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Chapter 11 The Study Of Numbers Up To 1000—Ii

The Reading And Writing Of Numbers It will be remembered that it was considered essential, throughout the course, for pupils to understand numeration beyond the particular range of numbers being studied. To conclude this chapter, a brief summary is given of the method of teaching the reading and writing of numbers beyond 1000–as recommended by Gattegno is Part VI of Book II of Mathematics. Pupils know how to read three-figure numbers but the signs they use are now set out vertically in three lines in the following manner: 1

2

10

20

100

200

3 30

4

5

6

40

50

60

300 400 500 600

7 70

8

9

80

90

700 800

900

By pointing to any two of the signs on different lines but pointing first to a sign on a lower line (e.g. first to 70 then to 3, or to 700 and then to 60, or to 500 and then to 4) the names of the numbers can be easily read. Similarly, any three signs on different lines can be pointed to starting with one on the bottom line, moving to one on the middle line, and then to one on the top line (e.g. 700, then 60, then 4 = 764). The only difficulty here is the irregularity of naming the numbers 11, 12, 13, . . ., 19, as eleven, twelve, thirteen . . ., and not as ‘ten one’, ‘ten two’, ‘ten three’, . . . For example, by pointing to 600, then to 10, then to 5 the name ‘six hundred ten five’ is produced which is called ‘six hundred and fifteen’.

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The Cuisenaire Gattegno method of teaching Mathematics  

The Cuisenaire Gattegno method of teaching Mathematics

The Cuisenaire Gattegno method of teaching Mathematics  

The Cuisenaire Gattegno method of teaching Mathematics

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