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The Cuisenaire Gattegno Method Of Teaching Mathematics

1

Quotition (for example, how many red rods make the length of a pink rod?)

2 Partition (for example, what is half of 4?) A more detailed analysis of this group of exercises (1-41) would show that Gattegno expects mastery of oral and written expression of the four operations in all their varied forms, up to and including the conventional vertical notation.

The Use Of Brackets There is, however, a further accomplishment which needs special discussion. It is doubtful if simple brackets such as those first appearing in exercise 10: e.g. 5 – (2 + 1), will have been used by primary pupils, this being left for introduction in secondary school. Yet now, by means of the Cuisenaire rods, the use of brackets can be understood by pupils in our infant grades. Brackets are essential for the correct expression of certain subtractions, and if from the very beginning every situation is exploited to the full, they should be introduced when the child commences written work. For the purpose of our discussion, numbers will be used in this explanation, although brackets can be introduced using the names-names of the rods. Once again the first step is oral discussion of a rod pattern. Fig. 52.

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The Cuisenaire Gattegno method of teaching Mathematics  

The Cuisenaire Gattegno method of teaching Mathematics

The Cuisenaire Gattegno method of teaching Mathematics  

The Cuisenaire Gattegno method of teaching Mathematics

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