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The Cuisenaire Gattegno Method Of Teaching Mathematics

12 = 2 + 3 + 3 + 4

12 – (2 × 3) = 2 + 4

4 + 3 + 3 + 2 = 12

12 = (

× 12) + (

12 = (2 × 3) + 2 + 4

12 = (

× 12) + (2 × 3) + (

2 × 3 = 12 – (2 + 4)

6 = 12 – (

12 = (

× 12) + 2 + 4

× 12) + (

× 12) + (

× 12) × 12)

× 12)

× 12 = 12 – 2 – (2 × 3)

Although it is usual for pupils to supply most of the readings, the teacher can stimulate them by asking: ‘Who has the line ( × 12) + ( × 12) + ( × 12) + 1?’ or by saying: ‘Add to your mat the line 5 + ( × 12) + ( × 12) . Who can read (or write) this new line in a different way?’ It is to be realized that 12 has not been studied previously and that the fractions have not been met with in this context, but a large number of pupils will have developed sufficient understanding to give the more complicated readings, or writings. However, the main purpose at this stage is given in the original direction ‘make a mat for l2 and see how many ways of writing down each line you can discover’. Such a free exploration of the particular number serves as a general introduction and often gives a pointer to the teacher as to what aspects will need emphasis during later work. Addition and subtraction The pupils are asked to read and then write some of the lines they can see in their patterns. These could at first be written on the blackboard as the pupils read them out but erased before they begin their writing. For each line there are as many as

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The Cuisenaire Gattegno method of teaching Mathematics  
The Cuisenaire Gattegno method of teaching Mathematics  

The Cuisenaire Gattegno method of teaching Mathematics

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