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Chapter 11 The Study Of Numbers Up To 1000—Ii

Along with practice in doubling it was also shown that the pupil acquires the subsidiary experience of expressing any particular number in a series as a ‘three’ or a ‘four’. Thus, knowing that 512 = 2 × 256 = 4 × 128 = 8 × 64 = 16 × 32 he would understand such towers as 512 = 4 × 8 × 16 = 2 × 16 × 16 = 4 × 4 × 32 = 4 × 2 × 64 From these towers he could derive a wide variety of mathematical statements such as: of 512 = 4 × 32 = 128

512 ÷ 32 = 4 × 4 = 16

At this stage his experiences should be further extended to include remainders in division. It is important that he always be given the basic facts from which to make his deductions. At the moment he is simply developing an understanding of the operation, as a preparation for confident reckoning later. Thus, given that 520 = 16 × 32 + 8 = 8 × 64 + 8 = 4 × 128 + 8 he can easily find 520 ÷ l6 = 520 ÷ 64 =

520 ÷ 32 = 520 ÷ 128 = 225

The Cuisenaire Gattegno method of teaching Mathematics  
The Cuisenaire Gattegno method of teaching Mathematics  

The Cuisenaire Gattegno method of teaching Mathematics

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