Page 111

Chapter 5 The Study Of Numbers Up To 10

What must be added to the black rod (or to 7) to make a train equal to the orange rod (or to 10)? What must be added to the light green rod (or to 3) to make a train equal to the orange rod? What must be added to two red rods (or to 2 × 2) to make a train equal to the orange rod? What must be added to a train made of one red and one pink rod (or to 2 + 4) to make it equal to the orange rod? 2 A vocabulary change is made and the above questions repeated in the following way: What is the ‘difference’ between the orange and the black rods? Or between the orange rod and a train made of a red and a pink rod? 3 Instead of ‘difference’ the term ‘minus’ is now used: Which length is equal to ‘the length of the orange rod minus the length of the black rod’ or, in short, to ‘the orange minus the black’?

Understanding Division 1

The children are asked: How many yellow rods equal one orange rod? And how many red rods?

101

The Cuisenaire Gattegno method of teaching Mathematics  
The Cuisenaire Gattegno method of teaching Mathematics  

The Cuisenaire Gattegno method of teaching Mathematics

Advertisement