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the April 8, 2009 • Volume 105, No. 23

Etownian elizabethtown college

On the Web: www.etownian.com

One Alpha Drive • Elizabethtown, PA 17022-2298

on campus

Health Services may close, relocate; options in review Sara E. Crimmel Staff Writer

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f you live in the quads, the apartments or even Founders, you may think it’s a bit of a hike to get to the health center. In the near future, you might be walking or even driving somewhere else to get medical care. Elizabethtown College is currently looking at a different health services model. “The College is considering a variety of options,” Dean of students Marianne Calenda said. Last year, Health Services was analyzed by Keeling and Associates as a “comprehensive higher education consulting firm with a proven track record of client service and commitment to higher education.” Keeling and Associates concluded that Health Services was located in an “old, inadequate [building], and poorly located on campus,” according to the report. “It conveys a poor image of professional health care that undermines the department’s efforts to establish and enhance credibility among students.” Calenda discussed how the College’s first choice was to create a new space for Health Services upstairs in the BSC near the Center for Student Success. That way, students would be able to access Photo: Matthew P. Butera counseling services and healthcare all in the same Elizabethtown College’s Health Services building is located across from Campus Security on Mount Joy Avenue. place. Unfortunately, this solution was deemed un- Its future location and existence are in question, as different options for health services are in consideration. suitable due to the lack of space and the location’s Students who would have to walk to this facility would inaccessibility in an emergency. Sandy Spayd, director of Health Services, said that One option would be is to create a partnership with not have a much longer walk to get to Health Services Facilities has upgraded the building since the study an outside health care provider, such as Penn State and would be able to have more access to this location Hershey, which is located behind the alumni house. than the current Health Center. See HS, page 3

on campus

Resident Assistant applications surge in times of need Shana M. Mihovics Staff Writer

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here has been a definite increase in the number of applications to become Residential Assistants next year here at Elizabethtown College. Many reflect that this increase may have much to do with the current troubled condition of the economy at home as well as abroad. The recession may have more students and parents thinking of Residential Assistant positions because students in this position are paid on a bi-weekly basis. RA’s look out for those students in their building as a parent would. Residential Assistance can be a tough

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job alongside the other tasks college students must keep up with, but it also could help put a student through college with minimal debt. At Etown this year, three quarters of the Residential Assistant staff will return. Usually about half are retained, but this year has yielded many more. There is not only an increase in the number of returning Resident Assistants, but there is a high number of new applicants for the positions as well. Director of Residence Life Allison Bridgeman believes that the surge of applications has a lot to do with the current state of the economy. “Problems with the economy may have hit some families harder than others, and they may need new ways to pay

Organ Donor Awareness Month Etown students had a chance to contribute by donating blood.

Features, page 5

for school,” Bridgeman said. “Students are looking for ways to do that.” In a survey of Resident Assistants, about half said returning next year had to do with the economy. Others said the money definitely was a positive benefit to the program. The most surprising aspect of the rise in Resident Assistant applications was not that there was a shortage of applications in the past, but that the wave of applications this year was the most the College has seen in four or five years. Unfortunately, the influx of new applicants and the increase of returning Residential Assistants is that it doesn’t leave many available positions. There are about 55 applications for fewer

Origins of the Easter Bunny What bunny trail did Peter Cottontail come hopping down, exactly?

Centerfold, pages 8 & 9

than 10 spots. This can be a problem for those deciding who receives the job. “It’s a leadership position,” Bridgeman said. The selection of these leaders is a very precise process, and the student must be responsible. A recent article in The New York Times also focused on the increased interest in Residential Assistant positions in colleges around the U.S. Many other colleges are seeing increased numbers of applicants for those positions. Residential Assistance may be the solution for some students, but only for a few. Students will have to search for other ways to pay for their education. Residential Assisting is a hard job, but it can be rewarding and well worth the trouble in order to stay in college.

Etown Queens Meet Etown’s very own beauty pageant contestants.

Campus Life, page 10

Nicotine Fiends Pay the Price The rise in tax on tobacco has users fuming.

Opinion, page 13


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news

the Etownian

news in brief

in the world

Jupiter’s great red spot may be shrinking. The spot is actually a storm that has been raging for hundreds of years. Scientists at the University of California, Berkeley, have concluded that the storm lost 15 percent of its diameter between 1996 and 2006. The storm measures approximately three Earth lengths across and has been observed since the late 1870s. Little is known of how it has lasted so long, though some scientists believe it is a more stable, high-pressure storm, rather than the low-pressure hurricanes Earth experiences.

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The Iowa and Vermont supreme courts both voted to cut down bills for state laws that would have banned gay marriages last Wednesday and Tuesday, respectively. This makes Iowa and Vermont the third and fourth states to allow same-sex marriage, following Massachusetts and Connecticut. Opponents in Iowa have already begun lobbying the legislature for an Iowa Marriage Amendment that would define marriage as between a man and a woman. A young girl from a household with two mothers proclaimed, “I’m really, really happy. I feel that my family has always had this right, and today it is true. No longer shall we be just people who aren’t allowed to be married. We are able to get married.” Five children were found murdered in their home near Tacoma, Wash. Saturday afternoon. The four girls and one boy ranged from ages 7 to 16. The girls were found shot in their beds; the boy was found in the bathroom. The children were killed by their father after he was informed that his wife was leaving him for another man. He was found dead several miles away in his still-running car, the result of a gunshot to the head.

Compiled by Aidan Bauernschmidt from cnn.com

April 8, 2009

North Korea defies UN, launches missile Julia N. Hadinger Staff Writer

it as a symbol of the country’s growing technological capabilities, and the possibility of nuclear missile technology. The United States Northern Command issued a statement

response to the launch. The U.S. believes that North Korea did this to prove to other countries that they are powerful are capable of inflicting damage. President Barack Obama stated

spect will never come through threats and illegal weapons,” Obama said. hile we have been in a Although there has been war for many years now, much international discusmany of our citizens do not feel sion regarding response to threatened. That feeling of North Korea’s actions, the security changed as North path which will be taken Korea decided to set up remains unclear. Many and then launch a miscountries are worried sile this past week. North about what may happen Korea referred to the projbetween the United States ect as a rocket carrying and North Korea. Naa communications sateltions are also concerned lite. However, Washington about what other weapons calls it an intercontinental North Korea may have in ballistic missile. their arsenal. CNN reported Thurs“If you had told me that day that North Korea this was going to happen a had begun to fuel the few years ago, I would not rocket, a sign that they have believed it to be true,” planned to launch very sophomore Lauren Selleck soon. The United States said. “Now that I actually Image: dailymail.co.uk thought that North Kosaw proof of a country, no rea would refrain from North Korean citizens watch a telecast of the rocket launch Sunday. Its launch matter if it’s North Korea, launching it because the defied warnings from the United States and the United Nations. shooting a missile, I’m now nation was preoccupied kind of worried.” with the two American journal- saying that, according to their that this move made by North While there have always been ists detained on charges of “per- assessment, the rocket flew over Korea “threatened the security countries threatening other napetrating hostile acts against the Japan, with its only payload land- of nations near and far.” tions for one reason or another, country”. The U.S. was wrong in ing into the Pacific Ocean. NothIn a recent speech, Obama many people did not take conits assumption. ing was put into orbit, and nothing said that he is going to push cerns then as seriously as they Sunday, North Korea defied fell on Japan. However, North the Security Council to take do today. international expectations and Korea claims to have successfully strong action. Because North Korea has launched their rocket. While launched the rocket launched and “Now is the time for a strong demonstrated their weapons North Korea claimed they were planted a satellite in orbit. The international response, and capabilities, the international only putting a satellite into United Nations Security Council North Korea must know that community is now in a state of space, the rest of the world saw called an emergency meeting in the path to security and re- increased fear and suspense.

in the world

Earthquakes strike Italy; damages severe Aidan E. Bauernschmidt News Editor

the historic buildings of the city. “If you look along the way, there are many palazzi that are cracked, and walls have fallen onto some of them,” Brothers said. “Most of the magnitude 6.3 earthquake ripped buildings in the city center are more than through central Italy Monday morning, 100 years old, and so they have walls that killing more than 100 people. More than are a lot weaker than other palazzi that are 1500 were reported injured. made of reinforced concrete. So there were The Italian Civil Protection Agency a lot more damages actually estimated a death toll in inside the city.” excess of 100, but other President Obama, speakmedia reported even highing Monday in Turkey, sent er numbers. condolences to those afItaly’s prime minister, fected. “We hope we are able Silvio Berlusconi, declared to get rescue teams in and the country in a state of minimize the damage as emergency and postponed much as possible,” he said. a trip to Russia. Pope Benedict XVI also L’Aquila, a historic coloffered his sympathy. He lege city about 60 miles was praying for the victims, north of Rome, experithe Vatican said in a stateenced jolts around 3:30 ment Monday; “especially a.m. Frightened residents the children.” rushed out into the streets The area also experias historic building topenced three significant afpled. Many of the structershocks within six hours tures dated back to the 13th century. Image: newyorktimes.com of the quake, ranging from The quake only lasted A 6.3 magnitude earthquake tore through central Italy Monday morning, magnitude 4.3 to 4.8. Italy is located near two about 30 seconds, but rubble killing over 100 people.The college city of L’Aquila was hit especially hard. major fault lines, making quickly filled the streets, apology for what he says was a failure to act it more prone to earthquakes than most blocking rescue efforts and burying cars. Rescuers dug through the rubble with on his predictions of a quake like this last other European countries. A 6.5 magnimonth. Giacchino Giuliania said authorities tude quake in 1980 killed nearly 3,000 their bare hands, searching for survivors. people in southern Italy. Other earthIn L’Aquila, tens of thousands of people dismissed him as a “scaremonger.” Joshua Brothers, an American mission- quakes in 1908, 1915 and 1930 killed tens have been removed from their homes, many of them taken to the city’s main stadium. A ary in L’Aquila, described the damages to of thousands of people.

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tent city has also been set up to accommodate other survivors. “It was the apocalypse,” resident Maria Francesco told reporters. “Our house collapsed. It’s destroyed, and there’s nothing left to recover.” An employee at a physics institute in Gran Sasso, near L’Aquila, is demanding an official


April 8, 2009

news

the Etownian

in the world

in the world

Emily M. Reigart Assistant Copy Editor

Peter S. Northrop Assistant News Editor

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Surprise: president in Iraq Lawmakers meet Castro

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resident Barack Obama visited Iraq for the first time in his presidency Tuesday. The commanderin-chief ’s unannounced visit was Image: newyorktimes.com the capstone in a President Obama is swarmed by soldiers seeking photos and week of overseas handshakes outside Baghdad. His visit Tuesday was predicted travel. The trip ocduring his travels this week, but was still surprising. curred just one day after six car bombings killed 33 people. said. “That is an extraordinary achieveEight more were killed in a separate in- ment and for that you have the thanks cident Tuesday. of the American people.” Shortly after Air Force One touched Earlier at a university in Istanbul, down, Obama traveled to the Camp Obama stood behind his decision Victory military base outside Bagh- to oppose the war and to push for a dad’s airport. American soldiers lined speedy withdrawal. However, he said the road, standing five to eight deep, in that it was necessary to transfer power order to salute the president. to the Iraqi peace-keeping forces at a The president used this visit as an reasonable rate. opportunity to address the troops. The president stated that he must Obama spoke inside a palace located ensure “that we do things in a responon the base as many soldiers snapped sible fashion.” photographs and recorded his speech. The current timetable for withMr. Obama, who has opposed the war, drawal from Iraq calls for the number stated that the Iraqis must now “take of troops to remain high until after the responsibility for their country and for Parliamentary election in December. their sovereignty.” “This is going to be a critical period, Obama also affirmed the troops’ these next 18 months,” Obama said in efforts. “You have given Iraq the op- reference to the ultimate deadline of portunity to stand on its own as a troop withdrawal from Iraq, set for democratic country,” the president August 2010.

continued from page one

HS analyzed, reviewed came out, making the structure more suitable and useful. The rooms upstairs have been changed into exam rooms and other changes will be made to make the building a more workable environment. Keeling and Associates acknowledged that Health Service’s strength lies in its employees. “The greatest asset of Health Services is the dedication and student-mindedness of its director and staff,” the report stated. Spayd agreed that the commitment of the staff to student well-being and the efforts of Students Promoting Awareness and Responsible Choices (SPARC) are a huge benefit to the College. “We have one of the best SPARC groups that I’ve ever seen,” she said. Spayd discussed how the Health Center has used both physical changes to the building and multimedia additions to increase its effectiveness. She is very excited about “The Well,” a virtual center for personal well-being. The Well allows individuals to evaluate their emotional, physical, intellectual, social and spiritual health and provides resources for them to improve their well-being. Calenda is currently in the process of researching other options for Etown’s healthcare next year. “Regardless of what we do, the College is committed to having Health Services,” she said. She also mentioned that no decision will be made without consulting Student Senate and asking for their thoughts on the matter. Not all Etown students may find the changes pleasant, however. “I think it’s absurd,” sophomore Dave Spelfogel said. “If people are sick, they don’t want to walk farther than they have to. Health Services is good the way it is.” Other students agree. “[Health Services] is a little far, but it’s definitely closer than it would be off campus,” first-year Sarah Knapp said. “I had mono and it was far to walk even down there,” firstyear Kaitlin Strunk concurred. Etown will still provide essential health care for its students; they just may not be flocking to the same building next year.

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few members of Congress’ black caucus met Tuesday with ailing communist icon Fidel Castro in Cuba. This comes a day after the legislator’s met with Raul Castro, Fidel’s brother and Cuba’s current president. This meeting sparked speculation that the United States may try to change the state of its relationship with Cuba. Three members of Congress were alleged to have met with Castro, chief among them Representative Barbara Lee, a Democratic House representative from California. The meeting happened by chance. Lawmakers were visiting the Latin American School of Medicine in Havana when a diplomat invited them to meet with Castro. There are no details yet on the nature of the discussion between members of Congress and the elderly revolutionary, and the White House had not responded to the meeting as of press time. However, many believe that this is the beginning of an attempt to restructure the U.S.-Cuba relationship. They may be right. The United States broke off diplomatic relations with Cuba in 1961 after Castro and his communist supporters overthrew the government. Since Castro’s takeover, there has been a trade

embargo with the island nation, and most American citizens are not allowed to travel there. In the 1960s, the U.S. went as far as training to Cuban ex-nationals in combat so that they could invade the island, overthrow Castro’s regime and implement democratic rule. However, President Obama has said that he is willing to pursue a more peaceful relationship with Cuba. There is no word yet if this unexpected meeting with the Communist leaders is part of a grander plan to pursue diplomacy. Obama’s plans to improve relations with Cuba include loosening travel restrictions to the country, allowing Cuban-Americans to visit family members and send them funds. This will affect an estimated 1.5 million Americans. “It’s time to let Cuban-Americans see the their mothers and their fathers, their sisters and their brothers,” Obama said during a campaign speech in Miami last year. “It’s time to let Cuban-American money make their families less dependent on the Castro regime.”

ATTENTION: Want to follow the situation in Cuba? We will be updating this developing story on Etownian.com. Check us out online!

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features

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April 8, 2009 town events • facts & figures• business

on campus

Williams preaches peace after teaching, volunteering far to the left and is killed instantly, her body torn to shreds by a land mine planted decades ago during the Vietnam War. A soldier could plant a land mine, and years later, it could kill his great grandson. Thousands of innocent people are still maimed by land mines years after the war.

Image: www.geocinema.com Jody Williams came to speak April 2 about putting her beliefs into action. Williams was 1997 recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize for her work in treaties against land mines. Jamie A. Miller Throughout her college career at the Staff Writer University of Vermont, Jody Williams was an avid peace advocate, fighting for ome people may wonder why anyone what she felt was right. trying to change the world would It wasn’t until a stranger on the street start by eliminating land mines when handed her a brochure that she discovthere are still starving, poverty-stricken nations. But imagine this: you leave for ered an issue about which she became school one morning, watching your extremely passionate. The brochure was every step, awaiting an explosion from titled “El Salvador another Vietnam?” Thinking she was positively crazy for the ground. It must be a good day as you walk even attending a meeting about the through the front doors of your school topic, Williams later found herself on the building in one piece, not having to street handing out those very brochures, worry about losing a limb until your spreading the word about her cause. walk home. However, back at home, your Elizabethtown College was lucky grandmother leaves to collect dinner for enough to have Williams share her exthat night. Along the way, she steps too periences and inspirational stories of her

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traveling adventures as she spreads peace and shares her passion. Thursday, April 2, Etown students and campus community joined Williams in the Leffler Chapel and Performance Center to learn that Jody Williams is a wimp. That is, if peace is for wimps, Williams is one. In a world where human beings should matter more than institutions, Williams wanted to make the world a more secure and accepting place. It is all about belief and action, as she described. “I’m an ordinary citizen who didn’t wait,” Williams said. “You need people who believe the same thing you do — who share the same thing you do — for change.” She understood that to be the change she wanted to see in the world, she needed to first educate others and make them recognize the issues going on around them. It took her five years to cultivate her campaign and encourage other countries to sign the treaty. Today, 80 percent of the world is part of it. Citizens around the world come together and work to help each other understand humanity. Williams mentioned that the second happiest day of her life (the first being her wedding day) was Sept17, 1997: the day when 90 countries terminated the succession of the mine ban treaty. “It’s not ‘kumbaya’,” Williams said in her talk about peace and acceptance. To reach the level of peace we would all like to see in the world, a sense of total security is vital. The security of education, finance, love and acceptance is needed. We all need to live for something, to make a statement. When there are 4 billion

people in Poland who live on less than $2 a day, our world cannot be considered secure, Williams stated, relating upon decisions of George Bush. Peace is getting up every single day and discovering a way to make a difference. According to Williams, peace is action. After years of teaching, traveling and volunteering, Williams founded the International Campaign to Ban Landmines (ICBL). In 1997, her hard work paid off when 122 nations signed the treaty, earning Williams the honor of the Nobel Peace Prize. She was head of the mission to report the situation of human rights in Darfur and the needs in Sudan. She became one of six women in the Nobel Women’s Initiative to represent various continents in order to bring together their experiences in an effort for peace and justice. Today, when Williams is not serving as campaign ambassador, she can be found at the University of Houston Graduate College of Social Work as a notable professor. In order to make a difference, Williams encourages her audience to get involved. She preached that individual and collective action is the only thing that really matters. With the amount of damage that fraud, lying and greed have done to our economy and our nations, Williams’ solution is to take action without waiting. As she travels around the country and speaks to audiences, preaching peace, she asks just one thing of us: “Care about something — anything. I don’t care what you care about — it’s the action.”

SIFE Sense

Learn loan lowdown, survive the struggle, SIFE says I n this time of financial disarray, there is much concern over the continuity of student loans. Etown’s college trust will continue to fund merit- and need-based scholarships into the near future, but those with loans from independent banks or savings and loan agencies may want to examine the status of their lender. While most student loans have fixed interest rates, those with flexible interest loans may see their rates increase. Another option may eventually come from Washington, as the Obama administration has proposed an initiative to provide $4,000 to college students in exchange for community service. The administration has also promised to expand the total amount of government loan money distributed to students. While analysts differ on whether or not the current downturn will impact most student loans, the Wall Street Journal has estimated that college endowment funds across the country have lost a total of $94 million so far, and the recession is

not yet over. During this time of economic strife, the amount of money available from private institutions and banks will continue to decrease. If you are not currently receiving financial aid but expect to need it soon, you should apply for need-based monies at the College’s Office of Financial Aid (located in Zug Memorial Hall) or seek government funding. To determine if you qualify for benefits, you will need to complete a Free Application for Student Aid (FAFSA) form, available in the Financial Aid office. It is anticipated that more students will be in need of financial aid for the fall semester due to the increasing unemployment rate. Recently, the national unemployment rate has skyrocketed due to the tenuous economic situation, and it appears that this trend will continue in the coming months. Financial aid is always beneficial if you can obtain it, and if you

are in dire need of student funding, there is most likely some available from either the Office of Financial Aid or government-backed Stafford Loans. According to the financial law Web site www. RealDealDocs.com, the most popular form of private student loan is the ParentPLUS loan, which requires a parent or guardian to cosign and pay if their child defaults on his or her loan. Banks have scaled back their offering of this type of loan as their available financial capital has decreased. Hopefully, the Obama administration will hold true to its promises and increase the amount of money available for government-funded Pell Grants and Stafford Loans. However, if you are paying off a flexible-rate bank loan, you will definitely want to check the bank’s financial situation.

Written by Elizabethtown College Students In Free Enterprise, a nonprofit organization that teaches others the principles of free market economics. Students, faculty and staff are strongly encouraged to visit the SIFE blog at http://etownsife.blogspot.com/. Contact SIFE@etown.edu with any questions.


April 8, 2009

features

the Etownian

on campus

5

April: national organ donor awareness month honored Patricia A. Cangelosi Staff Writer

March 6, 2007. When she learned that someone close to her was in need, Way knew she had to help. “It’s a calling,” she explained. “I’m supposed to do this.” Though the operation was less than comfortable, Way insists that the rewards pril is National Organ Donor Awareness Month, and several members of “far outweigh any physical pain I experienced.” If she could grow another kidney, the Elizabethtown College community have graciously shared their stories she would definitely donate again. “It is immensely fulfilling to watch someone of suffering, strength and survival. get their life back,” she said. Senior Bryan Williams received a kidney transplant Nov. 30, 2007 after a lifelong Assistant swim coach Allison Kreider held a bone marrow donor drive in honstruggle with kidney problems. The experience for him was scary and unexpected, or of her son, Tyler, last April. In 1998, Tyler was diagnosed with a pre-leukemic as a deceased donor suddenly became available. Since the chance may not have form of cancer called Myelodysplastic Syndrome, for which the only cure for come again for years, the only choice was to immediately perform the surgery. children is a bone marrow transplant. Unfortunately, before he could receive the Recovery was slow, but Williams is grateful to have his life. “On a normal day, transplant, Tyler passed away from an infection in June 1999, 11 days short of there are constant reminders of the transplant,” his first birthday. “College kids don’t necessarily he said, “and I think about the donor often. As think of life and death situations,” Kreider said, a recipient, you always think of the person who but by donating bone marrow, “you can save gave the organ.” somebody’s life while you’re still alive.” Junior Tammy Bateman faces the posIt normally costs $52 to get tested for elisibility of donating a kidney to her father gibility through the National Marrow Donor within the next couple of years. Her father, Program, but in May National Marrow Donor George Bateman, received a transplant from Program Month – all testing fees are waived. a cadaver in 2004, and began showing signs If organ donation saves so many lives, why of kidney failure again in the summer of aren’t more people willing to do it? There are 2008. Tammy is the last possible close relative many misconceptions about organ donation. who may be a match. Though she is afraid The most common one is probably the idea that of the prospect of undergoing such a dauntparamedics and doctors will not try as hard to ing process, she is much more scared of not save a person who has “Organ Donor” on his being a match. Bateman would then have to or her license. enter the national transplant list, and there is According to the Discovery Health Web site, no telling how long that wait could be. “The this is entirely false: “The medical staff trying hardest thing for him was to ask his children to save lives is completely separate from the Photo: Matthew P. Butera transplant team.” Bateman concurred. for something like that,” Tammy said. “But of course I’m going to help if I can. It’s one of Students were able to donate blood in the Event Space yesterday “They don’t even check to see if you’re an orto help with the blood shortage in Pennsylvania. April is National those things you don’t question.” gan donor until you’ve passed away,” she said. Organ Donor Awareness Month. Sophomore Joelle Atkinson, Assistant Another misconception is that organ donation Campus Life Editor for the Etownian, was goes against the teachings of certain religions. diagnosed with Infantile Polycystic Kidney Disease as a baby. Cysts grew on her However, according to Organdonor.gov, the official U.S. Government Web site kidneys, which pressed up against her lungs and prevented her from breath- for organ and tissue donation, “most religions support organ and tissue donaing. At 18 months old, Atkinson received a kidney transplant from her father. tion as a charitable act of love and giving.” These include Catholicism, Judaism, However, the disease worsened as she grew older. Islam, Lutheranism, Episcopalianism, Mormonism and many more. At 9, she received another kidney and a liver from a donor. According to Over 101,000 Americans are waiting for a transplant right now. Of those, Atkinson, the process made her stronger and a better person. “Things don’t 79,000 need at least one kidney, which is one of the only organs that can come as easily get me down,” she said. If she had the chance to donate an organ, she from a living donor. would do it “in a heartbeat.” One person alone, she points out, could save 20 Anyone interested in getting tested for eligibility is encouraged to visit the or even 30 lives. National Kidney Foundation Web site, www.kidney.org, or the United Network Etown’s Payroll Assistant, Cheri Way, donated a kidney to her brother-in-law for Organ Sharing Web site, www.unos.org.

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on campus

Percussion ensemble to perform various types of music Shaleen A. Spulio Managing Editor

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hen you’ve finished your taxes this April 15, take a break and attend this semester’s percussion ensemble event, sponsored by the fine and performing arts department (FAPA). The event brings together the Elizabethtown percussion ensemble and the Congueros who will shake, rub, scrape, hit or do anything else with their instruments to produce musical tones. When asked what makes this event so special, adjunct faculty member James Armstrong said, “This concert is strictly percussion-oriented, both Western and non-Western traditions.” The Ensemble incorporates drumming, singing and dancing into each performance presentation,” Armstrong said. Etown Congueros, along with the percussion ensemble, “specializes in the traditional folkloric music of the Caribbean and West Africa,” Armstrong said. Senior Laura Francis who is a member of the Congueros uses drums and small shakers and bells to create their unique sound. “What first attracted me to it is how different the music is from what I usually listen to and play,” Francis said. The conga is the main instrument of the

Congueros, and it is basically a tall, narrow and single-headed Cuban drum. The conga originated in Africa and is most likely decended from the Congolese Makuta drums or Sikulu drums. They were commonly played in the Congo. Simply put, a person who plays conga is called a "conguero," from which the ensemble derives its name. Though the more traditional African drums are made from hollowed logs, the traditional Cuban ones are more staved, appearing like barrels. Both types appear in Afro-Caribbean religious music. Additionally, congas are also very common in salsa, meringue and other forms of popular music. At the event, “the works by Percy Grainer, George Hamilton Green and

Ney Rosauro are mallet works incorporating marimba and xylophone in a quartet setting,” Armstrong said. “The music is very energetic and exciting,” Francis said. “We have added African dance to our repertoire this semester and will be performing it for the first time at this concert!” One style of music incorporated into the event is ragtime, which dates back to the early 20th century. Ragtime is one of the American-based musical genres and has pre-jazz tones that influenced the genre know today. “The ensembles uphold a standard of excellence nurtured by Elizabethtown College,” Armstrong added. “The music rep-

Photo: Julianne A. Keys

Etown students rehearse their performance for the percussion ensemble.They play both Western and non-Western styles of percussion music.

resents a commitment to multiculturalism and open-mindedness that is a part of the Etown mission.” Armstrong is the musical director of both the Percussion Ensemble and the Congueros. Living in the greater Philadelphia area, Armstrong commutes to Etown multiple times each week to teach classes and direct the two musical groups. He teaches percussion methods for music education majors and music therapy majors. He also gives private percussion lessons for any level or area. Not only does he teach and direct, but he authors some of his own works as well. One of his areas of expertise includes Afro-Cuban and AfroHaitian hand drumming. “Both music majors and non-music majors with an interest in percussion are invited to attend,” Armstrong suggested. The concert will last approximately 6090 minutes, so come to the Event Space at 7:30 the night of April 15 to explore this area of music. “It will be an excellent representation of percussion music from around the world,” Armstrong said. The event is free and open to the public, and FAPA encourages everyone to attend. “It will certainly be a special evening of great music,” Armstrong concluded.


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features

the Etownian

April 8, 2009

in the world

The

Jayd-ed edge

Rachel A. Marsteller Features Editor

Police fluff pillow fight Police in Detroit ruffled some feathers after they cracked down on an organized pillow fight at a downtown park. The Detroit News reported that police at Campus Martius Park prevented the feathery fight Saturday by disarming pillow-toting participants. The bout was part of a worldwide event organized on social networking Web sites. Michael Davis of Hamtramck said police confiscated the thirty-two-year-old Michael pillows but returned their cases. Davis said he was told that he needed a permit. Scott Harris of Ferndale told the News that it’s “not illegal to own a pillow.” Detroit police spokesman James Tate said cleanup was the issue. Lucky catch He’s lucky she said yes, and he’s also lucky the diamond engagement ring he dropped on the Brooklyn Bridge didn’t end up in the river. Don Walling fumbled the ring as he proposed to his girlfriend on the pedestrian walkway of the New York City bridge. But he valiantly shimmied down to the lower span — where car traffic travels — and found the bauble. It was slightly bent, but the diamonds were still in place. A police van patrolling the bridge stopped traffic to let him retrieve it. The Coram resident and girlfriend Gina Pellicani plan to marry April 24, 2010, the anniversary of the beginning of their relationship four years ago. Speedy Service at the DMV A woman accused of driving 103 mph with her 10-year-old grandson was on leave from a job at the state Driver and Motor Vehicle Services. The 53-year-old driver was arrested Sunday on charges of reckless driving and reckless endangerment. Investigators said she told them she was teaching her grandson about the dangers of speeding, telling him not to drive like her. David House, an Oregon Department of Transportation spokesman, told the Salem Statesman Journal that the woman joined the DMV in 1988 and was placed on leave March 16. The agency would not give a reason for her leave. House could not say how her arrest will affect her employment. Compiled from myway.com.

Service learning initiative pursued; PACC Huntley C. McGowan Assistant Layout Editor

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believe that service-learning is a fundamental form of experiential learning at Elizabethtown College that is clearly mission-centered,” Dr. Michele Lee Kozimor-King, assistant professor of sociology, said. In the words of the keynote speaker Steve Jones, service-learning here is “mission critical.” What we are currently seeing at Elizabethtown is a move toward more integration of service-learning with the academic curriculum. Last Friday, Kozimor-King and Nancy Valkenburg traveled to the PACC Assessment Institute to talk about service learning here at Etown. “From my experience at the workshop, it appears that this movement is part of a national trend,” Kozimor-King said. “At the PACC, I learned tools and methodology to assess student learning and civic engagement.” Some of the tools and skills that were acquired at the conference included the Furco Rubric, Holland Matrix and the Bringle and Hatcher CAPSL model. Most of the workshop focused on the value of assessment of civic engagement. “After attending, I’d like to see more institutional assessment of civic engagement here at Etown,” Kozimor-King exclaimed. “I believe an important reason to assess civic engagement is to enhance student development through a holistic approach.” She also believes that our college community needs to develop more clarity about what we want our graduates to look like. We should also then show how civic engagement can contribute to that vision. "I liked how as-

sessment was seen as a path to learning,” Kozimor-King said. “Assessment is valuable for its own sake since it improves the quality of student learning and faculty teaching.” Recently the office of Service-Learning has changed its name to the Office of Civic Engagement. Kozimor-King believes that this “is one positive step.” Nancy Valkenburg has also proved to be a valuable resource in the office. “She really understands the direction of the center and the mission of the College,” Kozimor-King said. “I think she is a valuable leader in this area and has great ideas on how to move the center forward. After attending the workshop, I’m proud of Elizabethtown’s foundation and believe that we have a good inventory of service-learning programs.” Kozimor-King, who said the next step is maturing the concept of civic engagement and assessing the readiness and willingness of the campus community. “The conference was about ways to integrate civic engagement with the mission and curriculum of the College,” KozimorKing said. She believes the living learning communities, such as Simple Living and Glaction, are an excellent model for the integration of civic engagement with academic curriculum. “The College needs to be locally accountable,” Kozimor-King exclaimed. “Etown needs to consider what it can do to serve the local community while at the same time producing graduates who are not only skilled professionals, but civic minded in their profession. I think a good example of this type of service-learning is the current Winters Heritage House Museum Community Survey Project being completed

by the Sociology 331 Social Statistics class this semester.” This project being completed by Sociology 331 ties civic engagement not only to the curriculum of the class, but it also helps students develop specific skills. All of the workshop speakers came from schools that received the Carnegie Community Engagement Classification. Most of the speakers highlighted the importance of such a ranking. “I would hope that Etown would aspire to become one of those schools in the near future, perhaps in 2010,” Kozimor-King stated. “In order to apply for the classification, more assessment of civic engagement would be necessary. This may be a stretch, but I loved learning about an academic service-learning faculty development program at Widener University where faculty develop a service-learning course in a semester long workshop.” Many schools represented at the workshop are beginning to integrate civic engagement into the first-year program. That may be something to consider in the future for the first-year experience here at Etown. “I would like to see more collaboration between the Center for Civic Engagement and the Center for Excellence in Teaching and Learning here at Elizabethtown,” Kozimor-King said. “Sometimes it seems too time-consuming to integrate service-learning into the curriculum on your own,” KozimorKing said. “However, if there was a semester workshop to plan it out with a group of colleagues, it would be much more likely to happen.”

on campus

Pulitzer winner speaks out about sprawl Melissa L. Jones Staff Writer

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emember the last time you drove to Lancaster? Whether it was to go to the outlets, the mall, ice skating or to buy fish from PetSmart, you probably noticed the plethora of rolling farmland that surrounds PA 743. Farmland is an iconic part of the Pennsylvania image. Just look at any Pennsylvania visitor’s guide or map, and you will see pictures of Amish people and farms. Many Elizabethtown College students either on a farm or at least live close enough to smell it during spring planting season. But this sterotypical Pennsylvania image has a formidable foe: suburban sprawl. Did you know that since the 1950s Pennsylvania has lost more than 4 million acres of farmland to suburban development? That’s an area of land bigger than Connecticut and Rhode Island put together! In fact, two Lancaster County farms, a combined total of 166 acres, are currently up for sale. One lot is

described as “gently rolling farmland” ideal for residential development. Thomas Hylton, a Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist, wants to change all this. So far, he has given over 400 talks in 35 states about the advantages of traditional town living and how to reverse sprawl. April 15, Hylton will share his knowledge with the Etown community. In his lecture “Save our Land, Save our Towns: Growing Communities, not Sprawl,” Hylton reflects on the relationship between sprawling development and decaying cities. He explains that by building suburban communities, we have created neighborhoods that are segregated based on wealth. Since the wealthy can afford to move into suburban neighborhoods, with big houses and fancy protective gates, the poor become concentrated in inner-city neighborhoods. Those at or below the poverty line often live in slums, which often have easy access to drugs and seem to promote gangs and crime.

Hylton also highlights the dangers of using farmland to build subdivisions, which would have the most impact on the future of the Etown community. In his book, “Save our Lands, Save our Towns: A Plan for Pennsylvania,” Hylton wrote, “What we’ve done is spend millions of dollars for new infrastructure to do little more than take our existing population and spread it around. We’ve ruined our wonderfully livable cities, and ravaged the countr yside surrounding them, in order to create a terribly expensive and woefully inefficient way of life.” He expanded on this by saying that our suburban lifestyle has physically separated us from our schools, malls, grocery stores and places work. Less than 60 years ago, most people only lived 15 minutes away from where they worked, and children could walk to school every day. But thanks to suburban sprawl, we have moved away from our close-knit communities and become more socially isolated. Now, we have

to drive to the grocery store. Students are often forced to ride the bus for over an hour to get home. Adults will often drive 30 minutes to get to their jobs. But Hylton has a solution. He believes that the best way to save our farms and fields is to return to our heritage and reinvest in our traditional cities, villages and towns. Hylton believes that with government action, we can return our cities to their former splendor and preserve the farmland we associate so strongly with central Pennsylvania. By moving back into cities and towns, we can stop relying so heavily on our cars, reduce pollution and revitalize the small town community feel that was so prominent just decades ago. The lecture will take place April 15 at 7:30 p.m. in Leffler Chapel and Performance Center. It is free of charge and open to the public, but due to limited seating, free tickets are required. Tickets can be obtained by calling the College’s ticket hotline at (717) 361-4757.


April 8, 2009

campus life

movies • music • television • humor • travel 1

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lifestyles • arts • advice • college issues 5

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the Etownian

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campus quirks

You don’t know jack ’bout Etown, yo Allison M. O’Boyle Staff Writer

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very day when you are crawling out of your dorm, heading to class, or sitting down in the BSC, you are walking around on our very own history book: Elizabethtown’s campus. In our day-to-day activities, we hardly stop to think about what this place we call our temporary home used to be and still is — and how far it has come. With the help of Director of Alumni Relations Barry Freidly ’69 and senior Jake Keeler, here are 12 things that most people probably don’t know about Etown’s history: One: This first piece of information is probably the most widely known, but is worth mentioning because of its importance. Alpha Hall was the original Elizabethtown College school house. Classrooms, dormitories, the library, and the cafeteria all resided in Alpha from 1899 until campus construction sped up. Two: If you have seen Keeler’s video vignettes on YouTube, you may be familiar with his quest for Rider Hall. It’s no surprise that he did not find it here on campus (except in the old yearbooks), but he did learn that Rider Hall, the school’s second building, used to exist until the 1980s where the J.G. Francis Memorial statue stands today. Because it was evaluated as unsafe, Rider was destroyed, but its stained glass windows still exist in the lobby of Leffler. Three: Many people see our beloved Brossman Commons as either one large building or three separate buildings (Jay’s, Concourse and Tempest Theater). However, the original student center was the Alumni Gymnasium, which stood where the Tempest Theater currently resides. If you were to stand at the library steps and look over at the BSC, you would see the original slate roof of the Alumni Gym. Built around that, of course, is the BSC we know today, but it has not remained unchanged. Most people do not know that the pool in the BSC is not in-ground. It is actually fully suspended by columns, and you can walk underneath it. The Jay’s Nest, at one point, was in the current dance studio, and the Marketplace was originally a game room. There was actually a hole in the floor of what is now the dining area, where students could overlook activities in the Event Space. In addition, the hallway by the theater office that leads to the pool was at one time a bowling alley. Etown definitely provided all sorts of entertainment. Four: Wenger was once called Fairview. Built as the first residence on campus (other than the original rooms in Alpha), Fairview housed students until the 1970s and was, incidentally, the first building on campus with an elevator. Since then, the elevator has been removed. Five: If you live in Myer, you might find it interesting to know that where your dorm stands, an apple orchard used

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to prosper. The school actually grew its own food during its early years, and the land under Myer reaped the benefits. Along the lines of food, Myer also housed the Marketplace (in what is now the Susquehanna Room) up until 2002. Six: Steinman was originally Gibble Science Center. Upon its first construction, what we know as Steinman was a plain building without the elegant pillars and aesthetic strength it has today. Seven: Zug was the College’s first library, along with the miniature one included in Alpha. When Freidly attended Etown, it was colloquial to say you were “Zugging it” or “going Zugging,” which meant you were going to the library. The Zug we know now was not the original completed edifice, either; the side wings, such as where the Business Office is housed, were added in the 1960s. Eight: In the 1960s, according to Freidly, there was no Campus Security. Rather, there was only “Jessie the Cop.” Apparently, Jessie only worked during the day and had one single duty — to ticket cars. Nine: Have you ever wondered where Baugher Avenue is — besides Mail Services, I mean? The original Baugher Avenue was actually a well-used street with parking lots that ran along the current path between Brinser and Ober. Ten: Why does Founders have such a different structure than the rest of the dorms? Originally, Founders was built as a Living Learning Center, similar to the LLCs now. However, the design plan was that professors would come to the middle lounges on each floor and teach their lessons there. Each discipline would live on a different floor, and it was thought that students would bond and better reflect on their daily lessons. However, this plan was never implemented. Eleven: There are two large triples in the basement of the B wing in Ober with private bathrooms attached. While it would be every trio’s dream to live there, both rooms were built as the “College Infirmary.” According to Freidly, the walk-in showers were especially designed for messy illnesses and injuries, and the large rooms could hold a good number of patients. But for all of you who live in Ober, don’t get too worried about the ghosts of deceased patients. Because of an increase in enrollment, the infirmary was never used, and the rooms were turned into dorms. Twelve: Most interestingly, there are tunnels that run underneath Ober and Royer. In Ober, there are two that can be accessed from the utility room between the wings. What’s more, there are trapdoors in the last rooms on the first floor. Royer’s tunnel is also accessed through its utility room but has no trapdoors. All of the entrances for these tunnels, of course, are locked. However, similar tunnels under Nicarry are still accessible for utility purposes. So there they are — 12 little-known pieces of Etown’s history. It makes me wonder what else we don’t know about this beloved school we call home.


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campus life

the Etownian

April 8, 2009

health habits

Cancer-causing evidence prompts tanning legislation Laura A. Farnish Staff Writer

Lawmakers recently ignited controversy by making tanning illegal for minors. Citing cancer worries, various states — including Florida and Hawaii n preparation for Junior-Senior, — are considering new laws to regulate many girls complete a checklist tanning bed use through parent or docof necessities: find a date, pick out a tor notes. dress, reserve a table, and, of course, Legislators hope the new law will engo tanning. courage healthier choices and advocate parental involvement. Florida, for example, already requires parental approval before minors can use tanning salons. If the new law passes, however, it will be the strictest in the nation. “I don’t think it is a bad idea,” Sandy Spayd, director of Health Services, said. “Even for those older, we don’t always pay  attention to medical research, and this would assure parents get involved in the process of educating about healthy decisions.” Although proposed regulations aim to minimize the tanning issue, many objectors are skeptical that these policies will cause minors to disobey the law. Furthermore, opponents to the law Image: mahalo.com find much hypocrisy within the proThis bathing beauty is soaking up some fake rays — and, possibly, cancer. Tanning has posed legislation. Adversaries claim that parental become a cosmetic ritual as regular as wearing makeup. Because prom season spurs consent will not make tanning beds more minors to visit tanning salons, some states are considering new legislation requiring parental consent for adolescents under 18 who wish to tan. safer. Some say that outlawing tanning

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According to the National Cancer Institute, approximately 500 people ages 19 and under were diagnosed with melanoma nationwide in 2005, the most recent year for which statistics are available. That’s a small fraction of the estimated new cases reported by the American Cancer Society that year.

bed usage is comparable to outlawing tanning on the beach. Others say that a tanning bed is actually safer than tanning on the beach because you know exactly how much exposure you are getting, thus avoiding burning on the beach. Regardless of the current law or laws to come, there are precautions to take to make tanning safer. First and foremost, you can avoid tanning beds altogether. But if tanning is something you can’t live without, make it as safe as possible.  One alternative is using tanning spray or lotion instead of hitting the salons. Some salons even sell these products. Additionally, you should be on the lookout for irregularities in your skin, as well as changes in the size, color or shape of moles you already have. Schedule yearly visits to a dermatologist. “Strictly follow the operators guidelines. I personally am sun sensitive and use a high SPF sunscreen when I am in the sun.  I’ve known students who were going to the tropics and wanted to get some tan before being exposed to that climate, they did go to tanning beds prior to leaving,” Spayd added. “I would suggest being an informed consumer.  Know the risks and then decide how much risk is acceptable for you.”

off-campus involvement

Pageant princesses prepare for next level of competitions Joelle E. Atkinson Assistant Campus Life Editor

“The song is about [Etheridge’s] fight and battle with breast cancer,” she explained. For each pageant, Kuperavage dedicates the dance to her teacher and choreographer, who is currently battling breast cancer. This summer, she will compete for a bigger crown: that of Miss Pennsylvania in he annual Elizabethtown College tradition of Mr. Etown may be over, but there are several students on the Etown campus who await the chance to vie for their Pittsburgh, Pa. “I’ve had many people tell me that they are planning on coming out to Pittsburgh own crowns. First-year Hayley Mazzur, sophomore Brittany Kuperavage and junior Maggie Sabota are all preparing for their turn in the spotlight, hoping to win the this summer to cheer me on in Miss Pennsylvania, and that is the best feeling in the world,” she said. ultimate crown. Sabota hopes to share the Miss America stage one day with Kuperavage. If Mazzur, who was signed to a modeling agency at the age of 13, received an invitation to begin competing with the National American Miss organization in 2004, Sabota won the Miss America competition, she “would be honored to serve as an ambassador for young women beginning with their National American Miss Junior Teen Clockwise, from right: junior around the country.” Pennsylvania pageant. Maggie Sabota accepts her She began competing in pag“As a young teenager, being involved with the organization, Miss Liberty crown; sophomore eants at the age of 18 through I learned how to be confident and outgoing,” she said. Brittany Kuperavage speaks the Miss America Organization. Along with these skills, she learned public speaking, as well about her platform at Relay for Sabota recently earned her curas how to be successful in an interview. She is currently second Life; first-year Hayley Mazzur rent title of Miss Liberty and has runner-up for the 2008 National American Miss Pennsylvania poses with her father. had great opportunities as a titleTeen and will continue her quest for the crown in the same holder. She has made more than competition this year. 50 appearances throughout New She prefers National American Miss to Miss America and Jersey, sharing her platform and Miss USA because the organization is “very family-oriented helping others. and relaxed.” A large factor for her in this competition is havHer platform centers on a cause ing her family involved. that is very close to heart: Lyme “My dad is always my onstage escort for the formalwear disease prevention. competition, and so with National American Miss, I get to go Sabota experienced the effects on stage and have him be a part of my success,” she said. of Lyme disease first-hand when Kuperavage, on the other hand, hopes to eventually win she was only 6 years old after her the Miss America title. mother was diagnosed with an “The places I would go, the people I would get to meet — it incurable form of the disease. would be a dream come true in every single way,” she said. With the Miss Liberty title, she She is currently Miss Greater Berks County, and this sumhas been able to speak about her mer, she will move on to the Miss Pennsylvania competition. Courtesy photos cause state-wide. “I was online doing scholarship searches, and I came across All three of these girls agree on one thing: none of these pageants are like what a scholarship from the Miss America Organization,” she said, explaining how she you see on television. became involved. “Most of the people I have met in pageants have been nice, intelligent, outgoing She had never participated in pageants, and figured she had nothing to lose, so she gave it a try in hopes of earning some money for school. Her crown took center and helpful,” Mazzur said. Kuperavage could not agree more, and she is thankful for the opportunities that stage this past March at the annual Etown College Relay for Life, where she spoke the Miss America organization has given her. about her platform of cancer awareness and what it meant to her. “Whether I was going to charity events, speaking publicly about my platform, “I have had numerous family members battle and die from cancer,” she said. Her talent — a lyrical dance to the inspirational Melissa Etheridge song “I Run for or visiting hospitals,” she said, “I have grown from the opportunity to do each of these things.” Life” — also reflects her personal platform.

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April 8, 2009

technology trends

campus life

the Etownian

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cinema review

New tools curb drunk dials, e-mails Diesel hits the gas Christopher A. Tjaden Staff Writer

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Jameson C. Rohrer Copy Editor

hrough a series of recent hen does murder become okay? What about contechnological developments, spiracy? Traffic violations? both Apple and Google have made The internal morality of “Fast & Furious” runs someefforts to prevent their users from thing like “If you’re good-looking, it’s okay to lie, rob and making drunken phone calls and kill as long as you don’t do it to any other good-looking sending drunken texts or e–mails. people.” Vin Diesel’s character — a brolic brute named So far, there are four main Dom or something — becomes peevish when an ugly applications designed by both person hurts his favorite hot chick. Meanwhile, Paul Apple and Google that work in Walker plays Brian O’Connor, a cold-eyed, street-smart a variety of ways. They include racer-cum-FBI-agent. This theatrical fantasy’s lack of Apple’s breath-testing device, background checks forces him to make a tough choice “iBreath;” Apple’s Bad Decision when fortune pits him against the same villain that Dom Blocker application; and Google chases. Will he slip back to his old ways in order to drop Mail’s Panic Button and “Mail one bad dude and sleep with Dom’s sister? (Spoiler warnGoggles.” In essence, all of these ing: hell yes.) application are designed to do “Fast & Furious” presents audiences with a colorthe same thing; however, each ful narrative deliciously bankrupt of either context or one goes about it differently. subtlety. Only the most navel-gazing critic could find Apple’s version of a Breathalyzer, meaning in the heavy-handed plot twists and stultifying “iBreath,” is revolutionary in that it dialogue; two words from Diesel (“You ain’t”) complete Image: otakku.com is the first Breathalyzer to connect the film’s most compelling exchange. to a user’s iPod or iPhone. All you Shown here: the iBreath device clips to the bottom of an iPhone or iPod touch. This dandy little piece of technology can instantly But the film’s tenacious excess — rabid product placehave to do is blow into your Apple relay your blood-alcohol level and let you know if you’re over the ment, cardboard characters and chunky explosions device, and your blood-alcohol legal limit. However, at $79.99, it’s one pricey gadget. — make it watchable. The B-list cast, bent on commucontent will then be displayed nicating their characters’ binary emotions, oscillates clearly on the screen. completely eliminating the temptation of even spectacularly between states of raw stoicism and bestial “All kinds of people are using it,” Don Bassler, de- seeing the contact in their phone, this applicalust. They all seem to enjoy driving, and for what it’s veloper of iBreath, said. “People listen to their iPods tion is geared towards stopping the user from an worth, everyone seems very good at it. more than they listen to their parents or friends who embarrassing situation or explanation later. Expensive bubble-gum cinema can certainly survive: might be trying to give them good advice.” Unlike the iBreath, this application only costs opening weekend earned “Fast & Furious” a cool $72 Etown sociology professor Michele Lee Kozimor– 99 cents and can be purchased online through the million. But for it to serve adrenaline to more than King stated that this tool was another way that iTunes Web site and store. middle-schoolers, the field requires refinement. Not in Google’s “Panic Button” authenticity: audiences pay to see Diesel shrug off bulwas created to give users a lets to the shoulder, not cry about them. Not in glamour: chance to “undo” what they the movie already has plenty of exposed décolletage and have done. Many have acciswaying humps to dress down the California street cirdentally sent out e–mails to cuit. It needs a stronger soundtrack and better jokes. unintended receivers when But “Fast & Furious” does its thing exceptionally well. both intoxicated and sober. There is even art, if you look for it: the establishing shots, Michael Leggett, the cresubtitles and stunts are generally both innovative and satisator of the application, told fying. Diesel provides a concentrated dose of consequenceABC, “This feature can’t pull free machismo, and it’s a drug worth taking. back an e-mail that’s already gone; it just holds your message for five seconds so you have a chance to hit the panic button.” By pressing the panic button, the user can Image: boygeniusreport.com choose to either not send the This screen shot shows the math problems which confront Gmail message, or to re-route it. If users who have activated “Mail Goggles.” The feature can be set for you are a Gmail user and are certain hours or days of the week to accommodate your needs. trying to turn on the “Undo humans are switching to non-human control by Send” option, you will be able to find it in Gmail avoiding reliance on friends, family and values, and Labs under “Settings.” instead placing their faith in technology. She also said The final application introduced by Google to that the iBreath is a good feature; however, it must prevent drunken e-mailing is “Mail Goggles.” Mail remain a “tool,” rather than the only thing that people Goggles is an application that asks its users to perImage: exclaim.ca rely on in order to ensure their safety. The creators form simple math for 60 seconds before their e-mail Vin Diesel menacingly changes gears as Dominic Toretto of this application hope that, upon seeing his or her is allowed to be sent. If the problems displayed are in “Fast & Furious.” Though this film is the fourth of the blood-alcohol content immediately displayed, the not completed within the time period, then the user Fast and Furious series, it actually serves as a prequel to user will avoid unwise activities such as driving (or in will not be allowed to send the e-mail until he or she the third movie in the series, “Tokyo Drift.” this case, calling, texting or e-mailing someone) while completes the test. Additionally, the intoxicated. The program is on sale for $79.99 through program displays a message that the company’s Web site and has sold thousands of reads something along the lines of copies since its debut. “Water and bed for you.” The appli• Pregnancy tests with immediate results Another application developed by Apple to pre- cation is only in affect on weekends • Education on all options vent drunken communication through the iPhone between 10 p.m. and 4 a.m., and it • Limited ultrasounds when indicated is the “Bad Decision Blocker.” This application can be adjusted as needed. • Confidential & free allows the user to select a contact in their address Through the creation of all of We care and we’ll listen. book, block them, and then set the duration of these applications, both Apple Lancaster Pregnancy Clinic time for which that contact will be blocked from and Google are taking strides 717-291-1800 communication. In blocking a contact, “it takes to prevent people from making Columbia Pregnancy Center that person’s e-mail address and phone number irresponsible communication 717-684-3400 out of the address book entirely. It puts it in a secret decisions when drunk. Hopefully, A Life-Affirming Organization www.pregnantwecare.com place that is not readable,” application designer they will save their users from Day and evening appointments available and CEO of Double Encore Dan Burcaw said. By many embarrassing situations.

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Wondering About Abortion?


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opinion

the Etownian

campus controversies • letters to the editor

d n ou

S Off

How do you feel about the tax increase on tobacco? by Matthew P. Butera

Sam Schlosser Class of 2010 “Uncle Sam deserves a portion of my enjoyment.”

Angela Coffey Class of 2011 “The government is overstepping their bounds. It is more of a personal decision.”

April 8, 2009 national debate • our take • guest columns

in the nation

Legislation implies ‘forced volunteerism’ Peter S. Northrop Assistant News Editor

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little while back, the House of Representatives passed a bill establishing a national mandatory service act for all young Americans. Voted in with a 321-105 margin, the Generations Invigorating Volunteerism and Education Act includes some wording I think you might find interesting. The act has yet to go to the Senate and went largely unreported, but in the past weeks it has ignited a firestorm of debate across the web as young Internet writers rally against what they see as “forced volunteerism.” You see, there’s a clause in this bill that talks about establishing a mandatory service act for all young Americans. For instance, it would force public secondary schools to establish service learning programs, much like the one Elizabethtown has. It would require all American citizens, ages 18 to 25, to perform anywhere from 50 to 100 hours of community service per year, in order to “strengthen the social fabric of our nation.” This has young people all over the nation in an uproar. Across the Internet, young people are raving and shouting on street corners, mobilizing against what they see as “modern slavery.” Now, I won’t go as far as that. I like the idea of volunteer work. As I write this article, my right arm aches under the pressure of the neon-green bandage the nice folks from the Central Pennsylvania Blood Bank gave me in return for a pint of my O positive goods. I take pride in the spirit of service that permeates our culture. America is a country that gives both its money and time in a way the rest of world can’t even fathom. It gets to the point where whole colleges are built around the motto “Educate for Service.” It’s a truly beautiful thing. However, I don’t like the idea of taking that volunteer spirit in the American psyche and forcing it to do more. Volunteer work is great just because of its very nature — people do it voluntarily. So many people help others because of a higher

calling, the kindness in their hearts, or just good old fashioned Catholic Guilt. If you force people to help others, it takes the soul out of it. Instead of serving soup at the local homeless shelter with a smile on our faces, some folks would hang drywall at a Habitat for Humanity build-site with a begrudging scowl. The work would be done haphazardly, and subsequently, the overall quality of “volunteer” work would go down, forcing even more labor to be done. That’s not the only thing that worries me about this bill. Its wording opens up the possibility that another, more sinister idea coauthored by Obama’s Chief of Staff Rahm Emanuel could take effect. In his book “The Plan: Big Ideas for America,” the Obama staffer discussed a “compulsory service act” of his own. However, instead of doing community service, the youth of America would be forced to enlist in three months in what is called “civilian service training.” This three month period would teach kids what to do in the event of an attack on their community and demonstrate how to assist in evacuations, among other things. It brings a far more military aspect to this “mandatory service” idea, and people are already murmuring about how this could pave the way for a new military draft. And that’s just terrifying.

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in the nation

Shootings fire up gun control advocates

Kevin J. Yu Staff Writer

F Betty Aubin Class of 2009 “I feel that it is grand. It would help deter young people from smoking.”

riday, April 3 in Binghamton, N.Y., 13 immigrants were shot before the gunman committed suicide in the fifth deadliest shooting this month. Another incident in Samson, Ala. left 10 people dead. In Oakland, Calif. four people were killed, six more died in Santa Clara, Calif., and a shooter killed eight in a nursing home. A total of 44 people were killed within the last month. Clearly, students have a reason to be concerned about weapon policies.

Michael Ruzzo Class of 2010 “I think they are just looking for a way to get more money to offset a deficit, and there won’t be a big outcry because it is tobacco.”

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The Virginia Tech Massacre sparked a gun control debate. January 2006, the Virginia State Assembly rejected a bill which would have allowed students to carry guns on the campus. In response, students at Virginia Tech joined the Students for Concealed Carry on Campus. This group has attracted much attention, and 12 other states are considering similar legislation. Another shocking incident occurred January 2008, when an international Chinese student named Xin Yang was de c apit ate d with a knife by a peer. Even after stricter policies have been enacted, are students fully safe from harm on any campus? States differ on this issue. Pennsylvania is a state which endorses the “right to carry,” a rule that a citizen may carry a firearm for personal defense. Moreover, Pennsylvania allows universities and colleges to decide whether or not concealed-carry is appropriate. Regardless of individual campus’ policy, anyone carrying a gun would be required to have a permit or license to carry the weapon. In general, Etown is safe from weapons violence. Between 2006 and 2008,

according to the campus security and safety report, there have been no firearms incidents; only a number of disorderly conduct and liquor law violations have been reported. Etown College does not allow concealed weapons on campus. In addition, campus security officers do not carry firearms. Dale Boyer, assistant director of campus security, said, “From a law enforcement perspective, I don’t think it’s a good idea to allow weapons on campus. It makes things difficult and complicated.” Boyer believes that the laws already in place serve their purpose and that there needs to be consistent enforcement of these laws already on the books. After all, there are eight full-time officers and four dispatchers available to help in any given situation. Phuong-Uyen Nguyen, an international student from Vietnam, said, “I’m roaming around all the time: on campus, off-campus and all over the place. I generally feel safe walking with campus security patrolling the perimeter 24/7. My friends feel the same way.” Campus security even has its own Student Patrol Program. Students can sign up to help as student escorts, and with crime prevention and parking assistance. They are reported to be the “eyes and ears” for the full-time staff, helping to ensure the safety of this campus.


opinion

April 8, 2009

in the nation

staff column

Tobacco taxes burn holes Cash clash B from 2008, only 13 percent of smokers arack, I think we need to talk. I respect what you’re trying to make over $90,000 per year, while a stagdo — really, I do. I’m a first-year college gering 53 percent make less than $36,000 student. By the time I graduate, I will per year. It’s quite the catch-22, really. If the smokbe up to my eyeballs in debt, and with the economy going the way it is, there’s ers don’t quit, it’s money out of their pockets no way an English major is going to that’s coming right back to their families in find a job. Anything you can do to help health-insurance funding. If they do, well, the state loses the revenue. me out, I’m 100 percent Tobacco industries do behind you. expect a drop in sales — But this? Really? Rachel L. Jesten around 6 to 8 percent — Barack, you used to be but despite that “incentive,” a smoker, right? Word on I doubt that it will come the street is you didn’t quit until you started your campaign. I’m a from people actually quitting. Representasmoker myself, Barack, and I’ll admit it tives from major tobacco industries expect to you freely, so I feel like we can have a that as prices rise, smokers will buy their tobacco, well, “elsewhere.” More illegal pretty honest conversation. I know you’re calling it an “incen- importation just means more work for tive,” nobly encouraging us to give up an border police, and now our U.S. dollars expensive and dangerous habit due to are dribbling out of the country. Without even touching whether it’s the looming economic crisis. You’re trying to help us out. But it’s not that easy, the government’s job to decide what my really, and I think you know that. We’re most dangerous habit is and give me not going to quit smoking because our “incentive” to quit — though I would like favorite packs of cigarettes are 62 cents to add that 22.8 percent of Americans are more expensive than they used to be. smokers, and thirty and a half percent Honestly, the hike in prices will probably are obese and at risk for heart disease, just stress us out, and then we’ll all want diabetes, stroke, high blood pressure and to complain about it, so we’ll buy more cancer, among other things — the whole cigarettes and head to our favorite porch thing just doesn’t seem like a great idea. There are plenty of ways to boost the or back door to commiserate with all the economy, Barack, and boost positive other smokers. Or maybe you’re being tricky. After image while you’re at it. You just have to all, the extra dollars wouldn’t hurt, right? be creative. In fact, I can think of a way No matter how bad the economy gets, right now that would create jobs, lower smokers will still be scrimping pennies crime rates, draw consumers from every together to afford that next pack, pouch income bracket out into the market, and or tin. Why not tax something that’s sure put you down in history as the single coolest president ever. But you probably to stay lucrative? “It’s not the upper classes who are buy- get that a lot, so I won’t badger you too ing cigarettes, it’s the middle and lower much about it. Bottom line, Barack, is that I feel a classes,” first-year Steve Motika said. “He’s little picked on — me and every other taking money from the same people he chimney-stack-huddled-in-the-cold, wants to give it right back to.” And he’s right. According to the I-could-quit-if-I-wanted-to smoker in Gallup-Healthways Well-Being Index the land.

Double Take Double Take

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n a recent press release, President Obama stated that the tax on tobacco will be raised 62 cents on each pack of cigarettes from 39 cents to now cost $1.01. The money gained from the tax will be used to provide health care for underprivileged children. This new tax could be considered an opportunity for smokers to kick the habit and better their lives in many ways. The new tax can most definitely be an incentive to stop smoking, especially in this financially difficult time. People with low paying jobs are more likely to smoke than those who are wealthier, so with this new tax the poor will be getting poorer. So why not quit? Why not save money and put it toward bettering your lifestyle? The tax will cause each pack of cigarettes to go up a dollar, so if you smoke a pack a day, you’re looking at close to four hundred extra dollars going down the toilet every year. The money people could save by not smoking would help a lot of families avoid debt and bankruptcy. The tax is really an incentive for smokers to stop using tobacco. We all know the health risks that are related to smoking and Carey E. Betts secondhand smoke. Many people each year die from heart disease, cancer and chronic respiratory diseases that are directly correlated to their heavy tobacco use. Maybe this new tax can be the motivation for people to better themselves and get healthier. We also have to remember the reason for the tax itself. The money from the tobacco tax isn’t going to some trivial cause; it’s going to provide free health care to underprivileged children. Free health care is one of the main things Obama promised in his campaign, and here he is slowly starting bytoJillprovide Hugusit, and people are complaining? Think of it as a donation, giving back and helping out your fellow man. Or if

Jameson C. Rohrer Copy Editor

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ad you joined the G20 protestors at Canary Wharf or Westminster, you would have brought water, since protest is thirsty work. You’d have toted vinegar and a shemagh in case of tear gas, and you might have left with bruises. Police commanders kettled 4,000 people outside the Bank of England, trapping civilians inside a cordoned area with no lavatories, no water and no exit. Anticipating animosity, many firms quietly advised their workers to “dress down to avoid being marked out as City workers,” according to thelawyer.com. Abandoned three-pieces didn’t protect windows (smashed!) or the keyboards (stolen!) of the Royal Bank of Scotland building, the ransacking of which resulted in dozens of wounds and arrests. The City fuzz were touchier than usual. According to the Guardian, “the Met called in support from 30 forces across the country to create a 5,000-strong team of officers.” At Bishopsgate, they stormed the G20 Climate Camp in force, beating men and women who, instead of fighting back, raised their hands and chanted, “This is not a riot.” The people had nowhere to go and neither did their bicycles or tents. Damage was high. Ian Tomlinson, 47, died there. Initial reports from the Evening Standard told of police medics enduring thrown bottles and detritus to save him. These were filthy lies, apparently; Tomlinson was (allegedly) assaulted with baton and shield before suffering a heart attack. His rescuers were fellow protestors. Some government officials, like MP David Howarth, acknowledge the “possibility this death was at police hands.” The G20 summit ended with a $1.1 trillion deal to be divided between struggling economies and world trade, which is just as expensive as it sounds. The BBC calls it “the death knell for the freewheeling Anglo-American way of banking,” which sounds good in principle — capitalism is a cruel, hungry god, and the further that we step away from French-cuffed investmentbanking old-boys, the better. But perhaps the G20 have missed the point. It is one thing to redirect a chunk of money greater than Australia’s nominal GDP. It is quite another to rewrite a system of thought. That system, which turns a state’s protectors against its citizens, has been pounded into most residents of the West since childbirth. Can any amount of money do anything but reinforce our obsession with competitive wealth?

you’re not a fan of free health care, or Obama for that matter, you could always quit. In order to prov i d e f re e health care, the government has to get the money somewhere. Especially in the middle of a recession, there is a limited amount of places from which money could come. In order to avoid raising taxes on true necessities, like food, gas or clothing, it makes sense for the government to raise taxes on cigarettes. They are not a true necessity, and the dollar tax is not going to stop smokers from purchasing cigarettes. They may complain about it, but cigarettes will still be purchased. Growing up, I was always told that if you don’t like something, do something about it. So if you don’t like this tax, do something about it: don’t pay it. This may be the government’s point. If you are upset that you have to pay a dollar extra for cigarettes, or can’t afford it, then it is probably in your best interest to quit. There are many benefits to quitting, and maybe, just maybe, this will be the straw to break the camel’s back.

the Etownian

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the Etownian the board Editor in Chief Jennifer L. Tarr Managing Editor Shaleen A. Spulio Assistant Editor Jamie L. Bartolino News Editor Aidan E. Bauernschmidt Features Editor Rachel A. Marsteller Campus Life Editor Aimée M. DiMichele Opinion Editor Craig H. Meaney Sports Editor Abigail R. Kramer Photography Editor Kalie M. Desimone Copy Editors Katherine E. Blackman Jameson C. Rohrer Online Editor Steven E. Bicker Layout Editor E. Adam Quinn Assistant News Editor Peter S. Northrop Assistant Features Editor Greta A. Kvinnesland Asst. Campus Life Editor Joelle E. Atkinson Assistant Opinion Editor Khouri E. McGrann Assistant Sports Editor Michael D. Steiner Asst. Photography Editor Matthew P. Butera Assistant Online Editor Zachary T. Johnson Assistant Copy Editor Michael D. Moss Emily M. Reigart Noelle A. Withelder Assistant Layout Editor Huntley C. McGowan Business Manager Anh P. Nguyen Asst. Business Manager Brittny E. McLaughlin Advertising Manager Elizabeth L. Cox Faculty Adviser Kirsten A. Johnson The Etownian is the student newspaper of Elizabethtown College. All editorial decisions are made by the student editors. With the exception of editorials, opinions presented here are those of quoted sources or signed authors, not of the Etownian or the College. Submissions to the Etownian are always welcomed. We will make every effort to print submissions, but do not promise publication. Submissions may be printed anonymously at the discretion of the editor. Submit letters to opinion@etownian.com


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sports

the Etownian

April 8, 2009

etown men’s lacrosse

Jays win fourth straight game, anticipate fifth Thursday Brielle E. Parady Staff Writer

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aturday, the men’s lacrosse team had a triumphant victory over King’s College, winning 13-2. The team had one of its best games this year and hopes to continue this trend for the remainder of the season. This game was the first in a series of six that are part of the Mid-Atlantic Conference, leaving Elizabethtown 3-2 and confident in their ability to make it to the playoffs. It was an epic win for the team, and although it is still early in the season, the game showcased the team’s skills in a way they haven’t seen so far this season. “We played our best lacrosse of the year. It was a classic team win,” Coach Terrance Corcoran said. “Everyone found a way to contribute to the victory in some way. Everyone played well. Even the players that saw little or no game time were

responsible for the win. It was their hard work in practice this past week that made us better.” The whole te am cont r ibuted to the win, making it a successful day for the team. Junior Aaron Weber totaled three goals and two assists, sophomore Greg Kenneally scored three goals, and Photo: Matthew P. Butera senior Ryan McCafferty tallied Senior Ryan McCafferty anticipates a pass one goal and four against Manhattanville. assists. SophoSophomore Hunter Malick more Shawn Corcoran, junior made nine saves, followed by Keith Staulters and junior Jon first-year Brendan Corcoran Day each scored two goals. with three. First-year Derek Karsten, along “All in all, this was our bigwith sophomores Mike Ken- gest team win,” Campbell said. neally and Brent Campbell, led “We all played together.” with five ground balls each. “We had great team and long

poll defense,” Malick added. “The defense was solid and communicated well throughout the entire game.” The game was a fourth consecutive win for Etown, but this same team enthusiasm will be needed in order to continue this streak. “This game wasn’t an easy win, but it was our best game of the year,” McCafferty said. “Everyone came together and the team played unselfishly. This week will be a harder game, and we will need the same effort and work the same together in order to win.” C o ach C orcoran st ate d that the goal for the team this year was “to  develop a team with character, a team of players that are unselfish and loyal to each other.” After yesterday’s game, he can see this goal becoming more of a reality. “The players are starting to take ownership of the team,”

Coach Corcoran said. “I sense an emerging pride among the players in themselves and each other.  They are realizing that it is ‘their’ team...and they have the ability to control their own destiny through hard work and accountability to each other.” All of the remaining games of the season are a part of the MidAtlantic Conference, which puts the playoffs in reach but hard to predict. Currently, the team is focusing on improving individually and working as a team in order to better the outcome of each game. After this past game, the team is eager for what is ahead and expects the next few games to be exciting. “Right now we just have to concentrate on one game at a time,” Coach Corcoran said. “This Thursday will be a big game against a strong Eastern College team.  I expect the intensity level to be very high for this game.”

etown tennis

Men fall to Kings; ladies postpone three matches in a row Nancy C. Briscoe Staff Writer

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he men’s tennis team played their first match in 10 days after two postponed matches last weekend versus Bridgewater (Va.) and Wilkes. Thursday, April 2, the Blue Jays had a home court advantage over Albright College in the Commonwealth Conference men’s tennis opener. They annihilated the Lions with a final score of 9-0.

In the singles portion of the match, first-year Manrique Arrea won 6-0, 6-0 in the first flight against Lee Fura. At flight two, senior Jeff Kirkhoff also posted a 6-0, 6-0 win to Kevin Gauby. Sophomore Bryan Metz was paired against Jason Lefkoe in flight three, defeating Lefkoe 6-0, 6-2. Paired against Albright’s Kevin Wong in flight four, first-year Jonathan van den Ende triumphed 6-0, 6-0. Sophomore Brian Osborn cleaned up in flight five with a 6-0, 6-1 win over Mike Callahan.

The Jays also succeeded in doubles. Junior Brok Walker and Metz took on Fura and Gauby with an 8-3 win in flight one. Kirkoff and sophomore Austin Plantz continued the streak, winning 8-0 over Wong and Lefkoe at flight two. “Albright was a really bad team,” Metz said. “They only had five players total. Everyone on our team beat their individual opponents.” The Lions forfeited flight six in the singles competition as

well as flight three in the doubles against sophomore Paul Brenner and first-year Matt Freedman. In an upset Saturday, April 4, the Blue Jays lost to King’s College. In singles, the match started well, with Arrea winning flight one against Jonathan Hand 6-1, 6-3 and Kirkhoff taking flight three 6-1, 6-3 over Povl Schmidt. In flight six, Osborn triumphed over Marco Stallone 6-1, 6-3. The men lost flight two, four and six in singles to the Monarchs.

etown track and field

Teams compete with Messiah and Juniata Ross M. Benincasa Staff Writer en’s track and field maintained the same spring season poise which they demonstrated at VMI this past weekend as they defeated Messiah and Juniata at Juniata College. The Blue Jays totaled 141 points on Saturday, while Juniata scored 126, and Messiah rounded out the meet at 118. On the track, the men were led by senior Dylan Rulander and first-year Evan DeArmitt. Rulander captured the 800 meters with a time of 1:58.64 and the 1500 meters in 4:11.33. DeArmitt also took a pair of races from the competition, claiming the 3000 meters in 9:05.89, the fifth-best time in school history. He also won the steeplechase with a time of 10:26.17. Claiming impressive finishes in the 200 meters and 400 meters (first and second respectively), junior Wyatt Eaton also dominated the field events for the Blue Jays. Eaton won the high jump with a leap of 5 feet, 10 inches, and came in second in the long jump, reaching 20 feet, 7.25 inches into the pit. All this came in spite of harsh weather conditions that could have easily hampered the team’s performance. “Weather is no excuse for a poor performance,” Eaton said. “It doesn’t matter if it’s pouring rain, snowing, hailing, whatever. Track is all about being mentally tough and mentally focused. All these guys proved that on Saturday.” The girls also fought hard at Juniata Sunday, but it simply wasn’t enough against the tough Messiah and Juniata teams. They did, however, bring in some impressive finishes in a number of races, including senior Tiffany Kulp’s time of 12:08.60 in the steeplechase, almost two minutes ahead of the second-place finisher. First-year Crystal Connelly also took first in the shot put with the fourth-best mark in school history at 31 feet, 10 inches. Connelly also took the third-best mark in the Etown record books in the discus with a throw of 107 feet, 8 inches, landing her in second place for the meet. The women’s 4x400 relay team, comprised of junior Bernadette Frawley, senior Chelsea Miles, Kulp and first-year Kathryn Howser, also took first place at the meet, with a time of 4:13.44. The men and women’s next meet is this Saturday at Bucknell at the Bison Outdoor Classic, where the women will try to regain their speed and strength, and the men will try to maintain the tenacity they displayed at Juniata.

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In doubles action, Arrea and van den Ende posted an 8-4 win over Hand and Schmidt at flight one. King’s College took flight two and three, defeating Walker and Metz 8-4 and Kirkhoff and Plantz 8-2. In women’s tennis, the Lady Jays had the week off. Both matches scheduled for the last weekend of March against Bridgewater (Va.) and Wilkes were postponed, helping the Lady Jays continue their four-win streak. Sunday’s delayed game against Wilkes is rescheduled for May 1. The men’s match against Juniata scheduled for Monday has been postponed, too. Yesterday, the ladies competition against Juniata has been postponed. They will now face Juniata on April 16. This was the third postponed match for the ladies. Although the Lady Jays had the first week of April off, they weren’t able to prepare for yesterday’s match every day. “We haven’t really practiced because of the weather,” sophomore Kate Roderick said. “But we were able to practice two hours on Sunday.” Next week, the men and women will face Stevenson on the road, and they will then have a home game versus Misericordia University. The women will play against Dickinson college next Thursday April 16, while the men will compete with rival Messiah April 18.


sports

April 8, 2009

the Etownian

etown baseball

15

Rowan provides tough matchup; Jays lose game 11-4 T. Gavin Nevill Staff Writer

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nother weekend, another dominant performance by the Blue Jays, another sweep of a conference opponent. Elizabethtown baseball entered its three game set against Albright College with a 5-1 record in its last six games. Sitting atop the Commonwealth Conference standings, Etown looked to extend its lead against fourth place Albright. The Jays welcomed the Lions to Etown for a windy Saturday doubleheader. Senior Sam Heaps was on the mound for the first game, seeking his fourth win of the year. The Jays fell behind 2-0 in the top of the third inning but never hit the panic button. “We have a lot of confidence as a team,” senior Adam Sheibley said. “We know when we get down that we have the ability to score a bunch of runs at any point to put us right back in the game.” Etown wasted little time in responding, and with a two-run home run by Sheibley and an RBI single by junior Brian Kiernan, the Jays took a 3-2 lead. Tacking on three more runs over the next three innings, the Blue Jays won the game 6-3. Heaps went the distance striking out 12 batters while giving up just one earned run. Junior Adam Hartzell followed up Heaps’ performance with a gem of his

Photo: Matthew P. Butera

Taking a pitch, senior Sam Heaps earned the win against Albright in game two of the series Saturday. Etown won both games and then continued to sweep the series Sunday with a 16-2 win.

own. The Jays again fell behind, this time 1-0 after four innings. It would be the only run Harzell would yield all day. He gave up just three hits in the entire game. Etown was able to manufacture a run in the bottom of the fifth inning. Senior Eric Luff singled and stole second. Sheibley knocked him home for the tying run with a single to the outfield. The game stood deadlocked at one apiece until the

bottom of the seventh inning. Junior Matt Vinagro doubled to center to get the rally started, and Luff came up big again with an RBI single to win the game for Etown 2-1. The two teams met again Sunday for a game at Albright, but, as Hartzell pointed out, the Jays came into the game with a leg up on the competition. “Winning both games gives us the edge and confidence to

know that this team is beatable,” Hartzell said. Etown hitters punished Albright, pitching early and often, as the Jays held a 9-1 lead after three innings. Vinagro earned the victory for the Jays with five strong innings. When it was all said and done, Etown had an impressive 16-2 win. The Blue Jays hammered out 19 hits in the win as 18 different players saw the field for Etown. After a quiet start to the series, senior Tom Semanek came through, reaching base and scoring four times in the blowout. “It didn’t matter what we did yesterday,” Semanek said. “We knew Albright was going to try and salvage a win and play their hardest. We just proved we wanted it more.”  The three game sweep helped improve Etown’s record to 16-8 overall, and, more importantly, 8-1 in the Commonwealth Conference. It was the Jays’ second straight sweep of a conference opponent, and Semanek was proud of how his team played. “I can’t say enough about the effort we all put in during the series,” Semanek commented. Adding to their win streak, Heaps was named Commonwealth Conference Pitcher of the Week for the week ending April 5. Heaps is currently 4-1 this season. Yesterday, the Jays lost to Rowan University with a score of 11-4.

etown softball

Ladies bounce back with six straight wins at home Thomas D. Hagerty Staff Writer

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arch was a rough month for the Lady Jays’ softball team. Their ability to perform at home has held strong throughout their season. They must love that Marketplace cookin’ because they are 7-1 at home this season. Junior shortstop Paige Tanner said, “We just perform better at home. I don’t know quite what it is, but we sure play well here.” She put things into perspective when she added, “We know we got to protect ‘The Nest.’” Their home dominance includes a doubleheaded sweep of Franklin & Marshall, a non-conference— but still intense— matchup. The Lady Jays had a huge day against the Diplomats, which included complete game shutouts for two of their first-year pitchers. In the first game, first-year pitcher Julie Sebastian took the mound. She gave up only six hits in seven innings, including two strikeouts. “Throwing my first shutout was an amazing feeling. It was such an adrenaline rush. I am so lucky to have such amazing defense behind me as well. I trust everyone behind me to help me get through the inning. It wouldn’t have been a shutout without them,” Sebastian said. The offense was provided by Tanner in the third inning. Following a walk and an error, Tanner hit a triple to knock in two runs. That would be all Sebastian needed as she shut down the Diplomat bats for the rest of the game. The Lady Jays would tack on three insurance runs later to win the game 5-0. First-year Elaine Parr got the start for the second game of the doubleheader. She also pitched all seven innings, shutting out the Diplomats. Parr gave up five hits and struck out five in her first career shutout. “As a freshman, it’s hard to transition, but all the hard work from the first half of the season is starting to pay off,” she said.

The Etown bats got going again in the third to manufacture the only run scored in the game. A single by sophomore Shannon Marsico got her on the base paths. Senior Marian Guzik laid down a sacrifice bunt, advancing Marsico into scoring position. This set the table for senior Lauren Hoover, who delivered with a single into left center that allowed Marsico to score all the way from second base. Great team play combined with Parr’s overpowering pitching brought the Jays’ cross-county rivals to defeat. “Hopefully we can keep our win streak alive,” Parr said. Two days later, they did just that. The Lady Jays

Photos: Matthew P. Butera

(Right) Senior Lauren Hoover goes for a hit in game one as the Jays faced Franklin & Marshall in a doubleheader April 2. The ladies swept the series winning game one 9-5, and game two 6-2. (Above) Heading home, Hoover looks to add another point on the scoreboard after a hit from junior Sarah Church.

were back in action, hosting a doubleheader against conference rival Albright College. They brought their first-year pitchers back out to the mound as Sebastian pitched all of the first game and Parr the second. Both girls earned wins as they swept another team at home. The offense is what helped earn the Blue Jays the win in game one. Seven different women scored in the 15-hit effort. Sarah Church went 4 for 4 in the 9-5 victory. In game two, Tanner led the offense with three hits, three runs and three RBIs. Parr was dynamite on the mound, giving up only four hits and striking out eight. The Jays won 6-4 and are currently riding a sixgame winning streak. They look to keep that streak alive today as Juniata visits this afternoon for a doubleheader. The team does not play again until April 16 at DeSales University.


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sports

the Etownian

etown athletics • pro sports • ncaa coverage

April 8, 2009 high school football • olympics • analysis

etown women’s lacrosse

Jays ranked 19th in nation, look to Wilkes

Kristen A. Conroy back goals. to give the Lady Jays a 13-0 lead. advantage in shots and colStaff Writer In the next 11 minutes, Etown Kozak fired off two more goals lected 24 groundballs to FDU ran the field with goals from se- between those of junior Megan Florham’s 21. Foley finished or the past two seasons, nior Kelsea Kozak, junior Alisha Byrnes and first-year Mara Mul- with six draw controls and four the Elizabethtown College Sangrey and sophomores Sarah vaney. Senior Anna Ford netted caused turnovers to go with three grounds balls. Simmons women’s lacrosse team has lost Cullinan and DeMatteo, closing the final goal of the day. to FDU-Florham in one-goal the first half at 8-0. FDU-Florham got in its one led the team with four ground balls, and Cullinan contributed postseason matches, including “We worked together all over and only goal with 2:23 left. a 15-14 setback in last year’s the field,” junior Caitlin Russell “It was really emotional for three caused turnovers. Senior goalie Jenn Hawkins Middle Atlantic Conference said. “The offense was calm down us after what happened last title game. on attack and didn’t get flustered year in the championship,” finished with eight saves and nearly recorded the “FDU-Florham first shutout in prois our biggest rival, gram history. Junior and we have not goalie Becca Watkins beaten them in two made one stop in the years,” senior Diana final two minutes. Simmons said just “We just started scorlast week. “They ing and never looked are a dirty, scrappy, back,” Simmons added. rough team, and we “The defense held them need to beat them to one goal, and it was a this year!” complete team effort.” Saturday, April 4, Before the FDU-Flothat’s exactly what rham wrecking, the Lady the Lady Jays went Jays took on Arcadia out and did. They University Wednesday, not only beat FDUApril 1. Etown came out Florham, but they on top yet again with a demolished them final score of 18-5. The at 18-1, tacking on win advanced the team their seventh conto take over the 19th secutive win. national ranking. “The game was After allowing only a m a z i n g ,” S i m Photo: Matthew P. Butera one goal in her 88 mons said. “It still Senior Anna Ford looks for somebody to pass to in a game against FDU-Florham. straight minutes of play, feels like it wasn’t The ladies destroyed the Devils 18-1. Hawkins was named even real.” the MAC Women’s LaIn the first two minutes of the game, junior Ka- or lose control. And the defense Simmons said. “So to come crosse Goalie of the Week. This tie Caprinolo scored the game’s kept it together the whole game out and shut them down for 58 is her second straight week with first goal, while sophomore and really worked as a unit.” minutes was just unbelievable. the honor. Catch the Lady Jays’ Maria DeMatteo followed just Foley scored the game’s next They didn’t know what hit take on Wilkes University before Easter break this Thurs., April 9 36 seconds later. Senior Katie five goals over a span of 20 min- them, and it was great!” Foley came out firing back-to- utes, then added a seventh goal Etown finished with a 38-13 at 4 p.m.

F

the Etownian’s

AthleteWyatt of the Week Eaton

Michael D. Steiner Assistant Sports Editor

T

he Etownian is euphoric to name junior Wyatt Eaton as this issue’s Athlete of the Week! In last Saturday’s tri-meet against Juniata and Messiah, Eaton had one of the best days in his collegiate career, winning two events and finishing second in another two. Eaton won the 200 meter with a time of 22.3 seconds and sprinted his way into seventh place on the Etown all-time top 10 for the event. In case you were wondering, that’s an average speed of 20 mph, which is the top speed

at which a full grown cat can run. He also won the high jump with a height of 5’10”. For you basketball fans, let’s put this into perspective: Eaton

Photo: Drac Williams

can jump over reigning NBA Dunk contest champion Nate Robinson, who stands 5’9”. Eaton came up just short in the 400 meter with a time of 51.51, averaging a speed of 17.37 mph. This is the approximate speed of a six-lined racerunner, a whiptail lizard found across Wyoming and the Great Plains. He also came in second place in the long jump, soaring to a distance of 20 feet 7.5 inches. That is 7.5 inches longer than a Megatherium, the largest giant ground sloth from South America, an animal which went extinct about 11,000 years ago. Congratulations again to Wyatt Eaton for a great meet,

and good luck to him and the rest of the track and field team as they travel to Bucknell this upcoming weekend.

Q&A Favorite Jay’s Nest grill item: Turkey Pretzel Melt, no tomato Favorite Sports team: Philadelphia Eagles, Boston Red Sox Favorite TV Show: 24  I can’t live without my: Jayci Scannapieco

InsideSports Etown Sports: Men’s lacrosse Tennis

Page 14

Page 14 Track and Field Page 14 Baseball Page 15 Softball Page 15 Women’s lacrosse Page 16 Athlete of the Week Page 16

Sports Recap Baseball (16-8, 8-1): Etown 6, Albright 3 Etown 2, Albright 1 Etown 16, Albright 2 Etown 4, Rowan 11 Lacrosse (M) (7-2, 3-2): Etown 13, Kings 2 Lacrosse (W) (10-2, 6-0): Etown 18, FDU-Florham 1 Softball (9-17, 2-4): Etown 5, F&M 0 Etown 1, F&M 0 Etown 9, Albright 5 Etown 6, Albright 6 Track and Field (M): Vs. Juniata/Messiah- 1st Track and Field (W): Vs. Juniata/Messiah- 3rd Golf: Lebanon Valley Invitational, tied for 6th

Schedule

of Sports

Baseball: April 10: vs. Penn State harrisburg April 13: @ Alvernia (DH) April 14: Juniata Golf: April 9: Blue Jay Classic April 13: F&M Invitational April 14: Penn State Invitational Lacrosse (M): April 9: @ Eastern Lacrosse (W): April 9: Wilkes April 15: @ Lycoming Softball: April 8: Juniata (DH) Tennis (M): April 8: @ Lebanon Valley April 9: @ Arcadia Tennis (W): April 13: @ Stevenson Track and field: April 10-11: Bison Outdoor Classic www.etown.edu/spor ts


Etownian Issue 23 - April 8, 2009  

April 8, 2009 issue of The Etownian

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