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The Cuisenaire Gattegno Method Of Teaching Mathematics

they would now experience a certain amount of difficulty in expressing at least some of the new numbers as a ‘three’ or a ‘four’. While 780 could easily be represented as 78 × 5 × 2, if it were not also recognized as 6 × 13 × 10, the addition of a units figure to make the number 783 would present problems which, for the present, the child would be unable to solve.

Exploring Numbers Of Three Figures Which Are Not Multiples Of 10 The way of overcoming this difficulty—typical of the Cuisenaire-Gattegno method—has already been met by the pupil during the earlier stages of his course. Right from the study of numbers of up to ten he was given complete freedom to explore the number system and to find his own way of expressing the relationship 7 — 4 = 3, for example, as of 14 — (20 — 16) = of 9. When he was introduced to the device of expressing a product and its factors by means of a pair of crossed rods he was invited to find for himself as many products as possible, using this technique. Similarly, during his search for new numbers, he used towers of three or more rods to represent their factors, which eventually brought him to the multiples of ten up to 1000. Now, at some opportune moment, he must be encouraged to discover for himself new numbers which can be represented by towers where

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The Cuisenaire Gattegno method of teaching Mathematics  

The Cuisenaire Gattegno method of teaching Mathematics

The Cuisenaire Gattegno method of teaching Mathematics  

The Cuisenaire Gattegno method of teaching Mathematics

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