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The Cuisenaire Gattegno Method Of Teaching Mathematics

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introduced, the game can be repeated periodically and each child should use the alternative methods. He need not keep to the order given above, but could first try the method he thinks easiest and then check by using the other methods.

Using Staircases For Exercises In Counting The making of staircases with common differences was described in Chapter 5. It will be remembered that it was possible to make more than one staircase with a common difference of, say, three between each of the steps (3, 6, 9; 2, 5, 8; and 1, 4, 7, 10). At that stage we were concerned with ascribing values to the respective rods. These staircases can be used for more than simply relating values to rods, they can for instance be used to develop the ability to count in steps other than the unit. 1

Build a staircase with a common difference of four, starting with the white rod, until you pass twenty.

2 Look at your staircase; read the values going up (1, 5, 9, 13, 17, 21) read the values coming down (21, 17, 13, 9, 5, 1) 3 Shut your eyes; say the values going up your staircase;

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The Cuisenaire Gattegno method of teaching Mathematics  

The Cuisenaire Gattegno method of teaching Mathematics

The Cuisenaire Gattegno method of teaching Mathematics  

The Cuisenaire Gattegno method of teaching Mathematics

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