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Ethical Living Issue 18 May / June 2010

Ethical Tourism

Taking the road less travelled

Pale and Interesting Ethical fashion and jewellery

Crisp, Crunchy Lunch

Issue 18 May / June 2010 £3.00 Make a positive difference

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ISSN 1754-047X

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Healthy, seasonal recipes

Plus

• Greening Sports • Managing Stress Naturally • Acupuncture • Travel Beauty Kits • Green London Guide • Trash to Treasure

Ethical Publishing


Welcome to Issue 18 of Ethical Living, our May/June issue. I hope that by the time you read this issue you will not already have grown tired of hearing about voting, as we are delighted to be announcing the first Ethical Living Beauty Awards and need your help! Our editorial team and reader’s panel have created a shortlist of delectable ethical beauty products and would now like to ask you, our readers, to help us choose a winner in each category. We hope that these awards will provide important recognition and feedback to suppliers and producers of the best products and encourage them to continue their good work. We also hope it will inspire other producers to further their efforts in making their products as natural, organic and cruelty free as possible. As we skip happily from spring to summer, it’s a great time of year for spending plenty of time outside. In fact, many of us are planning our summer holidays and looking forward to getting away from it all. But you might like to take a look at our article on ethical tourism first, to help you to shed some light on the difficult questions of the environmental and social impact of your trip. And in the meantime, our article on Managing Stress Naturally, will help you to cope with the everyday challenges that are thrown your way.

Happy reading!

Kim Marks Editor

Editor Kim Marks editor@ethical-living.org Published 6 times a year by Ethical Publishing Limited, PO Box 282, Stamford, PE9 9BW

Editorial contributors Sionead Bannister, Hannah Booth, Sarah Callard, Alison Clayton-Smith, Ellie Garwood, Andy Hamilton, Jaswinder Kaur, Julie Penfold

Email: hello@ethical-living.org Tel: 08456 432 499 ISSN 1754-047X For subscriptions Email: subscriptions@ethical-living.org Tel: 01778 392 011

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Pretty in Pastels Check out these fabulous ethical styles the latest fashions

Letters, News and Events Features

Health and Beauty

08 Trash to Treasure

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One man’s trash is another man’s treasure, so the saying goes. So, why not give another life to your unwanted items?, says Sionead Bannister

12 Going for Green

Can we help our sports become sustainable? Alison Clayton-Smith finds many sporting events are aiming for more than just gold

16 The Road Less Travelled

Uncontrolled tourism can have a devastating effect on local environments. Hannah Booth finds ethical tourism can make a difference

22 Introduction to Acupuncture Julie Penfold recounts her experiences of a complementary therapy that is now widely acknowledged around the world

24 Beauty Awards

Got the voting bug? Tell us your favourite ethical beauty products in our brand new beauty awards

26 Review of Travel Kits

Whether you’re camping at the coast or checking in at a luxury eco-pad, keep your cool with our guide to the best ethical travel kits

Home and Garden

Subscription Offer Fashion

21 Fruit & Vegetable Gardening: May-June

30 Beyond the Pale

In this issue’s column, Andy Hamilton offers advice on battling weeds, watching out for frosts and more



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This seasons fashions are awash with soft and subtle pastels. Check out these fabulous ethical styles to make sure you’re pale and interesting

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Crunchy Lunch Delicious carrot recipes with low carbon footprint

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Ethical Tourism Making a difference when you travel

35 Ethical Jewellery

Make sure your bling really does sparkle with these gorgeous new designs from ethical jewellers

Food and Drink

Competitions 48 Ethical Marketplace 50 Ethical Advice 47

36 A Crisp and Crunchy Lunch

Support British farmers and cut down on your food miles and carbon footprint, with these delicious carrot recipes

Travel 40 Green London Guide

From an eco-tour to a green hotel, Jaswinder Kaur gives us her top tips on how to explore the English capital as an eco-tourist

Finance and Work 44 Managing Stress Naturally

The nature of modern jobs and lifestyles means that stress is on the up. Ellie Garwood finds natural ways to help restore balance.

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Letters Mushroom magic

My daughter’s favourite hobby at the moment is turning all our recyclables into useful trinkets for her bedroom. She has jam jars, ice cream tubs, cat food boxes etc, all around her room holding everything from hair slides to dolls clothes. All decorated beautifully of course! She is currently customising Christmas presents for her friends and is terribly upset when things can’t be re-used and have to go in to the council recycling bins. Fay Acton, Northwich

If you’d like to tell us about how you’re cutting back on your plastic usage, a green idea you’ve had or an eco-experience you’ve enjoyed, write to us at Ethical Living, PO Box 282, Stamford, PE9 9BW or email to editor@ethical-living.org

It’s a wrap Hello, My fav eco idea is not to buy wrapping paper but to use alternatives. For instance, I keep all the kids artwork throughout the year and use it as ‘designer’ wrapping. If you don’t have kids, another idea is to use newspapers, the sports pages for the sports mad, beauty pages for the teenage girly types, etc. etc. Wendy Stanger, Norwich

Events

June

May

03 - 06 Sunrise Celebration Festival Held on the beautiful organic fields of Gilcombe Farm in Somerset, Sunrise runs on 100% renewable energy and has introduced new low impact policies and technologies – www.sunrisecelebration.com

07 - 10 The Real Food Festival A celebration of sustainable food, with cooking workshops, demonstrations, a huge farmers market and much more – www.realfoodfestival.co.uk 22 The Daylesford Summer Show A celebration of summer, where you can find out how fun it is to learn to grow, rear, find and cook delicious healthy food – www.daylesfordorganic.com

01 - 04 July Change Your World Sustrans’ fourth annual campaign challenging people to transform their lives by making local journey’s on foot, bike or public transport and by lobbying MPs. www.changeyourworld.org.uk

29 - 30 Bristol Eco Veggie Fayre Outdoor festival celebrating the best of eco-friendly and veggie, with entertainment, stalls, products, food and info – www.bristol.ecoveggiefayre.co.uk

05 World Environment Day Aimed to be the biggest, most widely celebrated, global day for positive, environmental action www.unep.org/wed



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Post Box - © Elena Moiseeva - fotolia.com; Man reading newspaper © drx - Fotolia.com

Recycled collection

I use a supermarket that supplies paper bags for loose mushrooms but plastic bags for all other fruit and veg, so I just grab a handful of paper bags and use them to pop all my loose fruit and veg in. If, at any point over the year, they had no loose mushrooms in stock, then I bought prepacked, but I washed out and kept all the plastic trays and now they are beginning to be planted up with herbs and salad crops, which can be grown on the windowsill and will last all through spring and summer. No need to buy more plastic, low food miles and fresh! Susan Mackenzie, Edinburgh


News

Calling all T-designers WOMbat is inviting people to get creative and submit t-shirt designs for the chance to have their t-shirt produced and sold for a month. The winning designers will have their design turned into a Fairtrade cotton t-shirt which will be sold online and in all WOMbat stores, plus they’ll receive a £100 WOMbat gift voucher. The competition will be running from July until the end of the year, so six customer t-shirts will be created. - www.wombatclothing.com

Donate your old specs KODAK Lens Vision Centres across the UK are urging specs-wearers to donate their unused glasses to help give sight to people in developing countries whose lives are blighted by poor, untreated vision impairments. As part of the national scheme run in partnership with Vision Aid Overseas, Kodak Lens Vision Centres across the UK are encouraging the public to donate their old spectacles together with a £1 donation. By marrying the donation and spectacles, the Kodak Lens Second Sight Project ensures that the glasses reach the Third World where Vision Aid Overseas volunteer opticians are working, dispensing spectacles to those who need them the most. - www.secondsightproject.com

Homeless wild animals A controversial and highly creative advertising campaign highlighting homeless wild animal outcasts ‘inhabiting’ the streets of a littered and graffiti-strewn city was recently launched. Using stunning animal images from top international photographer George Logan, Steve Hawthorne and Katy Hopkins from award-winning agency WCRS created a series of thought-provoking scenes to illustrate the plight of hundreds of thousands of endangered animals, forced out of their homes by human activities such as deforestation, war, climate-change and unrestrained agriculture. Logan and WCRS donated their talents and, through their contacts, secured free print and media space in support of Born Free’s efforts to prevent habitat loss and ‘keep wildlife in the wild’. - www.bornfree.org.uk

06 Camden Green Fair & Bikefest Packed with eco-activities for the family: Green Kids area, music, stalls, exhibitions and the ever-popular Bikefest – www.camdengreenfair.org.uk

20 Greenfest Event with kids activities, music, food and stalls, where visitors can meet environmental and community groups – www.greenfest.org.uk

20 World Naked Bike Ride A peaceful, imaginative and fun protest against oil dependency and car culture and the world’s biggest naked protest – www.worldnakedbikeride.org/uk

21 - 27 Recycle Week This year recycle week is focusing on small waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE), highlighting the range of items that can be recycled. www.recyclenowpartners.org.uk

13 - 20 Green Transport Week Raising awareness of the impact travel has on the environment with various events around the country www.eta.co.uk/green_transport_week 19 - 27 Team Green Britain Bike Week Free cycling events challenging everyone to rethink their everyday journeys and switch to cycling www.bikeweek.org.uk

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If you have any news or events that you would like us to feature in Ethical Living please email us at editor@ethical-living.org

May / June 2010




Trash to

Treasure

One man’s trash is another man’s treasure, so the saying goes and the phenomenal success of local Freegle Groups are certainly proving it right, says Sionead Bannister.

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e live in a disposable society. Industrial estates line landscapes all over the world, churning out cheap, mass produced household goods and consumables. Our appetite for buying and consuming is at an all time high. The world’s richest countries are using up resources faster than the world can keep up, and when all of the stuff that we buy breaks or we don’t want it anymore, the temptation is to fling it into the nearest bin and forget about it. Thanks to huge campaigns and various local government initiatives over the last twenty years, we are all aware of the benefits of re-cycling. Councils have also simplified the process of sorting household waste into recyclable piles. With growing rumours that the UK will run out of landfill space by 2016, increased environmental concerns, and new targets set by the Environment Agency to limit the amount of waste being sent to landfill, the pressure to keep the landfills from filling up has never been greater.



Freecycling™ not recycling Recycling is certainly one essential step in reducing waste but what about re-using? What about giving something you were about to throw into the bin a new lease of life? What about finding a way to connect our unwanted items with people who want them? In early 2003, a new organisation was set up in Arizona that its creator hoped would see an end to good stuff ending up in the landfill; Deron Beal set up The Freecycle Network, a now global online organisation spanning 85 different countries. The ethos of The Freecycle Network is simple - to provide a convenient and easy-to-use website for individuals who are throwing things away to offer them to people in the local community who might need them. The UK’s first Freecycle group was started in 2003, in London. The network as a whole enjoyed huge success in Britain, and now has almost 500 groups across the country. Each group is

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maintained and run by moderators who volunteer their time to ensure the smooth running of the community websites. However, the summer of 2009 was a turbulent time for the Freecycle Network in the UK. ‘There was a lot of turmoil going on behind the scenes, with Freecycle constantly putting lots of restrictions on our groups, and thinking they know how to run groups locally when they are in fact in the USA’ explains Ellie Neville, who is the owner and moderator of the Manchester Greencycle Group (part of the Freegle organisation). In September last year, following the failure of talks to negotiate greater independence and less American control, and after several disagreements between many British moderators and Deron Beal, many of the UK moderators felt they couldn’t continue as part of The Freecycle Network. Over 200 of the Freecycle Groups broke away from the Freecycle Network and set up their own, UK based, organisation called Freegle.

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In just over six months, Freegle has gone from strength to strength. It now has over 1 million UK members in nearly 250 groups. ‘It was absolutely the best move’ says Tina Willcox who owns and moderates the Stockport Freegle Group. ‘The whole point of the groups is that they are run at a local level and it’s a grass roots organisation that works within a community, and now we’re able to do that’. Ellie agrees. ‘Unlike other networks which do similar things, Freegle is owned and run by all its moderators. We do not make any money from this; it is entirely voluntary so it is a true grassroots and ethical organisation. Freegle puts the ‘Free’ back into free-cycling’ she says.

Freegle happy You only have to join your local group and scroll through the messages to see what’s on offer. There’s a huge assortment of items, from the weird to wonderful to practical to broken. A quick glance at

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the Manchester Greencycle group listings reveals a floor lamp is in need of a new home; as is a mini hamster cage, a selection of artist’s paints, an electric heater, a board game, a box of books, an electric guitar, some picture frames and a bedside cabinet. It’s a huge treasure trove of unwanted, but not unloved items. ‘Freegle saves huge amounts of reusable items from going to landfill every month’ says Ellie, ‘and it’s also nice to know that someone else is going to get some use out of something you don’t need anymore,’ adds Tina. And, it’s not only for things that people want to give away. Freegle lists also include wanted sections, where group members post requests for things they need in the hope that someone remembers they have just that languishing in their attic and would like to donate it to a good home.

Community spirit Freegle’s main aim is to keep waste out of landfill, and is not a charitable cause to help those who can’t afford to buy things they need. Inevitably though, as a community network, this is a happy side-effect. Ellie is sure that the recession has fuelled the success of Freegle groups. ‘With more people struggling to make ends meet, word quickly got out about how good Freegle is for finding items. Many people around the country decided to give us a go, and they were not disappointed. They continue to use their local groups frequently, and like the majority of our members, are very happy to be part of the Freegle community’, says Ellie. Rather than heading out to the nearest outof-town department store to spend their money, Freegle members are meeting new people in their neighbourhood and playing an important role in their community.

Something old, something new... Such is the popularity of Freegle groups that specialised ones are now popping up all over the UK. Sarah Lewis-Hammond set up Wedding Library for brides-just-been to give or lend things they don’t need to brides-to-be. ‘It’s similar to Freegle, but specifically for wedding items, and you have the option of loaning or swapping things instead of just giving them away’, says Sarah, who developed the site after her own wedding last year left her with lots of useful things that she didn’t want to just throw away.

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‘I realised there must be loads of stuff people find themselves with after their wedding that other people could use for their big day’, says Sarah.

Charity begins at home Another way to donate unwanted items is to give them to a charitable cause. Emmaus are one of a number of charities that rely on donations of unwanted furniture from the public in order to run their homeless shelters and rehabilitation communities. Many people who have previously been homeless have found refuge, a welcoming community and a sense of purpose at Emmaus Communities. The companions, as the residents are known, work as part of the Emmaus community, restoring old furniture and then selling it in the shops. In return they receive shelter, food and an allowance, but more importantly, community spirit and the support necessary for a return to independent living. There are nineteen Emmaus communities and shops across the UK, and they are always in need of good quality, useable furniture and bric-a-brac. Not only do such donations help Emmaus continue its great work, but it keeps re-usable items out of the landfill.

Re-use, re-use, re-use! The reasons for supporting the new re-use mantra are endless; waste is kept out of landfill, fewer resources are used to make new items, and you’ll play an important part in building a healthy grass-roots community initiative. So, have a good declutter, donate your trash and make someone else smile!

Useful contacts: Freegle Email: info@iLoveFreegle.org www.ilovefreegle.org The Wedding Library www.theweddinglibrary.net Emmaus Tel: 01223 576 103 www.emmaus.org.uk

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Going For Green How can we help our favourite sports become more sustainable? Alison Clayton-Smith investigates and finds many sporting event organisers are aiming for more than just gold.

The international scene Sporting events can be local, national or international but it’s the large-scale, international events that seem to attract the most attention in relation to environmental concerns. The United Nations Environmental Programme (UNEP) started its work on Sports and the Environment in 1994 with the Olympics and is not only still involved with the Olympics but also with organisations such as The International Federation of Football Associations (FIFA). Its aims include promoting environmental considerations in sports. Meegan suggests that such initiatives can be looked at under three main areas: infrastructure (e.g. buildings); overlay/operations on the day (e.g. transport); and legacy (impact long-term). Clearly, large-scale international events, particularly those that are one-off, pose challenges in all three. Summer 2010 will be dominated by the FIFA World Cup in South Africa. Through FIFA’s Green Goal programme, stadiums in South Africa have incorporated elements like rain water capture and energy efficiency into their infrastructure. But Meegan points out that the biggest potential area for negative environmental impact is the transportation and care of spectators. According to a feasibility

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study by UNEP, international travel to South Africa is set to account for more than 65% of the carbon footprint of the World Cup, a footprint which is estimated to be more than 8 times that of Germany 2006. Durban and the City of Cape Town have led the way in terms of carbon offsetting initiatives. However, the South African government only focused on planning for carbon offsetting in November 2009 and there are now concerns about whether the goal of being carbon neutral is achievable. Of course, in the UK, the big forthcoming event is the London 2012 Olympics. Organisers are aiming to comply with the British Standard for Sustainable Events Management (BS8901). Their sustainability plan includes consideration of the event’s long-term environmental impact and one of its aims is to add to local habitats. In January 2010, Olympic Delivery Authority Chief Executive, David Higgins, said ‘We are cleaning up industrial land and creating the green backdrop for the London 2012 Games that in legacy will become the UK’s largest new urban park in over a century’.

Local level initiatives: Football and triathlon Not all sporting events are complex international occasions but that doesn’t mean their organisers can sit on the sidelines. Two examples of environmental initiatives going on at a local level are in Football and Triathlon. Recently, The Environment Agency and The Football League Trust announced a partnership to improve environmental performance and promote green issues. The Trust oversees Community and Youth Development for 72 Championship, League One and League Two clubs and provides funding for their community programmes. That funding will now partially depend on a club’s environmental

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Runner - © Shariff Che’Lah - Fotolia.com; Football - © KeeT - Fotolia.com

‘T

he more sporting events, and events in general, toe the green line, the more that increases pressure on others to perform at a minimum level’, says Meegan Jones, author of Sustainable Event Management: A Practical Guide. Meegan has worked on sustainability issues for events such as the Glastonbury music festival and the London Marathon. So, what are organisers doing? And how can participants and attendees make their environmental contribution?


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performance. Initiatives include: low energy floodlights (MK Dons); rainwater harvesting for pitch irrigation (Exeter City); and Plymouth Argyle held the world’s first carbon-neutral football match. Triathlon is one of the UK’s fastest growing mass participation sports. In 2008, Crystal Palace Triathletes (CPT) organised the first carbon neutral triathlon in the UK, as a result of concerns raised by its 2007 competitors. CPT’s report on the event points out that: ‘Everyone wants to swim in clean water, to cycle and run in places where the air is fresh.’ In other words, if you want to participate in the sport, you need to take care of the environment that sport takes place in. For its 2008 event, CPT estimated that nearly 12,000 miles were travelled by competitors, race volunteers and suppliers and 95% of the race carbon footprint came from transport. Aside from participating in carbon offsetting initiatives, which included donating money to a local wood conservation scheme, they’ve also actively promoted car sharing and the use of public transport.

What can organisers do? Some sporting bodies are drawing up guidelines for their area. At British Triathlon, Events Organiser, Natasha Cuthbert says ‘Environmental responsibility is a key consideration for us in the British Triathlon Event Accreditation process. There are many simple ways that Event Organisers can reduce the environmental impact of their events at all levels from the club fund raiser to the British or National Championships. For example: 1. Do as much of the administration for the event as possible online, from registration through to the publication of results. 2. Use recycled or recyclable materials wherever possible (race bag, awards, event signage, etc). 3. Encourage all involved to be environmentally aware as well, e.g. make it easy for them to recycle everything they bring, encourage car sharing. 4. Leave the area used by the event exactly as you found it. 5. Tell people what you are doing to help the environment - it could help with your relationships with key stakeholders, such as the local authority or sponsors.’ Meegan Jones highlights recycling and composting as an easy win. But, she says, don’t forget to make sure items are actually recycled and composted. Sounds obvious but sometimes people don’t follow through. One of the most useful

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initiatives she’s seen has been offering a deposit refund system on cans and bottles. ‘Immediately that gives you an almost 100% recycling rate.’ Better than recycling for food-related items, Meegan says, is composting. Ensure that food traders use compostable bags and trays and get them to include their preparation scraps in the compost bins, so there’s not too much dry material. To ensure other non-compostable items don’t get put in the bins have volunteers standing by to check that nothing unsuitable goes in. Encouraging ideas like composting can be a great way to develop community engagement. A sports club may not have much use for compost but the local allotment holders might. They can act as volunteers on the day, checking the bins and then ultimately taking away the compost when it’s ready.

What about participants and spectators? If you attend or participate in sporting events, you can play your part too. Jon Alexander completed the world’s first eco Ironman-distance triathlon last year, travelling by train to the race in Barcelona and sourcing eco-friendly kit. And don’t forget to ask the organisers what they’re doing. The Crystal Palace Triathlon went carbon neutral because competitors asked the question. So, do sporting events get the winner or runner up medal? Meegan says that a few years ago you didn’t really see anything on music festival websites about green initiatives but this has changed. Sporting events need to catch up. Given the passion that sport arouses, there are significant opportunities to take positive steps and raise awareness of environmental concerns.

Useful contacts: UNEP Sport and the Environment www.unep.org London 2012 and Sustainability Tel: 020 3201 2000 www.london2012.com FIFA Green Goal Programme www.fifa.com Environment Agency and the Football League Trust Tel: 08708 506 506 www.environment-agency.gov.uk Crystal Palace Triathlon www.crystalpalace-tri.co.uk

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Discovering the

Road Less Travelled Ever wondered about the true cost of those two weeks on a sundrenched beach? Hannah Booth reveals the benefits of ethical tourism and the difference it can make to peoples lives.

Community based tourism Similar low-impact initiatives are springing up all over the world, but whether it’s India, Thailand or Kenya, the concept is the same: local communities manage trips themselves, earn a living doing so and spend the profits where they choose. And tourists get an authentic experience of a lifetime.

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This type of initiative is often referred to as community-based tourism. ‘Community tourism should give a fair share of profits back to the community, which they might invest in, say, health or education’, says Tricia Barnett, director of Tourism Concern, a UK charity that campaigns against exploitation. ‘And it should respect traditional cultures, too.’ Community-based tourism is not yet the norm. All-inclusive holidays involving a far-flung beach and a big resort are still the choice of most but they are less beneficial all round. They can tear apart local communities, wrecking people’s homes, livelihoods and traditional ways of life, as they are displaced from coastal areas to make way for vast hotel complexes. As for the holiday itself, you’re unlikely to have a mind-broadening experience while tanning on a sun-drenched beach for two weeks.

Displaced people Displacement caused by the privatisation of land happens often without warning and without adequate alternatives or compensation. Fishermen in Kerala, south India, uprooted from the state’s sun-drenched coasts, for example, find it impossible to make a living inland. The privatisation of coastal areas means that access to the sea to fish or for leisure is denied. A Taj luxury beach resort in the village of Kovalam, Tamil Nadu, south India has violated fishermen’s rights by saying they couldn’t moor 50 boats on the shore because they blocked tourists’ view of the sea. Villagers are waiting to hear if the government will provide them with three acres of alternative land to replace the seven acres taken over by the hotel.

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Shoes - © sandra zuerlein - Fotolia.com

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hen Kevin Beer signed up to a trekking holiday in Ethiopia last December, his main concern was how unfit he was. But thoughts of aching limbs disappeared as soon as Beer and his wife, Fiona Chapman set eyes on the Ethiopian landscape that would be home for the next four days. ‘It was immense, breathtaking - you could see for miles across valleys, mountains and meadows’, he says. ‘The scale of the country is hard to put into words.’ This was no ordinary package trip. Beer, an English teacher living in Madrid, hiked between villages with a local guide, his backpack carried by donkeys; slept in comfortable, purpose-built huts; and got to know the locals. ‘We ate with our hosts every night’, he says. ‘They gave us tea and honeytoast when we arrived - much needed after a day’s trek. In the late afternoons, we explored on our own: on the last night, we saw baboons climbing the rocks near us. We got to know Addisu, our guide, really well, and we shared our trekking routes with kids going to school and people going to market. It was a privilege, one of the best trips of my life.’ This is ethical (or responsible) tourism at its best: holidays that benefit both local communities and tourists. The trip that Beer took is run by TESFA, an organisation that supports and trains local communities in Ethiopia, enabling them to host small groups of tourists close to their villages.


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Locals rarely see tourists’ money, as most of it goes directly to the multi-national corporations that own the resorts, or tour companies who arrange trips. ‘Small businesses are forced to compete with established multi-national companies, and have to pay higher prices for, say, food and property’, says Barnett. The knock-on effects of these developments can devastate communities, leading to rising inequality, rising crime levels, greed and corruption.

Devastating development Uncontrolled development often leads to environmental damage in some of the most fragile, landscapes in the world. Rubbish builds up, as there is often little investment in its removal; marine life can be wrecked by pollution and water sports; water shortages are common, particularly near thirsty golf courses and swimming pools; and forests are felled to make way for snow sports. Tourism Concern is campaigning with other local and international groups to halt the development of a luxury resort on Bimini in the Bahamas, which the charity claims is causing devastating environmental damage. The Miami-based developer pushed ahead with the project (managed by Hilton Hotels) before plans for a protected area were put in place. It has already destroyed pristine marine habitats, threatening the livelihoods of local fishermen. A year ago, the Bahamian Government declared that a marine protected area would be established but it is yet to be implemented. Meanwhile, the resort development continues. In Grenada, campaign group People In Action (PIA) is lobbying the government to support the creation of a sustainable resort in the protected area of Mount Hartmann and Hog Island. The site was earmarked for one of the world’s largest Four Seasons resorts, but financing ran dry after the economic downturn. PIA is trying to persuade the government to support a more environmentally sound development that would also entail consultation with local people, and to resolve outstanding disputes over land ownership.

The recently-formed Tourism Sustainability Council, comprised of over 40 organisations, is addressing this. It is working to establish universal guidelines that could, in future, ensure all tourism companies operate under the same criteria. People can cut through greenwash themselves though by choosing to holiday in a more independent way, thus injecting cash directly into the local economy: staying in locally-run hotels, eating at local restaurants, using local guides and buying local crafts.

It’s good to talk But those who still enjoy the ease and comfort of an all-inclusive, Western-style holiday can do their bit, however small. Use local transport, preferably trains; learn a few local words; ask for towels and linen to be changed less; leave tips in cash; ask permission before taking photographs; and keep air-conditioning to a minimum. Or, simpler still, ‘Just talk to your waiter or cleaner’, says Tourism Concern’s Barnett. ‘Find out something about their lives - and it may just alter your worldview.’ In other words, ethical tourism, at its simplest, is a state of mind. It doesn’t have to be overly worthy - it simply means being aware of the country you’re in, treading lightly on people’s homes and cultures, interacting, communicating and behaving appropriately. How do you find good ethical holidays like Kevin Beer’s trekking trip? The Ethical Travel Guide, published by Tourism Concern, is a good place to start. Or read the travel sections of national newspapers. Sandele Bay eco-retreat in Gambia, west Africa, recently won The Guardian’s ethical travel award for its employment of local staff, sustainable construction and the fact that the land it is built on will revert to the local village in 25 years’ time. Choose your next holiday wisely and it might just be the best trip of your life.

To fly or not to fly? Of course, you can’t talk about the environmental impact of tourism without mentioning one of the greatest offenders: flying. For tourists, it’s a hard moral decision. Do you stay at home to minimise your carbon footprint? Or do you fly to a less well-off country and support communities and projects that need your dollar? Doing both, but boycotting megaresorts in favour of low-impact, locally-run and sustainable hotels, is one route to an ethical trip. However, many operators are now labelling their holidays ‘responsible’ or ‘eco-friendly’ and it can be hard to know what’s real and what’s greenwash.

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Tourism Concern is an independent campaigning organisation fighting exploitation in tourism. They strive for ethical, fairly trade tourism through collaborative work with industry, governments, and NGOs. Tourism Concern’s Ethical Travel Guide lists over 800 ideas for community-based holidays and excursions. www.tourismconcern.org.uk

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May to June: Fruit and Vegetable Gardening In this column, our fruit and vegetable growing expert, Andy Hamilton, tells us everything you need to know about growing your own, in the most ethical way possible. From planning your plot to what to plant and harvest from season to season, Andy is here to guide you every step of the way.

M

ay is another busy month for the gardener. Weeding will have become a full time job, there is still planting to be done and it is even time to start harvesting some of the fastest growing crops. The longer days and the brighter weather can make the work a joy and it is often around this time that my fondest gardening memories come from. There is something truly magical about arriving at your veg patch to be confronted with courgette flowers, the first flush of peas or to almost visibly see your runner bean vine extending it’s way up your canes. I’m not an early riser, but at least once during May I like to get up at 5am and head up to my allotment; just to spend some time in that very peaceful few hours on an early summers morning appreciating the reasons I have stayed hooked on gardening for so many years.

Battling weeds It is thought that if a vegetable gardener is going to totally give it all up they will do so in their second year. Indeed, the one thing that might make the novice gardener leave the gardening game during these next two months are the weeds. It is easy to get overwhelmed by the sheer amount of weeds growing and the speed that they grow. It seems that for each dandelion you dig up another springs up and the bindweed has weaved its way into so many of your plants that it is hard to see where it stops and your plants begin. There are a few tricks the organic gardener has up their sleeve in order to beat these troublesome weeds. Firstly, mulch: if you put straw, composted leaves or even grass clippings around your plants then the weeds can’t grow. I tend to use this in

conjunction with a bit of hoe action and it seems to work. I have also experimented with underplanting and that seems to work very well. Around my kiwi vine I planted some margoram, this grows so nothing else can. Of course, you can’t expect your plants to give you maximum yields if you underplant them, but I think two crops at once, PLUS less weeds, more than makes up for this.

Watch out for frost You might have read on seed packets, websites and in gardening books the words, ‘Plant when the risk of frost has passed’. This is normally May time for those in the South of our country and June for those in the North and in Scotland. However, a late frost has caught out many a gardener over the years, so do keep an eye out. Plants can be protected with a bit of agricultural fleece (ask you garden centre) or even screwed up newspaper. If there is a morning frost and you have not protected your plants, try a tip from my allotment neighbour Brian and pour ice-cold water on your plants. For the last two years, I have not had to water my allotment until September but fingers crossed we won’t get such a wet year this year. Who knows, we may even have to resort to watering our plants on a daily basis. Most plants will benefit from a jolly good soaking every three days or so. It is far better to give your plants loads of water in one go rather then drips and drabs every day. It is better to water during the morning or just before nightfall, as there is less chance the water will evaporate. However, if you can only get to your plot at 4pm every day then don’t worry, just as long as your plants do get some water!

Andy Hamilton, is co-author of the critically acclaimed The Selfsufficient-ish Bible, covering everything from growing fruit and vegetables, keeping livestock, to saving energy and even green holidays. Andy’s allotments, his home, and his foraging areas are all in Bristol, where he works as a professional forager. Email Andy at gardening@ethical-living.org with your gardening questions.

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Introduction to

Acupuncture T

he underlying principle behind acupuncture is that all the body’s functions are connected by the flow of Qi (the vital energy required around the body) and when illness or pain occurs, whether physical or emotional, this is due to the flow of Qi being impaired. This flow can become disturbed by many physical and emotional causes including poor diet, stress, illness, infection, age, or emotional traumas such as anxiety and grief. Once the nature and the cause of the imbalance is diagnosed, the acupuncturist’s intention is to regulate Qi, which in turn stimulates the body’s own healing response and restores its natural balance. Acupuncture works by restoring, promoting and maintaining good health and has been used to relieve acute symptoms such as back pain, arthritic pain, musculoskeletal pain, severe headaches, hay fever, sciatica, menopause, infertility, PMS and IBS. In May 2009, NICE (National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence) issued guidelines that acupuncture be made available on the NHS for chronic lower back pain.

How it works For those who have never experienced acupuncture, trepidation is common ahead of the first session as the idea of needles entering the skin and the fear of the unknown in terms of pain and after effects is prevalent on a patient’s mind. The actual experience of having acupuncture is a deeply relaxing, relatively pain-free one with a predominant feeling of calm remaining with you post-session. Ultra-fine sterilised disposable needles are inserted into carefully selected acupuncture points on the body where they remain for twenty minutes. Scientists suggest that acupuncture works by stimulating the nervous system and in turn activating the body’s natural healing ability. The location of each needle is entirely unique to each patient’s symptoms and health concerns. The needles are often not placed directly on the immediate source of pain, and this is because the problem area is frequently elsewhere on the body. By looking holistically at a patient’s health problems and focusing on outside factors including diet, lifestyle and exercise, acupuncture resolves the root cause of the condition, as well as relieving symptoms. In order for the patient to experience optimum improvement in their health condition, the advice given by the

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Acupuncture needles - © RB-Pictures - Fotolia.com; Woman having acupuncture © Yuri Arcurs - Fotolia.com

Based on Chinese medicine principles, traditional acupuncture is a complementary therapy widely acknowledged around the world and is now featuring more prominently in mainstream healthcare. Julie Penfold explains how it works and what to expect.


acupuncturist on diet and lifestyle must be followed to maximise the long-term effects of the treatment, as the two very much work in tandem.

What to expect During my session with Kim Huynh, Acupuncturist and British Acupuncture Council member, Kim had a detailed discussion with me about my diet, looking at eating times, whether foods I eat are hot or cold, toilet habits, optimum times when pain develops and also looked at my lifestyle, sleeping habits and whether I was sufficiently active and maintaining a regular exercise regime. This part of the session was comprehensive and included a telephone conversation ahead of the session and a long chat before the acupuncture took place to suggest changes I could make to my eating habits, such as not drinking chilled orange juice first thing on waking, as it is a shock to my system and can upset my gut before I have even started the day. Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) is a condition I have suffered with for a number of years, and after rigorous tests, I was finally diagnosed as having the syndrome just a few months ago. The main symptoms I suffer from frequently include painful spasms, alternating bowel habits, bloating, discomfort around the stomach area and flatulence, which can be very embarrassing depending on the social situation. Acupuncture has been found to be very effective in relieving the symptoms of IBS. On the day I visited Kim, I was suffering enormously from painful spasms and diarrhoea, so was hoping to see an immediate effect on my symptoms. I did envisage the needles would all need to be placed on my stomach and was a little anxious at the thought of this. The feeling of the needles being placed into your skin is a very delicate one with a momentary

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awareness that they have penetrated the skin, which feels like a sharp pinch. For the duration of the treatment you feel both comfortable and relaxed. Kim used a total of twelve needles on my body, placing only three directly onto my stomach to help reduce muscle tension, and relieve painful spasms.

The results The remaining needles were placed away from the stomach area as Kim explained the more severe the symptoms, the further the treatment is conducted from the source of pain. The remaining needles were placed on my hands, to stimulate my immune system and under my knees to aid digestion and wellbeing; as well as trigger points on my feet to ease IBS-associated headaches, reduce diarrhoea and flatulence. The hands and feet are the most sensitive areas of the body. I had a reaction to the needles on my feet, which left the area red and extremely itchy. Kim advised this was due to the sensitivities within my body and that IBS was still an ongoing problem for me. Despite my feet’s resistance to the treatment, after a brief period of painful spasms, I felt awash with calm and experienced little stomach pain for the remainder of the day and this calm also extended to my erratic toilet habits, much to my pleasure. Acupuncture is a treatment I feel could really help with pain relief for my condition and on the holistic advice side; I am endeavouring to make those changes to better manage my health condition naturally.

Further information: For more information on acupuncture, or to find a qualified acupuncturist, contact the British Acupuncture Council on 020 8735 0400 or visit www.acupuncture.org.uk

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Health and Beauty Awards

Best Haircare Product:

Best Skincare Product:

John Masters Lavender Rosemary Shampoo A’kin Unscented Natural Shampoo Naturtint Permanent Hair Colorant MOP C-System Hydrating Shampoo

Caurnie Bog Murtle Body Butter Dr Alkaitis Replenishing Serum Weleda Skin Food Inlight Organic Foot & Leg Balm

Best Make-Up Product:

Best Bath/Shower Product:

Madera Moon Flower Tinting Fluid Nvey Eco Mascara Elysambre Lipgloss Barefaced Beauty Mineral Foundation

Jason Cranberry Satin Shower Raw Gaia Lavendar Raw Soap Dr Bronner’s Castille Soap Weleda Pomegranate Body Wash

Best Baby Product:

Best Suncare Product:

Green People Lavender Baby Wash & Shampoo Beginning by Maclaren - Organic Dusting Powder Burts Bees Baby Bee Shampoo & Wash Weleda Calendula Nappy Cream

Green People Sun Lotion SPF15 + Tan Accelerator Lavera Self Tan Lotion Neal’s Yard Organic Lip Formula Sun Protection Jason Sunbrellas Family SPF45

Best Treatment:

Best Personal Product:

Beyond Organic Foot and Muscle Reviver Sun Chlorella ‘A’ Salus - Floridix Tisserand Eucalyptus & Tea Tree Antiseptic Cream

Yes! Intimate Lubricant Mooncup Moom Hair Removal Natracare Tampons

Best Online Shop:

Best Overall Brand:

SoOrganic Amarya Spirit of Nature Naturisimo

Jason Weleda Green People Lavera

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Award ribbon - © Angela Jones - Fotolia.com

Welcome to the Ethical Living Health and Beauty Awards 2010. In our inaugural awards you, our readers, will have your say. Our editorial team and reader’s panel have created a shortlist of delectable ethical beauty products and would now like to ask you to help us choose a winner in each category. To vote for your favourite visit www.ethical-living.org/awards.


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Review of

Whether you’re taking your holiday in the UK this year or taking a flight to your destination, you can minimise the environmental impact of your travel by making sure you take as little with you as possible. This will reduce the weight of your luggage and therefore the carbon emissions used to transport it and can mean less waste to throw away too. Many ethical cosmetic companies offer their natural and organic products in mini sized versions or travel sets that include everything you might need. Here are a few of our favourite travel cosmetic kits.

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March / April 2010

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Bathroom bottles © © Kasia Biel - Fotolia.com

Travel Kits


JASON Trial Travel Sizes

Spiezia Men’s Starter Set

Herbfarmacy Try Me Gift Pack

JASON offer travel sized options for many of their natural products, including aloe vera shampoo and conditioner, body wash, body lotion, lavender hand and body lotion and powersmile toothpaste. From £1.75

Contains shaving oil (a fantastic alternative to sharing foam), nourishing face balm, men’s body oil (10ml each) and cinnamon soap (22.5g), neatly presented in an organic cotton bag. Great for weekends away. £21.95

5 miniature sized products from the skincare range, including rose face oil (5ml), whole body lotion (50g), starweed face cream, luxury foot cream and working hands cream (20g each). With min. 76% certified organic ingredients. £24.95

Available online from: www.kinetic4health.co.uk Tel: 0845 072 5825

Available online from: www.spieziaorganics.com Tel: 0870 850 8851

Available online from: www.herbfarmacy.co.uk Tel: 01544 327 371

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Dr Hauschka Daily Face Care Kit

Lavera Wild Rose Travel Kit

The Organic Pharmacy Starter/Travel Set

Cleansing cream (10g), cleansing milk, facial toner (10ml each), moisturising day cream, quince day cream (5ml each) and rose day cream (5g), all in a handy travel tin. Ideal for normal, dry and sensitive skin. £15.31

Four mini products from the Faces Organic range for dry and demanding skin to cleanse, tone and nourish your skin. Includes cleansing milk and moisturising milk (7.5ml each), toner and moisturising mask (10ml each). £11.00

Glossy white bag containing carrot butter cleanser, double rose rejuvenating, double rose ultra, antioxidant serum and gel, jasmine high gloss shampoo and conditioner, lemon & eucalyptus shower gel, organic muslin cloth. £45.00

Available online from: www.amarya.co.uk Tel: 01565 653 727

Available online from: www.lavera.co.uk Tel: 01557 870 567

Available online from: www.theorganicpharmacy.com Tel: 08448 008 399

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FREE Sun Lotion and After Sun when you subscribe to Worth

£27.74

Ethical Living has teamed up with Green People to give each new subscriber a free SPF15 sun lotion with sun tan accelerator and an After Sun worth £27.74. Be naturally safe on holiday! We all like healthy, tanned skin for the summer and Green People are here to help with an award winning sun range. Using certified organic and fairly traded ingredients their sun formulations combine natural, broad spectrum UVA and UVB protection with antioxidants and skin vitamins to protect against cell damage. Effective natural sun protection without any harsh chemicals and with soothing and moisture-binding properties to reduce the likelihood of skin irritation or prickly heat. Allergy sufferers love them as they suit all skin types and may also be suitable for those with eczema or psoriasis. No Parabens, Lanolin, phthalates, petrochemicals, PEG’s or other nasties.

For more information about Green People and their products please call 01403 740 350 or visit www.greenpeople.co.uk 28

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To subscribe for only £18 call 01778 392 011, complete the order form below or visit www.ethical-living.org and quote promotion code ‘GreenPeople10’ Title

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Ethical Publishing Limited, PO Box 282, Stamford, PE9 9BW Fax: 08456 432 499 Make a positive difference

May / June 2010

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Beyond the pale

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This season’s fashions are awash with soft and subtle pastels. By choosing items with a strong ethical message, you can make sure you really are pale and interesting.

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1 Layered Playsuit, made from fair trade and organic cotton with high waisted shorts and a layered vest top, peach on top and navy striped underneath. £51.00 www.anniegreenabelle.com Tel: 01509 812 833 2 Lyzet Pullover by Jackpot, in apricot with a V-neck and short sleeves. Made from organic cotton marl. £35.00 www.ascensiononline.com Tel: 08453 881 381 3 Spring/Summer Home Front Dress, made with reclaimed end of roll fabric. Classic 40’s shirt dress with contrasting daisy buttons and tie waist belt. £68.00 www.tarastarlet.com Tel: 020 8986 2089 Make a positive difference

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4 Carapace Vest in bright, made from undyed British Blueface Leicester wool and Hellebore Short Sleeve Shrug in Petal, made from naturally dyed British angora mohair. Both naturally dyed. Vest £149.00 and Shrug £75.00. www.makepiece.co.uk Tel: 01706 815 888 5 Knee Length Coat in purple, made to fair trade standards in cross weave handloom cotton. Double breasted with button details, hand applique work and block print lining. £109.90. www.nomadsclothing.com Tel: 0800 655 6261

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6 Kamille Skirt by Amana in duck egg green with contrast waist tie that weaves in and out of waistband and zip fastening at side. Full circle skirt made from organic cotton. ÂŁ85.00 www.thenaturalstore.co.uk Tel: 01273 746 781 7 Lola Dress by Komodo, printed rayon voile dress in coral. Made to fair trade standards. Elasticated waist for perfect fit. Looks great worn over leggings. ÂŁ65.00. www.puritystyle.com Tel: 01252 820 055 Make a positive difference

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Ethical Jewellery 1

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1 Brilliant Open Engagement Ring. Brilliant cut diamond held in an open 4 claw setting. Made from fair trade platinum. £1480.00 www.credjewellery.com Tel: 020 3176 7839 Fa

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4 Buttons & Beads necklace. Made from old jumpers covered with hand-dyed Lakeland wool & vintage mother of pearl buttons. £17.00 www.blackberrywinter.co.uk R

Make sure your bling really does sparkle with these fabulous new designs from ethical jewellers.

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2 Khomeissa Earrings, with hinged central piece. Handmade to fair trade standards by Tuareg artisans in Niger from Britannia silver. £25.00 www.saharanarts.com Tel: 0117 914 3795 Fa

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5 Romantic Small Disc Earrings, made from a piece of reclaimed and recycled vintage biscuit tins, with sterling silver earwire. £13.99 www.katehh.co.uk Tel: 01745 826 500 R

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3 Little Acorn Pendant on 16” chain in 9ct ethical yellow gold from carefully selected community mines with fair trade policies. £245.00 www.fifibijoux.com Tel: 01683 220 977 i r tr a d e

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6 Flava B Coil Bracelet, handmade to fair trade standards in Kenya with beads made from recycled magazine, posters and calendars. £10.00 www.juzionline.com Tel: 01245 221 248 Fa

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If you want to support British farmers and are trying to cut down on your food miles and carbon footprint, then carrots should definitely be on your shopping list. British carrots are available for 11 months of the year, from early June right through to May and were recently given a carbon rating by Farmers Weekly of just 45g of carbon per 1kg of carrots, compared to 80g for onions, 240g for potatoes and 15,000g for beef.

Carrots are also extremely good for you. They are high in fibre and brimming with beta-carotene, which the body uses to make vitamin A, a nutrient that’s needed for growth and healthy hair and skin, as well as good vision. Carrots are also naturally low in calories, fat, saturates and salt. An 80g serving counts as one of your recommended five portions of fruit and veg a day.

A Crisp and Crunchy Lunch Try out these tasty and healthy carrot recipes with a low carbon footprint.

Organic, local, fresh ingredients from farmers’ markets, local suppliers or even your back garden will enhance your cooking and tasting experience.

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Chairman of the British Carrot Growers’ Association, Martin Evans, says: ‘In the past carrots have had a bit of an image problem, probably because they are such a familiar item they were regarded almost as a commodity. But now they are starting to come into their own, as shoppers turn away from more exotic veg which has been flown half way round the world.’ To celebrate their increasing home grown appeal, the British Carrot Growers’ Association has developed a ‘Best of British’ collection of delicious recipes featuring the freshest seasonal ingredients. So, what are you waiting for? Pick up a pack of carrots now and get cooking.... For more recipes and carroty facts, visit www.britishcarrots.co.uk.

Carrot, Chicken and Barley Soup Serves 4-6 The next time you’re having a roast chicken, this soup is the ideal thing for the next day. Use the chicken bones to make delicious fresh chicken stock. And the last bits of chicken meat and any leftover vegetables, like potatoes or peas, can all be stirred in. Pearl barley thickens the soup and makes it really hearty too. It’s a delicious, warming soup for any time of year.

Ingredients: 1 tbsp Vegetable Oil 450g Carrots – peeled and sliced 1 Leek – cleaned and sliced 1.2 litres Chicken Stock 75g Pearl Barley 175g Chicken – cooked and broken into bite sized chunks 175g Potatoes – cooked and chopped 100g Vegetables – cooked, such as peas, broccoli, or green beans

a large pan, cover with about 2.4 litres of water, add a bay leaf if you like, then bring to the boil. Cover and simmer for 30 minutes to extract all the goodness from the bones, then remove the lid and simmer for a further 40 minutes or so or until the liquid has reduced by half. Strain to remove the bones then leave to stand for 5 minutes. Use a spoon to skim off any excess fat which rises to the surface of the stock. It’s now ready to use but can be stored in the fridge for up to 4 days or frozen for up to 6 months. Cook’s notes: To save time you can always make chicken stock with a stock cube or from concentrate.

Method: Heat the oil in a large pan, add the carrots and leeks, then sauté over a medium heat for 4 minutes. Add the stock, pearl barley, chicken and potatoes and season well. Bring to the boil, then cover and simmer for 20-25 minutes or until the pearl barley and carrots are tender. Stir in the cooked vegetables, return to the boil and simmer for 1 minute. Stir in the parsley and season to taste. Ladle into bowls and serve. To make chicken stock: Pick all the chicken you can off a chicken carcass and set aside. Place the chicken bones, and skin in

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Veggie Crumble Pie Serves 4 Ingredients: 1.2 litres Vegetable Stock 450g Carrots – peeled and sliced 225g Parsnips – peeled, halved and sliced 350g Small New Potatoes – halved 2 Leeks – cleaned and sliced 150g Frozen Peas 4 tbsp Cornflour 4 tbsp Crème Fraiche 2 tbsp Fresh Tarragon – chopped, or 10ml/2tsp of dried Tarragon 175g Plain Flour 75g Butter 1 tbsp English Mustard 75g Cheddar Cheese – grated Salt and Freshly Ground Black Pepper

Method: Preheat the oven to 200°C/400°F/Gas Mark 6. Place the stock in a large pan and bring to the boil. Add the carrots, parsnips and new potatoes, cover, return to the boil and simmer for 15 minutes or

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until tender. Stir in the leeks and peas, return the stock to the boil then remove from the heat. Drain the stock and reserve. Place the vegetables in an ovenproof dish. Discard 300ml of the stock, return the rest to the pan. Mix the cornflour to a smooth paste with a little cold water and stir into the stock with the crème fraiche and tarragon. Bring the mixture to the boil, stirring until you have a smooth creamy sauce. Simmer for 1 minute. Pour the sauce over the vegetables and season well. Place all the topping ingredients in a food processor with a good pinch of salt and ground black pepper; whizz together until they resemble fine breadcrumbs. (if you haven’t got a food processor then rub the butter into the flour, then stir in the mustard and cheese and rub together again until you have a crumbly mixture). Scatter the mixture over the top of the vegetables then bake for 20 minutes or until the top is golden brown. Serve as a vegetarian main course or vegetable side dish.

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The Best Ever Carrot Cake Makes 1 large 20cm cake Moist sponge lightly spiced and sandwiched together with cream cheese icing - who could resist? Not everyone is a fan of walnuts though so if you prefer replace the walnuts with raisins instead. It’s hard to say which tastes best!

Ingredients: 350g Light, Soft Brown Sugar 3 Large Eggs 350ml Sunflower Oil 350g Plain Flour 1.5 tsp Baking Powder 1 tsp Bicarbonate of Soda 2 tsp Ground Cinnamon 1 tsp Ground Ginger 1 tsp Vanilla Essence 350g Carrots – peeled and grated 75g Walnuts or Raisins – finely chopped

Ingredients for the icing: 350g Icing Sugar 50g Soft Butter 1 tsp Vanilla Essence 150g Cold Cream Cheese Walnut Halves Ground Cinnamon – to dust

Method: Preheat the oven to 170°C/325°F/Gas Mark 3. Lightly oil 3 x 20cm/8in sandwich tins and base line with baking parchment. Place the sugar, oil, and eggs in a large bowl and beat together with a wooden spoon until the mixture is smooth and thickened. Sift over the flour, baking powder, bicarbonate of soda, cinnamon and ginger then fold in until well mixed. Fold in the carrots and walnuts or raisins. Divide the mixture between the prepared cake tins. Bake in the middle of the oven for 30-35 minutes or until golden, risen and the middle bounces back when lightly pressed. Leave to cool in the tin for 5 minutes before transferring to a wire rack to cool completely.

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For the icing: Sift the icing sugar into a large bowl, then add the soft butter and vanilla essence. Use an electric whisk on low, to beat this until it is well mixed. Add the cream cheese and briefly beat together again until just combined. Don’t over beat or it will become runny. When the cakes are cold, peel away the baking parchment. Divide the icing between the three cakes, spreading it evenly over the top of each. Stack the cakes one on top of the other. Top with the walnut halves and cinnamon. Store in a cool place.

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Green L London Guide

ondon is one of the greenest capitals in the world and is set to become greener still now that everyone’s becoming environmentally conscious. Here’s a guide to a perfect green experience in London, from going on an eco-walk through central London, to eating in an organic pub, and finally dancing the night away in a bid to save the planet.

1. Go on an Urban Eco Tour Tel: 07722 559 245 www.green-london.org.uk

Jaswinder Kaur gives us her top tips on how to start exploring the English capital as an eco-tourist. 40

An unusual two and half hour tour of London’s famous landmarks. As the name implies, this tour delves into environmental issues affecting us all. Winner of the Guardian and Unltd Green Living Award, Glastonbury Award 2008 - 2009, this social enterprise was set up in August 2009 by Catherine Baker. The interactive eco-tour lets you take in the sights of London, from Trafalgar Square to the Cabinet War Rooms, while gaining insights into the myriad issues surrounding climate change. The tour is extremely engaging, as the guide manages to simplify and make relevant all of the different and complex issues associated with climate change - from population growth, to our carbon

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London Big Ben © sborisov - Fotolia.com; London St. James’ Park © he kingston - Fotolia.com

Green London Guide


footprint and waste management. Along the way, participants get involved in various interactive and sometimes amusing activities. Much has been said about carbon emissions and how many tonnes people in the UK emit through their day to day activities. One of the unusual activities on this tour is visualising how much a tonne of carbon actually is! Each stop on the tour ends with ten tips on how we can all play our part in tackling climate change. This urban eco-tour helps you to realise that your actions as a consumer do have an impact on the environment and makes you want to do your bit. Certainly, some parts of the tour were sobering, especially those concerning the tipping point, but overall one leaves feeling positive and empowered to make change, while appreciating the urban and natural sights of one of the greatest cities on the planet. Tours cost £11.10 per person and are conducted on Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays. You can book in advance or turn up at the meeting point in Trafalgar Square. Make a positive difference

2. Club for the Climate Club4Climate London, 156 Pentonville Road, London N1 9JL Tel: 020 8888 2333 www.club4climate.com Opened in October 2008, this unassuming club along Pentonville Road is the place for clubbers with an eco-conscience. With their tagline ’All you have to do is dance to save the world‘, Club4Climate shows that fighting climate change is not all gloom and doom, you can have fun and do your bit to protect the environment. How does it all work? The dance floor is covered with cells that transfer the energy of dancing limbs into electricity, which in turn powers about 60 per cent of the club. The remaining 40 percent is ecofriendly electricity. The club also waives the cover charge for any patron who proves that he or she travelled there in an eco-friendly way. Admission: £10.00 cover charge.

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12 Camley Street, London, N1C 4PW Tel: 020 7833 2311 www.wildlondon.org.uk Just beside London’s busiest transport hub, King’s Cross and St. Pancras, lies a two acre nature reserve on the banks of Regent’s Canal. A former coal yard, this nature reserve created in 1984 comprises a meadow, woodland and pond. Walking tracks along this lush and green environment let you be at one with nature and you can spot a variety of birds from kingfishers and mallards to reed warblers. For an hour or two, you forget that you are in London for the air is cleaner and there’s no traffic in sight, just bird songs and the rustle of leaves in the breeze. Opening hours 10am to 5pm daily.

4. Have a meal at an organic pub The Duke Of Cambridge, 30 St Peter’s Street, London N1 8JT Tel: 020 7359 3066 www.dukeorganic.co.uk The Duke of Cambridge pub in Islington is the UK’s only certified organic gastropub. Certified by the Soil Association, this award-winning pub was ahead of its time, established in 1998, way before it was hip to be green! Founded by Geetie Singh, the pub eschews big business and supports independent producers. It serves organic, locally produced food and keeps its transport miles to a minimum with about 80 per cent of its produce sourced from the Home Counties. The pub’s menu is seasonal and its fish comes from sustainable sources certified by the Marine Stewardship Council. Its organic beers and lagers

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are brewed by two breweries close to London. Every aspect of this pub is green from its reusing and recycling policy to its energy, which is generated by solar and wind power. Expect to pay about £27.00 per person for a 3 course meal excluding wine. Opening hours 12pm to 11pm from Mondays to Saturday and 12pm to 10.30pm on Sundays

5. Stay in London’s greenest hotel The Cavendish Hotel, 81 Jermyn Street, St James’s, London, SW1Y 6JF Tel: 020 7930 2111 www.thecavendish-london.co.uk The cream façade of this hotel block on Jermyn Street, just off London’s Piccadilly Circus looks just like any other. But this is no ordinary hotel; the Cavendish Hotel is one of the few London hotels to be awarded the gold award for its environmental policies by Green Tourism London. To ensure a low carbon footprint, the hotel has an energy efficient lighting system and an in-house water bottling system that reduces packaging and delivery of bottled water to guests. Guest rooms have low volume showers and taps, and newspapers are given on request only. All of these measures have helped this 230-room hotel reduce its CO2 emissions to lower than half the average rate of 29kg per guest, per night. The hotel also uses Fairtrade products throughout and its restaurant serves local, seasonal produce and fish from sustainable sources. The hotel also hires out bicycles and provides cycling, walking and running maps to its guests. Prices start from £140 per room per night.

May / June 2010

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London Tower Bridge © Blickfang - Fotolia.com

3. Camley Street Nature Reserve


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Managing Stress

Naturally Constant movement, along with the intense nature of modern jobs and lifestyles, means stress is on the up. Ellie Garwood finds out how a few simple practices and lifestyle changes can help us to restore balance.

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and 85 per cent of all serious illnesses, as well as various negative emotions, such as anger, frustration and depression. However, natural stress management techniques, such as yoga, Tai Chi and Reiki, along with meditation and other holistic therapies, can help calm a busy mind, and heal an over-worked body, restoring balance into our lives, and in turn the lives of our families and even communities.

Yoga and Tai Chi Ancient Eastern practices, such as yoga and Tai Chi, can help ease and release physical tension built up by stress. With their quiet, precise movements, the practices draw the focus away from our busy, chaotic lives. They also encourage a deeper, more relaxed breathing pattern, which can slow the heart rate and eliminate carbon dioxide from the body. In China, Tai Chi classes are provided in public parks and

May / June 2010

open spaces by the Government, as they are seen as a vital way to keep the population healthy, happy and stress free.

Meditation Meditation, a key part of both yoga and Tai Chi, is another brilliant way to introduce calm into your life. Karen Font-Garcia, a Hampshire based meditation teacher, says, ‘Meditation helps focus the mind, clearing out all of our busy, everyday thoughts. By focusing on one thing you’re forced to forget the world around you and all the stresses that come with it. If you want to bring peace and tranquillity into your life, improve your quality of sleep and learn how to deal with stress effectively, meditation truly is the key.’ As with any new pursuit, meditation becomes easier with practice and you may wish to gain tips and techniques by initially joining a course before

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Stressed Woman © Sean Prior - Fotolia.com

‘W

e are the ones who block our own paths to tranquillity and we are the ones who must clear them again’. It’s an ancient saying with a massively modern relevance. Tranquillity, calm and a stress free life, contrary to popular belief, aren’t solely for those able to afford luxurious spa retreats, or personal masseurs. All the peace we could ever wish for is inside each one of us - we just need to donate a little time and effort into unlocking and embracing this inner calm. In our busy, modern lives it has become the norm to rush from one activity to the next, from work to the shops to the gym. Such constant movement, along with the intense nature of modern jobs and lifestyles, means stress, and all its negative manifestations, is on the up. Numerous studies have shown that stress triggers at least 70 per cent of all visits to doctors,


‘Meditation helps focus the mind, clearing out all of our busy everyday thoughts.’ Karen Font-Garcia

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not considered an illness, when felt for a prolonged period of time the body can begin to be affected both physically and mentally, as it weakens the immune system; Reiki aims to counterbalance this’, she says.

Homeopathic remedies Reiki Reiki, a practice which evolved in Japan in the early nineteenth century, is another increasingly popular natural stress management practice. The word Reiki means Universal Life Energy, referring to the energy that surrounds us. The practitioner transfers their healing energy by gently placing their hands non-intrusively in a sequence of positions over the whole body. The whole person is treated rather than specific symptoms, and a full treatment normally takes one to one and a half hours. Recipients often describe feeling a glowing radiance, heat or a tingling sensation during Reiki sessions, and a sense of calm and wellbeing after. Tina Furness, a South Coast based Reiki Master, has seen many of her clients transformed by the process. ‘The calm brought about by Reiki can be seen immediately in many cases. Treatments reduce stress within the body, which allows the body to begin the healing process. While stress in itself is

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For those short but intensely stressful events, interviews for example, or exams, there are a range of homeopathic remedies available. Bach Flower remedies (which are hand produced in England) are made naturally from spring water infused with wild plants and flowers from a specific region in the UK. The remedies were developed by Dr Edward Bach, a physician and homeopath, who believed the properties of different flowers and plants can help calm various mental states. He identified 38 basic negative states of mind and created a plant or flower based remedy for each one. Pine, for example, is said to calm feelings of guilt, sweet chestnut extreme anguish and aspen is thought to help quell the fear of unknown things.

Lifestyle changes Smaller lifestyle changes are also a key way to eliminate stress. Try swapping coffee and traditional black tea for herbal teas, chamomile and lavender tea are particularly renowned for their calming properties. Getting

May / June 2010

the required eight to ten hours sleep can also make a profound difference to your stress levels. As can exercising, which in turn can often help turn off the brain and induce a more rested sleep. Another, more obvious, technique is limiting your exposure to stressful situations. Take a moment to think of and write down the main causes of stress in your life. Is it your job, your commute or perhaps a friend or spouse? Then, make shifts to eliminate, or lessen, these situations and their impacts. If you sit in heavy traffic on your commute to work, can you take the train in order make your journey more pleasant? Sitting and looking out of the window can be amazingly relaxing, as can reading a book or your favourite magazine. Is it your job that’s stressing you out? Can you speak to your boss, explain your situation and make changes to move towards a better work/life balance? Perhaps even taking the plunge to look for a new less stressful job altogether. Different stress management techniques will appeal to different people, finding out which one is right for you might take a little time but the effects, on your health, mentality and general outlook, could well be lifechanging.

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Woman Meditating © Scott Anderson - Fotolia.com

going it alone. Tips to remember include: sticking to the same time each day, making sure you are not liable to be disturbed halfway through and embracing the power of your senses – choosing the right sounds (CDs) and smells (joss sticks/oils) is essential.


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eginning is the 100% natural and organic skincare range from Maclaren. Made from sustainably and ethically sourced ingredients, the products support the environment as well as your baby’s delicate skin. Shortlisted for Ethical Living’s ‘Best Baby Product’, the beginning absorbing dusting powder is the perfect way to keep babies skin dry. Natural absorbents; corn starch and kaolin, combine with antiseptic tea tree oil and lavender to soothe and protect. For more information please visit: www.maclarenbaby.com.

Competition WIN A CALENDULA SHAMPOO AND BODY WASH Win one of 75 packs of Weleda Baby Calendula Shampoo & Body Wash, worth £6.95 Prize details: Weleda’s best-selling Calendula Shampoo & Body Wash is especially gentle, and has been dermatologically-tested on easily irritated skin prone to eczema and dermatitis. It’s suitable not just for baby’s delicate skin, but also for older children and adults that have to take special care. Made with golden organic calendula petal extract and moisturising plant oils, this skinfriendly bodywash is also kind to eyes. It’s free from SLS/SLES, GM ingredients, synthetic ingredients or artificial additives, and contains eco-friendly plant cleansers made from biodegradable plant sugars and coconut. Recently voted Best of the Best Baby Wash by the TIPS midwife-tested awards. www.weleda.co.uk Entry details: For your chance to win simply send your name, address and email to Weleda Competition, PO Box 282, Stamford, PE9 9BW or by email to weleda@ethical-living.org. Terms and conditions: Closing date for entries is 31st July 2010. Entries received after this date will not be eligible. Prize available in the UK only, subject to availability, non transferable and no cash equivalent or any alternative can be redeemed.

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Summer is almost upon us! Whether you’re heading off to a festival, going on a camping trip or hanging out at home, we’ve got lots of ethical ideas for you.

Ultimate festival kit

Tent hotel

Any festival-goer will know that when planning what to take with you it’s important to travel light. For those of you who are tired of having too many products to squeeze into your backpack, a handy, travel size Dr Bronner’s Castile Liquid Soap is the ultimate festival must have. It can even fit into your pocket! The hard working product has a multitude of uses, including cleaning your clothes, hair, body or face. It can also be used to shave, as a massage oil and this peppermint option can even help to brush your teeth! The soaps are completely biodegradable and vegetable based, made with certified fair trade and organic ingredients. They contain no synthetic foaming agents, thickeners, preservatives, fragrances, dyes or whiteners and come in a 100% post consumer recycled bottle. The travel size liquid soap is £1.69. For your nearest stockist call 0845 072 5825 or visit: www.kinetic4health.co.uk

If you’re off to Glastonbury, Haselstock, Serenata or Vintage at Goodwood festivals this summer but dread trying finding a good spot to pitch your tent, look no further! Hotel Bell Tent will be set up offering wonderful hassel free, VIP, luxury boutique camping accommodation that’s ‘just like staying at a hotel’. You just check in and check out, leaving all the hard work to them! Hotel Bell Tent is made up of elegant cream 100% cotton canvas Bell Tents set up as ‘rooms’. The 5 metre hotel suite comfortably sleep up to 6 people on three luxury queen size luxury inflatable mattresses, while the 4 metre tents are more intimate, comfortably sleeping up to 4. Bell Tent’s are available dressed with fabulous accessories to transform them into cosy and welcoming spaces. www.hotelbelltent.co.uk

Let’s play camping

Change your space Staying at home this summer? If you’re not planning a holiday, why not have a change of scene by giving your living space a fresh new look insead? GreenSteps Natural Eco-Paint is a ready to-use, VOC free, solvent free and highly durable, non-toxic interior matt paint, made from natural minerals, not petrochemicals. It’s non-toxic and is therefore safe for families and children. GreenSteps is the only paint on sale in the UK with Natureplus accreditation. 2.5L tin is £17.00. Available from Tesco Extra stores. www.greensteps.co.uk

Let your little ones have their own camping experience everyday with this recycled cardboard play house. Paperpod supply an imaginative range of toys and furniture made from tough corrugated card with unfinished surfaces, which enable your child to get creative and decorate the outside using paints, crayons, pens and stickers. Once the kids have finished their play camping, the structure simply folds away for easy storage. £33.95. www.paperpod.co.uk


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Ethical Advice In this column our ethical agony aunt, Sarah Callard, answers your ethical dilemmas. From where to holiday to whether it’s better to hand wash your dishes or use a dishwasher, Sarah finds out the most environmentally friendly and ethical options.

Sarah Callard has been writing about natural lifestyles for over 10 years. She is a columnist for the Saturday Telegraph magazine and the author of Green Living. If you have an ethical question that you would like Sarah to answer, please email us at advice@ethical-living.org

???? ????? Q. I’m a keen gardener but I

only have a small garden with no space suitable for a compost bin. I’d love to make my own compost and I hate throwing away kitchen waste but I’m not sure what to do.

A. Compost bins come in all

shapes and sizes but, more often than not, they are big, black and conical and designed to sit on earth in an unused corner of your garden. If, like a lot of people, you have a small outdoor space or just a yard, making your own compost may not seem like a feasible option. However, you do actually have quite a few choices. Green benefits As a keen gardener, you already know the benefits of home composting but there are so many I feel compelled to mention a few. It can drastically cut down on household waste: around 40% of the average dustbin’s contents are materials that can be turned into compost. Composting improves soil quality, and reduces the need for chemical fertilisers and peatbased composts. Demand for peat-based compost is causing the peat bogs in Britain to diminish, thereby destroying a wildlife habitat and using a finite resource. A wide range of kitchen waste can be composted including fruit

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and vegetable peelings, eggshells, tea bags and coffee grains. Waste paper and cardboard can also be composted although it is advisable to tear, scrunch or shred it first. Garden waste like grass clippings, fallen leaves and cut flowers, can be composted but the key thing to remember is that there should be a good mixture of kitchen and garden waste. Choosing a site Ideally, compost bins should be placed directly onto the earth, so that worms and other organisms can make their way into the bin and start working on your compost. It also allows for better aeration and drainage, both of which are beneficial for successful composting. However, if you have no option, it is possible to site a compost bin on concrete, tarmac or a patio. If you have paving slabs you might consider removing a couple, so your bin can sit directly on the earth or another option is to build a small raised bed on which to sit your compost bin. If it is sitting directly on a paved surface, beware that some liquid might seep out of the bottom of the bin and stain the paving underneath. You will also need to introduce the soil-dwelling organisms, such as worms, manually to your bin. You can do

May / June 2010

this easily by adding a shovelful or two of soil to the bottom of the bin. It’s not advisable to put a compost bin directly onto decking, as the liquid that seeps out will stain the deck, so your only real option here is to create a raised bed. If you use deckboards to create it and plan some planting around the compost bin you can actually make a feature of it, which might be a good option if you are really pushed for space. You’ll need to seal the boards under the bin with decking seal and then line the space with plastic to protect the deckboards underneath - cut some drainage holes through the plastic over the spaces in between the deckboards. Opening a can of worms If you live in a flat or have very little outdoor space a wormery might be the best option for you. There are wormeries available for indoor and outdoor use and they cost anywhere between £40 to £100. Wormeries take a bit more effort than a standard compost bin but they work on the same principle and are a great way to reduce kitchen waste and make some top quality compost for your pots and window boxes.

For more information please visit www.homecomposting.org.uk

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Ethical Living Issue 18 May / June 2010

Ethical Tourism

Taking the road less travelled

Pale and Interesting Ethical fashion and jewellery

Crisp, Crunchy Lunch

Issue 18 May / June 2010 £3.00 Make a positive difference

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Healthy, seasonal recipes

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• Greening Sports • Managing Stress Naturally • Acupuncture • Travel Beauty Kits • Green London Guide • Trash to Treasure

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