someone in this situation. I liked being able help her when she was in trouble.”

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Today Thor is learning how to adjust to a new phase in his life...retirement. Thor is settling into his new life but it has not all been easy. “It can take awhile for a police dog to come out of work mode,” said Lamle. “Every morning Thor knows when I start to get up for the day. I can hear him in his kennel getting agitated and whining, ready to go with me.” It has been tough on Lamle too. “Sometimes during the day or when I am coming in from work I just feel like I am forgetting something then I realize, Oh...Thor isn’t with me,” he said. While not quite ready to be an indoor lap dog, Thor is bonding with Lamle’s oldest son. “The first time we brought him into the house to let him sleep in Hunter’s room

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Thor went into building search mode,” Lamle said. Introducing Thor to indoor living may have to wait a while longer. In the mean time Hunter has taken over Thor’s care by feeding and playing ball with him. Lamle laughs about Thor’s ‘tough dog’ persona. Thor is hardheaded and wants to be seen as a tough dog. “My wife bribes him with cheese treats. I think he likes her more than me,” he said. “She has long finger nails and will scratch him through his kennel. I look out and there is Thor just leaning against her getting scratched and he is groaning and loving it. When Thor sees me he instantly jumps away looking around to make sure I did not catch him being a big softie. He is all over my wife unless he knows I am there, then he just ig-

nores her.” Lamle loves his job and his partner. He knows that without the support of his family he could not do what he does. For now Lamle is working as a solo officer but he looks forward to getting another dog. Thor’s official retirement ceremony is being held at the 2013 Paws 4 the Cause Dachshund Dash. The money this year will help the city with the purchase of a new dog for Lamle. With many departments expanding from German Shepherds to Belgian Malinois or Dutch Shepherds, Lamle was asked if he had a breed preference. His answer... “A tough one.”


Little Racers Run Big at the Dachshund Dash The fourth annual Enid Paws 4 the Cause Dachshund Dash is raising money for a special cause this year. With the retirement of K9 Thor a new police dog is needed at the Enid Police Department. Thor’s handler, officer Justin Lamle, hopes to be back on K9 patrol by Fall. The Dachshund Dash is a fun day for the family becoming one of Enid’s more anticipated events. “Many racers have teams wearing team shirts, cheering them on,” said April Danahy, marketing director for Security National Bank. While the event is cute and entertaining there is a competitive edge to the race. “It’s all how you train your racer and they do train,” said April. Sanctioned by the National Dachshund Foundation, the champion and reserve champion are eligible to race in Findlay, Ohio at the national dachshund races.

This year there are four divisions for racers to compete. Puppies, Adults, Seniors and a new division for mixed-breed dachshunds. “It is a fine tradition of community support to champion animal-related causes,” said April.

“This is for people who love animals.” One of the greatest things about Paws 4 the Cause Dachshund Dash is how it supports causes for animals in Enid. The first race raised money to replace retired police dog Rex and plant trees at the Enid dog park. Year two helped add water

bowls along the master trails. Last year an outdoor adoption area was built at the Enid Animal Shelter. With this year’s cause slated to raise money to purchase another police dog, it was decided to have Thor’s official retirement ceremony open the dash. Through the years more than $20,000 has been raised for these projects. As long as they are on a leash, even your four-legged family members are welcome to come watch and cheer on racers. The Dachshund Dash is just plain fun. Those little Dachshunds are big dogs in small packages. “I just love their little beating, racing hearts,” says April.

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Champion Park Volunteer Build Photos by Nancy Killam

1. Craig Box, Whitney Box, Gail Box, Matthew Athey 2. Bill Short, Whitney Box, Joan Riley 3. Casey LaBrue, Craig Box, Matthew Athey 4. Cole Whatley, Taylor Dillingham-Schmidt 5. Doug Seely, Clint Chelf 6. (Left to Right) Cole Whatley, Dylan Smith, Colton Chelf, Matt Peck, Mason Banner, Blake Pendelton, Trevin Ray, Clancy Roberts, Libby DillinghamAnderson Clint Chelf, Taylor Dillingham-Schmidt, MatthewAthey, Tyson Seng, Casey LaBrue, John Dillingham 3

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Robbie Bullis Financial Advisor Even though Robbie Bullis hasn’t yet met the small pink bundle soon to enter his world, he already knows she’ll be a daddy’s girl. Bullis and his wife, Tyree, are expecting their first baby in September and both are ecstatic. “I am sure that she will have me wrapped around her finger in no time!” laughs Bullis. Bullis is a family man who’s described as enthusiastic and friendly by friends and colleagues. He’s known as someone whose available whenever needed and always willing to help or lend a hand. Bullis grew up 30 miles south of Enid in Dover, Oklahoma, a town he visits frequently to help his father out with the farm. After high school, Bullis “chased baseball to Garden City Community College for two years” before finishing up his Bachelors degree in Agri-Business at Oklahoma State University. It was while in college that Bullis got a taste for finance. “During the summers and holidays, I would help out as a teller and shadow officers at a bank in Kingfisher,” remembers Bullis. “That’s where I first developed a passion for finance and

the service that comes with the business.” His senior year of college he interned for Edward Jones with a financial advisor in Ponca City. “During that internship I got to see first hand a company that always puts the client first and that treats people right. At that point I knew if given the opportunity, that is where I would build my future,” says Bullis. Bullis has now been a financial advisor with Edward Jones for six years. He fills his days making calls, personal visits or holding financial strategy sessions with clients.

“Just getting to interact with great people who share the same values as us is very rewarding,” says Bullis, who enjoys celebrating his clients’ accomplishments. “It might be a new grandbaby or good wheat harvest, they are all special. It is very exciting to see people succeed and know you had a small part in helping.” Bullis loves being a financial knowledge but because of his advisor and helping people dedication to service. “The late right here in the community. Ted Jones (son of the firm’s Though he works with money founder) is quoted as saying, ‘I every day and follows the am the richest man in America. markets incredibly close, in I have a wife who loves me in the end Bullis says he’s blessed spite of my faults. I have four not because of his financial dogs. Two love only me. One

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loves everybody. One loves no one, but still is very loyal and follows me everywhere I go on the farm. I have a horse I love to ride around the farm, and best of all she comes to me when I call her. I have too much to eat and a dry place to sleep.


I enjoy my business. I love my farm and my home. I have a few close friends, and money has never been my God.” recites Bullis. “I try to read that often; knowing that it applies directly to me. That there are things in life that are just more important!”

www.edwardjones.com Member SIPC

Etown Sponsor Content

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YWCA Purses with Purpose Photos by Nancy Killam 1

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1. Carol Lambertz, Ila Nicholas 2. Jackie Boyd, Halfway House client 3. Grace Enmeier & Martie Oyler Enmeier 4. YWCA Volunteer of the Year Marilyn Jenkins & Carol Zaloudek 5. YWCA Director Kim Blankenship with Keynote

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speaker Louisa McCune-Elmore 6. Jennifer Fields, April Davis, Kim Boeckman 7. Kaitly Ferguson, Tamara Herman, Norma & Tim Ferguson, Taylor & Teresa Ferguson, Noah Ferguson and Zane Herman 8. Jackie Boyd with Kim Blankenship

9. Kyle Dillingham 10. Cathy Nulph,Erinn Mack, Melissa Kirtley, Charlene Young, Kelly Thompkins 11. Barbie Henson 12. Marilyn Jenkins, Norma Ferguson, Ginni Gwinup, Annie Gilbreath 13. Ashley Ewbank &

Amy Charmasson 14. Julie Lawrence, Rynn Day, Nancy Roeming 15. Norma Ferguson with husband Tim – Woman of the Year


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“Continuation of a Legacy” by Bridget Nash Photos by Alan Tarin

Dwight Davis Scheffe’s Prescription Shop is the place to go for friendly customer service and staff who care. That is why pharmacist Dwight Davis has made his career at Scheffe’s. “The reason I appplied at Scheffe’s was because they always had the reputation of being customer service oriented,” said Davis. Davis has now been at Scheffe’s for 37 years and the customer service values that were important when he started are still the center of the Scheffe’s philosophy. Davis received a degree in biology from Phillips University and then transferred to

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Southwestern Oklahoma State University. There he studied to become a pharmacist and graduated in 1975, moving back to Enid. “I wanted to know my customers and have them know me and (Scheffe’s) afforded that opportunity,” said Davis. “I had some hospital offers but I couldn’t see that setting as something I wanted to do.” Davis said he always enjoyed the small drugstore atmosphere and he wanted to be able to build relationships with his customers. Scheffe’s boasts the kind of atmosphere that Davis enjoys but he said Enid also helps with making his job enjoyable.

“The nature of the people, the salt of the earth kind of people,” said Davis. “People willing to help each other and know each other and being able to establish relationships with people easily.” Davis and his wife, Betty, raised two children in Enid and in his 37 years at Scheffe’s he has seen the precription shop keep up with the ever-changing times and never lose its friendly atmosphere. “People are more educated...more involved in their healthcare now,” said Davis. “Pharmacy has evolved with that trend to educate people about their medications and


Dwight Davis

healthcare in general. We offer services, advice, guidance as well as the pills.” People who are actively involved in their healthcare find Scheffe’s personable atmosphere suitable for that involvement. “There is more of an opportunity to know your pharmacist personally,” said Davis. In the past, Davis has taken his involvement in pharmacy beyond his work schedule by being involved in pharmacy organizations and the American Cancer Society. In his spare time, he likes to stay active with gardening, fishing, woodworking, running and biking. He also enjoys reading. Among the numerous facets that make the person of Dwight Davis, Scheffe’s is a big part of who he is. “I’m proud that I’m part of the long tradition of Scheffe’s,” said Davis. “We’ve been in this town since 1946. It’s been my honor to be associated with them.”

127 E. Randolph • Enid, OK 73701 • (580) 233-2152 330 South 5th • Enid • (580) 233-2128 Etown Sponsor Content

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1 Farmer’s Market GreEnid Event Photos by Nancy Killam 1. Isabella Groendyke 2. Eli, Cathie, Angelica Berry 3. Annabelle Adeline with Amelia & Braden Adeline 4. Kelly Killam, Tim DeClerck,

Brian Henson, Jerry Allen 5. Frank Baker and Carmen Ball 6. Larry Kiner 7. Sophie Funk

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Etown Sponsor Content

Growing Through The Years With

Grace:

Eat…Drink…& Age Gracefully by Jacqueline Hince Photos by Nancy Killam

“One cannot think well, love well, sleep well, if one has not dined well.” - Virginia Woolf A Room of One’s Own

If there were a way to calculate how many times the phrase “eat your vegetables,” is muttered each day it likely would top popularity charts. Mothers tell children to gobble up their greens, doctors and dieticians hammer patients with the request and nearly every article about how to fight aging, lose weight or get healthy requires a plate full of produce. Vegetables, fruit, whole grains and low-fat dairy are considered some of the best anti-aging foods but Syd Smith says that doesn’t mean you have to give up the occasional guilty indulgence.

“It’s all about balance and moderation.”

Smith is the Dietary Consultant at Greenbrier Village and manages the residents and patients throughout Greenbrier’s five levels of care including Burgundy Place, Assisted Living, Nursing Home, Rogers Home and Skilled Nursing and Rehabilitation. Smith has worked at Greenbrier for eighteen years. This year the Oklahoma Association of Health Care Providers named her the 2013 Dietician of the Year and honored her with the 2013 Super Hero for Dietary Award.

Syd Smith, Assisted Living – Ilamae Terrell Though Smith says moderation and portion control are a huge issue for all ages, when talking about older more fragile generations, what you eat and how much you eat plays a direct role in your health. “Oh, diet is critical,” emphasizes Smith. “Medicine is very important, all the treatments we do are very important but you have to maintain

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a healthy intake and diet to build those cells and tissues back up and to maintain a healthy function in your entire being.” When a new client comes to Greenbrier Smith assesses their condition. Each new resident has individual needs but Smith says the most common issue she sees is seniors eliminating certain foods from their diet. “If they’ve been at home and they haven’t been

cooking for themselves then they may have stopped eating a variety of things and instead they just made what was easy, or if they come in and they’re having trouble chewing then they may have left out meats and vegetables and other foods that are harder to chew. They may limit fluid intake because they are nervous they’ll have an accident.” Smith says even in these situations it is important


to have a well-rounded diet. She suggests those struggling consult a doctor or registered dietician to find a way to ensure they’re getting all the nutrients they need. In 2011, the Department of Agriculture created the “My Plate” campaign to push Americans to fill their plates with vegetables, fruit, protein, grains and dairy at meals. “My Plate” focuses on things like consuming whole fruits full of fiber rather than just drinking juice, picking green leafy vegetables filled with antioxidants over ones topped with gravy and butter, and eating whole grains instead of their processed white flour counterparts. It also suggests you get protein from beans or legumes as well as meat. Drinking plenty of water throughout the day to avoid dehydration is a must. Smith says following “My Plate” to eat better will have a positive effect on nearly every aspect of your health. “Although it depends on that person and what they’re condition is, often within a couple weeks of following a better diet people feel better,” reiterates Smith. “They’re more hydrated which can even effects how clearly you think, they have more energy and they’re more willing to participate in activities.” It can affect your emotional health as well. In order to encourage their clients to follow a well balanced diet, in 1996 Greenbrier Nursing Home began a cultural change they call “Welcome Home”. The goal is to transform their nursing home from more institutionalized care to feeling as though you’re in your own house. As part of their effort to create that home-like living space for aging residents Smith revamped the dining room to make it more of a café setting. Residents are now given menus each day and have a number of choices they can make when it comes to what they eat and when. Smith says it’s made a huge difference, “Everybody likes to still be able to make those choices and have that control in their life and so I think it’s made them feel better about that. They just like the freedom of it and like coming in at different times. I feel like they eat better.” Smith encourages the elderly living independently or with a caretaker to look for ways to make eating healthy readily accessible.

Homes of Greenbrier – Melba Best, Syd Smith Pick up fresh produce every week, join a service such as “Meals on Wheels” or go grocery shopping for your loved one to make sure fresh fruits and vegetables are on hand. For those with aging parents, finding time for you or someone else to go over and cook healthy meals your parent can simply re-heat may aid them in following a healthier meal plan. “Having those things on hand, having fruits and vegetables there where that person can have that readily available to them means they’re going to eat better,” encourages Smith. Eating better means you’ll feel better to continue growing through your years with grace. References For Article: helpguide.org www.choosemyplate.gov

Burgundy Place Patsy Shepard, Jennifer Moore, Annie Roberts, Misty Rowden, Sharon Wagner, Tracie Brennan, Syd Smith, Gina Howe

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June was a whirlwind month for the brand new Enid Event Center. Starting with their ribbon cutting, their grand opening events included the Greater Enid Chamber of Commerce Business Expo, Gary Allan in concert and the spectacle of Cirque Musica. Etown welcomes Enid’s newest attraction, the Enid Event Center.

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Lopez Lomong Kyle Brownlee read Lopez Lomong’s book, Running for My Life, in two or three sittings. Lomong’s story captivated Brownlee and he wanted to bring Lomong to Enid so he could share the story in Enid. Along with a   luncheon on Friday, September 13, Lomong will also speak to Enid High School students during his visit. Lopez Lomong was born in Kimotong, a small village in southern Sudan in 1985. When he was 6 years old, his whole life was turned upside down. His village was attacked and rebel soldiers from the Sudan People’s Liberation Army took Lopez and other boys as prisoners. After weeks of watching boys slowly die in the rebel camp, Lopez and three other boys escaped through a hole in the fence. Lopez and these boys ran for three days through the African plains until they

reached Kenya and were placed in a refugee camp. Lopez spent 10 years in this refugee camp, until he—as one of the Lost Boys of Sudan who were relocated through the work of Catholic Charities--moved to the United State to begin his new life as the adopted son of an American family. As a way to acclimate to his new home, Lopez would go on long runs, as he had done in Kenya, and he drew the attention of his high school cross country coach. It was here that his running career began. Lopez showed immense potential and went from New York to Northern Arizona University where he won two NCAA championships. In 2007, Lopez became a professional runner and in 2008, after becoming a US citizen, he made the Olympic team, proudly

representing his new country, the USA. At the Beijing Olympics Lopez was voted by his fellow countrymen to carry the US flag into the opening ceremonies, and he went on to perform well, making it to the semi-finals of the 1500m. In this time, Lopez has also had the opportunity to return to his homeland of Sudan and meet the parents that he thought had been killed during the raid on his village. He has a heart and passion to see peace in the country of his birth that continues to be ravaged by civil war. Lopez’s desire is to inspire people, to spread the word about what is happening in Sudan and to give hope and opportunities to others.

Wymer Brownlee will host one of the former “Lost Boys of Sudan,” US Olympian, author, philanthropist and professional runner Lopez Lomong on Thursday, September 13, for a luncheon at the Northern Oklahoma College Campus. His story inspires and motivates, while reminding everyone of the power of hope. Mark your calendars now. Details and tickets available soon. 580.237.0060 or wymerbrownlee.com

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By Carrie Vega Chad Yniguez is a person who is not afraid of taking that first step in an open door when one closes. Chad has led quite an interesting life of service not only to his country, but also to the public. He went to West Hills College in California on a bull riding scholarship. While nursing a bull riding injury, Chad saw a naval recruitment commercial, and decided it was time for him to grow up and find his own way in life. He signed up during the first Desert Storm and spent a total of eight years serving in the United States Navy. Learning to stick weld from his father, Chad became an HT, or Hull Technician. HT’s take care of all the metal work and plumbing on a ship. He served on the USS Supply (AOE6). In a fueling accident, Chad’s knee was blown out, and he

received an honorable discharge. A few months later, Chad and his wife moved from California to Fairview, Oklahoma. He began working for Mabar manufacturing transportation equipment. He took the Oklahoma Welders Certification course at Fairview’s Northwest Technology Center. He spent thirteen years following his passion of creating things though welding. But three years ago, during Oklahoma’s economic bust, he was laid off. While going through Job Corps to search for a new place of employment, he discovered Autry Technology Center’s Respiratory Therapy program. Chad learned that he needed to obtain an associate’s degree to help him complete the respiratory program at Autry. With the support of his wife and children Chad was able to go concurrently to Northern Oklahoma College and Autry. NOC gave him the background needed in science, math, and English. Autry gave him the job specific skills to become an Oklahoma Licensed Respiratory therapist. Being a people person, welding did not give him the social interactions that he craves, but respiratory therapy does. While doing clinicals in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, Chad witnessed his first ever C-section, and that baby came in at a stout and sturdy twelve pounds. Three hours later, he witnessed an emergency C-section of a delicate, one pound, premature baby. Chad told me, “I have been lucky enough to have found a second career that I am just as, if not more, passionate about.” As a respiratory therapist, Chad thrives in a field that is fast paced, and on the front edge of ever changing technology that requires thinking outside the box.

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Etown Advertiser Content


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1.

Southard House B&B Grand Opening Photos by Nancy Killam

1. Steve Dickson and Carol Chermack 2. James and Tammy Neal 3. Ribbon cutting 4. Ginger Engler, Mary Donaldson, Betty Dillingham 2.

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August / September Etown 2013