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Chapter 11 The Study Of Numbers Up To 1000—Ii

any three or more rods are used. All that the teacher need say is, ‘Make a tower using any three rods and write down what you see in it’. Such freedom should bring him into direct contact with a host of new numbers, any one of which could be used to study multiplication and division. The fact that during his search the pupil will incidentally discover and remember the basic relationships concerning at least some of these new numbers, (for example, that 783 = 29 × 27) is of secondary importance at the moment, but will be most helpful at some later stage in his mathematical career when he happens to meet such a question as 790 ÷ 29 = . Then, says Gattegno, he will recall the number fact and will readily write that 790 ÷ 29 = 27, with 7 as the remainder. Thus, while the primary aim remains the development of mathematical concepts, particularly those relating to multiplication and division, mastery is, indirectly, being secured over at least some additional number facts, which Gattegno regards as most important because it enables pupils to carry out mentally some otherwise quite difficult operations.

Discovering Useful Products However, the pupil cannot be expected to explore the remaining numbers up to 1000 without some situations having been specially designed to stimulate his interest. Gattegno

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The Cuisenaire Gattegno method of teaching Mathematics  
The Cuisenaire Gattegno method of teaching Mathematics  

The Cuisenaire Gattegno method of teaching Mathematics

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