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Chapter 11 The Study Of Numbers Up To 1000—Ii

The first of these commas is called ‘thousand’, so that 2,783 is easily read as two thousand seven hundred and eighty-three. The pupils are then asked: ‘Can you read these numbers: 4,633; 15,217; 144,638?’ Note that the zero must still be used as a place holder in such numbers as 12,027; 102,003; and 12,000. If a second comma is introduced to the left of a six figure number, it is called ‘million’. Thus, the names of such numbers as 3,471,534 and 154,655,102 can now be read. Again, place-holders are used in such numbers as 73,001,040 and so on. The next comma on the left is called ‘thousand million’ so that now numbers of up to twelve figures can be read; for example, 3,215,474,689 and 708,643,294,062. By using other commas, read as ‘million million’ and ‘thousand million million’, any number that is not too long to write down can be read by simply using the names of the commas.

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The Cuisenaire Gattegno method of teaching Mathematics  
The Cuisenaire Gattegno method of teaching Mathematics  

The Cuisenaire Gattegno method of teaching Mathematics

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