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MAGAZINE ExperienceTheSouthwest.com

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Finding Common Ground

preservation collaboration recreation #theevolutionofelan


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Finding Common Ground

preservation collaboration recreation


contents

options art lovers

a conversation with greg istock 18

creating art, music, and life in abstracts

the art of interior design 22

artisans who bring function and style to life

the allure of watercolor 26

an historical perspective through the eyes (and brush) of roland lee

soul searchers

the dark night of the soul 30

a space in time where new life begins

let’s try some civility 32

the longing for meaningful (and civil) conversation

adventure in wellness 34

a “dream� vacation that truly benefits mind, body, and soul

adventure seekers

the day we set the colorado river free 41 a grand experiment in ecological restoration

boots and burgers 50

a deliciously novel hiking and dining guide

concrete to canyons 58

when inner city students step foot into zion

desert dwellers

building ice age park 62 a prehistoric venture takes shape in urban style

expectations in every issue

etched in time 8 leaving their mark 10 #theevolutionofelan 12 experiencethesouthwest.com 13 meditations 14 snapshots 92

story keepers 66

historic structures: the mouthpiece of history

the green that turned golden 70 the 50th anniversary of dixie red hills golf course

saving an oasis 74

the collaboration of preservation and recreation in southern utah

culture creators the hills are alive 80

on our cover

Writer, Rowan Jacobsen Photography By: Fred Phillips

a journey through the years of making music

community arts and events information 84

the people, the places, the dates, the vibe...the culture of southern utah


ETCHED in time

The Jeep was packed and pointed in the direction of Moab. “Baby Blue” was ready to hit the road. My husband, Steve, had planned a four day excursion to break in our new “Baby” - a modified Jeep Wrangler equipped with suspension, lift, lockers, wench, tools, survival kit, an ice chest, and lots of snacks. We headed north on Cottonwood Canyon Trail east of Kanab, stopping to explore the hoodoos along the way. With the tops off of the Jeep for a splash of crisp air, we meandered along the Cottonwood Canyon Trail ending late in the afternoon at Kodachrome Canyon. Scenic Byway 12 led us to Escalante by nightfall where we checked into a no frills, no wifi, mid-century motel; we embraced the novelty. Dinner at Escalante Outfitters, conversations with locals, and a map was all it took. Moab would have to wait—the Grand Staircase had numerous off-road trails and they were calling. Growing up in the rural Arizona desert, I learned a thing or two about off-roading. I owned a motorcycle and drove our dune buggy long before my first kiss. In 1971, the Parker Dam Chamber of Commerce and the National Off-Road Racing Association collaborated with the BLM and the Colorado River Indian Tribes to create a 500 mile offroad race. I spent my teen years camping along that race course with friends, watching the lights of the big trucks working their way through the rugged hills in search of the finish line. How I loved being outdoors under the stars...and the roar of an engine. The 800,000-plus acres of the Kaiparowits Plateau form the wildest and most remote part of the Grand Staircase. It is said to contain the best record of Late Cretaceous terrestrial life in the world. The Kaiparowits also harbors an estimated 5 to 7 billion tons of recoverable coal. Three hours into the drive we discovered Native American ruins. We stood for a moment honoring the space. I photographed the craftsmanship and utilized my lens as a microscope to zoom in on the details. I stood at the entrance of a dilapidated wall that appeared to host a small cave beyond it. I focused my lens, and as I did, two of the bluest eyes I had ever seen rose from the dark. I froze. I could not identify what “it” was but I knew “it” was present. I slowly backed away. Those blue eyes watched my every move then vanished back into the dark. I reflected on the symbolism of that moment; the mutual respect exchanged between myself and the wild.

“Yet the remoteness, the size, the harsh terrain, the heat, the aridity, the streams poisoned with alkali and arsenic, the wind, the silence when there is not wind, the overpowering solitude of the Kaiparowits -- these are precisely the commodities which make it valuable. It is a fierce and dangerous place, and it is wilderness right down to its burning core.”- Southern Utah Wilderness Alliance Learning to love off-roading early in life also taught me to appreciate the wilderness and the preservation thereof. Had I not have had the opportunity to explore a myriad of remote areas, I would not understand the need to respect them. Preservation and recreation are often seen as an oxymoron. All or nothing; one way or “no way.” Opinions are either right or wrong; black or white. Few believe that preservation and recreation can ethically coexist. I believe they can. In this issue of Etched, we share with you some glistening examples of just that...places and people working together to not only make the southwest an excellent place for recreation but a place to honor and protect. Our articles reflect collaboration as a conversation. They highlight people who know how to turn down the noise to listen, then turn it up to get things done. Our pages portray projects that emulate social, environmental, and economical responsibility without all of the warfare that has become an inherent part of advocacy. I was never able to identify those big, blue eyes that connected with mine that day, but I haven’t forgotten them. Nor have I forgotten what it’s like to sleep under the stars, or the thrill of a race car completing 400 miles of the most rugged off-road terrain imaginable. I am reminded of my gratitude for such experiences when the opportunity to collaborate exists and the joy of discovering common ground prevails. Seek and ye shall find.

darci hansen editor in chief

www.ExperienceTheSouthwest.com

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#theevolutionofelan

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Finding common ground experience enjoy awareness educate preserve

2015

leaving their mark

volume 9 – issue 1

The outdoor issue

Darci Hansen Founder Editor in Chief

• │

rowan jacobsen writes about place and how it shapes ecosystems, cultures, cuisines, and us. His quest to capture the spirit of place and people has led him from the bayous of Louisiana to the marshes of Alaska’s Yukon Delta, from the jungles of India and Burma to the rivers of Amazonia. He writes for Harper’s, Orion, Mother Jones, and Outside, where he is a contributing editor. He is the author of the James Beard Award-winner A Geography of Oysters, Fruitless Fall, The Living Shore, American Terroir, Shadows on the Gulf, and Apples of Uncommon Character. He lives in Vermont. Nikki Melanson is Director

of Marketing in The Nature Conservancy’s Western Division. A 14-year veteran of the Conservancy, she is responsible for leading activities that introduce people to conservation work happening in the organization’s Utah, New Mexico and Nevada chapters. Nikki has bachelor’s degrees in English and French, and a master’s degree in publications management. She resides in Jackson Hole, Wyoming.

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• │ Associate Editors Vicki Christian Editorial Assistant Gina Jrel Arts Erin Jensen Copy Tammi Swanson Stylist

Nick Adams Lead Photographer JJ Abernathy Contributing Writers Cindy Clemens June Pace

Signe Adams Contributing Stylist

• │ Nick Adams Contributors Lyman Hafen Rowan Jacobsen Roland Lee Nikki Melanson Roger Naylor Amyanne Rigby Taylor Steelman Melynda Thorpe Dave Becker Contributing Rick Fridell Photographers Steve Holm Kerrick James Ann Jensen Mike Koopsen Danny Lee Bob Miller John Morey Roger Naylor Fred Phillips Alan O’Neal Matt Rich Amyanne Rigby Lisa Romerein Elaine York • │ Carrie Leishman Vice President of Publishing

Fred Phillips

has over 18 years of experience doing ecosystem restoration, landplanning, fundraising and landscape architecture in the southwestern United States. Over the last 18 years, Fred and his team have successfully raised over 15 million dollars in grants for the restoration and protection of rivers in the southwest. Fred has extensively boated the Colorado River from the Utah Border to the Colorado River Delta. He is also a musician, filmmaker and photographer. He resides in Flagstaff, Arizona with his wife Kellner and their daughter Faye.

Laurie James Design Editor

Kurt Dumm Circulation & Distribution

Roger Naylor,

a travel writer and humorist, is the author of Arizona Kicks on Route 66 and Death Valley: Hottest Place on Earth. His work has appeared in Arizona Republic, USA Today, Arizona Highways, and Route 66. He is a senior writer for The Bob and Tom Show radio program. Find out more at www.rogernaylor.com.

p.o. box 910346 • st. george, ut 84791 tel 435.627.9662 • fax 435.656.2615 www.ExperienceTheSouthwest.com

The entire content is copyright of Etched Magazine. No part of this magazine may be reproduced without express written permission. Etched Magazine does not assume liability for articles, products or services advertised herein. Etched Magazine trademark pending.

#theevolutionofelan

THE OUTDOOR ISSUE 2015


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#theevolutionofelan

on our cover

INSTAGRAM

Writer Rowan Jacobson paddles into the sunset in the Colorado River Delta. The “pulse flow” of water brought the river channel back to life where it had been dry for decades. The project reconnected communities with the river, restored native plant communities for wildlife, and inspired two countries to continue restoring this international treasure-the Colorado River Delta.

instagram.com/etchedmagazine desert dwellers | adventure seekers | soul searchers | art lovers | culture creators hashtagalongwithus: #EtchedMagazine #ExperienceTheSouthwest #getoutoftheoffice

For story see page 40 - Photography by: Fred Phillips

january 2015 - celebration of life month

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Special Notes From Our Readers: Ralph Stalter Jr. Wonderful issue. Loved Darci’s editorial: “May your dreams become your journey!” Suzanne Burgon Allen Fabulous! I love the new name and look, which all surprised me! Tammy Damore Congratulations! So many wonderful things are happening! Elise Mortensen West wow wow and triple freakin’ WOW! Jeri Tafoya Okay this is another new favorite!

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meditations

Inspiration from the Sun Capricorn

December 23 - January 20

You may be living out newly discovered possibilities that you’ve only recently acknowledged. Others may recognize your ability to innovate and praise your imaginative approach to life. To acknowledge that there are areas you excel in is to fully realize your potential. You will feel brilliant when you accept that you have much to offer.

Aquarius

January 21 - February 19

There’s a need to be as polite as possible as you interact with individuals. Engage your ability to think before speaking, choosing your words and gestures carefully. The people you encounter will appreciate your thoughtfulness and pay similar attention to your needs when they are in a position to do so. A polite approach to interpersonal relations will serve you well.

Pisces

February 20 - March 20

June 22 - July 22

You apply your creativity and imagination in many ways. Why not ask the universe for help and guidance to channel this creativity for inspiration to manifest your goals and ideas. Asking for guidance can inspire creativity and direct your vision to pursue your heart’s desire.

Leo

July 23 - August 21

Resolve to release limiting behavior and habits. Consider that these unproductive habits may be echoing experiences you’ve carried with you since childhood. Meditation can help you connect to your past and be a powerful tool in releasing these patterns. Take the time to explore the subconscious source and allow your newfound awareness to forge a new path to a healthier, happier you.

Virgo

August 22 - September 23

Feeling additionally social indicates that you are acknowledging enjoyment of time spent with friends. Perhaps when you are with them you may want to reflect upon how important they are to your life and well–being. Our time is always best spent when we are with people who enrich our spirit and create deeper bonds.

Infusing your actions with generosity will inspire those around you and strengthen the intensity of your altruistic activities. Attitude is contagious, and by creating a strong foundation of happiness within, you can share your joyful attitude with others, helping them to feel inspired, peaceful and encouraged.

Aries

Libra

September 24 - October 23

Scorpio

October 24 - November 22

March 21 - April 20

Feelings of compulsive behavior can interfere with your ability to focus on obligations. Review of your current emotional state may discover that your distractibility is causing you to neglect your responsibilities as you are turning your attention to that which pleases you. Regain your equilibrium by paying careful attention to the way you budget your time. A rational approach to work and play will help ensure you have plenty of time for both.

You may be surprised to hear unexpected good news. Possibly you are in line for a promotion or a loved one has been the recipient of a financial windfall. The complete joy of life’s little surprises lies in their ability to catch us off guard and remind us that there are many blessings still to come.

Taurus

Examining your life’s direction could lead you on a search for a more meaningful life. Look closely at what parts of your world ignite your passion the most and how you can incorporate those elements into your way of living. By doing what energizes you, you move closer to realizing what your yet–to–be–fulfilled purpose is.

April 21 - May 21

You can positively influence the world around you by channeling your compassionate nature into the choices you make each day. Many times these decisions not only impact your life but countless others with whom your experiences are connected. To make positive change in your environment is to carefully consider the ramifications of your choices. With this kind of awareness you can take pride in living a more compassionate, conscientious life.

Gemini

May 22 - June 21

Sagittarius

Breakthrough realizations about things that hinder you create a new sense of happiness. Recognizing your limitations provides liberation. Make a list of your various ideas and notice that some of your thoughts are framed in negative language. Change those thoughts to be positive and affirming and you will see that you have the power to transform your life and fill it with compelling and enlightening realizations.

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Cancer

November 23 - December 22

Trust in your inner strength. When you take a thoughtful approach to your obligations you demonstrate strength and trust in yourself to make positive decisions. When you believe in yourself and your capabilities, you are more apt to take advantage of challenging opportunities, knowing that you are your own best source of encouragement and motivation.

#theevolutionofelan

T H E OUTDOOR ISSUE 2 0 1 5


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art lovers

VISUAL - PERFORMING - CRAFTSMAN

“Every human is an artist. The dream of your life is to make beautiful art.”

MAGAZINE

- Miguel Ruiz

A Conversation with Greg Istock 18 | The Art of Interior Design 22 | The Allure of Watercolor 26


art lovers

A Conversation

with

Greg Istock WRITTEN AND PHOTOS BY Nick Adams

Greg Istock lives in Virgin, Utah. He is a somewhat reclusive lifelong artist and musician adding his unique perspective to the local creative community. His paintings have sophisticated color palettes and textural components presented in abstractions; his music can be described similarly. Below is a candid conversation I had with Greg, about his life and his art. Here’s his take:

ETCHED: HOW DID YOU GET STARTED AS AN ARTIST?

GREG: Painting started as a child, I would doodle in school, and that got a little more complex with time. I had a lunchbox with a war painting on it and I decided one day I was going to copy it, see if I could paint the same thing. It worked out pretty well. I looked at the commercial art world for inspiration since at that age I didn’t know anything about fine art. Painting and drawing was entrenched at a really young age, and then later on in high school I realized I had a talent and my teachers suggested I go in that direction in life, so that was going to be the plan. I attended an art school in Seattle, and about six months into it I got a call from a friend who was a musician asking me if I wanted to go on the road backing up a musician who was kind of famous at the time, and I’m like, “I’m in college” and he said, “yeah but this is Tim Thomas” and I said, “OK, I’ll do it.” So I quit art school and pursued a music career and that lasted most of my life until about 10-15 years ago when we moved to Utah and I decided I was going to retire from that and pursue painting again. I painted over the years when I had time because I’ve always loved it, but now I’m forcing myself to take the time to get back into it.

ETCHED: WHAT IS YOUR PREFERRED MEDIUM?

GREG: I like paint, I just like squeezing paint out of a tube and mixing colors and all that kind of stuff, although I’m working with wax now and carving into the wood before I paint it. A painting, to me, is something to be revered if it’s done well, so paint for the most part is my desired medium to work in. It can be oil or acrylic, it can be mud, it can be plastic, it can be anything at all but something that I can get wet and fluid and put onto a surface.

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above: Greg Istock is surrounded by some of his paintings and musical instruments in his home studio in Virgin, Utah. left: “Engaged� - Oil on carved wood, 17 x 14.

MAGAZINE

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left: “Bathing Woman” - Oil over encaustic on wood, 11 x 9-1/2 below: “The Watcher” - Oil on carved wood, 14 x 18-1/2

ETCHED: ARE THERE ANY ARTISTS OR GENRES THAT ARE INFLUENTIAL TO YOU?

GREG: I think any great painting is an influence to a painter. Some of the great painters who have been capable of producing numbers of great paintings, when you start seeing that you have to raise those artists up in appreciation because when you work at it a lot you realize that someone can get lucky one or two times but somebody who can produce great work over and over again is pretty amazing. You can’t ignore Picasso, he gave everybody a bit of freedom; the Impressionists brought a color sense to painting; and then some of the American abstract painters like Jackson Pollock, (Willem) de Kooning, (Mark) Rothko again brought something that showed us all what kind of freedom you can have in painting. There is a French artist, Jean Debuffet, who was a pretty big influence on me because he brought a sense of fun without it being silly.

ETCHED: YOUR HOME HAS THIS BEAUTIFUL VIEW OF THE ZION AREA, BUT YOUR WORK DOESN’T NECESSARILY REFLECT THAT; DO YOU EVER GET THE ITCH TO GO SIT ON THE PORCH AND PAINT WHAT YOU SEE?

GREG: Absolutely! I do landscape paintings sometimes, I think the landscape is a viable starting point for a painting, but most of the time they come up short of what it is that I see out there that I love about it. But it’s not about whether it’s a landscape, or a person or an identifiable object or not, it’s about the reaction or the relationship you have with the thing that you’ve made, and anything is ok. I’ve done a couple of landscapes that I like, and I’m sure I will do more. I’m sure that some will have a connection to where I live, although I doubt that I will do a purely representational painting of what’s around me here.

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ETCHED: WHAT ARE SOME CHALLENGES TO BEING AN ARTIST IN SOUTHERN UTAH?

GREG: I think the challenges are much the same as they are everywhere. The bottom line is you have to make an emotional connection with somebody through a visual means. That should be the same no matter where you are, people are the same really everywhere. The reality is a little different here inasmuch that I don’t think there are as many people as interested in fine arts here as there might be in a big city with millions of people. It’s just a numbers thing, you know, there’s not a lot of people that are into fine art to the point of seeking it out, learning, researching and understanding it. And then to do something original, the way I understand it, the human mind a lot of times doesn’t react positively to something that’s new, people might not get it at first, so if you do something original you will have a little harder time being accepted. #theevolutionofelan

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ETCHED: YOU SAID YOU HAVE RETIRED FROM MUSIC, BUT I KNOW YOU STILL PLAY; WHO ARE YOU PLAYING WITH?

GREG: Most of my time musically is spent with the Three Hat Trio (www.3hattrio.com). I play stand-up bass with Hal Cannon (banjo) and Eli Wrankle (violin). We’re trying to expand on traditional folk music and take it into a more jazz direction or something that hasn’t been done yet with that kind of instrumentation. We have a recording out, we’ve done some festivals around the state, and we’re starting a new recording. Also, Erik the Red, a local band here, we’re still doing some gigs. And then a new project with Sean Taylor and Skatt Seargent called Stockbeat #9, I play drums and we show up with no plan in mind, no songs in mind, total improvisational, a pure jam session but absolutely fun.

Perfectly Imperfect with earthy base metals, recycled, found objects, and vintage asymmetry throughout.

Distinct. Chic. Timeless.

ETCHED: WHAT INSTRUMENTS DO YOU PLAY?

GREG: Bass, piano and drums are my three main instruments. I truly love those three instruments, each one of them has a place in my soul, if you will, that the other one doesn’t occupy. I can be very happy to play any one of the three for an evening. I did a jazz CD last winter called “Visitors and Dreams” of myself recording with those three instruments that got played on NPR on their jazz program. It’s a one-man band.

Now Open

225 North Bluff #23 St. George, Utah

ETCHED: DO YOU HAVE A WEBSITE?

GREG: No. If you want to find me, you’ll really have to look for me! A selection of new paintings by Greg Istock is showing at Bit and Spur in Springdale, Utah, from January through March, 2015.

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art lovers

the ART of

Interior Design

Interior design across the southwest has evolved as quickly as its population. Perhaps it is the landscape that draws these artists here. It has been said, the gravitational pull attracts the creative. Whatever the force, southwest interior designers have independently created living legacies. With styles that juxtapose refinement with rawness, sophistication and swank, and seamlessly blend an array of culture under one starry sky, these artisans of living spaces have revolutionized the look, feel, and meaning of authentic living in the southwest. Artisans in their own right, designers bring more to life than just the visual or ambient enhancement of an interior space. They seek to optimize and harmonize the uses to which the interior environment will be set. Interior designers utilize their eclectic talents to intertwine style, color, mood, harmony, contrast, comfort, convenience, and even safety to unveil an interior that is uniquely a work of art. While maintaining the fundamentals such as scale, proportion, rhythm, emphasis, balance, and harmony in their approach, designers are fiercely committed to creating a feeling of suitability that unifies the living space to the exquisite southwest lifestyle. Meet a few of these designers who have developed the art of melting home and life into a synergistically masterful experience.

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#theevolutionofelan #theevolutionofelan T H T E HOUTDOOR E W I N TER ISSUE 2 0 1 5


the ART of Interior Design

Designer Guide

Joni Christensen, Joelle Nelson, Lorna Larsen

The dynamic design of Heritage Home and Garden is a captivating experience. A company well known for a continuously fresh take on high end design, Heritage Home and Garden is a local favorite as well as a far-reaching choice with clientele throughout the country. Comprehensive design throughout new construction, remodeling, and custom home decorating, will never be more enjoyable and rewarding than with this accomplished company. Consistently fashionable, classy, and compelling, Heritage Home and Garden is a refreshing choice for any fine home design project. Visit their showroom filled with quality and inspired home furnishing, accessories, window and floor coverings.

Photo by Steve Holm.

Heritage Home & Garden 770 East 700 South - St. George, Utah 84770 435-673-5555 - www.heritagehomeandgarden.net

Kent Bylund, Lead Landscape Designer

Indoor/outdoor living has been a cornerstone of our design since our very first project. Living in this modern world we are bombarded with information, and nature provides a balance to the overload we experience in life. Our design team is very conscious of the impact nature has on one’s psyche. As a result, we always try to create areas of escape even in a home that is primarily designed for entertainment and large groups. In our designs you will always find little spaces of solitude that allow one to decompress from life’s demands and provide an opportunity for reflection. Split Rock Design 2 West St. George Blvd #36 - St. George, Utah 84770 435-414-3939 - www.splitrockinc.com

Angie Marshall & Lori Worthington

Tasteful Trends Interiors’ award winning design team can bring your dream to reality! From dozens of first class local Parade Homes completed, to the “Best Interior Design” Award in the Salt Lake Parade of Homes, we have the experience, resources, and grasp of design elements to make your project unique! We excel at carpet, tile, wood flooring, furniture, accessories, blinds, shades, custom window treatments, and custom bedding. We also specialize in hospitality design projects and have HD resources for restaurants, hotels, time shares, offices, waiting rooms, high tech facilities, and other commercial environments.

Photo by Mykal’s Photography.

Tasteful Trends Interiors 291 East 1400 South Suite 1 - St. George, Utah 84790 435-674-7114 - www.tastefultrends.com

Calli Bingham Wade, Lead Designer

It is impossible not to be influenced by the raw, rugged beauty of Mother Nature and her dramatic impact on the Southern Utah landscape. From the inception of Split Rock Design, our focus has been to capture her essence and bring it into design. Our clients come to St. George to embrace nature, to re-group, be pampered, and get away from the rat race of the urban environment. This unique geography that is shaped by the merging of opposing forces is one of the touchstones of our inspiration. We bring the glamorous and the brutal, the rugged and the lavish together to create an experience designed to engage the senses and mirror the mystery and revelation that one encounters in the desert. Split Rock Design 2 West St. George Boulevard #36 - St. George, Utah 84770 435-414-3939 - www.splitrockinc.com

MAGAZINE

Photo by Danny Lee.

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the ART of Interior Design

Designer Guide

DeAnn Thorley

DeAnn Thorley established her full-service design firm in 2006 after designing interiors for various other companies. Since then, she has designed custom residences throughout Utah, California and Nevada; developing a niche for the Architectural design of custom homes; and expanding her business to include commercial projects. The work of DeAnn Thorley is as diverse as the clients she represents, from luxury ocean front homes on the California coast, to a mountain top retreat in Utah, to a quaint ranch home in Nevada; each one reflects the personality and the lifestyle of the individual client. Whether it is a contemporary home with Asian influences; a country French home filled with Provencal furnishing; or a Spanish Colonial home finished in handcrafted materials, the commonalities are understated elegance and appropriate detailing. The work of DeAnn Thorley has been featured in various publications including; C Magazine, Western Interiors, Southern Utah Home & Garden, and House Beautiful Magazine, “Bel Air Celebrity Design House�. Photo by Lisa Romerein.

DeAnn Thorley Designs 222 S. 100 W., St. George, Utah 84770 435-669-9669

Lead Page: top left: Calli Bingham Wade, Split Rock Design - Photo by Danny Lee. top right: Tasteful Trends Interiors - Photo by Mykals Photography. center: DeAnn Thorley Designs - Photo by DeAnn Thorley. bottom left: Kent Byland, Split Rock Design - Photo by Danny Lee. bottom right: Heritage Home & Garden - Photo by Steve Holm.

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art lovers

The Allure of Watercolor WRITTEN BY Roland Lee

I can still remember the first watercolor painting that grabbed my artistic attention and ultimately fueled my 40-year relationship with the medium. I was an art student at Brigham Young University in the 1960’s, studying to be a designer/illustrator, with little experience in studio painting. A casual stroll through a new exhibit brought me face to face with a small watercolor painting by a young artist named Dean Millman. To say I was entranced would be an understatement. In fact, I stopped cold, stunned by what was in front of me. A tree in a field--simple as that--yet done with such bravado that I was mesmerized. I thought the painting was magnificent. My young artistic brain could hardly wrap itself around the way an artist could create something so wonderful with just watercolor and paper. In that moment I became instantly aware of the power of paint on paper. My pounding heart was hooked. And my love affair with watercolor was launched.

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When I moved to St. George from Los Angeles in the early 1970’s, I was not aware of how important this area would be in shaping my own art career. About that same time another artist retired to Southern Utah from California by the name of Robert Shepherd. I was awed by his credentials. His background included many great murals for big public buildings and several LDS temples, and work on Cecil B. Demille’s epic movie The Ten Commandments. But what I loved most were his exciting and beautiful paintings of the red desert landscape, all done in transparent watercolor. I used the money from the first gallery painting I ever sold to purchase one of his originals. The watercolor paintings Shepherd produced greatly influenced what St. George came to accept as collectable art. I followed his lead and was soon creating watercolor landscapes as well. He was my mentor. Other respected Utah artists were also producing watercolors, and refining their techniques in the medium. Art teachers like Carl Purcell, Osral Allred, Glen Dale Anderson, Gael Lindstrom, Stephen Naegle, and Tom Leek were all actively using watercolor as their medium of choice. Their influence provided a fertile ground and paved the way for the current love and acceptance of watercolors in Southern Utah. Transparent watercolor has a certain fascination to both collectors and artists. Its spontaneity, transparency, and fluidity strike a chord with collectors, while the degree of difficulty, portability, and luminosity attract the painter. Since the paint is transparent, the artist must work from light to dark, preserving the lighter passages using a technique called “negative painting.” Some degree of planning and luck are involved. Then there is the aspect of working “wet-intowet.” Water is applied to the paper surface and various pigments are added, which mingle and flow together creating rich and pure color passages. Finally, the white of the paper sparkles through giving watercolors their characteristic glow.

MAGAZINE

Although undoubtedly the most popular and widely accessible painting medium, watercolor has often been treated lightly by museums and scholarly critiques. There are various reasons for this, but the fact remains that the medium’s unique characteristics that made it popular throughout history, continue to make it a relevant art form today. Popularized in the 1500’s with the advent of paper, watercolor thrived with the development of better pigments and grounds in the 1700’s. British artists such as J.M.W. Turner and John Sell Cotman did much to promote its use and were widely appreciated. In the 1800’s such well-known western artists as John Singer Sargent, Thomas Eakins, and Winslow Homer developed a huge following for their watercolors. The wave rolled through the western world with great museums such as the Boston Museum of Art collecting their work and hosting exhibits. In the mid and late 1900’s Andrew Wyeth’s exquisite watercolors gained notoriety, while Rex Brant, Milford Zornes, and Millard Sheets from the “California School” pushed the boundaries of watercolor to new heights of popularity. The American watercolor Society was founded in 1866 to “elevate and promote the stature of watercolor,” and many other national, state, and local watercolor societies now carry the torch, including the National Watercolor Society, Utah Watercolor Society and Local groups such as the Southern Utah Art Guild (SUAG) and the Dixie Watercolor Society (DWS). The DWS membership consists of both amateurs and professionals who actively foster interest in watercolor through outdoor paint-outs, workshops, meetings, and exhibits. Watercolorist Dick Rose led the DWS organization for many years,

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and his leadership was the glue that held the group together. Its current president, Karen March, has refined the mission to focus mainly on Transparent Watercolors and provide wider exhibit opportunities. Local artists are actively encouraged to become a part of these organizations. I have spent the past 40 years exploring the medium of watercolor as an artist, a student, and a teacher. Along the way I have come to love watercolor in the same way we love our family and friends. It’s not always easy to get along, but always rewarding. It provides moments of excitement and exhilaration, tempered with bouts of frustration and anger. Sometimes I feel like I am in charge, doing all the work, only to realize that the medium should really be getting the credit. But through it all, we are still together, and still loving every minute of our relationship.

Roland Lee is a professional watercolorist living in St. George UT. A graduate of Brigham Young University and a signature member of the National Watercolor Society, Roland’s original paintings can be found in over 1500 collections. He was recently awarded the Utah Governors Mansion Award for Art by Governor Herbert.

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STYLE - WELLNESS - GROWTH

soul searchers

“The things you are passionate about are not random, they are your calling.” – Fabienne Fredrickson

The Dark Night of the Soul 30 | Let’s Try Some Civility 32 | Adventure in Wellness 34


soul searchers

The Dark Night of the Soul WRITTEN BY Erin Jensen

“In the depth of winter, I finally learned that within me there lay an invincible summer.” - Albert Camus Even in the warmer climates throughout the southwest, the winter months with their long nights can seem ominous. December 21, the winter solstice, marks the shortest day of the year where even the southwestern states have fewer than ten hours of sunlight (nine hours and thirty-seven minutes to be exact). The dark and dormant days of January and February serve an invaluable purpose in readying nature for new life in the spring. The same could be said for us. While we may imagine the perfect life would be one with perpetual sunlight, the truth is, the fertile dark is where new life begins to form.

Saint John of the Cross, a sixteenth century Spanish mystic, wrote extensively on the dark night of the soul. He viewed these seemingly dismal periods as transformative passages that had the capacity to move us into a deeper realm of spiritual understanding and enlightenment. Throughout our lives we can experience many dark nights, some more intense and longer in duration than others. One may feel depressed, but the dark night is not the same as a clinical depression which should be treated by a physician and mental health professional. The dark night is about the spirit and the stripping away of the false identity—the counterfeit self—and stepping away from the illusions of our old life before entering the light of authenticity.

the mansion just before they leave the premises. You hear the music but you’re not sure where it’s coming from.

An analogy used to describe what it’s like to navigate through the dark night of the soul is seen in Sue Monk Kidd’s book, When the Heart Waits.

The darkness that is a prerequisite for new life is too often viewed as a negative. We want insight without it, but it’s essential that we pass through this chasm. We will not reach a new understanding of reality without it because it’s through this passage that we allow our old ego mind-sets to be transformed. We must make room for a new awakening. As Sue Monk Kidd writes, [It is] “a necessary and universal passage in spiritual transformation.”

Imagine you’re in a huge mansion on a very dark night. There are no lights in the house and you see absolutely nothing. Now imagine that someone or something has just opened a music box somewhere in

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You plead for the opener to help you find the origin of the music, but you get no answer. You feel completely abandoned—well almost, because you can still identify the music through your sense of hearing. Following the sound may not be as effective as having sight to guide you, but it’s all you have at the moment. You follow the sound even as you feel abandoned. It is here, in this place of abandonment and desolation, where you can finally learn what is necessary to move toward a new understanding of reality.


In the film, Groundhog Day, Phil Connors (played by Bill Murray) was a cynical man who was dissatisfied with his job and his life in general. He was a television meteorologist in Pittsburgh. He and his crew were making their annual trip to cover the Groundhog Day festival. Phil, grumpy and obnoxious, was preoccupied with himself. Because of a blizzard, they were forced to stay in Punxsutawney an extra night. Phil was stuck reliving Groundhog Day for what seemed like an eternity. He was in his own personal hell. At first he reacted with confusion followed by anger. Then he shifted into self-indulgence. After that, he became suicidal and tried to escape his circumstances, killing himself over and over only to awaken in Groundhog Day again. There came a time, after his “dark night of the soul” phase where he realized that it was up to him to make the best of his circumstances. He signed up for piano lessons and began to think of others during the course of the day. He helped three older women change a flat tire and he caught a boy falling out of a tree. He saved a man from choking to death by performing the Heimlich maneuver. He did this day after day after day. But it was an old homeless man, shivering in the bitter cold of a Pennsylvania night that made the greatest impact on Phil. Over the course of reliving the same day, he covered the man with a blanket, took him for a hot bowl of soup, and finally, got him to the hospital when he realized the man was sick. Phil was greatly distressed when he was told by a hospital worker that the old man had died. How did this happen? The once self-centered and non-caring Phil Connors was now living a life filled with compassion and meaning. His focus turned from egocentered to other-centered and he did this with love. He surpassed the mundane, lived through the dark night of the soul and entered a transcendent realm where he realized his life’s purpose was to serve others. It was only then that he was able to leave Groundhog Day. When I was a child, my mother used to raise chickens. She had an incubator and would diligently turn the gestating eggs so the light would warm all sides. My siblings and I patiently watched many chicks peck their way out of the eggshell. I don’t know how long it took because time stood still for me at these magical moments. Eventually, the chick, slathered in wet, would limp out on the soft straw that rested at the bottom of the incubator. With head flopping and legs shaking, the little chick would struggle to stand and lift its head. Before we knew it, there would be a fuzzy yellow or black chick scurrying about ready to begin life. The eggshell that once housed the chick was now littered, like pieces of paper, in the incubator. It served its purpose, which was crucial at one point, but was needed no more. Poet and philosopher, Mark Nepo once said in an interview that when the butterfly leaves the cocoon, it does not mean the cocoon is wrong. It merely means that the butterfly has outgrown it. I think that everyone has a different cocoon or an eggshell, a place of fertile darkness that slowly changes us from one level of consciousness, where we are spiritually asleep, into a renewed and unique understanding of the world. When we’ve completed what we need to in order to soar, we can break through the silk surroundings of our chrysalis and emerge, metamorphosed and awakened to new insights. Winter is our time to be still, to be patient, to gestate in our dark nights. It is in the fertile blackness where our wings begin to form and grow. And when the springtime arrives, we’ll be ready for flight.


soul searchers

Let’s Try Some Civility WRITTEN BY Cindy Clemens

“Our nation has a critical need for a meaningful and civil discussion about America’s future built around the values that have shaped our history and our character.” - John Wilson, Chairman of Purple America

Recently, I had a calm and enlightening conversation with a person who has very different beliefs than me about religion and politics. What is even more surprising is this person was much younger than me – I am a Baby Boomer and she is a Millennial. It gave me hope that maybe we can have civil and productive discussions around important, meaningful issues. I decided to do some research and find out what others are saying about the possibility of civil discourse. I found some interesting ideas and resources I’d like to pass along.

Seek First to Understand

Understanding is the cornerstone for a real two-way, civil conversation. Over 800 years ago St. Francis of Assisi encouraged this when he wrote “grant that I may not so much seek...to be understood, as to understand...” Steven Covey wrote about this idea in his bestselling book, 7 Habits of Highly Effective People. ”If you’re like most people, you probably seek first to be understood; you want to get your point across. And in doing so, you may ignore the other person completely, pretend that you’re listening, selectively hear only certain parts of the conversation or attentively focus on only the words being said, but miss the meaning entirely. So why does this happen? Because most people listen with the intent to reply, not to understand.”

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The intention of the participants must start with an honest desire to understand where each other is coming from. This does not mean agreeing with the position – it is simply about opening up room at the very beginning to truly understand without debating or persuading. This involves two important skills. The first is listening fully and completely, without a separate mental dialogue going on inside your own head. Think of it as listening until you no longer exist. The second is to resist the temptation to interrupt and interject comments, questions, or objections. Let the other person lay out his or her position fully. After all, we do have two ears and one mouth for a reason. As Doug Larson reminds us, “wisdom is the reward you get for a lifetime of listening when you’d have preferred to talk”

Create a Personal Civility Code of Conduct

When we think about changing the negative tone of dialogue occurring at the local, state and national levels, it may seem too big and overwhelming to do anything about it. While it is a daunting task, there is a simple and effective place to start. Each one of us can make a personal commitment to be civil and courteous in all of our conversations. As Mahatma Ghandi reminded us, “If we could change ourselves, the tendencies in the world would also change. As a man changes his own nature, so does the attitude of the world change towards him. ...We need not wait to see what others do.” #theevolutionofelan

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Purple America is an interesting organization that is focused on shifting the American conversation to a more civil tone one person at a time. Advocating for a deeper understanding of the widely shared values that form our nation’s common ground, they have developed the Purple America Pledge: “I believe that Americans of all walks of life value Equality, Family, Faith, Freedom, Love and Respect, Community, Giving Back, the Good Life, Opportunity, Success and Doing the Right Thing. These values unite us in a common bond that defines us as uniquely American, meaning we are more similar than we are different. Our society benefits when we honor this bond, above our differences, in our conversations. I promise to honor this bond, to practice these values, and to celebrate them in others, for the greater good of all.” Seems like a good place to start. If more of us took this pledge, it could be the ripple effect we need to start the ball rolling.

Find the Bigger Issues Behind the Controversial Issues

Robert Jensen, a University of Texas professor, wrote a very interesting editorial in the Austin Statesman a couple of years ago urging people to discuss the basic questions of human existence. “Remember this: Our affluent society produces an excess of everything except what we most desperately crave: meaning. Such meaning comes when in our everyday lives we talk with people - those we know and strangers on the bus - about the most basic questions that have unsettled humans forever: What does it mean to be a decent human being? How do

we deal with the problems of power?” These basic questions are the big issues behind most of the political and social issues of our time. Perhaps it is time to start focusing on these big issues. Instead of discussing a particular immigration order or the Affordable Care Act, we can discuss how to reconcile our rich heritage of welcoming immigrants with our limited supply of public services or whether quality healthcare is a privilege or a right. These are not easy questions to answer, but finding ways to have these conversations in a civil manner lies at the core of our rights and responsibilities as citizens of the world.

Interested in more information? Steven Covey – “7 Habits of Highly Effective People” www.stephencovey.com/7habits/7habits-habit5.php Purple America www.purpleamerica.us Video of MC Yogi “Be the Change (The Story of Mahatma Gandhi)” www.youtube.com/watch?v=n_gQxVOmod0 Editorial by Robert Jensen www.statesman.com/news/news/opinion/jensen-go-aheadtalk-religion-and-politics-at-the-/nS9zg/ Cindy Clemens is a life coach and motivational speaker who helps people redesign their lives and savor every moment. Find out more at www.cindyclemens.com @Cindy Clemens Life Coach


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soul searchers

Adventure

in Wellness WRITTEN BY Cindy Clemens | PHOTOS PROVIDED BY Red Mountain Resort

A vacation usually begins with a little daydreaming, slathered with relaxation, rejuvenation, adventure, exploration, or the ultimate vacation-the option to have it all. The most popular vision looks similar to lying under a palm tree, indulging in a deep tissue massage, surrounded by breathtaking views...no work, no worries, just reconnecting with your inner-wanderlust. Destination spas are among the most popular leisure attraction in the U.S. with American’s spending $13.6 billion annually. More and more, the concept of wellness is creeping into these statistics. Yet most Americans don’t seek information about their health until something goes wrong. But, what if that dream vacation could slip in an individualized health assessment from caring and credentialed clinicians all the while exploring canyons and connecting with the stars under the desert’s night sky? Dreams do become reality. The collaboration between the award-winning Red Mountain Resort in Ivins, Utah and the Intermountain Healthcare LiVe Well Center in St. George, is designed to entice your senses with an unprecedented vacation experience and move your lifestyle in a healthier direction.

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Photo provided by Intermountain Healthcare.

Red Mountain Resort’s “Rejuvenate and LiVe Well Package” - which includes the  Live Well Assessment Plus - combines the expertise of Intermountain Healthcare’s LiVe Well Center with the nurturing of Red Mountain Resort to cast a caring net and provide a custom plan to get well and stay well. This five-day, four-night package starts with a half day visit to the warm and welcoming LiVe Well Center. Guests provide a personal history and profile, meet with a physician to evaluate their health history and wellness needs, go through state of the art body composition, fitness and metabolic testing, meet with a nutritionist and leave with knowledge, tools, and an exercise prescription for personal wellness. Upon returning to Red Mountain Resort, package guests put their plan into action with three healthy meals each day, guided hiking, group fitness classes for all levels, a meditation workshop for stress management and two private sessions with a personal trainer to practice the exercise prescription. Tired muscles are soothed with a 50-minute massage, and once back home, the LiVe Well Center Team will follow up with three health coaching sessions by phone or email.

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The secret sauce for this innovative wellness package is how it meets several goals in one very enjoyable experience. The best of medicine and science is provided eliminating the need to search through the endless number of healthy living approaches. World-class hospitality and service is delivered throughout the stay, allowing guests to enjoy a real vacation and the breathtaking red rocks of Southern Utah. Most importantly, guests leave with a powerful foundation for healthier living. As Trevor Smith, Manager of the LiVe Well Center observed, “for most busy professionals, when was the last time they spent a half day focusing on themselves, learning how to improve their health and wellness?” This was echoed in the comments of Tracey Welsh, general manager of Red Mountain Resort, when asked about the length of the package. “I like the idea of a fiveday, four-night package. If it were shorter, it would not be enough ‘me’ time. The guests really need the time to invest in themselves. People can’t change until they find a program they believe in and try it out.”

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Both Smith and Welsh feel this is an ideal collaboration given their shared vision and the cross-over of target clients. While a few other destination spas do offer their own medically-based programs, Welsh stressed it would not make sense for Red Mountain Resort to invest in the equipment and staff needed to provide that type of science-based program. “Given the hospitality focus of the LiVe Well Center and our mutual commitment to helping people live the healthiest life possible, it just makes sense to work together.� While it may seem like this package is geared toward out-oftown visitors, that is actually not the case. Local residents are encouraged to take advantage of this opportunity right in their own backyard to retreat, rejuvenate and discover their personal path to life-long wellness. Smart locals can come during the slower summer and winter seasons and enjoy even more personalized attention. Plus, they can continue to participate in the many services, classes, and lectures at the LiVe Well Center even after their package experience.

MAGAZINE

Although the Rejuvenate and LiVe Well Package has been offered for just a few months, the early numbers are encouraging, Welsh believes participants will want to return yearly to see how they are doing and make it an annual wellness retreat. In fact, in the follow-up health coaching sessions, several guests said they planned to return next year because it was such a good way to jumpstart their health goals and look at negative behaviors they had developed. Receiving immediate and individualized test results, having a plan created just for them, and working that plan for several days with support and guidance made a lasting impact.

Interested in more information? To find out more or to book your stay, visit www.redmountainresort.com/livewell.

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travel - recreation - explore

adventure seekers

“One day, you will wake up and there won’t be any more time to do the things you’ve always wanted. Do it now.” – Paulo Coelho

The Day We Set the Colorado River Free 41 | Boots and Burgers 50 | Concrete to Canyons 58


The Day We Set

The Colorado River Free WRITTEN BY Rowan Jacobsen | PHOTOS BY Fred Phillips

It’s been more than 50 years since the Colorado River regularly reached the sea. But last spring, the U.S. and Mexico let the water storm through its natural delta for a grand experiment in ecological restoration. As the dam gates opened, a small band of river rats caught

a once-in-a-lifetime ride.

The Delta seen from the air near its merger with the sea.

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adventure seekers

On Friday, March 28, 2014, I did something that has been impossible for most of the past 50 years. As photographer Pete McBride snapped photos of me, and two French documentary filmmakers shot footage of him, and an unidentified blue helicopter circled above, I pumped up an inflatable NRS paddleboard, dropped it onto the Colorado River below Morelos Dam, on the Mexico-Arizona border, flopped onto the board, and glided over the cool waters.

What was remarkable about this was not my less-than-graceful launch but the fact that I was launching at all. Morelos, the last of the 12 major dams on the main stem of the “American Nile,” is where you go to watch the Colorado die. Stand on Morelos and look north, toward the United States, and you see a sparkling, reed-fringed river coming at you. Look south and you see an empty channel that twists 100 miles to the sea. After a thousand straws from Denver to Los Angeles have sipped the Colorado dry, after 40 million people, 10 million cows, and countless heads of iceberg lettuce have had their fill, the coup de grâce is delivered here at Morelos, where the last 10 percent of the river is shunted into the Reforma Canal and piped west to the Mexicali Valley so we can all eat baby spinach in January. Thus it has been for more than 50 years. After Glen Canyon Dam was completed in 1966, the Colorado River delta was left for dead. No water, no life. But an unprecedented agreement between the U.S. and Mexico called Minute 319 changed all of that. Over eight weeks, a 105,392-acre-foot pulse flow of water—about 34 billion gallons— would pour through Morelos and down the dry channel. The idea was to mimic the dynamics of the Colorado’s historical spring flood, timed to coincide with the germination of willow and cottonwood seeds. For more than a year, restoration ecologists with Arizona’s Sonoran Institute and Mexico’s leading environmental group, Pronatura, had been planting seedlings and digging channels, concentrating on the low-lying areas where the groundwater was already high enough to support clusters of cottonwoods and willows—and even a few beaver and muskrat. With a little luck, the water would make it far enough down the dry channel to reach these places. With a little more luck, there might be just enough extra water in coming years to keep some of those new seedlings alive. It was the unlikeliest of plans: take a titanic slug of water from the most over-allocated river in North America, shoot it through some of the driest country on earth, and turn these godforsaken wastelands back into an Eden. And how anyone managed to pull it off is mystifying, because—perhaps you’ve noticed—the West is as parched as Mars right now. In the heart of the Great Megadrought of 2014, with Lake Mead draining behind Hoover Dam like an unplugged bathtub, farmers scuffling for water like dying men in a life raft, and the Bureau of Reclamation warning Arizona and Nevada to plan on rationing by 2016, somehow $10 million worth of agua pura was being jettisoned.

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Take a titanic slug of water from the most over-allocated river in North America, shoot it through some of the driest country on earth, and turn these godforsaken wastelands back into an Eden. Honestly, nobody knew if it would make it to the sea. Nobody knew what would happen. Nothing like this had ever been tried before. And while scores of scientists from all over the world had descended on the delta to measure the effects on salinity, hydrology, biology, and every other factor they could think of, we were here to take the river’s pulse in an entirely different way. We were going to float it. Dead for decades, would it now feel like a glorified irrigation canal? Or, somewhere in the middle of it all, away from the cameras and piezometers, might we still summon the spirit of the Colorado? Forget the science; we were here for a séance. Just below the dam, at least, the river truly looked reborn. All but one of Morelos’s 20 gates were wide open, and so much water was pouring down the channel that a lake had formed around the structure. Before a handful of perplexed onlookers, our ragged flotilla of river rats carried a couple of dented aluminum canoes and two inflatable paddleboards to the shores of the instant lake. The water would be sinking into the dry sand over every mile, but for now it was all systems go. I was with four men, most in their forties, who’d made the Colorado their lives. Fred Phillips, the Flagstaff, Arizona, consultant who’d put the trip together, is the Southwest’s premier restoration ecologist, the man who pioneered the art of transforming barren Colorado riverfront into lush wetlands. Pete McBride grew up on a Colorado ranch that depended on the river. Six years ago, he’d attempted to follow it 1,450 miles to the sea; the resulting book and film are unforgettable testaments to the death throes of the lifeblood of the Southwest. Osvel Hinojosa Huerta, 39, the ecologist in charge of Pronatura’s restoration projects and the region’s preeminent ornithologist, had covered every square mile of the river channel on foot doing bird surveys; he could hardly believe he was about to do it by boat. Sam Walton, a member of the family behind Walmart, had worked for years as a river guide in the Grand Canyon, as well as a hydrologist. He’d assisted Fred on several restoration projects, and the Walton Family Foundation funded some of the pulse-flowrestoration work. Sam had grown skeptical, however, of the pulseflow strategy—he feared that too much water would simply sink into the dry riverbed, when it could have been channeled directly to restoration sites via canals—and was here to see the results for himself. As it was for all of us, the resurrected Colorado was catnip to him, whatever happened. Our game plan had been to “start slow, then back off”—we’d be running out of river soon enough—but Sam shot down the channel on a banana-yellow Badfish paddleboard and disappeared, chasing virgin water. The rest of us stuck to the program. Pete glided in a canoe, snapping photos. Fred broke out his guitar and rattled off “The Baggage Boat Blues,” a Fred Phillips original. I paddled upstream until I was above the dam, lay flat on my back, and became maybe the first person to float under the gates since Chris McCandless slipped through here in his canoe in 1990, during one of the last floods to wet the lower Colorado, on his way to the Gulf of California and into the wilds of history. The world felt new.

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vvvvvvvvv Days earlier, the world had felt very old to me. Old and exhausted. I’d stood in the center of the parched riverbed and stared at the Mad Max misery of the limitrophe, the 23-mile stretch where the Colorado delineates Mexico from Arizona and where desperate men run the gauntlet to deliver themselves or drugs to the promised land. If you wanted to find a place that symbolized everything that has gone wrong in the delta, this was it. On the U.S. side, the 20-foot-high rusted fence with the halogen spotlights rising above it and Border Patrol trucks stalking the front. Next to it, the bridge in the Mexican city of San Luis Río Colorado arching over the riverbed. The guys in San Luis told me how fishing was their life back in the 1990s, when a few unusually wet years revitalized the river. Bass, carp, corvina. As teenagers they used to jump off the bridge. Kersplash. Now it’s a 35foot plunge to the dry bed below. Bored teens on ATVs did donuts in the sand, round and round. I tried to reconcile what I saw with Aldo Leopold’s description of the Colorado River delta in A Sand County Almanac, a towering text of the conservation movement. In 1922, Leopold and his brother paddled up the mouth of the river from the Gulf of California, camping along its braided channels and “deep emerald” waters. Leopold fell hard for the place. “The river was nowhere and everywhere,” he wrote, “for he could not decide which of a hundred green lagoons offered the most pleasant and least speedy path to the Gulf. So he traveled them all, and so did we. He divided and rejoined, he twisted and turned, he meandered in awesome jungles, he all but ran in circles, he dallied with lovely groves, he got lost and was glad of it, and so were we.” The river Leopold found was a “milk-and-honey wilderness” filled with game “too abundant to hunt,” which Leopold chalked up to the innumerable seedpods hanging in every mesquite tree. “At each bend we saw egrets standing in the pools ahead, each white statue matched by its white reflection. Fleets of cormorants drove their black prows in quest of skittering mullets; avocets, willets, and #theevolutionofelan

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Sam Walton paddles toward the Morelos Dam.

yellow-legs dozed one-legged on the bars; mallards, widgeons, and teal sprang skyward in alarm.… When a troop of egrets settled on a far green willow, they looked like a premature snowstorm.” There are few birds here now. Few walls of mesquite and willow. A classic case of unforeseen consequences. The delta gets about two inches of rain per year. It makes Kuwait look like a rainforest. But thanks to its great benefactor, it used to be the ecological jewel of the Southwest. Fed by snowmelt from the Rockies, the Colorado would leap out of its banks each spring to green the delta countryside for miles around. At two million acres, the Colorado River delta was half the size of the Mississippi River’s lower delta and, because it was an oasis in a vast desert, probably even more vital. Of the hundreds of thousands of acres of riparian forests that once flourished on the lower Colorado, less than 2,000 acres of native willow and cottonwood remain. The rest has turned largely to tamarisk, a mangy, invasive shrub that is one of the only plants that can survive the salty sands of the modern delta. In jeopardy is the entire Pacific Flyway, that billion-bird artery stretching from Alaska to Patagonia, whose travelers must now make the 400-mile death-flap over the Sonoran Desert without food or respite. Even today, few Americans grasp that the same river that carved Canyonlands and filled Lake Mead also kept Baja and Sonora alive. Back in the era of massive dam building, farmers and city planners were only too happy to see the wild Colorado transformed into a domesticated delivery system. Denver, Las Vegas, Phoenix, Tucson, Albuquerque, Los Angeles, San Diego, Mexicali, and many more municipalities drink the Colorado every day. As do you. Most of America’s winter veggies are grown in the irrigated valleys of Southern California and Arizona. Your fridge is filled with Colorado River greens. Your beef was fattened on Colorado River alfalfa. Even your milk may well be the Colorado transformed. We all nurse from the mother river. MAGAZINE

Rowan Jacobsen and Osvel Hinojosa pump up the paddleboards before setting out on the river.

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Rowan Jacobsen canoes past Morelos Dam.

We ripped downstream on a bona fide river. It was eight feet deep, a hundred feet wide, roiling cool and green in the desert light.

I’d planned on misery. I’d thought: The water won’t be that deep. I’d thought: The water will be gross. I’d thought: We’ll be clawing our way through tamarisk thickets. Pushing ourselves through flotsam and froth. I was wrong on all counts.

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Beneath me, drowned tamarisk trees waved like kelp in the current. We were flying through a forest, the paddleboards our magic carpets. I smacked into the top of the occasional tamarisk, staggering like a drunken pirate, but the river had risen right over the top of most obstacles. An hour into our journey, the river felt very alive. And this entire pulse flow was just 0.7 percent of its annual flow. We were surfing on a rounding error. Yet this miraculous flood—deemed so important to relations between the two countries that it had elicited a morning of speechifying by everyone from the governor of Baja (“There are 260 rivers that cross international boundaries, and this is the first such event in the history of the earth”) to the U.S. deputy secretary of the interior (“In retrospect, it seems so obvious that neighbors should take care of one another”)—had taken 15 years of lobbying to bring to fruition. #theevolutionofelan

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On March 23, I’d stood with a crowd of 200 on the bank below Morelos Dam, gazing at the concrete monolith and waiting for the first gate to open. Beside me, Jennifer Pitt, the director of the Environmental Defense Fund’s Colorado River Project, and Peter Culp, a Phoenix attorney and the go-to lawyer for Colorado River water issues, held their breath. “We’ve been waiting a long time for this,” Pitt said. It was way back in 1998 when Pitt, who was already at EDF, and Culp, then a law student volunteering for the Sonoran Institute, first came up with a plan for how new water-sharing agreements could free up some flow for the delta.

Rowan Jacobsen lets sand fall through his fingers in the riverbed, before the pulse flow.

For years the idea went nowhere. Mexico and the U.S. were battling over Mexico’s water supply, and by 2006 litigation was the preferred mode of communication. It took an earthquake to shake everyone into action. On Easter Sunday 2010, a 7.2-magnitude temblor destroyed much of Mexico’s canal system. The U.S. agreed to store some of Mexico’s water in Lake Mead on an emergency basis until Mexico could use it, and relations began to thaw. In November 2012, Minute 319, the latest amendment to the 1944 Water Treaty between the two countries, was signed. It allows Mexico, which has no large reservoirs of its own, to store future surplus water in Lake Mead in exchange for agreeing to share the burden of any future shortages. The U.S. agreed to invest in improvements to Mexico’s irrigation network, and part of the water saved from that was devoted to delta restoration. Mexico’s National Farmers Confederation objected to what it saw as a water grab by the U.S., and California’s Imperial Irrigation District and Los Angeles squabbled over each other’s role in the agreement, but their voices were drowned out by the deal’s environmental component, which made it a crowd-pleaser in both countries. As Pitt put it, “How could you not fix this problem? It’s so obvious. And it gets people on an emotional level. It’s just not right. Especially at the bottom of something as grand as the Colorado River.” And with that, Gate 11 creaked open, a frothing mass of whitewater spilled out of the dam, and everybody went wild. Jennifer and Peter raised their fists in the air. Cameras clicked. Two drones whirred overhead. A sheet of water rushed over the marsh, simmering with escaping air bubbles, and licked our feet. Champagne corks popped. Jennifer doused Osvel. Osvel doused Francisco Zamora, director of the Sonoran Institute, who cried, “¡Hay agua!” And we all watched as a tendril nosed its way down the channel, hesitated in a pool, seemingly uncertain, then appeared to make up its mind as it spilled over the lip and ran downstream. If the water could make it 50 miles, it would reach the Laguna Grande restoration site, where tens of thousands of seedlings had been planted by Pronatura and the Sonoran Institute.

Rowan lets water fall through his fingers in the same spot of the once dry riverbed, during the pulse flow.

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“That was so easy,” I said to Peter Culp. “Just open the gates and let the water flow. Should happen every year.” But Culp wondered if it would ever happen again. As part of Minute 319, EDF, the Sonoran Institute, and Pronatura had agreed to provide a 52,000-acre-foot base flow, to be delivered over five years, to keep the new trees alive. They were scrambling to purchase water rights from Mexican farmers, and they’d teamed up with the Nature Conservancy, the Redford Center, and the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation in a Raise the River campaign to find the $10 million needed to do it. Even Will Ferrell and Kelly Slater lent a hand, shooting a mock PSA with Robert Redford in which they proposed that instead of raising the river, we should move the ocean.

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Canoeing on the reborn river. Inset: As the group descends the delta, the river gets shallower and muddier.

But in 2017, the agreement must be renegotiated, and there is no guarantee that it will include water for the environment at all. With the Southwest projected to add another 20 million people in the next two decades and climate-change models predicting a 10 percent decline in the Colorado’s flow, finding extra water is getting harder. Frankly, the fact that it happened in 2014 felt like a minor miracle. Right up until the moment when the first dam gate opened, I’d half expected black helicopters to swoop in and claim this precious resource for the city-state of Los Angeles. Knowledge that this flood might never be repeated made it seem even more dreamlike as we forked into a low-lying meander and found ourselves in a lush bayou that felt more like Mississippi than Mexico. Beavers slapped their tails at us. Bees nuzzled willow flowers. Seeds rained down by the billions. Osvel cocked his ear and

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#theevolutionofelan

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reeled off bird names. A flock of white-faced ibis wheeled overhead. Beads of light caught where the water surface bulged around cattail stems. “This looks suspiciously like a green lagoon,” I said. “I can’t believe how normal it feels,” said Pete, a look of awe on his face. “The ecological memory is so deep.” When Pete tried this journey in 2008, he’d run out of water to travel on and wound up hiking 90 miles through salt pan to reach the sea. “It was hell,” he said. “A total slog. Worst trip I’ve ever done.” “I can’t believe how safe it feels,” Sam said. Just a few years earlier, every crime known to man took place amid the tamarisks of the limitrophe.” By late afternoon, we’d already covered 20 river miles, and the cottonwoods disappeared. Billions of tiny copepods, having lain dormant as eggs for a decade or more, had hatched and were feasting on algae along the water’s fringe. High, sandy banks—perhaps 100,000 years’ worth of powdered canyon—bracketed the flow. Beyond them, a khaki nothingness. The occasional image of a drowned cactus rippled up at us like something out of a Dalí painting. We saw no one. No one, that is, until we rounded a bend at dusk and heard the throb of ranchero music. The sleepy city of San Luis Río Colorado had awakened. The water had arrived the day before; the party was ongoing. Kids splashed and giggled in the shallows. Dozens of trucks lined the banks, speakers blasting. An ice cream truck and a coconut seller were doing brisk business on the beach beneath the bridge. An optimist with a net waded chest-deep through the water, sweeping it around him. The French filmmakers, who were working on a two-hour documentary for their People of the River series, were waiting for us. We camped in a mesquite grove previously restored by Pronatura, where Osvel’s Pronatura compadres were waiting for us with tamales, tequila, Tecate, and a mountain of carne asada so vast that it stretched all the way into breakfast. To the binational agreement we contributed three guitars and a mandolin. Juan Butron, a leathery local guy who’d been working with Pronatura and would be helping us navigate the delta’s twists and turns tomorrow, joined us in time

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to deliver a rousing rendition of “La Bamba” to the stars, with light coyote accompaniment. Around the campfire, we discussed what it would take to get San Luis its river permanently. “I wish social memory was longer than it is,” Sam said, strumming absently. “Are people still going to be inspired in three years when there’s not much to show from this?” With Sam’s backing, Fred’s consulting firm had developed a concept design for the delta restoration projects that used high-tech gates and levees to capture much more of the water than the dirt channels dug in the current sites, but it had not been implemented. “There will be a lot of excuses not to go further,” he said. “But the opportunity is huge. It’ll be something to watch.” Yes it will. Here’s the short version: In ten to twenty years, unless the drought breaks in a big way or everybody in Los Angeles starts recycling their own pee, Lake Mead will run dry, and the Southwest will have to pack up its playthings and move in with its relatives back east. Here’s the longer version: Each year, according to the Law of the River (http://www.usbr.gov/lc/region/g1000/lawofrvr.html), the century-old pillar of legal documents governing the allocation of the Colorado, Lake Mead must distribute 1.5 million acre-feet (MAF) of water to Mexico, 4.4 to California, 2.8 to Arizona, and 0.3 to Nevada. It loses another 0.6 MAF to evaporation. But the reservoir receives 1.2 MAF—four Las Vegases—less than it distributes. Currently, Mead has just 12 MAF left. Really, really bad math? Well, yes, but the original math was done during a particularly wet period in the early 20th century, when there seemed to be more than enough water to go around for the sparsely populated Southwest. Even as the Sunbelt boomed in the 1980s and 1990s, Mead’s managers avoided paying the piper, thanks to a series of wet El Niño years. The piper came calling in 2000, when the worst drought in 1,200 years settled onto the Southwest. Worse, research into the deep archeological record revealed that the wet decades of the 20th century were the anomaly and the dry years of the 21st were closer to the norm. Since 2001, Mead has been dropping 13 to 14 feet each year. It is now below 1,100 feet, with a 120-foot-high white bathtub ring to show just how far it has fallen. When Mead hits 1,075 feet, which should be in either 2016 or 2017, automatic rationing begins. Farmers in Arizona will begin to be cut off. At 1,050 feet, which looms for 2020, Vegas loses its current water intake, Arizona’s farmers go under, and Hoover Dam stops being able to generate hydroelectric power. “All of those agricultural districts receive federally subsidized power,” Peter Culp had pointed out to me as we’d watched water pour out of Morelos Dam. “Suddenly, you have the ag districts trying to buy power on the market at five times the price.” When the reservoir drops to 1,000 feet, somewhere around 2025, Phoenix is toast, Vegas loses its new intake, and farming becomes impossible in great swaths of the Southwest. “In the meantime,” according to Culp, “you’ve got a bunch of banks and bond markets saying, You know, that Vegas-Phoenix real estate market doesn’t look like such a great investment. The last time they concluded that, it tanked the world economy.” Which is why Culp suspects emergency measures would kick in before then. “There’s no way you can let Mead hit 1,000. It would be so horribly stupid.”

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Digging a channel to help the river through the earthen causeway.

Slowing Mead’s downfall would require suspending the Law of the River, which dictates that Southern California will remain unscathed as its neighbors collapse—something Culp finds unlikely. “It’s not credible that Arizona and Vegas would be entirely cut off before California is affected. Can you imagine the feds standing by and allowing that to happen?” Instead, picture a wildly unpopular federal water czar declaring a state of emergency and parceling out Southern California’s water to keep Phoenix and Vegas on an IV drip. Picture the mother of all lawsuits creeping across the Mojave dunes.

people $2 per square foot to remove their lawns. Drip systems are being ran to shrubs and shade trees.

That’s the doomsday scenario. And who doesn’t love the clarifying tonic of impending doom? Y2K. Peak oil. Now the coming megadrought. Dry riverbeds and white bathtub rings seize headlines. Sam wishes there was less focus on scare stories and more on smart water solutions—ways to shepherd the West through its day of reckoning to a green future of thriving cities, hyperefficient agriculture, and a Colorado delta teeming with life. It turns out that, even at the lower-flow levels projected for the Colorado, we have enough water to do all those things, if—and this is a big if, an if as vast as a Sonoran Desert horizon—we get smart. Really smart. Children of Dune smart.

Agriculture can save even more—though the real gains must come through you, carnivore. At least 70 percent of the water in the Colorado River basin gets used for agriculture, and most of that is used to grow livestock feed like alfalfa. This means that about five million acre-feet of the river—a third of its entire flow—gets turned into milk or hamburgers, and hamburgers are a particularly stupid thing to make out of the Colorado. Each hamburger takes about 500 gallons of water. If we each eat one fewer hamburger per year, we’ve just freed up a generous annual pulse flow for the river.

For example, while Phoenix uses 165 gallons of water per person per day, Tucson uses just 128. One difference? Phoenix still favors a lush-lawn look, whereas Tucson embraced its desert identity decades ago. Lawns out, cactuses in. All new homes are required to have gray-water systems that reuse water for irrigation. The city offers rebates for low-flush toilets and rain collectors. And 10 percent of the city’s water is reclaimed from the sewer system, treated, and used for irrigation. That still can’t touch Vegas, where every drop of water that goes down a drain or toilet is treated and pumped back into Lake Mead. The only water lost is what’s used for irrigation, and even that has plunged since the city banned new front lawns and began paying people to replace existing ones with desert vegetation. Water use in Vegas has dropped by a third. Los Angeles is also now paying

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Every city in the Southwest will need to get aboard the Vegas bandwagon. And they can. Australia already has. Cities there, which have been dealing with crippling aridity longer than we have, use just over half the water per person of their American counterparts. If Southern California alone were to adopt Australian rules concerning outdoor watering and low-flow fixtures, it would save 1.3 MAF of water per year—more than Lake Mead’s deficit.

Not that the river would get it. Current “use it or lose it” water laws don’t allow farmers to sell any surplus allotment, so they end up growing as much alfalfa as they can and selling it on the global market. Peter Culp estimates that 50 billion gallons of water—1.5 pulse flows—is shipped to China each year in the form of alfalfa, and even more to Japan. An open water market would allow both cities and environmental groups to pay farmers far more than they currently make growing alfalfa. Conservation groups are working to establish one, but the effort will face years of political wrangling. We don’t have years, so let’s get on it. Toilet to tap. Grass to cash. Beef to beans. A new generation of falafel-munching cowboys checking the drip irrigators on their olive farms. And spending their off-season floating the mighty Colorado delta. By the time we launched, it felt like we were on a vision quest of our own, traveling the Colorado’s possible futures. There were no #theevolutionofelan

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more green lagoons. The water got browner, sandier, shallower. In places the surface was dotted with clouds of frothy brown scum. “The Mojaves call this turtle shit,” Fred said. “It used to cover the river before the dams.” We knew we were running out of river when the channel flattened and we found ourselves paddling in a foot of brown, tamarisk-clogged water. Osvel and I were in a canoe up front, and as we cleared a stand of tamarisk we saw a ten-foot-high wall of sand stretching across the channel—a road crossing installed by some farmer who never expected the river to be wet again. I looked up at the wall and thought, This is how it ends. But then we saw two figures standing on the berm. It was Peter Culp and Jennifer Pitt, who’d been chasing the leading lobe of the river for days by jeep through farmers’ barren fields. After spotting the dam from the air, the NGOs had sweet-talked a local excavator into digging an emergency trough through the berm. It was still too high for the water, but not by much. Osvel and I canoed through the last few inches, pushing our paddles against the sandy bottom, until our bow ground to a stop. We’d run the river dry. The others arrived behind us. “Keep it going!” they shouted. We attacked the trough with our paddles, shoveling it down to the water’s level. Peter and Jennifer joined in. For 15 years they had written reports, filed briefings, raised funds, and bended ears to get the water this far. Now they were digging with their bare hands to get it a few feet farther. At 6:24 p.m., as the shadows of tamarisks lengthened across the redtinged sands, the first trickle escaped the trough and dropped into the empty channel on the far side. We cheered. Soon the water was building on itself, picking up speed, scouring the sandy walls of the road. Through the night it rose, and we rode the mini-rapids on our paddleboards again and again, occasionally knocked sideways by a calving chunk of road. Pronatura had brought Fred’s truck down from Morelos to haul our gear back, and we spent the night by the river, sleeping in the sand. We had come 32 miles. That meant there were another 68 or so to reach the sea, some of them very dry. The water would make just a few more miles the next day, and the day after that, creeping on through the saline lands. A week later, it would fill the backwaters of Laguna Grande, where 100,000 trees are now sprouting, and it would touch places—and people—that never thought they’d see water again. Having no more river to travel, we returned to our lives. Fred to Arizona, Sam and Pete to Colorado, me to Vermont. Osvel and Juan to Pronatura’s bird counts and flow monitoring. Sam gave Juan his paddleboard, scrawling “Por Juan del Rio” on the yellow deck. A few days later, they began reducing the flow out of Morelos, and the river slowed even more. So I was surprised when I received a note from Pete. He and Sam had returned to the delta. “I have to make the sea,” Pete wrote. “Kind of reaching mission stage at this point.” With Juan divining the way on his Badfish, they took it in 20mile chunks, waiting for the water to fill each reach. It wasn’t pretty. “Complete warfare,” Pete wrote. “Chopping, pleading the boards through dead and living cattail and mesquite jungles. It will go down as the most beautiful and one of the hardest paddles in this kid’s book.” They battled mosquitoes and 107-degree temperatures; they MAGAZINE

floated over swimming coral snakes and under endangered clapper rails. Toward the end, they had to paddle commando on their bellies in the dark to hide from malditos—narco bandits who work the empty lower delta—but on May 5, they hit the high-tide line of the gulf and kissed salt water. Thus the séance ended. On May 21, 2014, the gates of Morelos Dam groaned closed, and the last of the water snaked into the dust. San Luis Río Colorado went back to being the city on the sandbox. Was the grand experiment worth it? To Sam, that depends on what happens next. “One pulse does not a living system make, but it does remind us that it is alive,” he wrote. Knowing that, do we let the river go back to its slumber, or do we raise it again? Annually? Permanently? Having seen the limitrophe wet and dry, having watched the dam open and close, I now understand more than ever that, at some level, it is simply a choice we get to make, and I have to believe that for anyone, Mexican or American, who got a taste of the delta in the spring of 2014, it’s an easy call. We’d found the bucking, ecstatic Colorado of old, right where we’d left it, romping through its old playgrounds like an oversize kid. For a few electric miles, it was in its element, and so were we. It tumbled into a hundred green lagoons, traveling them all, and so did we. It divided and rejoined, twisted and turned, meandered in awesome jungles, got lost and was glad of it, and so were we. It turned down long-forgotten paths, trying to find a graceful way forward, and so did we.


adventure seekers

BOOTS AND BURGERS

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Photo by Kerrick James. #theevolutionofelan THE OUTDOOR ISSUE 2 0 1 5


Boots

Look in my closet and all you’ll find are eight pairs of hiking boots, Merrell’s Moab Ventilator, identical except for the varying stages of wear and tear. No sneakers, sandals, or flip-flops, just boots. I live in hiking boots. Though I don’t hike every day, I can. I’m always dressed for the trail. From my window I see mountains, mesas, and red rock cliffs. This is no place to hunker indoors. Easy access to trails and a user-friendly climate make Arizona a biped’s paradise. If hiking isn’t our official state pastime, it should be. A trail snatches you; steals you from the mundane. The common misnomer is that we take a trail. In reality, the trail takes us. WRITTEN BY Roger Naylor

Here’s the scenario: I roll out of bed and point my truck toward a trail. I hike into the Arizona outback under a high arched sky with a lingering hint of moonlight. Dawn wounds the eastern horizon as coyote yips recede in the distance. I walk for miles. I wander lonesome lands—a maze of canyons, a canopied forest or a snarl of desert—it doesn’t matter. I adore every square inch of this heart-wringing, soul-squeezing state. The silence soothes me. Wildlife swoops and scampers at the edge of my vision. The lustrous light of morning sharpens to a hard glare. The twisted trail pulls me deeper into wilderness as wildflowers perfume a subtle breeze. Past noon the sun turns squinty-eyed mean. The heat begins to stalk me with a knife in its teeth. I walk for miles. On the drive home I stop at a diner or café, a casual joint where no one bats an eye at my dusty boots and sweat-streaked shirt. The waitress calls me “Hon” and hustles out my drinks. I don’t need a menu because I know exactly what I want. I chug ice water and my stomach rumbles until my burger arrives. I bite into the grill-kissed slab of beef. Right there, that’s my favorite day of all. That’s Halloween, Christmas, and the spring equinox rolled into one. Walk off a few calories and then pack them on again. I admire the Zen-like simplicity of it. I’ll take a boots and burgers day anytime I can get it.

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By putting boots to soil, pinning eyes on the horizon and plunging into wild country, we reap untold benefits, both healthy and spiritual. Walking has been described as controlled falling. Hiking, for me, is controlled falling in love.

Burgers

I turned outlaw during the third grade, a pintsized desperado lured down a wicked path by a craving I couldn’t control. Twice a week I left elementary school to walk home for lunch, which was permitted as long as you went home. But I didn’t. Instead I ducked into a dimly lit joint. I couldn’t help myself; I was jonesing for the good stuff. As soon as my tiny figure darkened the doorway, the man behind the counter knew what to do. He slapped a hamburger on the grill. Yes, I had a cow on my back. I was hooked on burgers. Let the other saps at school choke down a brick of institutionalgrade meatloaf; I was feasting on a juicy joy bomb, the most exquisite of foods, the coup de grease . . . the burger. A hamburger is the king of comfort food because it’s a flashback on a bun. With the first bite you are transported to a more innocent time when your world revolved around simple pleasures like cartoons, running fast down a hill for no reason, and throwing rocks at someone you had a crush on, then refueling with a burger and a shake.

All these years later and burgers still hold me in their sway. They’re the perfect post-hike meal, but to be clear, I do NOT eat a burger every time I go for a walk. I have reformed the bad habits of my youth. Moderation is the key. My vegetarian wife is a terrific cook and has broadened my culinary horizons considerably. I enjoy a wide range of foods. Yet I never lost my taste for the simple elegance of a hamburger. That familiar blast of charred but juicy meat, meshing with a chorus of complimentary flavors in an easyto-chomp package still rocks my world. Now they are a treat, not a staple. I’m an avid hiker, topping the 1,000-mile mark many years. Most days I eat pretty healthy, but once every week or two, I pounce on a burger. Or hot dog. Sometimes barbecue, or pizza, or burrito. Depends what trail I’m on. You’ll find plenty of my favorite eateries here. This book is a love letter to Arizona masquerading as a hiking and dining guide. Beyond trail descriptions and restaurant info, I provide suggestions for other local attractions and activities. I add historic tidbits, fast facts, rambling thoughts, personal anecdotes, and big dollops of quirkiness. When you spend as much alone time on the trail as I do, all sorts of weird notions ricochet through the old noggin. Most of all it’s packed with great days, amazing days, my best days. Peel off a few for yourself. Lace up the boots and explore the scenic wonders of this epic landscape. Then unwind in a comfortable hideout, where burgers leap off the grill like trout from a stream. Let yourself be pampered by a spatula technician. Order a burger—cheese it if you want—and bite into your delicious past. Want fries with that?

Boots and Burgers: An Arizona Handbook for Hungry Hikers. Text by Roger Naylor. Published by Rio Nuevo Publishers. To purchase, please visit your local bookseller. Books can also be purchased from treasurechestbooks.com and on Amazon.com. For more news about Rio Nuevo Publishers, visit them on Facebook at facebook.com/RioNuevo and their blog at rionuevo.com/news/.

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Lookin’ Out My Back Door The first house we bought in Arizona was because of the back porch. We walked in the front door and I kept going straight out the back. My wife got the grand tour from the realtor and finally came looking for me. I was ready to make an offer without knowing whether the house had a kitchen or bathroom. It had a porch with a spectacular view of Mingus Mountain. I had a mountain right out my back door. I was living in a Credence Clearwater Revival song. Patio, porch, balcony, veranda—however it’s qualified, that’s where I want to sit. It’s a room, yet it’s outside. What’s not to love? A porch shades you from the sun but lets you experience the warmth. It shelters you from the rain but lets you feel the spray of the water. Porches are Zen structures, selfcontained worlds beyond the reach of dilemma and despair. Having a porch attached to one’s home is what truly separates us from the animals.

Widforss Trail is easy on your knees but fiercely squeezes your heart. Photo by Mike Koopsen. Below: Tasty canyon views peek through all along the Widforss. Photo by John Morey.

Widforss Trail, North Rim I feel like an idiot for not knowing this already, but here’s my big take-away from this trail: Lupines smell delicious! I never thought of lupines as having a distinct fragrance, but when the Widforss cut through great swaths of the blue wildflowers, the aroma staggered me—a scent reminiscent of amped-up lilacs. I actually lay down in the middle of the path, inhaling for several minutes. Fortunately, no one else happened along just then. Fast Fact: All visitor facilities at the North Rim are closed from mid-October to mid-May.

Not every trail at the canyon is a grueling death march. The Widforss, for example, never dips below the rim. Named for Gunnar Widforss, an artist who painted western national parks in the 1920s and 1930s, the trail rambles through shaggy woods, offering big canyon panoramas on the way. Near the

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trailhead, grab a brochure from the metal box. The guide matches up with numbered markers scattered along the first 2.5 miles of the hike identifying points of interest. Much of this segment traces the edge of the gorge, so you’ll enjoy impressive viewpoints. The final marker is one such overlook. You can head back after that for a nice 5-miler. If you continue, the trail turns into the forest, cutting through a picturesque little valley where I had my lupine epiphany. Even though it was early in the monsoon season, blooms were splashed across the forest floor. I spotted fleabane, paintbrush, fireweed, and several others I couldn’t readily identify.

On the approach to Widforss Point, a picnic table sits in the shade of a big ponderosa pine. It has to be the most superfluous picnic table in the park. Who’s going to drive to the North Rim, hike five miles into the woods, then stop a few feet from the rim—where there are no canyon vistas—to have a picnic? Fast Fact: The Grand Canyon is 277 miles long, up to 18 miles wide, and over a mile deep.

My suggestion is to continue walking the additional fifty yards to Widforss Point. There you can find a nice sitting rock with terrific views and have yourself a proper canyon-side repast. Remember: friends don’t let friends picnic irresponsibly. Where: From Grand Canyon Lodge, drive 2.6 miles north to the signed turnoff. Turn left on the gravel road and proceed to the parking area. Cost: $25 entrance fee per vehicle. Difficulty: Moderate. Length: 10 miles round-trip. Details: (928) 638-7888, www.nps.gov/grca/. #theevolutionofelan

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Lees Ferry Lodge at Vermilion Cliffs M a rbl e C a n yon

This rustic inn sits on one of the loneliest and most scenic highways in Arizona, just south of the Utah state line. Tucked against a ferocious escarpment of towering rock walls, Lees Ferry Lodge offers motel rooms, a restaurant, and a bar with an amazing beer selection. I can’t vouch for the rooms because I haven’t spent the night but I can never drive by without grabbing a bite and a brew and to relax for a while on one of my favorite front porches in the world. The Vermilion Cliffs rise 3,000 feet above the plateau, a geological upheaval that appears as an endless line of lofty buttes and mesas. Carved by eons of erosion to expose a bouquet of colorful strata, the cliffs provide your meal with an unforgettable backdrop. You can’t go wrong with ribs, steaks, the delicious smoked trout platter, or big ol’ burger. But it’s the porch

Photo by John Morey.

I love most. Sitting there on a June evening as the twilight unpeels the afternoon heat and the sky spins through a color wheel—red, then orange, then melting into a molten puddle of gold—is the ideal way to kiss summer full on the lips. Milepost 541.5 Arizona 89A, (928) 355-2231, www.vermilioncliffs.com.

Fast Fact: The only place where the United States Post Office still delivers mail by mule is the village of Supai, located at the bottom of the Grand Canyon.

Jacob Lake The North Rim Parkway (Arizona 67) begins in the hamlet of Jacob Lake. While little more than a busy corner, this still qualifies as the main commercial district between the North Rim and Kanab, Utah. Historic Jacob Lake Inn offers motel rooms and cabins. They also sell gasoline and operate a general store, soda fountain, lunch counter, and bakery. Be sure to stop and grab a sack of fresh-baked cookies. They’ve got classic flavors and also some weird but yummy combos. Your sweet tooth will thank you. (928) 643-7232, www.jacoblake.com.

Photo by Matt Rich. MAGAZINE

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Ja’di’To’oh Ant elope point m a r in a

A bit of sun followed by a splash of shade defines Hanging Garden Trail. Below: The Hanging Garden makes a luxuriant little desert oasis. Photos by Roger Naylor.

Hanging Garden Trail, Page Page is the gateway to Lake Powell, which has nearly 2,000 miles of shoreline, more than the entire west coast of the continental United States. Yet one of the loveliest hikes in town leads to a pool of water so small it wouldn’t fill a cactus wren’s bathtub. A wide path lined by river rocks cuts across open sand to the base of Manson Mesa. From here the trail bends left and skirts the edge of the slope. Big views roll back over the broken lands toward the dam and a sliver of lake. Lake Powell exists because of Glen Canyon Dam. Construction of the 710-foot-tall stone arch dam was completed in 1963 and began corralling the waters of the volatile Colorado River. It took seventeen years for Lake Powell to completely fill. While the purpose of the

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Hot Tip Learn about Native American culture at the Explore Navajo Museum in Tuba City. Exhibits touch on creation stories, ceremonial life, and family systems. The museum is adjacent to Tuba City Trading Post and Navajo Code Talkers Museum. www.discovernavajo.com.

dam was to provide water storage and to generate power, it has also created uncanny drama in the middle of nowhere. This epic reservoir spreads across a land carved and scraped, twisted and torn, as if the cosmos continues to tinker with it. Rock walls and columns rise abruptly from sapphire waters. Submerged towers and castles appear at every bend of the lake. Atlantis does exist; its skyline lies hidden beneath the Southwestern desert.

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I follow the cairns on a short, gentle climb with the sun ricocheting off bare stone. The trail is hot and exposed, which makes the ending such a sweet payoff. Up and under the high shoulder of the mesa, a lush oasis awaits, tucked in a verdant alcove. As I approach the recess, I’m smacked by a wave of cool air, like a cream pie in the kisser. The temperature drops sharply. More than just simple shade, this is an enveloping shade. I feel like I’m wearing a suit made out of shade with ice cubes stuffed in the pockets.

A dense mat of ferns forms a luxuriant cover across the entire back wall. Small orchids bloom amid the greenery created by a seep spring. This is the namesake hanging garden. A few stones surround a saucer-sized puddle, forming a mini-saloon for lizards. Several lurk nearby waiting for Happy Hour. I pull up a cool rock and join them. Where: Drive through Page on U.S. 89. Just north of the city, 0.5 miles before the dam, there’s a turnoff on the right with a brown hiker sign. Turn and follow the gravel road 0.2 miles to the signed kiosk. Cost: Free. Difficulty: Easy. Length: 1 mile round-trip. Details: (928) 608-6200, www.nps.gov/glca.

There’s a great burger waiting nearby but you have to pay a cover charge to get in. It’s actually the entrance fee to the Glen Canyon National Recreation Area. But if you made the drive to Page, you no doubt planned on visiting Lake Powell anyway, so start at Antelope Point Marina. Built in partnership with the Navajo Nation and National Park Service, Antelope Point is Lake Powell’s newest marina. There’s a public launch ramp, plus Marina Village, which is the largest floating platform in the world. That’s where you’ll find a lounge, retail store, and the lovely restaurant, Ja’di’To’oh—Navajo for “Antelope Springs.” The open breezeway and floor to ceiling glass walls make the whole place seem like a sprawling patio. Even when sitting indoors, it feels like you’re outside. Natural light streams in from every angle, and your meal comes with a side of lake panoramas. The brawny burger is topped with cheddar cheese, bacon, and Hatch green chiles, so there’s a nice spicy bite riding in at the tail end. (928) 645-5900, www. antelopepointlakepowell.com.

Fast Fact: Lake Powell is the second largest manmade lake in the United States. The largest is Lake Mead, also in Arizona.

“Looking hard for a drive-in, searching for a corner café, where the hamburgers sizzle on an open grill night and day.” — C h u c k B e rr y

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Along the Way...

Horseshoe Bend

around water, I’m happier on shore. Still, I’ve done my share of

Treat yourself to an optical thunderbolt just south of Page. A

kayaking and canoeing and have been out on Lake Powell in ev-

short hike leads to Horseshoe Bend Overlook perched atop a

erything from a speedboat to a luxury houseboat with a hot tub

steep cliff with the emerald-green Colorado River shimmering

on the upper deck, and it is pretty cool. Lake Powell meanders

one thousand feet below. You’ll have no trouble figuring out how

for 186 miles with 96 major canyons begging for a little explora-

this spot earned its name because the river makes a sweeping

tion. You can rent all manner of watercraft from Antelope Point

horseshoe-shaped curve. It is an eye-popping, jaw-dropping

and Wahweap Marinas, or book one of their scenic cruises.

sight. Bring your wide-angle lens to capture it all. Use extreme caution when approaching the edge and keep control of children

Goulding’s Lodge

and pets. If you find heights daunting, try lying down on the

Although Goulding’s Lodge sits just outside the boundary of

ground and peering over the edge. The trailhead is located off

Monument Valley Navajo Tribal Park, it is a crucial piece of the

U.S. 89, two miles south of Page.

valley’s history. It was Harry Goulding, operator of a trading post, who first brought the sprawling western landscape to the attention of John Ford. Goulding and his wife Leone, affectionately known as “Mike,” first built rooms to provide accommodations to the film crews and actors. Goulding’s Lodge, nestled at the base of a towering butte, is a minitown today with grocery store, gas station, gift

Lake Powell

shop, restaurant, museum, and tours in open-air vehicles. Each

Humans are primarily land mammals, designed for land-based

night a small theater shows a movie filmed in Monument Valley,

activities such as walking, running, and Dancing with the Stars.

which is seriously fun. Southwestern-style rooms are clean and

Swimming does not come naturally to any creature with feet

comfortable and come with private balconies. (435) 727-3231,

instead of flippers. Staying away from deep water is prudent.

www.gouldings.com.

That’s my boating philosophy in a nutshell. While I like being Top: Horseshoe Bend. Provided by Jackson Bridges/City of Page. Bottom Left: Lake Powell. Photo by Bob Miller. Bottom Right: Goulding’s Lodge. Courtesy of Goulding’s Lodge. MAGAZINE

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A scenic dirt road snakes across the floor of Monument Valley. Photo by Roger Naylor.

Wildcat Trail, Monument Valley There are many ways to explore the radiant desolation of Monument Valley, but if you want a piece of it all to yourself, hike the Wildcat Trail. The Wildcat is the only trail within the Tribal Park that visitors can hike without a Navajo guide. It brushes so close to the iconic formations known as the Mittens, you can feel them holding you.

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g Park visitors can drive

Hot Tip

a rough, 17-mile dirt loop road through the heart of the park. Navajo-led tours are also available and

well worth the cost. Remote sections of the park like Mystery Valley are accessible only by guided tour.

Starting from the campground below The View Hotel, the trail drops a few hundred feet to the valley floor. This feels like the edge of the world, where blocky towers vault from the sand and sagebrush and pierce a tall sky. It is hauntingly quiet here in the brittle afternoon light. I walk into the expanse, gazing at monoliths stranded like shipwrecks washed up on an ancient shore. Curving through the gnarled scrub and wind-bent juniper trees, Wildcat loops

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around West Mitten. The Navajos have occupied these lands for centuries. Yet for generations of moviegoers like me it was director John Ford’s grand-scale films that helped Monument Valley come to define the American West. His first movie set against this backdrop was the 1939 classic Stagecoach, elevating the genre and turning John Wayne into a breakout star. Orson Welles claimed to have watched Stagecoach more than forty times during the making of Citizen Kane. I probably see it that many times in a weekend if my wife goes out of town. For a hike through such an unrelenting sweep of land, it is surprisingly intimate. The easy walking gives your eyes a chance to consume every detail. Small stacks of rock cairns and a few signs point the way. I move at a tarantula’s pace, slow crawling across the sand, trying to make the miles last. As I swung around from the backside of the formation, I had one of those small diamondshaped moments that leave permanent fingerprints on your heart. Standing alone on a rise at the base of the Mitten, a horse grazed in the scrub. A chestnut, his coat almost liquid in the sun, he flicked his tail and cocked an eye my way. I stood for a long time and could

hear no sound but his contented chomping. It was me and a horse, alone in Monument Valley. I was no longer watching westerns; I was living one. I climbed from the valley floor, stopping to look back every few steps to reassure myself the horse hadn’t dissolved into another desert mirage. As I reached the trailhead, the fading sun swabbed the stony plumes with a radiant glow. Deep rich reds washed down the formations, shimmering in still air. I felt like I was seeing the reflection of God’s brake lights as He stopped to give me a smile. Some days it just pays to get out and walk around. Hey, I think I’m hungry! Where: Monument Valley Navajo Tribal Park is 175 miles northeast of Flagstaff. Take U.S. 89 north to U.S. 160. Turn right and proceed to Kayenta. Turn left on U.S. 163, go for 23 miles, and turn right into the park. Trail begins 0.4 miles north of visitor center from the campground. Cost: There is a $5 per person entrance fee. Difficulty: Moderate. Length: 3.2 miles. Details: (435) 727-5874, www.navajonationparks.org

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The View Hotel monument va ll e y

Monument Valley Balloon Company Everyone wants to witness the sunrise in Monument Valley but only a fortunate few get to be part of it. Rise above the monoliths in a hot air balloon and meet the sun while it is still young and supple and bathing the landscape in golden

Perched on a mesa amidst towering monoliths, The View is the first hotel built inside Monument Valley Navajo Tribal Park. Designed to exist in harmony with the magnificent surroundings, the hotel stands only three stories tall, a low contour conforming to the mesa that overlooks the valley. The restaurant, just like most of the motel rooms, faces east toward prominent formations the Mittens and Merrick Butte. In a state with no shortage of dramatic settings, this one is hard to top. Their burger is a solid half-pounder called—wait for it— the John Wayne. But while you’re here, you should try some traditional dishes like the Navajo taco or the green chile stew, loaded with chunks of potatoes, carrots, and spicy pork. (435) 727-5555, www.monumentvalleyview.com.

hues. From May through December, Monument Valley Balloon Company picks up passengers from nearby motels during the predawn and drives to a launch site. (800) 843-5987, www.monumentvalleyballooncompany.com. Photo courtesy of Monument Valley Balloon Company.

Fast Fact: Unlike the rest of Arizona, daylight saving time is observed on the Navajo Nation.

Featuring the Locally Handcrafted Ales of Zion Canyon Brewing Company

N OPE ALL R YEA

Entrance of Zion National Park 95 Zion Park Blvd, Springdale, UT Turn into Zion Canyon Theatre Live Music Every Friday & Saturday Great Food Large Riverside Patio Kid’s Menu Open for Lunch and Dinner


adventure seekers

Concrete to Canyons Millions of people visit Zion National Park annually. Some are local. Most have traveled from afar. What lies within the park’s 232 square miles is a landscape of towering, narrow gorges, remote mesas, and washes that lead to isolated canyons…canyons that reach up to 20 miles in length. The vast majority of those who visit the canyon partake of the 15 miles of paved trails. Zion’s depths require time and experience to truly be explored. Millions of people visit Las Vegas, Nevada annually. The epicenter of nightlife in the southwest. Embellished with towering hotelcasinos, gambling, shopping, dining, and the ongoing development of cultural venues, ‘Vegas’ is predominately a resort destination. Interstate 15 carves its way through the center of the city. Vegas is not without its challenges. Those who feel the struggle most are the children of the inner-city. Only 160 miles separate Las Vegas from Zion, yet they are polar opposites. Yet something magical happened when the two cultures collided. 110 fifth grade students from the Andre Agassi College Preparatory Academy (AACPA) in Las Vegas stood upon Zion’s floor for the first time, awestruck in wonder. This was the first group of students from AACPA and Rainbow Dream Academy to experience the beauty of Zion. The students participated in what Zion National Park calls, “Concrete to Canyons” program. Unique in its approach, Concrete to Canyons received the 2014 America’s Best Idea grant from the National Park Foundation. Barb Graves, Zion’s Education Coordinator, shares, “The aim of the grant is to engage diverse audiences in meaningful and relevant ways with national parks and to inspire participants to become stewards of our National Park System.” The National Park Foundation grant was matched by the Zion National Park Foundation and the Andre Agassi Foundation to allow more students to participate. The program was then executed in partnership with the staff from Lake Mead National Recreational Area and Grand Canyon-Parashant National Monument. In preparation for the excursion, the AACPA and Rainbow Dream Academy staff participated in their own training; the first Zion Concrete to Canyons Teacher Institute. Instruction provided the staff with an in-park camping experience and orientation prior to the student visits. The goal of the Institute was to introduce the teachers to the park’s natural and cultural resources while also participating in some of the same activities and camping situations that the students would experience during their visits. For most, it was also their first visit to Zion. For four days and three nights, students and teachers engaged in ranger-led hikes and activities throughout the park including the East Rim, Weeping Rock, the Grotto, the Narrows, as well as participating in the Night Sky Program. It was apparent to the staff that the children and the chaperones were overwhelmed with amazement. The children filled their wilderness journals with insights and thoughts reflecting their experience. Around the campfire students and staff would tell of their deeper appreciation for public lands and how they learned the importance of protecting and respecting the plant and animal life. MAGAZINE

left: Students walking to the Virgin River to explore canyon-building. top: Building miniature canyons along the river to show weathering and erosion when water is added. above: Students share their impressions of Weeping Rock with Ranger Eleanor.

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When asked to share their favorite experience during the trip, the responses were simple, yet priceless: putting up their tents; building canyons in the river; seeing Saturn through a telescope; sitting around a campfire; roasting and eating s’mores; seeing the ostriches on the bus trip; hiking; the waterfall at Weeping Rock; getting to draw the mountains; experiences that are all too often taken for granted. Most of all, the children enjoyed the physical activities and challenges associated with exploring the great outdoors. Much can be said for the Zion National Park Foundation (ZNPF). Their efforts are the primary financial support behind Concrete to Canyons. At the top of ZNPF’s fundraising endeavors is the annual Zion National Park Plein Air Art Invitational. Lyman Hafen, Executive Director of ZNPF, reflected on the 2014 event, which delivered a resounding $160,00040% of which will go directly to the Foundation to support the park’s Youth Education Initiative and ongoing art programs. “This year’s plein air event exceeded all our goals and expectations. We were overwhelmed by the amount of support…This event is the perfect example of how a national park, a non-profit partner, and a community can partner for the good of a place we all love so much.”

Camp is set in Watchman campground.

And then there’s Andre Agassi. When Etched Magazine spoke with Andre in 2011, he shared his committed to making things happen for the children of inner-city Las Vegas. “I had been ranked number one in the world (dropping to #110). Deep inside I hated tennis at that time in my life. I hated what it had taken from me. It had given me some skills though. So I decided to connect with my sport…to make a systemic change in a child’s life - which is the school, and why I played tennis long after my body told me to stop.” Noted as potentially the greatest comeback in tennis history, Andre proved the doubters wrong, winning the French Open and the U.S. Open in 1999 returning him to the #1 ranking…all for the ability to raise funds and awareness for the school. Agassi Prep was dubbed a National Model Charter School by the U.S. Department of Education in 2003 and since has received many accolades over the years. The collaboration with Zion National Park is just another reflection of Agassi’s commitment to his kids. Once the children returned to their classrooms, they began preparation for a stewardship program at Lake Mead National Recreation Area this spring. The Concrete to Canyons program equipped these students and their families with the tools to responsibly conserve, manage, and advocate for our natural resources—an effort deemed worthy of America’s Best Idea. Information and images provided by the Zion Natural History Association.

Interested in more information? ZION NATIONAL PARK FOUNDATION VISION The Zion National Park Foundation is the official fundraising partner of Zion National Park. The Foundation operates as a division of Zion Natural History Association (ZNHA), a 501(c) (3) not-for-profit corporation in the State of Utah. Established in 1929, ZNHA operates the retail sales in park visitor centers. The retail operations of ZNHA fund the overhead of the Foundation, making it possible for more than 90 percent of Foundation-generated funds to go directly to important projects in Zion National Park.

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PEOPLE - PLACES - THINGS

desert dwellers

“Wilderness... is hereby recognized as an area where the earth and its community of life are untrammeled by man, where man himself is a visitor who does not remain.” – Wilderness Act

Building Ice Age Park 62 | Story Keepers 66 | The Green That Turned Golden 70 | Saving an Oasis 74


desert Dwellers

Photo by Alan O’Neal.

Building Ice Age Park WRITTEN BY Melynda Thorpe

Las Vegas is preparing to take the world stage with a very prehistoric and unexpected cast of characters. Local and national supporters are rallying around the concept of protecting a gold mine of Ice Age fossils while creating a modern, urban national park just minutes from the Las Vegas Strip. In the north part of the Las Vegas Valley and just a 30-minute drive from the Las Vegas Strip runs a sandy desert wash. Until now, the area has remained unprotected and open to recreation and misuse. It is hard to believe that this area was once a lush wetland inhabited by herds of roaming Ice Age animals including Columbian mammoth, American lion, sabre tooth cat and the fierce dire wolf. Now, the world-famous metropolitan community known for nightlife and entertainment is poised to take the world stage once again with a very prehistoric, unexpected cast of characters. To bring protection to the area dense with fossils and to provide due diligence to the history that can be found here, a powerful group of elected officials, community groups, scientists and national advocates are working to make a change that will alter the map of Las Vegas forever.

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Brushing away the layers of history, Tule Springs tells the story of survival, extinction and evolution over a period of more than 200,000 years. Now with a world-destination urban community supporting it, and legislation in process, the proposed Tule Springs Fossil Beds National Monument could soon become one of most accessible and visited national park units in America. According to Lynn Davis, senior manager of the National Parks Conservation Association Nevada Field Office, if legislation is passed, the Las Vegas Public Lands and Tule Springs Fossil Beds National Monument Act would transfer nearly 23,000 acres from the Bureau of Land Management to the National Park Service for protection and preservation of the fossil beds site. It would also set a model for a new kind of national park – a modern, urban, active research park where visitors can observe paleontologists uncovering Ice Age animal fossils as they are unearthed in the very location where herds once roamed. “When you go out to the site, you look across what appears to be flat desert,” Davis says. “Then, as you walk down into the wash you enter a rugged badlands area, and this is where it becomes truly magical.” Scientific reports state that thousands of Pleistocene-era fossils have been found at Tule Springs since they were first discovered in the 1900s. In the early 1960’s, the area became the site of a “Big Dig” excavation operation and was the first site in the world to use radio carbon dating system. At that time, a team of 30 scientists from New York, Nevada and California garnered large equipment for digging trenches and surveying the dense population of fossils. Using bulldozers and other heavy equipment, some trenches were dug more than a mile in length and can still be seen from satellite images today. Findings and fossils of the Big Dig are housed at Nevada State Museum and Nevada Natural History Museum in Las Vegas just miles from the site. But when tents were packed and papers published, somehow Tule Springs Ice Age fossils were forgotten. University of Nevada, Las Vegas Paleontologist Josh Bonde, Ph.D. says the layers of exposed hillside at Tule Springs are “dynamic, readable pages of history.” For Bonde, Tule Springs is an extension of the classroom and a living laboratory for his students. “This is probably the greatest collection of Ice Age fossils in the world,” he says. “Students can come out here and have access to a world-class excavation site with fossils surfacing as the land continues to change with the wind weather. Every time we come out here we find something new.”

Heavy equipment halts while camel teeth are excavated from the floor of a trench at Tule Springs. Left to right; Richard Shutler, John Mawby, unidentified archaeologist, and machine operator. The Big Dig 1962-1963. Photo with permission Nevada State Museum, Las Vegas. Lynn Davis Photo by Melynda Thorpe

Davis has been working with supporters of Tule Springs since 2007 in what she calls “a heels to hiking boots kind of project.” In close proximity to Las Vegas city, residential neighborhoods, businesses, schools and Nellis Air Force Base, “The effort to preserve this land has required rallying broad community support from local officials, business leaders and community groups through presentations and meetings” she says. “But strapping on hiking boots and taking dignitaries into the fossil-dense landscape was how support was solidly cemented.” Where it really started, according to Davis, was with a few individuals who formed a friends group, built up support, and came to NPCA and asked, “What do we have here?”

MAGAZINE

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UNLV Paleontologist Josh Bonde considers Tule Springs Fossil Beds a living laboratory for his science students. Chiseling from the hillside, Bonde reveals remnants of Ice Age plant life found within the layers of rock. Photo by Melynda Thorpe.

For O’Neill, to see the business community, elected officials, scouts, military and native people come together in support has been something remarkable. “We’ve even incorporated the Las Vegas trail system to connect to Tule Springs. You can actually now pick up a trail on The Strip and ride to Tule Springs from downtown Las Vegas.” With more than 40 million international tourists traveling to Las Vegas each year, “We hope to give them a reason to stay just a little bit longer,” O’Neill says. “Once you go out to the site you want to stay. It is really something special.” Josh Bonde, Ph.D. Photo by Melynda Thorpe.

Leading the citizen effort is Jill DeStefano, president of Protectors of Tule Springs. “When we first started gathering support, we stood at the department of motor vehicles -weekends, in the heat, in cold getting signatures on a petition to let our elected officials know that public wants this protected.” Alan O’Neill, Founder Outside Las Vegas Foundation and retired National Park Service superintendent has also been instrumental in growing support for the project. “I’ve been involved in conservation and public lands management for 48 years,” he says. “This is the best example I’ve ever run across where you have such a community involvement and buy-in.”

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For Bonde, there is a sense of urgency to bring protection to Tule Springs. “This is the greatest record of Ice Age ecosystems anywhere in the world,” he says. “People are so excited when they find out this is here - we want to make sure it can be preserved and protected before irreparable damage is done.” Legislation to designate Tule Springs a national monument has been endorsed by Nevada Governor Brian Sandoval, the Nevada State legislature, Clark County Commission, the cities of Las Vegas and North Las Vegas, the U.S. Air Force, educators, the tourism and resort industry, dozens of community groups and thousands of individuals. According to Davis, the legislation is co-sponsored by Nevada’s entire Congressional delegation, and is continuing to advance through the legislative process. “This land deserves inclusion in the National Park System,” she says. #theevolutionofelan

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The U.S. Senate passed a bill in December of 2014, that will create the Tule Springs Fossil Beds National Monument in the far northeastern side of Las Vegas valley. The designation takes in more than 22,000 acres that includes tens of thousands of ice age fossils. Paleontologists estimate the site could contain hundreds of thousands of bones showing the past quarter million years of the earth’s history including pertinent information about the ice age era.

Jill DeStefano Photo courtesy Protectors of Tule Springs.

Melynda Thorpe celebrates 20 years working in the communication industry. At Utah Valley University, she was institutional director of creative services, editor of UVU Magazine, and adjunct public relations instructor. Now in Southern Utah, Melynda is founder of Emceesquare Media Inc, a full-service media production and event management company, and executive producer for the new Southern Utah LIVE Television Network.


Torrey School House

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desert dwellers

Story Keepers WRITTEN and PHOTOS BY Amyanne Rigby

The path of history is paved with stories. Over time, perhaps centuries, the mouthpiece of these stories becomes the historical places which remain. While some are maintained and others forgotten, both stand as witnesses of the people and communities in which they once thrived.   There are four elements of historic preservation. These include: preservation, rehabilitation, restoration, and reconstruction. Amongst the communities of the Southwest are historic places lost in time which embody some of these forms of historic preservation.

PRESERVATION

Fruita School House In the effort to preserve historic edifices, all dimensions of that particular building’s uses and occupants are honored, not simply those of its original state. Three one-room schoolhouses of the southwest illustrate preservation.   The Torrey Schoolhouse on State Route 24 in Wayne County is one of only a dozen remaining structures constructed in the early days of pioneer settlement. And as a log meetinghouse, it is unique. It is the only remaining structure of its kind. It also illustrates the half-dovetailed notching and square bell tower. The building process of this site began in 1898. The materials of which it was built provide architectural insight into this time period. As a product of preservation, all of its various functions and uses are honored and preserved. This building served as a schoolhouse, meetinghouse, church house, and civic center for the community of Torrey until the 1970s.     Not far from the Torrey Schoolhouse is the historic Fruita Schoolhouse. The playground of this historic schoolhouse is Capitol Reef National Park. Its impressive landscape is unlike any other. The drive to educate their children was a staple characteristic of Mormon Pioneers. The land for this structure was donated by Elijah Cutler Behunin. His daughter Nettie was the first school teacher at age 12. Her first class totaled 22 students.   Built in 1896 by local Junction settlers, the main use of this structure was for education, but it was also the home to dances, town meetings, elections, church youth activities, box suppers, and various other celebrations.    In its original form, this schoolhouse had a flat dirt roof. In 1912 or 1913 a peaked shingled roof was added. The interior of the schoolhouse was once bare and chinked logs. However, in 1935 the walls were plastered.   In 1900 the schoolhouse was used by Wayne County School District until 1941 when the community dwindled in students. In 1964 the Fruita schoolhouse was nominated by The National Park Service as a historic place.    Like the Torrey and Fruita schoolhouses, the Bicknell or Thurber schoolhouse/Relief Society Hall is a product of restoration honoring the span of its existence and all of those who “wrote” their stories here.   The cattle ranchers and wheat farmers of neighboring Thurber (present day Bicknell) constructed this Relief Society Hall in 1897. Upon Completion in 1899, this building served the needs of education, religion and social. This Hall has likewise been preserved.   MAGAZINE

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REHABILITATION

Products of Rehabilitation are those historic properties which have been fixed up and used for uses other than its original ones. Examples of rehabilitation include the Glenwood, Utah Gristmill and the 1914 Torrey, Utah Schoolhouse. Located in the small rural community of Glenwood in Sevier County, stands the 1884 picturesque gristmill built by Joseph Laban Wall. A grist mill grinds grain into flour. Grist mills were key elements of early pioneer communities. While the level of significance of this building may only be on a local level, this mill is honored for its historical function as it was once a manufacturing facility. Today, the mill has been rehabilitated and serves as a private home.   Torrey, Utah was once the lifeblood of Wayne County. Weekend dances, country bands, boxing matches were often attended by the locals as well as ruffians such as Butch Cassidy. While the “Kid” no longer roams Wayne County, his echoes still linger.   The 1914 Schoolhouse of Torrey, Utah is now home to a Beautiful Bed and Breakfast. This schoolhouse once housed grades 1-8 but now hosts a plethora of visitors. Its recent renovations have maintained the historic nature of the schoolhouse but its uses now differ. The first floor which once housed three classrooms now constitutes the Grand Room which serves as a place of greeting and relaxation. It also houses the Garden Room which is wheelchair accessible. The 2nd  floor of the original schoolhouse now consists of three suites appropriately named, the Writing, Reading, and Arithmetic rooms. Even the attic space has been renovated to house five rooms.    Glenwood Gristmill

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RESTORATION

Perhaps, the most challenging of the four elements of preservation is that of restoration. Simply put, restoration involves returning a specific structure to its original form both historically and architecturally. It involves the hidden and most detailed specifics of its time periods. No repairs, recreations, or alterations are made if they are not specific to the time period of the edifice. Two such examples of historic building restoration are located in the color country of the Southwest. They are the Nielsen Grist Mill located in Wayne County and the Historic Hunter House in Cedar City. The Nielsen Grist Mill was built in 1890 for Danish convert to the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, Hans Peter Nielsen by his son-in-law Niels Hansen. The mill lays claim to one of the most breathtaking backdrops, Thousand Lake Mountain. Known as Thurber Rolling Mills, this mill served the needs of the surrounding area for 40 years.    Nielsen ran the mill until his death in 1909. The Syrett brothers and others operated the mill until 1935. Over the years, the mill has fallen in need of great repair. Thankfully, the Steely family and members of the Intermountain Chapter of SPOOM (Society for the Preservation of Old Mills) have restored it. At Present day, the mill houses its original 16 elevators, reels, dust collector, water-powered turbine, wooden pulleys, drive belts and cash register.    Architecturally, the mill is a historical gem. Constructed after the post and beam design and supported with authentic hand-hewn timbers, this mill is fed by water diverted from the Freemont River and guided by wooden flumes into a turbine which turns the Buhr grindstone. Of the 20 remaining gristmills in Utah, the Nielsen grist mill is the only one to retain its original water-powered tools.   In 2005, when the oldest home in Cedar City faced demolition, the community sounded its outcry. Built in 1866 by Scotch Immigrant, Joseph Hunter, the home stood as a testament of the pioneer spirit. Having fallen out of the hands of the family, the home was threatened by a wrecking ball. Thankfully, members of the community and family joined forces to save this property.   It became a massive project of restoration. In 2005, the current property owners sought to demolish the home in order to create a larger parking area. As a business decision, the current owner declined to sell the historic building to the Hunter family. It was either demolish it or move it.    This historic home was built in 3 stages in 1866, 1891 and 1924. The first section built in 1866 demonstrated vernacular architecture including wall dormers and gable-end chimneys in its ½ story brick design. Typical of this time period it exhibits common brick bonding and relieving arched windows. Decorative elements portrayed on the home mix the Greek and Gothic revival styles. Future stages of construction resulted in the addition of several additions including the rear “T’ extension. The added design elements were Victorian in nature and included an elaborate porch.    The first and original section of home was the only portion stable enough to be moved in 2005 at a cost of 95,000 dollars. Through community, family, and RDA funding the home now resides at the Frontier Homestead State Park. While some argue that its historic authenticity was lost in its removal from its original residence of Center Street and 100 East, most agree that  under the circumstances #theevolutionofelan

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Nielsen Gristmill

the objective of preservation was reached in the restoration and relocation of the home.   For the family, the preservation and restoration of their ancestral home is nothing short of miraculous. Upon relocating the home to the State Park, members of the Hunter family were shown the fragility of the home as adobe bricks crumbled instantaneously upon touch. To them, it was as if Joseph Hunter himself oversaw the movehis indomitable pioneer spirit intervened—this house was supposed to be saved! Through the restoration of this historic home, the story of the pioneer days of Cedar City is shared, interpreted, and revered.

RECONSTRUCTION

History shares stories that are happy and full of triumph and stories that share defeat, of lives shattered, of livelihoods changed. But it’s the story that matters. It’s these same stories which prompt reconstruction. The element of preservation inspires today’s builders to create copies of structures specific to historical time periods. The materials and techniques used may vary greatly from the time period but the story is shared—the history is preserved. MAGAZINE

There are remnants of the past, rubble from buildings, scattered adobe bricks, and old wood frame barns which still linger as echoes in the Southwest. While some are not preserved in the traditional fashion, these echoes are nonetheless heard. The one room school house struggling for survival in Widstoe, Utah is one such example. It tells the story of a once thriving community left desolate. The Southwest landscape is a keeper of stories. Whether through preservation, rehabilitation, restoration, reconstruction and perhaps even desolation, the stories are waiting to be heard.

Amyanne Rigby enjoys wandering the red rock hills of Color Country with her husband, Travis, and their five children. Together, they discover the Southwest’s beautiful outdoors and the history of its rural communities. She is a sports fan, avid volunteer, and lover of puffy clouds, giggles, and sunshine! Follow all of her adventures at Barnwoodandtulips. blogspot.com

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desert Dwellers

The Green That Turned Golden WRITTEN BY Melynda Thorpe

With a flourishing golf community comprised of local residents and tourists, it is difficult to imagine a time when the sport did not exist in southern Utah. Golf has become a major economic driver for the area, and a tourism draw second only to Zion National Park. Tee times are stacked at full capacity from February to April, and courses remain open seven days a week to accommodate the steady streams of twosomes and foursomes eager to swing their clubs and chase a little white ball. The southwest region has become a favorite destination for golf enthusiasts. Twelve golf courses overlay Southern Utah’s red desert terrain while neighboring Mesquite, Nevada hosts seven. With courses meticulously manicured to boast long stretches of lush fairway, punctuated by dense putting greens, the area is befitting for its nickname, “a golfer’s paradise.” It’s hard to envision the southwest desert landscape without these sprawling green ‘dance floors.’ Pioneering the onset of golf in southern Utah was the City of St. George’s Dixie Red Hills Golf Course. This year, 2015, marks the 50th anniversary of the spectacular Dixie Red Hills. Although 50 years doesn’t seem that long ago, golf came to southern Utah about the same time that refrigerated cooling systems were introduced making summers in the desert bearable. The timing was perfect for introducing the sport that would become a hole in one tourist attraction.

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The Golfer’s Paradise that Almost Wasn’t The idea of establishing the area’s first golf course took great effort, determination, and patience for a group of individuals with economic foresight. This vision traces back to the 1930s when Orval Hafen made diary entries about his research into the economic benefits of golf courses. When he made the recommendation that local residents build a golf course, his personal history states that he was often met with the response, “Are you crazy?”. It was rumored that Mormon prophet, Heber J. Grant, also made the suggestion to build a golf course and garnered a very similar response from farmers struggling to make ends meet. Golf was considered a luxury that the average citizen did not have time or money for, nor did the city have the surplus to fund such a project. The idea continued to be shelved until after World War II. In the early 1960’s, golfer, Jim Colbert, connected with Sid Atkin, past president of the St. George Chamber of Commerce. Atkin had expressed interest in building a golf course, and Colbert provided the enthusiasm that would get the ball rolling. Atkin took the idea to his uncle, Joe Atkin, former mayor of St. George, who suggested they create a committee to compile information and rally support. The Atkins also solicited the involvement of then city council member, Neal Lundberg, and launched a feasibility study. The study determined that in order for a golf course to be successful in St. George, a minimum of forty rounds of golf a day sold at $1.25 per round would be necessary. Though that would seem a bargain by today’s green fee, at the time it was the equivalent of one meal out and the national minimum wage. The project required the concerted and tireless efforts of a few individuals who recognized the opportunities and benefits golf would bring the community. Civic leaders in the area were known for their conservatism. It was difficult for project supporters to convince the council to approve the plan. The general consensus was that most local citizens would never use the golf course, thus making it was difficult for city leaders to justify using taxpayer funds to underwrite an economic development project. Not until William Lassiter, an investor in St. George Bank, suggested the city use revenue bonds to raise the $60,000 needed to build the course, was the idea embraced. Photo by Dave Becker.

On August 3, 1964, the St. George City Council voted four-to-one to authorize bonding and the use of city property to establish the region’s first golf course. With help from the Elks and Lions clubs, who agreed to donate labor, and a group of financial backers, the proposal for St. George’s first golf course was passed, ground was broken, and Dixie Red Hills Golf Course opened on July 4, 1965.

The Course The surrounding red bluffs and mesas are a signature trademark of southern Utah and reflected in the course’s name. The vibrant red rock backdrop dominates the 2,733-yard, par-34 design course. Dixie Red Hill’s architect, Ernie Schneider, did an excellent job of optimizing what naturally existed, while infusing a variety of shade trees such as Mondale pines, Mesquite trees, Cottonwoods, and an array of shrubbery surrounding water features. The vegetation was designed to provide the much needed shade that Schneider envisioned would be necessary during the sultry summer months. William (Bill) Barlocker, former mayor of St. George, Neal Lundberg, former mayor of St. George and former Governor Cal Rampton.

MAGAZINE

The 9-hole course, magnificent park-like setting, the color contrast between the lush greens and red rocks, all would provide the visual dazzle that Schneider banked on in creating a unique setting that would lure golfers to come back for more.

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Meet the Pro In 1980, local high school student, Allen Orchard, played on his high school golf team and visited his father, Brent Orchard, regularly at work. Brent worked as a golf pro at Dixie Red Hills Golf Course from 1976-2003 and his son Allen, enjoyed the challenge and culture of what he describes, “a gentleman’s game.” Allen went on to study at Southern Utah University and to play for the SUU golf team before returning to St. George to follow in his father’s footsteps. Allen states, “The game of golf has helped me in my life, providing lessons in how you treat others and demonstrate respect, and for our family – golf is part of who we are.” Since his father’s retirement in 2003, Allen has been serving as PGA pro at Dixie Red Hills Golf Course that has grown to become a renowned course for local and visiting golfers. Recently, Golf World Magazine designated Dixie Red Hills one of the “Top 25 Courses in the Country” – a designation Allen Orchard attributes to the design and challenge of the course that can be enjoyed by golfers of all ages. Orchard says Dixie Red Hills is the busiest course in town averaging 55,000 – 63,000 rounds a year. “Play seems pretty evenly split between local and visiting players. It’s pretty incredible to have seen the golf community grow in southern Utah over the years.”

Ladies of Dixie Red Hills Orchard says he is pleased with the number of lady golfers he has seen increase over the years. In fact, Dixie Red Hills Ladies Association has 140 active members with a waiting list of up to fifty players at all times. With ladies league play on Thursday mornings, Orchard says 70 tee times are typically dedicated to seeing the ladies out onto the course. The women’s league president, Natalie Montoya, says she feels honored to call Dixie Red Hills her home course. Now retired, Montoya says golf is one of the reasons she and her husband moved to southern Utah. “In addition to the small town ambiance and the beautiful climate, we came for golf,” she says. “I’ve golfed with people from Canada, and all over the country, who have nothing but good things to say about St. George, it’s people, and our golf courses.“ “This little course is so beautiful,” Montoya says. She often sees deer and red fox on the fairways. “One day I was putting on hole number one, and I looked up to see two bighorn sheep standing with me on the green.” According to Montoya, seeing wildlife and being out in the fresh air of nature are at the top of her list. “There’s nothing like it.”

Over the past 50 years, the Dixie Red Hills Golf Course has matured beyond the dreams of those who envisioned it. It’s glorious surroundings and unique design have etched the Dixie Red Hills onto the score card of golf’s history. To play it is to appreciate it. For more information on this and other area municipal golf courses, go to: http://www.stgeorgecitygolf.com

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Photo by Dave Becker.

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Ann McLuckie, Utah Division of Wildlife Resources biologist, with desert tortoise. Photo by Elaine York.

“The wilderness and the idea of wilderness is one of the permanent homes of the human spirit.” - Joseph Wood Krutch

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desert dwellers

Saving the Oasis WRITTEN BY Nikki Melanson

For outdoor lovers, there is perhaps no better playground than southwest Utah. Washington County, home to several growing communities including St. George, sits at a rare intersection of landscapes, from mountain peaks to red rock canyons to desert trails. The area provides visitors with a glimpse of the incredible diversity of our natural world and its history. It also creates an important opportunity for people to come together to protect Utah’s natural heritage for the benefit of future generations. In the dry expanses of Southern Utah, such an effort often begins around water. “The vitality of the West, and all of its amazing places and plants and animals, is in some way tied to water,” says Elaine York, The Nature Conservancy in Utah’s West Desert regional director. Ninety percent of all wildlife in desert environments is found within one mile of a river at some time during their lives. In Washington County, that life-giving waterway is the Virgin River.

Restoration on the Virgin River

The Virgin River originates just north and east of Zion National Park and flows through southwest Utah, northwest Arizona then on to Lake Mead, Nevada. It is partly responsible for making Washington County one of the richest “hot spots” of biodiversity in the United States—supporting 40 state sensitive species and 12 federallylisted species. Its critical streamside corridor provides nesting, wintering and migration habitat for an amazing collection of birds including the endangered southwestern willow flycatcher. It’s also a popular place for hikers and kayakers who want to explore this jewel in the desert. “We’re working with local partners like the Virgin River Program and the Utah Division of Wildlife Resources to explore ways to sustain a healthy river for wildlife and people,” explains York. “We focus on finding places where the Conservancy can add value to existing efforts, for example contributing science or planning expertise, so that we can collectively achieve meaningful conservation success.” The Conservancy has partnered with a number of local, state and federal partners on riparian restoration projects, from the removal of invasive species to the planting of native seedlings. On the science front, the Conservancy is collaborating with the Virgin River Program, the Utah Division of Wildlife Resources and the Washington County Water Conservancy District to understand river flow patterns and temperature fluctuations. The results will help biologists and water managers better understand what is needed to keep native fish populations thriving. A naturalist-led hike along the river, hosted by the Conservancy and Utah Division of Wildlife Resources in the fall of 2014, provided an opportunity for locals to learn more about the work being done to help the area’s native fish. “The walk along the river was beautiful and the fish trapping was particularly interesting,” says Kathy Roos, Conservancy member. “It was fascinating to learn of all the efforts going into protecting this important area.” The Conservancy and the Virgin River Program jointly purchased and protected a riverside property located in a key stretch of river corridor near Zion National Park. “The 27-acre tract is situated along a section of river that supports a high diversity of wildlife and stable populations of native fish—it’s one of the most pristine riparian corridors in the American Southwest,” says Rick Fridell, a biologist with the Utah Division of Wildlife Resources. “There’s significant momentum around efforts to protect the Virgin,” summarizes York. “With all of the partners working toward a shared vision, we have real hope for the river’s sustainable future. A healthy river benefits people, nature and the local economy.”

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top: Virgin River, Photo by Ann Jensen. left: Utah Division of Wildlife Resources staff and interns seine Virgin River fish. Photo provided by Utah Division of Wildlife Resources. right: Desert tortoise - Photo by Rick Fridell.

Collaborative Planning

A shared vision is at the foundation of a set of planning tools developed by Conservancy scientists called Landscape Conservation Forecasting™ (LCF). Working with both public land management agencies as well as private landowners, the Conservancy is developing strategies to restore these expansive, irreplaceable landscapes to a healthier condition for people and for wildlife. This breakthrough technology uses satellite imagery, predictive modeling, cost analysis and other tools to help participating partners predict how specific management actions will affect key habitats. This glimpse into the future enables public agencies to spend limited budgets on activities that will most benefit natural places and wildlife. Already a proven success in Dixie and Fishlake National Forests, these partnerships are now unfolding in Washington County’s scenic red rock country and mountain forests. The Conservancy has completed an LCF on more than 100,000 acres of the Bureau of Land Management’s (BLM) National Conservation Areas that are critical habitat for the Mojave Desert tortoise and many other native species. Two other projects in southwest Utah, comprising a total of more than 1 million acres, are in process with the Forest Service and BLM. “Our public lands support some of the West’s most unique and at risk wildlife, yet they face enormous pressures,“ says Ann McLuckie, wildlife biologist with the Utah Division of Wildlife

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Resources. “Collaboration between private conservation groups and public agencies is crucial to the future of species like the Mojave desert tortoise.” These public lands are also home to world-class mountain bike trails, hiking trails, 14 Wilderness areas, two National Conservation Areas and many visitors enjoy camping amidst the stunning sandstone topography. Jimmy Tyree, BLM Field Manager in St. George, said “With the pressures of increased recreation, collaborative planning to protect the land is important to ensure people can enjoy abundant recreation opportunities for generations to come, balancing this use with healthy habitat for wildlife.”

Securing Places for Nature and People

Another species whose future depends on collaboration is an endangered flower that is found only in Washington County and nowhere else on Earth—the dwarf bear poppy. Federally listed as endangered in 1979 and one of the rarest plants in the West, the dwarf bear poppy faces challenges from human impacts, including development and off-road vehicle use. The Conservancy has worked with partners to acquire properties in Washington County that provide a safe haven for the poppy – and other threatened species – while ensuring that the local community and visitors can still enjoy this remarkable landscape. “This site is so close to town that anyone can walk or bike to it, offering a chance to see the changes that have occurred since the #theevolutionofelan

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Conservancy has stepped in to protect the area,” says Sarah Gaines, a Nature Conservancy member and volunteer. Gaines adds that she feels lucky to be able to monitor the preserve’s vibrant flowers and diverse animals from season to season. The 800-acre White Dome Nature Preserve was completed with the help of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Utah’s School Trust Lands. Slated to open in spring 2015, the White Dome Nature Preserve will include a moderate, 5-mile hiking trail. Situated within barren, gypsum-rich hills, this winding trail will provide opportunities to view the beautiful dwarf bear poppy, so named because the blue-green rosette of its leaves are each lobed like a bear paw, with every lobe subtended by a silver hair or “claw.” As Renée Van Buren, biology professor at Utah Valley University, puts it: “The White Dome Nature Preserve is as significant to Washington County as Central Park is to New York City. A place for us to be the visitor and the rest of the natural world to carry on without us.”

Seeing these plants bloom in the spring is a unique and memorable experience. Conservancy supporters Keith and Marilyn Davis eagerly look forward to going to White Dome every year. Adds Marilyn, “We tell our church groups to go out there and enjoy it. This past spring was particularly beautiful.” Other opportunities to explore the wonders of nature near Southern Utah include the Lytle Ranch, an oasis in the Mojave Desert that sustained early pioneer families and supports numerous rare species today, and the Red Cliffs Desert Reserve, 60,000 acres of spectacular scenery as well as important habitat for the federally listed desert tortoise.

Interested in more information? The Nature Conservancy is the world’s leading conservation organization whose mission is to conserve the lands and waters on which all life depends. Over the past decade, the Conservancy has worked alongside state and federal agencies, private landowners and other nonprofits to advance conservation across Washington County. The Conservancy’s deep science roots and desire to collaborate with others have helped develop pragmatic solutions to pressing conservation challenges. Statewide, the Conservancy has protected 1.2 million acres of private and public lands. To learn more about The Nature Conservancy in Utah and its work in Washington County and around the state, please visit nature.org/Utah.

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- Unknown

The Hills Are Alive 80 | The People, The Places, The Dates, The Vibe...The Culture of Southern Utah 84


art lovers

The Hills Are Alive WRITTEN BY Lyman Hafen | PHOTOS PROVIDED BY The Southwest Symphony Collection

In May of 1981, when Maestro Ron Garner stepped to the podium in the St. George Tabernacle and summoned the first note of what was then the only full symphony between Las Vegas and Provo, it was a historic moment. Yet it was merely one more step in a natural evolution that began in 1861, with the arrival of the first Mormon settlers in the St. George Valley. The history of St. George is much more than just the saga of a hardy band of pioneers who faced the elements and won. It is also the story of a community that treasured culture and tempered the rigors of founding a new life in the desert with a rich heritage of music, dance and drama. The dust churned up by the scores of wagons that arrived late in 1861 had hardly settled before the first cultural events were being held in St. George. Although it was religious faith that brought them here, the musical instruments and sheet music belonging to those early settlers could often be found packed alongside their scriptures. A choir was organized in St. George before 1861 ended. James Keate was its leader. William McIntyre on the violin and Harrison Pearce on the clarinet provided accompaniment. As the legendary 40-day rain descended beginning at Christmastime, the settlers, still camped in their wagon boxes, kept their spirits up by dancing on the wire grass flat now encompassed by the Dixie State University

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campus where the modern day Southwest Symphony performs. Joe Fordham, a teenage boy who sawed a mean fiddle, played for those dances and legend has it when one of his strings broke, one of the pioneer women produced from her treasures a spool of silk thread which was twisted and made into a replacement string. One of the first set-backs experienced by the early arrivers happened to George Staheli who was a leading musician in the highly musical Swiss company that came to Santa Clara in 1861. The Swiss Mormon converts were passionate about their music and as they traveled the rough and dusty pioneer road, they lightened their burdens by playing and singing the songs of their native land. Staheli had been trained as a bugler in the Swiss Army and was a music teacher. The coronet he brought from Switzerland hung by a strap on the side of the wagon. The leather strap wore thin and at some point along the way it broke. The coronet fell, and the rear wheel of the wagon passed over the precious instrument, crushing it beyond

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In the mid 1860s, Professor Charles J. Thomas came to St. George and formed a brass band consisting of Charles Walker, William Thompson, William Webb, Henry Lang, Harrison Pearce, and Andrew Heppler. On March 15, 1866, Walker recorded in his diary:

repair. Staheli was heart-broken and for three years was without an instrument. But that didn’t stop him and his music loving brethren from making the best music they could with what they had—mouth swabs. Three years later a stroke of luck netted the group a set of ten fine band instruments through an unexpected inheritance by one of the band members from a relative in the old country.

“At night went out with the Band and serenaded E. Snow [the LDS apostle who headed the Dixie Mission]. He received us cordially and invited us into the house where we entertained him and his family with our performance on our brass instruments for some time. I suppose this is the first time these black volcanic rocks and this desert region were saluted by the strains from a brass band.”

Among the original settlers sent to St. George by Brigham Young, six individuals listed musician as a primary profession. President Young hand-picked the entire group based on skills, talents, and trades. He always ranked proficiency in the arts equally important alongside other professions and trades. The first group of instrumentalists to perform together in St. George would have most likely been those who played at the presentation of “The Eaton Boy” on July 24, 1862, at the original Bowery near where the Tabernacle now stands. Since that day, public music performances have been a staple in this town.

John Eardley took over the band in 1868. He was a potter with a special talent for music. A December 1, 1868 advertisement in the town’s local paper, The Cactus, ran this way: “Wanted: Six young men and a good cornet player to join the St. George Brass Band. For further particulars apply to Captain John Eardley.”

The first public building in St. George was neither church nor school, but the St. George Hall, a place where residents could gather for amusements and culture. Completed just two years after the first settlers rolled their wagons to a halt, the Hall served for many years until a slightly larger Social Hall was built, then the Opera House, then the Tabernacle, then the upper-story performance hall in the original Dixie College building on Main and 100 South, then the original fine arts center on the new Dixie College Campus, and finally, the Cox Auditorium on the Dixie State University campus which the Southwest Symphony now calls home.

2014-2015 34TH SEASON GARY CALDWELL, CONDUCTOR | COX PERFORMING ARTS CENTER 325 SOUTH UNIVERSITY AVENUE, ST. GEORGE, UTAH IDYLLIC IMAGES FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 2014 7:30 PM

HALLOWEEN SPOOKTACULAR “MOVIE MONSTERS” with

St. George Dance Company

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2014 7:30 PM

M A G I C A L EXPRESSIONS COLORFUL IMPRESSIONS JENNY OAKS BAKER:

HANDEL’S MESSIAH SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 2014 7:30 PM MONDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2014 7:30 PM

TABLEAU NOUVEAU FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 2015 7:30 PM

CLASSIC ROCK & OTHER FAVORITES FRIDAY, MAY 8, 2015 7:30 PM

YOUTH CONCERTO CLASSIC

PATRIOTIC POPS UNDER THE STARS

FRIDAY, APRIL 3, 2015 7:30 PM

SATURDAY MAY 16, 2015 8:00 PM Tanner Amphitheater in Springdale

with

St. George Dance Company

Tickets may be purchased at DSUTIX.COM or by calling 435.652.7800 Watch for other special Southwest Symphony Orchestra events by visiting WWW.SOUTHWESTSYMPHONY.CO MAGAZINE

Original Artwork By Susanne Clark © All Rights Reserved

William Thompson led the band in the late 1870s. Thompson was publicly spirited and to insure that St. George would never be without a band he organized a juvenile group which he kept together until after the turn of the century when the Woodward School, Dixie High School and Dixie College assumed the role of training young people in music.

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Music conductor Gary Caldwell leads the Southwest Symphony Orchestra at Springdale’s Tanner Amphitheater, the Symphony’s traditional May venue with Zion National Park as a backdrop. (approx. 1989)

Among the original St. George pioneers was Edward Duzette, a drum major who learned to play at Nauvoo in the famous Nauvoo Legion Band directed by William Pitt. Duzette soon had a fife and drum corps in St. George and under his tutelage a number of fine fifers and drummers were produced. Among them was Oswald Barlow, a mason by trade who took over the band when Duzette moved to Rockville. Legend has it the bass drum used by Duzette and Barlow had been used as a signal drum during the Utah War in Echo Canyon. It was said the drum could be heard at a distance of 15 miles down the canyon. The band continued under Horatio Pickett, then Edwin Taylor Riding. Meanwhile, Duzette organized a new fife and drum corps in Rockville consisting of John Dennett, Oliver Gifford and Freeborn Gifford, who were old men by the time their music welcomed President Harding at the gate to Zion National Park in 1923. Bands too numerous to mention formed, flourished and faded in the late 1800s, and all through the 1900s. With the establishment of the St. George Stake Academy (later Dixie College and now Dixie State University) in 1911, the groundwork was laid for what would

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eventually evolve into the Southwest Symphony. Legendary music teachers like William Staheli, Joseph W. McAllister and Earl J. Bleak set a high standard for music on the old Dixie Campus. That tradition continued in 1963 as the campus moved to the eastern edge of the valley and beloved teachers like Ron Garner and Howard Putnam entered the picture. By the time Dr. Norman Fawson and his violin teacher Irene Everett dreamed up the idea of a local symphony in 1981, there were enough fine musicians in the county, and ample physical facilities to make the dream real. Ron Garner took the baton, and in the brass section was a gifted young musician named Gary Caldwell who played a beautiful shiny trumpet that never had to hang on the side of a pioneer wagon. Lyman Hafen is a fifth-generation Southern Utahn who has been writing about the region’s history, culture and personality for 30 years. He is the executive director of Zion Natural History Association and the Zion National Park Foundation, and is president of the National Association of Partners for Public Lands.

#theevolutionofelan

T H E OUTDOOR ISSUE 2 0 1 5


Around the

World

18

in

Hours

Where HOPE is the Same in Every Language. You’d be surprised how many of your friends, neighbors and loved ones have been touched by cancer. Imagine what you could accomplish if everyone came together, if only for one day, united in the fight against cancer. SHARE THE RELAY FOR LIFE EXPERIENCE WITH SOMEONE CLOSE TO YOU.

The 27th Annual Relay For Life in St. George, Utah

April 24-25, 2015 Hansen Stadium on Dixie State University campus david.moore@cancer.org or 435-674-9707 for more details. www.relayforlife.org/stgeorgeut 1. 8 0 0 . AC S . 2 3 4 5

w w w . ca n ce r . or g

St-George-Relay-for-Life

@Relay4LifeStG


DIXIE WATERCOLOR SOCIETY

#getoutoftheoffice

SPRING SHOW AND COMPETITION

“CASTING SHADOWS”

With its endless red rock mesas, sensational weather and inventive happenings, any time of year is the right time to enjoy the southwest. When looking for something to do or company calls, your entertaining options are endless. From snow skiing and rock climbing to golfing and gallery gazing, winter in the southwest will tempt your senses and lure you to #getoutoftheoffice.

February 9 - February 20 Main Street Plaza Foyer 20 North Main Street St. George, Utah 11 am to 5 pm Monday through Saturday Reception and Awards Presentation Thursday, February 12th, 6 to 8 pm Judged by award-winning Utah watercolorist, Jana Parker. Refreshments will be served. Artwork will be available for sale. The Dixie Watercolor Society (DWS) is a non-profit organization dedicated to

PROMOTE, ENCOURAGE, EDUCATE AND ADVANCE

transparent watercolors through activities for the benefit of Dixie Watercolor Society members and the general public.

get out

www.dixiewatercolorsociety.com

Find us on Facebook at DixieWatercolorSocietyStGeorgeUtah

PRESIDENTʼS DAY WEEKEND GALLERY WALK & ARTISAN STREET MARKET A smaller, more intimate affair that showcases fine art, home decor, jewelry and design inspiration. 435.673.6628 | 435.674.2306

800 Coyote Gulch Court | Ivins, UT 84738

KayentaArtVillageIvinsUtah

www.KayentaArtVillage.com


Party with the Artists: The 2015 “Arts to Zion” Art and Studio Tour In January, over Martin Luther King, Jr. weekend, Washington County becomes one expansive tour site. But alongside the traditional sights, visitors get a once-yearly chance to visit the studios and galleries of our finest professional artists. For the fourth year in a row, the “Arts to Zion” Art and Studio Tour is bringing art to the fore by bringing the public to the artists. To get a glimpse into how the most beautiful man-made products are created, 72 artists are opening their doors to participants in the tour. They will share their secrets, show you where they work, explain what inspires them, and maybe – in the case of painter Lonni Clarke – even offer you cookies. Thanks to the efforts of Art and Studio Tour founder Bobbi Wan-kier, we get an invitation to the world of easels, paintbrushes, mounds of clay, and sketches of dreams. But as crazy as it seems (if your office is not a romantic studio filled with original art), that is just the professional side. For the first time in 2015, the artists and their appreciators will also get the chance to play together at after-hours parties for three consecutive nights. If you’ve never been to an artists’ party, it is time. If you’ve ever wished that St. George offered more in the way of cultural events and nightlife, you owe it to yourself to be there. And if you’ve never had the chance to attend six art parties in three days, here it is! The festivities kick off on Thursday night with three VIP After-Hours events at Split Rock Gallery, the Authentique and Mission Galleries, and the Main Street Gallery. On Friday, photographer Nick Adams is hosting a Masquerade Ball at the 13th and Park Art Space. Saturday night, new and old friends will celebrate at the Zion Brew Pub in Springdale – although it may likely expand from there. The fete concludes Sunday afternoon at the Kayenta Arts Village. Think of it as a progressive party that covers an entire county over a long weekend! These events and more are available exclusively to ticket-holders for $10. Visit artstozion.net to reserve your ticket. Information provided by Taylor Steelman.

MAGAZINE

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#getoutoftheoffice

get out

Best Friends Animal Sanctuary Magical Winter Experience for Visitors, Volunteers in Scenic Southern Utah

A one-of-a-kind winter vacation experience for animal lovers is less than a 90-minute drive from St. George, Utah Best Friends Animal Sanctuary provides refuge for about 1,700 homeless animals on any given day. It has been known for thousands of years as a sacred place to the people who lived here. Angel Canyon, the home of Best Friends, is a peaceful and tranquil place where many ancient peoples gathered in centuries past, and where today, many animals are loved and heal from their hard life journeys. Every summer thousands of people flock to Best Friends to visit and volunteer—and most of them miss out on the most special time to visit the Sanctuary—when the snow dusts the red rocks and a more intimate experience is possible. Free tours are offered every day except Christmas Day, volunteering is always free and in the winter special rates are offered on the cabins and cottages. The Sanctuary, located five miles north of Kanab, is home to dogs, cats, birds, rabbits, horses, pigs, goats, mules, sheep, burros and wildlife. The animals come to this sanctuary in the canyon from far and wide. Some are ill, some have been neglected or abused, and all are homeless. But once they’re at this animal refuge they receive everything they need, physically, emotionally and psychologically, to thrive and find good homes.

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For those few who are never ready to take that next step, Best Friends is their safe haven for life. There really is nowhere else like the Sanctuary on earth. Winter at Best Friends means a chance to romp in the snow with the dogs, horses, goats, potbellied pigs … and even some intrepid cats who go for walks on harness and leash … and enjoy a more unforgettable experience with the animals. In fact, winter at the Sanctuary is magical, according to volunteers Mindy Baggish, Kirsten Miller and Cindy Coleman. “The dogs are more snuggly and wanting to be cuddled,” said Mindy Baggish. “When it snows those red cliffs look like something just out of a fairytale.” Kirsten Miller said, “in terms of getting that special Utah experience, you really can’t do better than Best Friends Animal Sanctuary. For adults, spending time with the animals is a return to the joy of childhood.”

#theevolutionofelan

T H E OUTDOOR ISSUE 2 0 1 5


And for people who are not all that keen on snow and cold, volunteering in the winter at Best Friends is still a not-to-be-missed return engagement, according to Cindy Coleman. “Truthfully, I had sunshine every day of my vacation at Best Friends in December 2014. One of the biggest benefits is, because there are not as many volunteers, I can have my pick of assignments.”

And there are plenty of indoor activities in all the animal areas to warm your hands and your heart. From playing with cats, to cuddling dogs, to hanging out with parrots in their cozy aviaries and snuggling rabbits, the animals are just as happy to have people with them inside. “And another bonus,” volunteer Kirsten Miller said, “is the opportunity to work alongside people who are joyful in their work.”

Winter Getaway

Best Friends Animal Sanctuary January or February 2014/15 Receive a very special package that will include: • Off-season rates at Best Friends Cottages ($95/night) and Cabins ($60/night) • 2 free lunch tickets to Best Friends on-site lunch café (full salad bar, vegetarian/vegan entrees and dessert plus coffee or tea) • 2 T-shirts free as well as other exciting discounts!

FREE TOURS

Every day of the year, except Christmas Day. General sanctuary tours, but also a variety of specialty tours including a guided walking tour to horses and pigs, DogTown tour, Angels Rest guided tour and many others. Please call 435-644-2001 ext. 4537 to inquire about all of our tours.

FREE VOLUNTEERING

• Unique opportunity to combine love of nature with love of animals in an exquisite setting that’s rich with outdoor recreational adventures. • As a volunteer, you’ll enjoy the rewards and feel-good memories of helping make a difference in the lives of homeless animals. • Wonderful weekend getaway for the entire family. Winter’s a great time for volunteering because the Sanctuary has fewer volunteers which means a broader range of options for working in all the animal areas. To register to volunteer go to: bestfriends.org/volunteer. Photos by Molly Wald, Best Friends Animal Society.

MAGAZINE


calendar

ST. GEORGE UTAH

ART

ORCHESTRA

#getoutoftheoffice

CEDAR CITY UTAH

CINEMA

SPRINGDALE UTAH

LITERATURE

THEATER

HURRICANE UTAH

COMEDY

WASHINGTON UTAH

LIVE MUSIC

DANCE

IVINS UTAH

KAYENTA UTAH

FAMILY FRIENDLY

BEVERAGES AVAILABLE

PAID EVENT

january events 1

thursday

It’s a Wonderful Life 7:30 pm Brigham’s Play House

2

friday

Live Music at The Town and Country Bank 12 pm - 2 pm

Funky Friday with Soul What?! 8 pm George’s Corner Restaurant

It’s a Wonderful Life 7:30 pm Brigham’s Play House

Wham Bam Poetry Slam 8 pm Jazzy Java Rock’n Roll Grill

Off the Cuff Comedy Improvisation 10 pm OTC Training Center

Off the Cuff Comedy Improvisation 10 pm OTC Training Center

3

saturday

Tuacahn Saturday Market 9:00 am - 1:00 pm

9

friday

10 saturday

Live Music at FireHouse Bar & Grill 9 pm

Live Music at FireHouse Bar & Grill 9 pm

4

sunday

6

tuesday

Storm the Mic 7:30 pm Jazzy’s Rock’n Roll Grill

7

wednesday Speaking Truth Open Mic 7 pm

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Main Street Books

Springdale Second Saturday Art Walk 9 am - 9 pm Tuacahn Saturday Market 9:00 am - 1:00 pm

It’s a Wonderful Life 2:30 and 7:30 pm Brigham’s Play House

Live Music at FireHouse Bar & Grill 9 pm

Live Music at The Town and Country Bank 12 pm - 2 pm

11 sunday

Live Music at FireHouse Bar & Grill 9 pm

13 tuesday

Storm the Mic 7:30 pm Jazzy’s Rock’n Roll Grill

15 thursday

Dirty Rotten Scoundrels 7:30 pm St. George Opera House

#theevolutionofelan

T H E OUTDOOR ISSUE 2 0 1 5


What’s happening Southern Utah?

16 friday

Live Music at The Town and Country Bank 12 pm - 2 pm

24 saturday

Dirty Rotten Scoundrels 2 pm and 7:30 pm St. George Opera House

Dirty Rotten Scoundrels 7:30 pm St. George Opera House St. Petersburg Symphony Orchestra 7:30 pm Heritage Center Theater Off the Cuff Comedy Improvisation 10 pm OTC Training Center

17 saturday

Tuacahn Saturday Market 9:00 am - 1:00 pm Dirty Rotten Scoundrels 2 pm and 7:30 pm St. George Opera House

Live Music at FireHouse Bar & Grill 9 pm

25 sunday

Live Music at FireHouse Bar & Grill 9 pm

26 monday

Dirty Rotten Scoundrels 7:30 pm St. George Opera House

27 tuesday

Piano Battle 7:30 pm Cox Auditorium

Live Music at FireHouse Bar & Grill 9 pm

18 sunday

19 monday

Live Music at FireHouse Bar & Grill 9 pm

Storm the Mic 7:30 pm Jazzy’s Rock’n Roll Grill

29 thursday

30 friday Storm the Mic 7:30 pm Jazzy’s Rock’n Roll Grill

21 wednesday

Speaking Truth Open Mic 7 pm Main Street Books

22 thursday

A Streetcar Named Desire 7:30 pm Eccles Fine Arts Center Off the Cuff Comedy Improvisation 10 pm OTC Training Center

Dirty Rotten Scoundrels 7:30 pm St. George Opera House

Live Music at The Town and Country Bank 12 pm - 2 pm Dirty Rotten Scoundrels 7:30 pm St. George Opera House Off the Cuff Comedy Improvisation 10 pm OTC Training Center

MAGAZINE

Live Music at The Town and Country Bank 12 pm - 2 pm Dirty Rotten Scoundrels 7:30 pm St. George Opera House

31 saturday 23 friday

Dirty Rotten Scoundrels 7:30 pm St. George Opera House A Streetcar Named Desire 7:30 pm Eccles Fine Arts Center

Dirty Rotten Scoundrels 7:30 pm St. George Opera House

20 tuesday

Tuacahn Saturday Market 9:00 am - 1:00 pm

Tuacahn Saturday Market 9:00 am - 1:00 pm Dirty Rotten Scoundrels 2 pm and 7:30 pm St. George Opera House A Streetcar Named Desire 7:30 pm Eccles Fine Arts Center Live Music at FireHouse Bar & Grill 9 pm

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calendar ST. GEORGE UTAH

ART

ORCHESTRA

#etchedmagazine

CEDAR CITY UTAH

CINEMA

SPRINGDALE UTAH

LITERATURE

THEATER

HURRICANE UTAH

COMEDY

WASHINGTON UTAH

LIVE MUSIC

DANCE

IVINS UTAH

KAYENTA UTAH

FAMILY FRIENDLY

BEVERAGES AVAILABLE

PAID EVENT

february events 1 2 3

sunday

Live Music at FireHouse Bar & Grill 9 pm

monday

Dirty Rotten Scoundrels 7:30 pm St. George Opera House

tuesday

saturday

wednesday Speaking Truth Open Mic 7 pm Main Street Books

Tuacahn Saturday Market 9:00 am - 1:00 pm Dirty Rotten Scoundrels 2 pm and 7:30 pm St. George Opera House A Streetcar Named Desire 7:30 pm Eccles Fine Arts Center

A Streetcar Named Desire 7:30 pm Eccles Fine Arts Center Storm the Mic 7:30 pm Jazzy Java Rock’n Roll Grill

4

7

Live Music at FireHouse Bar & Grill 9 pm

8

sunday

Live Music at FireHouse Bar & Grill 9 pm

9

monday

Dirty Rotten Scoundrels 7:30 pm St. George Opera House

Angele Dubeau & LaPieta 7:30 pm Cox Auditorium A Streetcar Named Desire 7:30 pm Eccles Fine Arts Center

5

thursday

Dixie’s Got Talent 7 pm Cox Auditorium Dirty Rotten Scoundrels 7:30 pm St. George Opera House A Streetcar Named Desire 7:30 pm Eccles Fine Arts Center

6

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friday

10 tuesday

Storm the Mic 7:30 pm Jazzy Java Rock’n Roll Grill

12 thursday

Dirty Rotten Scoundrels 7:30 pm St. George Opera House

13 friday

Live Music at The Town and Country Bank 12 pm - 2 pm Tableau Nouveau 7:30 pm Cox Auditorium

Live Music at The Town and Country Bank 12 pm - 2 pm

Dirty Rotten Scoundrels 7:30 pm St. George Opera House

Dirty Rotten Scoundrels 7:30 pm St. George Opera House

Funky Friday with Soul What?! 8 pm George’s Corner Restaurant

A Streetcar Named Desire 7:30 pm Eccles Fine Arts Center

Wham Bam Poetry Slam 8 pm Jazzy Java Rock’n Roll Grill

Off the Cuff Comedy Improvisation 10 pm OTC Training Center

Off the Cuff Comedy Improvisation 10 pm OTC Training Center

#theevolutionofelan

T H E OUTDOOR ISSUE 2 0 1 5


What’s happening Southern Utah?

14 saturday

Springdale Second Saturday Art Walk 9 am - 9 pm

22 sunday

Live Music at FireHouse Bar & Grill 9 pm

Tuacahn Saturday Market 9:00 am - 1:00 pm

24 tuesday

Glenn Miller Orchestra 7:30 pm Heritage Center Theater Storm the Mic 7:30 pm Jazzy Java Rock’n Roll Grill

Dirty Rotten Scoundrels 2 pm and 7:30 pm St. George Opera House Live Music at FireHouse Bar & Grill 9 pm

15 sunday

Live Music at FireHouse Bar & Grill 9 pm

17 tuesday

DSU Men’s, Women’s Choir & Vocal Jazz 7:30 pm Eccles Fine Arts Center

26 thursday

Man of La Mancha 7:30 pm Eccles Fine Arts Center

27 friday

Man of La Mancha 7:30 pm Eccles Fine Arts Center

Speaking Truth Open Mic 7 pm Main Street Books DSU Chamber Singers & Concert Choir 7:30 pm Eccles Fine Arts Center

19 thursday

Texas Tenors 7:30 pm Cox Auditorium

20 friday

Live Music at The Town and Country Bank 12 pm - 2 pm DSU Symphony Band Concert 7:30 pm Eccles Fine Arts Center

Live Music at The Town and Country Bank 12 pm - 2 pm Moonlight & Magnolias 7:30 pm St. George Opera House

Storm the Mic 7:30 pm Jazzy Java Rock’n Roll Grill

18 wednesday

Moonlight & Magnolias 7:30 pm St. George Opera House

Off the Cuff Comedy Improvisation 10 pm OTC Training Center

28 friday

Tuacahn Saturday Market 9:00 am - 1:00 pm Moonlight & Magnolias 2 pm and 7:30 pm St. George Opera House Man of La Mancha 7:30 pm Eccles Fine Arts Center Live Music at FireHouse Bar & Grill 9 pm

Off the Cuff Comedy Improvisation 10 pm OTC Training Center

21 saturday

Tuacahn Saturday Market 9:00 am - 1:00 pm Dixie State Symphony Orchestra Winter Concert Cox Auditorium 7:30 pm Live Music at FireHouse Bar & Grill 9 pm

SHARE THE SCENE

Support the local art scene in Southern Utah! We love seeing our readers out in the community.

Share your photos with us so we can hashtagalong #getoutoftheoffice, #etchedmagazine, #experiencethesouthwest For corrections or additions, email etchedcalendar@gmail.com

MAGAZINE

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snapshots

#etchedmagazine

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See more photos at www.ExperienceTheSouthwest.com.

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Zion National Park Plein Air Art Invitational

The 2014 Zion National Park Plein Air Art Invitational was heralded as a huge success. The event welcomed twenty-four invited artists who spent a week painting on location in the park, capturing the magnificence of the autumn light and color on canvas and paper. The artists created more than 200 paintings which were on display for art enthusiasts and buyers from across the country during the Gala Opening. The week was filled with demonstrations by the artists and opportunities to watch the artists in action. Lyman Hafen, Executive Director of the Zion National Park Foundation, said, “This year’s plein air event exceeded all our goals and expectations...It is an amazing event that partners the community with the park and combines art and philanthropy.” More than $160,000 was raised in art sales, 40 percent of which goes to the Zion National Park Foundation to support the park’s Youth Education Initiative and ongoing art programs in the park.

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1. Rachel Pettit 2. Cyndi Schumacher, Gregory Stocks 3. Kate Starling, Dave Santillanes 4. Susan Parrish, Sabine Gnittke 5. James McGrew 6. Michelle Condrat 7. Royden and Sandee Card

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T H E OUTDOOR ISSUE 2 0 1 5


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life is beautiful festival

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Life is Beautiful is an inspirational company dedicated to helping people conquer their fears and chase their dreams. Its signature project, the Life is Beautiful Festival was founded in 2013 and launched in October of that same year as a highly successful lifestyle event featuring marquee musicians, chefs, artists and speakers. Held in the heart of Downtown Las Vegas, Life is Beautiful Festival attracted more than 60,000 patrons in its first year, 90,000 in its second, and is now branching out to an international online forum for social change. For more information on the company’s projects and the latest festival news, visit www.lifeisbeautiful.com. 1. Crowd During Outkast Performance: photo by Powers Imagery 2. Fred Mossler, Joey Vanas, Rehan Choudhry, Las Vegas Mayor Carolyn Goodman, Oscar Goodman, Tony Hsieh, Don Welch and Andrew Donner: photo by Powers Imagery 3. Dave Grohl of Foo Fighters: photo by FilmMagic 4. Chef Duff Goldman: photo by Jeff Kravitz, FilmMagic 5. The Roots: photo by Powers Imagery 6. Tyler Glenn of Neon Trees 7. Jose Andres and Bruce Bromberg serve Paella: photo by Powers Imagery 8. Life Is Beautiful Guests: photo by Powers Imagery 9. Lionel Richie 10. Hand-made metallic wire mesh sculpture created by Edoardo Tresoldi

MAGAZINE

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1

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Festival of Trees - Cedar City

1. Christmas tree donated by

Southwest Applied Technology Cedar City welcomed the Festival of Trees, a holiday event hosted by Stonehaven Events Center, Women College, Cedar City, UT in Business, and the Cedar City Fire Department all in efforts of providing local families in need with 2. Connie Weaver, Sharon Wasden, a little help from Santa. “For every tree sold, approximately two families will get a Christmas,” said Becky Gifford (Mrs. Claus) Stonehaven owner, Sharon Wasden. “That’s what it’s really all about.” Adorned with the decorated trees 3. Remi Mackelprang, Virgil Newton which were auctioned, the event provided adults and children alike with holiday festivities that will also (Santa Claus) benefit the Cedar City Women in Business scholarship fund. 4. Festival of Trees and guests

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SWATC Student of the Year

Southwest Applied Technology College of Cedar City, Utah named Harsh Kansagra the SWATC 2014 Student of the Year. Kansagra won a $1,000 cash prize, donated by Zions Bank, and moves to the next step in pursuit of the UCAT Student of the Year title. The Southwest ATC Student of the Year will serve as a local ambassador for technical education, the campus and its programs. James Mullenaux, Student Services Director said, “We can talk about our college all day long, but nothing means more than hearing praise from a student.” In January, Kansagra will join the Student of the Year winners from the other seven UCAT campuses in the competition for UCAT Student of the Year. This distinction will hold additional duties as an ambassador for technical education, including visits to the legislature, and the sought after prize, a two-year lease on a Ford Focus.

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5. President Brennan M. Wood presents $1000 prize to SOY Harsh Kansagra 6. Harsh Kansagra, Brian Wentz, Kaleen Wood

#theevolutionofelan

T H E OUTDOOR ISSUE 2 0 1 5


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Twisted Silver Calls Southern Utah Home

Designer and owner of Twisted Silver, Debra Mitchell, celebrated the company’s relocation to Southern Utah with a special open house to celebrate holidays. Debra, who was recently featured in Etched Magazine, introduced her full line of designs to guests, all of which portray her distinctive style and use of earthy base metals, found objects, and vintage asymmetry. Guests were treated to special pricing and on-site sales, as well as a designer’s gift, while guests also contributed to the celebration by donating diapers for needy families. 7. Taralyn Ledbetter, Laura Hooper, Matt Madsen, Debra Mitchell 8. Matt Madsen, Debra Mitchell 9. Twisted Silver jewelry designs

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Viva La Fiesta

12

When the staff of Recycled Consign & Design in Cedar City opened their doors for their annual holiday event it was all about, “Viva La Fiesta.” Guests were greeted by the talented Amanda Hill, owner of Recycled, and treated to a night filled with the opportunity to mingle with bloggers, photographers, designers, fashionistas, and an array of creative types. Guests were treated to a photo booth, braid bar, sombreros, and of course, the opportunity to shopping Recycled’s eclectic collection of designer clothing and vintage wares. 10. Amie Pendle, Courtney Brinkerhoff, Laura Leavitt, Carissa Rasmussen, Jess Mikel 11. Carrie Leishman, Amanda Hill 12. The “braid bar”

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Profile for Etched Magazine

Etched Magazine Outdoor Issue - January February 2016  

Finding Common Ground: Preservation | Collaboration | Recreation

Etched Magazine Outdoor Issue - January February 2016  

Finding Common Ground: Preservation | Collaboration | Recreation

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