Page 1

Collaborate 2 0 1 4

A n n U A L

+

R e P o Rt

Emporia Public Schools + Emporia State University + Flint Hills Technical College


Contents 3D Emporia....................................................................................................................................... 4

Emporia Public Schools Welcome .......................................................................................................................................... 6 Alan Keck’s Tribute............................................................................................................................ 7 EHS Science Department Growing New Pathway............................................................................... 8 Community Service­­—Going Above & Beyond.................................................................................. 10 Expanded Service to Students and Families.................................................................................... 13 STREAM......................................................................................................................................... 14 Capturing Kids’ Hearts.................................................................................................................... 16 Institutional Statistics....................................................................................................................... 19

Emporia State University Celebrating Change ........................................................................................................................ 20 Residence Hall Renovations............................................................................................................ 21 Efficiency Experts............................................................................................................................ 22 International Perspective.................................................................................................................. 23 Learning Spaces............................................................................................................................. 25 Children Inspire Glass...................................................................................................................... 26 Campus Master Plan....................................................................................................................... 28 New Visual Identity Embraces University’s Future............................................................................. 29

On the cover

Legislative Update........................................................................................................................... 30

Row 1: Anton Sandoval, teacher, Emporia Middle School; Caite Schoeck, 2014 graduate, Emporia High School; Josh Williams, 2014 graduate, Computer Design and Development program, Flint Hills Technical College; Patricia Reyes, Migrant Student & Family Resource specialist, Emporia Public Schools; Row 2: Frances Wecker, teacher, Emporia High School; Lance Nitahara, Hospitality/Culinary Arts program instructor, Flint Hills Technical College; Teri Whitson, senior, Emporia State University; Jeff Miller, graduate student, Emporia State University; Row 3: Signe Truelove, teacher, Emporia Middle School; Levi Cole, student, Automotive Technology program, Flint Hills Technical College; Soojin Bae, senior, Emporia State University; Rhonda Weatherbie, Dental Hygiene program instructor, Flint Hills Technical College; Row 4: Andrew Smith, associate dean, School of Library and Information Management, Emporia State University; Nakita Elwood, senior, Emporia State University; Preston Mossman, senior, Emporia State University; Jessica Roby, graduate, Business Administrative Technology program, Flint Hills Technical College.

Bright Lights, Big City...................................................................................................................... 32 Institutional Statistics....................................................................................................................... 33

Flint Hills Technical College Reflection........................................................................................................................................ 34 Flint Hills Technical College to Receive Solar Panels from Westar..................................................... 35 Flint Hills Technical College Ranked as Top in Country..................................................................... 36 A Blessing in Disguise...................................................................................................................... 38 Employers Recognized at Champion Level ..................................................................................... 40 Changing Lives through a Mission of Mercy..................................................................................... 42 Students Place at State and National Competitions......................................................................... 44 Institutional Statistics....................................................................................................................... 47

2

+ Annual Report

Fiscal Year 12-13 +

3


3D Emporia What do an ostrich ranch, roomscheduling software and a bike-sharing program have in common? All three are ideas developed by students and deemed by judges as worthy of prize money in the first-ever 3D Emporia business-venture competition. 3D Emporia, which stands for Dream It — Design It — Develop It, is a partnership between the Emporia State University School of Business and the Emporia Area Chamber of Commerce with underwriting from ESB Financial. The framework for the competition began with students

from

Emporia

State

University

and

Flint Hills Technical College, participating either individually or in teams of up to three members, submitting business plans that pitched a “big idea” to a panel of judges and qualifying for the next round in the competition. The semifinals were limited to 20 teams or individuals. During the semifinal round, students had three weeks to refine their big ideas through faculty mentoring and workshops led by entrepreneurs in the community. The semifinalists then had 20 minutes to pitch their final business plans to a panel of judges and go through a series of questions and answers. The top three teams were chosen, and winners announced at a gala event April 11 at Emporia State University. In this first year of the event, 31 teams entered the competition. The top three were: • Rock Creek Ostrich Ranch: A diversified ranching proposal that strives to meet the growing demand for an alternative red meat while providing good stewardship of natural resources. Emporia

4

+ 3D Emporia

State students Nakita Elwood, junior crime and delinquency studies major from Madison, and Teri Whitson, senior accounting major from Emporia, earned $4,000 for first place.

South Korea; Jeffery Miller, senior management major from Shawnee, and Preston Mossman, senior business administration major from Topeka, won $1,000 for third place.

• Williams Web Development: Web-based service that pitches to provide software capable of managing scheduling and booking needs for educational institutions and larger corporations at a fraction of the cost of competitors. Flint Hills Technical College student Joshua Williams, computer program design and development from Emporia, won $2,000 for second place.

“The 3D competition is a great opportunity for

• Biker: A business pitch to bring bike rental kiosks to Emporia State University, giving the Emporia State community the ability to live healthier and consume fewer resources through a costeffective option. Emporia State students Soojin Bae, senior management major from Pohang,

students to get a feel for what it takes to develop an entrepreneurial plan and work through it to make a concept a viable business. It enables them to put an idea together and know that they have some help in making it successful,” explained Dr. Dean Hollenbeck, president and CEO of Flint Hills

receiving another $1,000 for the new business. Williams Web Development and Biker finished as runners-up. “While we are so thankful for the monetary rewards we have received, there is no way to put a value on the knowledge, experience, confidence and networking opportunities this competition has provided,” said Whitson of Rock Creek Ostrich Farm.

Technical College.

Added Dr. Kristie Ogilvie, dean of Emporia State’s

All three Emporia teams advanced to head-to-

Challenge

head competition April 30 against the top three teams in Kansas State University during the first-

School of Business, “The Kansas Entrepreneurial was

an

academically

value-added

opportunity for our students. I cannot thank enough the faculty, staff and community members who were

ever Kansas Entrepreneurship Challenge. There,

supportive of this competition and in turn gave our

Rock Creek Ostrich Ranch placed second,

students such a remarkable experience.” Annual Report +

5


Welcome Welcome to the second issue of Collaborate, a joint report highlighting the successes of the educational institutions in Emporia. This year, the Emporia Public Schools has placed special emphasis on the teachers, administrators, support staff and students who demonstrate extraordinary effort in carrying out our mission. These articles feature examples of tireless efforts that often go unnoticed.

M. Theresa Davidson

Our employees go above and beyond to develop new learning opportunities for a new generation of students, help young citizens understand the value of giving back to the community, share personal and professional talents to make our schools safe and caring places for students and staff and ensure that no barrier restricts a student’s access to learning opportunities. As you read through the stories and look at the photographs, understand that no one of us can work in isolation. Our success is fueled by the collaborative efforts of our partner institutions of Emporia State University and Flint Hills Technical College and the contagious support of the Emporia community. M. Theresa Davidson Superintendent

Alan Keck’s Tribute Seven years ago, after successfully fighting lung cancer, Emporia High School art teacher Alan Keck decided it was time to reach into his bucket list. “I wanted to do something for Emporia High School to pay back for the great experience,” he explained. “I’ve never had a day I dreaded coming to work. How many people get the opportunity to teach glass blowing? Not many.” In April, one month before retiring from a 25-year teaching career, his blown-glass chandelier was dedicated in the EHS Library as a tribute to past EHS faculty, staff and graduates who have served in the military and Peace Corps and those who will serve in the future. The unique, free-form crystal chandelier is titled “Peace” and it contains several hundred pieces of blown glass created by Keck and 16 current and former students along with the incoming glass and ceramics teacher, Grant Charpentier. “It was really fun to build this thing,” Keck said. Each piece was blown over a seven-year period in the EHS glassblowing studio, which Keck believes is the oldest continuing hot glass studio in a public high school in the United States. When the current high

6

+ Emporia Public Schools

school building was designed in the early 1970s, a small glass studio was added to the art department. Many former students have gone on to careers as glass artists and teachers, he said. Several of them returned to help with the project. The chandelier hangs in the EHS Library where the individual pieces reflect lights from ceiling spotlights and natural light from large windows. Several glass teardrops hang from the bottom of the piece. “Peace is not free,” Keck said. “These teardrops represent everyone who served, especially combat veterans and their families.” Helping Keck create the chandelier in addition to Charpentier were these current and former students: Tanner Clark, Stephen Protheroe, Seth Mangus, Colter Keck, Brian Berger, Stacy Keck Gonzalaz, Miranda Lane, Travis Ison, Willie Haynes, Nick Dikin, Mitchell Luna, Racheal LeClear, Graham Markowitz, Shannon Ernst, Evan Markowitz and Shelly Ayers Goete. Annual Report +

7


EHS Science Department Growing New Pathway The greenhouse at Emporia High School is a flourishing classroom and during the next year it will be transformed into the hub for a unique agricultural career pathway for students. Science teacher Frances Wecker has spent the

Emporia Board of Education this fall to be included in

past year updating the greenhouse, and in the

the 2015-16 enrollment materials.

meantime, student interest in plant science. Enrollment in botany is up and she has discovered “how many closet plant lovers there are among the students.” Plants are thriving in the 9-year-old greenhouse­— flowers, ferns, succulents, carnivorous plants and vegetables—most started from seeds by students. Some perennials have been moved to new flowerbeds in the greenhouse courtyard on the north side of the school and some annuals were planted in beds at Horizon Plaza. Members of the EHS Landscaping and Garden Club also have taken advantage of the space and some of the results can be seen in their flowerbeds and flower pots around campus. “My goal is to give students an experience that’s unique, to teach them basic skills for personal use that could also work into a career,” Wecker said. “My focus has been college and career readiness. It’s a unique opportunity to have a state-of-the-art

up,” she said. “There is a misconception that an agriculture pathway is all about farming and crops, but it can be whatever we want it to be. We have chosen to approach this a little differently to better suit our population. We are going to pursue a plant pathway and gear it more toward urban farming and growing your own foods.” Botany will become Plant and Soil Science, the second course in the sequence that will allow students to explore production, conservation and propagation of plants. Wecker hopes to include landscape design and cultivation of plants. The biggest barrier for schools starting such a pathway is purchasing the materials and equipment. “We already have a functioning greenhouse so we have the hardware to do it,” she said. Wecker gives a lot of credit to the greenhouse

greenhouse.”

restoration to Jason Bates, a paraeducator in the

If everything falls into place, her dream of establishing

been very good on the mechanical side of getting

an agricultural pathway at EHS will become a reality in the fall 2015. She has the support of school administration and she is working closely with the Kansas State Department of Education to get

8

“There are lots of interesting avenues opening

science department. “Everything has to click. He’s this to be a functional ecosystem.” “I really feel strongly about students coming away with something they can put in their tool bag for a

required agreements in place and plan a course

personal interest or a career,” she said. “I love the

sequence. A request to add the introductory course,

idea of having a college and career readiness option

Introduction to Agriculture, will be made to the

for our students in the plant sciences!”

+ Emporia Public Schools

Prairiescape Grows from Independent Study Years from now, Caite Schoeck hopes to see a thriving prairie on the Emporia High School campus. Last spring she completed an independent study with botany teacher Frances Wecker and planted 26 native grasses and flowers to create a prairiescape near the pond on the east edge of the campus. “As part of my research, I talked with Dr. (Thomas) Eddy from ESU and became very interested in prairies and their benefits to our environment,” said Schoeck, who graduated in May.

Coreopsis, White Prairie Clover, Purple Prairie Clover, Rattlesnake Master, Wild Bergmot, Spotted Bee Balm, Wild Quinine, Foxglove Beardtongue, Prairie Cinquefoil, Yellow Coneflower, Black-eyed Susan, Stiff Goldenrod, Hoary Vervain and Heartleaf Alexanders. Native grasses in the landscape are: Sidoats Grama, Blue Grama, Prairie Brome, June Grass, Little Bluestem and Rough Dropseed.

“The goal of the project is not only to provide some beautification for the high school, but also to provide a living, teaching landscape for future botany and biology classes. The landscape is intended to be a mini prairie that will be low maintenance and provide learning opportunities for students. The prairie will take three to four years to fully come in, but once established it will last for generations.” In April, Wecker and members of the Landscaping and Garden Club led by Ashlie Thomas helped Schoeck prepare the ground and plant the seeds. The club will take over maintenance of the area as a project. Schoeck also plans to closely monitor the area while she continues her studies in biology at Emporia State University. Native flower seeds planted in the landscape are: Anise Hyssop, Nodding Onion, Lead Plant, Sky Blue Aster, Smoth Blue Aster, Canada Milk Vetch, Sand Annual Report +

9


Community Service­— Going Above & Beyond One of the important lessons all district employees share with students is the value of community service. At any given time at every building, small and large projects are raising funds and collecting needed supplies for important causes. • In the past year, Emporia Public Schools employees have donated nearly $16,000 to the United Way, $1,200 to the Emporia NEA scholarship fund and just under $900 to the National Teachers Hall of Fame Memorial to Fallen Educators. Every school and Mary Herbert Education Center use denim day donations to assist individuals in need inside and outside of school. • Four schools—Emporia Middle School, Logan Avenue, Walnut and William Allen White Elementary Schools­—raised just under $8,500 through penny wars for the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society. • Logan Avenue organized a blood drive, and the Emporia High School Student Council sponsored three blood drives during the year. The four drives collected 220 pints of blood for the American Red Cross. • The Salvation Army and Abundant Harvest are benefactors of many school service projects. Nearly all schools participate in the annual KVOE Drive for Food in October. Timmerman Elementary students and staff contributed more than 7,200 food items. Logan Avenue Elementary also collected nearly $600 for the Salvation Army before the winter holiday season. • In the spring, the EHS Student Council sponsored Project Emporia, a city-wide food drive for Salvation Army, Abundant Harvest and SOS. Students raised $635 and collected more than 1,000 cans of food, which was matched by ESB Financial. Riverside Elementary also contributed 833 cans to the drive. • In the winter, Student and Family Resources at Mary Herbert Education Center organized a community

10 +

Emporia Public Schools

clothing drive for students. Each school received a bag of clean clothing (washing donated by The Wash House) and 11 appliance boxes of clothing were given to Abundant Harvest to distribute to families as needed. The Emporia Middle School Rotary Interact also organized a food, toy and clothing drive for Abundant Harvest. More than 40 bags of donations were collected. • The EMS Rotary Interact and Riverside became collection points for can tabs for the Ronald McDonald House Charities, which provide family rooms at hospitals and lodging for families of children undergoing hospital treatments for serious illnesses or injuries. The two schools collected more than 15 pounds of the aluminum tabs. • In December, Turning Point Academy elementary classes with the help of four Timmerman students donated nearly 183 books to an elementary school in Honduras. Local media coverage of the project also was published in a Honduras newspaper, The Honduras Weekly.

• EMS Rotary Interact sponsored “Freeze the Disease” in May, selling freeze pops during lunch periods, and donated the proceeds to UNICEF to help pay for vaccinations in developing countries. • In April, Village Elementary raised $5,579 for the American Heart Association.

• Riverside fifth-grade students held three fundraising projects during the spring semester, raising $2,500. The class voted to donate the money equally to five Riverside staff members who

were

experiencing

serious

health

problems.

• In April, Riverside and Emporia NEA jointly sponsored a 5K Run/Walk and raised $2,000 for the Read to Your Bunny program and to purchase books for Riverside students’ home libraries. • EHS students and staff turned in bottle caps and UPC codes from Coke products to the $partan $aver during the year and earned more than 9,000 points in the Coke Rewards program. In April, the $partan $aver faculty and staff used the points to purchase games and equipment for Michele Wells’ adaptive special education classes. Annual Report +

11


Expanded Service to Students and Families A year ago, the Emporia Public Schools consolidated several existing services into a single location, and in the process, increased resources for families. The result was the new office of Student and Family Resources, which combines student enrollment, Emporia Youth Mentoring and the Migrant Education Program. The primary objective of the office is to enroll students and ensure that families are connected with all the services they need in the schools and in the community. Those services can range from students’ special academic and health needs at school as well as family child care, housing, transportation, medical care, school supplies, clothing and food assistance. “Overall, our goal is to remove all barriers to education for our students,” said Heather Wagner, Student and Family Resource specialist. “I am eager for all of the opportunities our office can provide for the families of Emporia Public Schools. I feel passionate about connecting families with schools and community resources in order to inspire an optimal learning environment for our students.” New families move into Emporia every week, and after September 1, 219 students enrolled in school through Student and Family Resources. The office provides each new family with a welcome packet and follows up once the children are in school to assist with other community connections if needed. “The families truly like that they can benefit from enrolling their children all in one stop without having to go to a number of schools,” said Patricia Reyes, Migrant Student and Family Resource specialist. “Families leave our office feeling accomplished and with a smile on their face.” The office also is responsible for identifying migrant and homeless students and ensuring that they get services that are outlined in federal law. A changing economy has resulted in more students

12 +

Emporia Public Schools

who are considered homeless, which means they lack a fixed, regular and adequate nighttime residence. According to Wagner, the district has identified 40 homeless students who qualify for certain services. Her job is to remove all barriers to enrollment, attendance and success in school. The agricultural nature of the local economy also brings a number of migrant families to Emporia, and Reyes serves the same role with these families. One of the challenges for migrants is that frequent moves interrupt their children’s education. The Migrant Education Program focuses on keeping the children in school and helping families adjust to a new community. During 2013-14, she served 38 migrant families with a total of 74 children. A primary focus of her program is English literacy for children and adults, and helping the adults continue their education. Emporia Youth Mentoring, formerly YouthFriends, also operates out of the office. Wagner and her staff, Amanda Rodriguez and Brooklyn Owens, work with school counselors and teachers to identify students who would benefit from an adult mentor. By the end of April 2014, 529 students had been paired with mentors since August 2013. The mentoring program has 121 volunteer mentors, 69 of whom joined the program since the fall of 2013. Many of the mentor-mentee matches continue year after year. In the past year, 69 new student referrals were made to the program. Mentors are asked to spend at least one hour with the student each week and all the mentoring is done at the child’s school. Annual Report +

13


STREAM A year ago, not many people knew a lot about STREAM. Today it is a common term in the Emporia Public Schools and among school-community partners. In March 2013, the Emporia Public Schools was awarded a five-year $4.2 million 21st Century Community Learning Center Grant to extend learning time in the areas of Science, Technology, Reading, Engineering, the Arts and Mathematics. The district immediately opened computer labs in the evening for students and their families, offered evening tutoring for students, organized a summer reading program and checked out electronic tablets to students for reading eBooks, and added six days to the 2013-14 school year. In August 2013, the challenge of pulling together the details and logistics of STREAM seemed enormous. A year later, the results were above and beyond the expectations of district administration, according to Dr. George Abel, assistant superintendent of Teaching and Learning. “The Emporia Public School teachers have made STREAM project activities something students will remember as a highlight for the year,” Abel said. “Preschool students are still recalling their trip to the apple orchard and relating it to classroom learning. Elementary and secondary students have had the opportunity to be on post-secondary campuses, and for the first time, a large cross-section of elementary students are talking about what they want to study when they go on to school after high school.” “Teachers are making student learning relevant to the students in ways that were not previously possible,” he said. Walnut teacher and STREAM coordinator Cindy Hadicke said teachers enjoyed the freedom the grant has allowed to extend the curriculum in a variety of ways that takes students outside the classroom.

14 +

Emporia Public Schools

“This grant has provided our students with life experiences that are an extension of their learning,” Hadicke said. “Students have received experiences in theater, physical fitness, nutrition and award-winning author visits. Also, this grant has allowed teachers to extend the curriculum in reading, math and science.” A team of teachers took on additional roles as coordinators who planned the days, created the schedules for students and staff, worked with community partners to plan visits and activities and arranged for transportation and food service. The extra school days were devoted to educational experiences that could not be accomplished during the regular school year. As a result, students had a wealth of educational experiences they may not otherwise have had. “Our students have grown in many ways through STREAM this year,” said Whitney Dorsey, Riverside teacher and STREAM coordinator. “They have worked on team building, raced robots, built rockets, used advertising and math to cook healthy meals, traveled back in time to the pioneer days in Kansas and learned about cultures from all over the world.” The extra days have focused on a variety of themes, appropriate for each grade level. Activities incorporated art, character education, college and careers, engineering, health and fitness, math, music, reading service and citizenship, science, social studies, technology and writing. Students traveled to college campuses, learned about local business and industry, attended plays, visited educational points of interest in Emporia and the state.

One example was “Welcome Mother Earth” at William Allen White Elementary in the fall. Sheri Bonnet, a teacher and STREAM coordinator, said the day focused on science and introduced students to prairie plants native to the Flint Hills, setting up a weather station donated to the school by Emporia State University and expanding the school’s recycling program. “These days provided opportunities our students wouldn’t usually have, and classroom activities before and after STREAM days were tied to the content and curriculum standards,” Bonnet said. Teachers and administrators said the success of STREAM in year one relied on the cooperation of local agencies and businesses. Many organizations, agencies and individuals worked with teachers to design activities for students. These include: Camp Alexander, Camp Wood, City of Emporia, David Traylor Zoo, Emporia Arts Center, Emporia State University, Flint Hills Technical College, Kansas Wildlife & Parks, Karr Apple Orchard, Lyon County Historical Society, Lyon County Conservation, Lyon County Extension Service, Roga Pumpkin Patch, Red Rocks State Historic Site and Topeka

Performing Arts Center. Local authors, artists and community volunteers also contributed their time and talents. “We partnered with ESU students to teach students the components of STEM,” said Dorsey. “They engineered and designed water, airpowered and straw rockets. They also learned about robotics through a drone that went over our school and an obstacle course. The partnership was very beneficial.” “We are building relationships with community partners,” said Ashleigh Swanson, Village teacher and one of two STREAM coordinators. “Staff are noticing student excitement continuing for several days.” Emporia High School focused one day on College and Careers. Mitchell Garrett, one of the STREAM coordinators, was pleased with how students reacted to the opportunities. After visiting a college campus, one student wrote, “I even started thinking about going there, at first I made my mind up and said I was never going to college. But when I went there it blew my mind, and I have never wanted to do anything like this in my life! It is like I got a wake-up call.”

Annual Report +

15


Capturing Kids’ Hearts In early 2013, Emporia Middle School Principal Wendy Moore learned about a dynamic, simple framework for creating a healthy culture in schools. After a three-day training in the process, she was convinced Capturing Kids’ Hearts would energize her school and help students adjust to middle school. The philosophy behind the Capturing Kids’ Hearts framework is, “if you have a child’s heart, you have his head.” That philosophy was woven into three days of training in August 2013 for the entire EMS faculty. The goal was to give teachers the tools to build relationships with students and earn their respect. The result would be better students who were ready and willing to learn. When students arrived later that month, teachers launched the beginning of a new culture for the school. A year later, Moore is excited about the change her school has experienced and the potential for students and adults to become better leaders and citizens. “Student ownership at EMS has increased,” Moore said. “They feel ownership in how we treat each other at our school and how the school is run.” “The kids have noticed a difference. They can’t give it a name but they see and feel the difference.” Dr. Kristen Kuhlmann, Emporia’s executive director of secondary education, describes the change at EMS as “transformational.” One key element is the use of “social contracts,” mutually agreed-upon rules for how students and adults treat each other. Once the contract is in place, all parties have earned the right to respectfully challenge someone who violates the contract. “With the use of the social contact, you are creating an environment of mutual respect between students

16 +

Emporia Public Schools

and teachers, between students and students, and

Flippen Group and Capturing Kids’ Hearts. They asked

can all be better teachers, students, parents, siblings,

between teachers and teachers,” Kuhlmann said.

if he was satisfied with the work he has done building

spouses and colleagues. I wish every teacher had

“The values that are part of a social contract are

stronger relationships through his training programs.

Capturing Kids’ Hearts.”

“He said ‘no,’” Kuhlmann said. “He told them, ‘I

The district’s long-term goal is to extend the Capturing

believe every student deserves a teacher that cares

Kids’ Hearts framework across the district. All new

Capturing Kids’ Hearts provides a framework for the

about them. My work is not done until every student

teachers at EMS will be trained, and this month training

employability or “soft” skills often cited as critical by

has that teacher.’”

is scheduled for administrators of the elementary and

those things that make a quality person and a quality citizen in our community.”

high schools and other key staff at those grade levels.

employers. “It’s the skills we talk about with becoming Kuhlmann noted that most adults would agree

The training also will be offered to 250 support staff

that their education and training did not include

members who have regular contact with students during

In April, students in the Teen Leadership class at EMS

relationship-building skills. “With the right tools, all of

the day—bus drivers, food service staff, secretaries,

spoke via Skype with Flip Flippen, founder of the

us could improve our relationships with people. We

aides and paraeducators, and custodians.

college and career ready,” she said.

Annual Report +

17


Institutional Statistics

Emporia Public Schools Institutional Statistics

Capturing Hearts in the Classroom Once the Capturing Kids’ Hearts philosophy was introduced at Emporia Middle School, the next step was to add the curriculum. In the fall 2013, a new elective was offered to seventh-and eighth-grade students, “Teen Leadership.” Early in 2013, EMS Principal Wendy Moore asked teachers Anton Sandoval, eighth-grade science, and Andrew Hawley, seventh-grade social studies, to take additional training that would certify them to teach Teen Leadership. Both men were not sure what to expect, but after the training, they were eager to pursue the journey. “This has been my best year since I’ve been here,” Sandoval said. “Teaching can be tough, and at that time, I was struggling. It was a good time to bring me back to using effective tools as a teacher. It really motivated me professionally.” Hawley agreed that Teen Leadership has reminded him that “the reason you’re here is the students. If you have emotional stumbling blocks in the classroom, you’ll never get to the academics,” he said. “They’ll never forget how you make them feel.” Both teachers use their new skills in their personal lives as well as professionally. “It’s challenged me to apply the leadership principles in my own life,” Sandoval said. “You can’t just teach it; you have to live it.” Hawley said the training and curriculum allow him to spend much more time teaching and less time managing classroom behavior. “It has really reduced the amount of stress in class,” he said. “I am teaching more, and the barriers are gone. The class has a better knowledge of my expectations, and they respond better. In doing so, I have a safer classroom.” The Teen Leadership learning objectives include developing relational and leadership skills—how to interact with others, making a good first impression,

18 +

Emporia Public Schools

Mission

We build futures by preparing today’s students for tomorrow’s opportunities.

Core Principles Andrew Hawley

Anton Sandoval

communications skills and presentation skills. In January, Sandoval and Hawley took a group of students to an Emporia Board of Education meeting to give a report on Capturing Kids’ Hearts and the Teen Leadership class. Each student gave a short speech about his or her impression of the class. Their teachers “were extremely proud” of the students’ poise and ability to speak in public. From a teacher’s point of view, Capturing Kids’ Hearts and Teen Leadership “helps you find hope that you are making a difference,” Hawley said. Teen Leadership is a semester elective class offered to seventh and eighth graders. In 2013-14, 117 students enrolled in the course. Second-semester enrollment grew based on word-of-mouth recommendations from first-semester students. The training to teach the class has given Hawley and Sandoval a new perspective on their profession and they see Capturing Kids’ Hearts transforming the way their colleagues teach and build relationships with students. “You see all of your classes through a different lens,” Sandoval said. “Any student can learn but you have to start with the right foundation of building positive relationships.” Hawley said, “The class has blown away any expectations I would have had. (Students) know you care about them and they are learning to care about each other.”

• We will strive for excellence and success for all stakeholders. • We will lead by example through serving others. • We are committed to unity in relationships, vision, and implementation. • We will lead with integrity.

Vision

Emporia Public Schools will build a culture that guarantees success for all.

Board Goals

1 Maintain a plan that consistently moves every student to read on or above grade level by end of third grade, and monitor and support a plan of action that will maintain or improve that level of excellence at subsequent grade levels while effectively supporting students not reading at grade level. 2 Improve and assure an effective culture for learning with all students, parents, staff, and community members. • Reduced teacher turnover • Elevated school status in the community • Lower drop-out rate • Significant reduction in discipline referrals • Discretionary effort by all • Positive parental rapport • Metacognitive discussions • High teacher morale • Accelerated student achievement • Elevated teacher/student rapport • Motivated students 3 Rank consistently in the top quartile of Kansas and national school districts within the next five years for students prepared to be college and career ready. 4 Maintain a technology infrastructure and protocols to facilitate the classroom integration of electronic tools for students and staff. 5 Maintain and enhance strategic planning to effectively use fiscal, human, and community resources.

Enrollment (headcount)

• Students enrolled....................................... 4,599

Student Demographics

• Hispanic/Other Cultures ...............................56% • White ...........................................................44% • English Language Learners ..........................34% • Low Socioeconomic Status .........................69%

Personnel (FTE)

• Licensed personnel....................................... 465 • Non-licensed personnel................................. 322

Graduation Rate

Graduation Rate (FY 2013).................................85% Dropout Rate (FY 2013).....................................1.5%

Graduate Post-Secondary Plans

• Continue education......................................64% • Employment................................................6.5% • Military service.............................................4.7% • All other.....................................................24.6%

Institutional Accomplishments

• William Allen White Elementary and Turning Point Academy received Master Recycling Awards from the Emporia Natural Resources Advisory Board for ongoing school-wide recycling programs. • Emporia High School received a Bronze Award designation for best high schools by U.S. News & World Report. • Emporia Middle School special education teacher Signe Truelove was one of seven Kansas Master Teachers honored in March 2014. • EHS senior Miranda Lane received a national gold medal award for her ceramics entry in the 2014 Scholastic Art & Writing Awards. • EHS junior Meg Detwiler was honored for her exemplary volunteer service with a President’s Volunteer Service Award granted by The Prudential Spirit of Community Awards program on behalf of President Barack Obama. Annual Report +

19


Celebrating Change Enrollment growth, phenomenal progress on the Now & Forever campaign and the I’m A Hornet marketing campaign are just three of the exciting changes we have seen at Emporia State University this past year. All of these changes illustrate both our new culture as an “adaptive university” and our new strategic plan. Thanks to our unique partnership with the Kansas Leadership Center, we at Emporia State University have embraced the concept that leadership is an activity Dr. Michael D. Shonrock

not a position or title. This belief permeates everything we do. As an adaptive university, we are responsive and engage faculty, students and staff to also be responsive to the unique challenges of a dynamic society. Along with all citizens of Hornet Nation, we focus on the common good. When we work together, exciting changes happen: • Our enrollment of 6,033 students on the 20th day of classes in the fall semester was a 3 percent increase from the previous year — the largest percentage

Residence Hall Renovations Nearly 120 first-year students at Emporia State University started the spring semester with a move. Residents who lived in Singular Hall during the fall 2013 semester moved into the newly renovated Trusler Hall. Singular, built in 1959, and Trusler, built in 1963, share common spaces in the middle of the building. The building is connected to the Towers Complex on the east to comprise new-student housing at the university. The renovation of 60 student rooms included adding a sink/vanity with a mirror to each room. Each floor has community restrooms for residents designed with three large sink/vanities, three toilets and five showers that include changing stalls. Lounges on each floor include 40-inch flat screen televisions and modern, comfortable furniture. Some floors include separate study rooms that groups can use for projects. The new spaces added technology — wireless internet, two Ethernet connection ports in rooms,

five outlets for electronic devises — as well as free laundry and cable television provided in lounges. Students living in Singular packed up their rooms before leaving for the winter break. On the Sunday before spring classes began, they moved into their new rooms in Trusler and worked to design their living space. New extra-long twin beds were designed to be able to stack as bunk beds or be elevated to loft beds with space for desks underneath. Each resident also has a moveable wardrobe, desk and desk chair provided. The same week students moved to Trusler, Singular Hall closed so construction crews could begin renovating its spaces. When students return to campus Aug. 15, both halls will be filled and larger core community lounges will connect the two buildings.

increase of all Kansas four-year institutions. • Our campus master plan, developed with input from campus constituents, alumni and members of the Emporia community, gives us a comprehensive framework for future decisions concerning our buildings, grounds and potential expansion. • Kansas legislators agreed with Gov. Sam Brownback that our vision for an Honors College was a wise investment and allocated $1 million to its creation. On the following pages you’ll learn of other exciting happenings this past year at Emporia State. While we enjoy reflecting on what we have accomplished, we look forward even more to where we are headed. Michael D. Shonrock, Ph.D. President

20 +

Emporia State University

Annual Report +

21


Efficiency Experts

International Perspective

Thanks to an independent researcher, fans of Emporia State Hornets have proof of what they’ve long maintained — that investing in the athletics program is a wise investment that benefits the student-athletes and the university.

Learning, bonding and exploring the sights of London, England. Few master’s level students could ask for more.

Dr. Jeff Tubbs of Cost of College Sports (costofcollegesports.com) recognized Emporia State as the most efficient athletic program in the MidAmerica Intercollegiate Athletics Association. Tubbs’ study covers the years 2009-13 and measures the cost per win by taking into account conference wins and losses in football, volleyball, soccer, men’s and women’s basketball, baseball and softball along with total expenditures of the department. The research covered all 16 teams that belonged to the MIAA conference at any time during the fouryear span. The study also ranked the best on-field performance and a combination of the efficiency, onfield performance and graduation rate. Among the schools that were members of the MIAA for the entire four-year period and are still full members of the MIAA, Emporia State is the second ranked program in onfield performance and the combined performance, efficiency and graduation rates. Two of the schools in front of Emporia State in the rankings were not members of the MIAA for the entire four-year period. “This is another example, from an objective outside source, that verifies what we have believed for a number of years. Overall our programs have the best cost-per-win ratio in the MIAA,” said Kent Weiser, director of Intercollegiate Athletics at Emporia State. “I am very proud of our coaches and of course our student-athletes. Our coaches continue to make good decisions on how to invest their resources.” Data for the Cost of College Sports study is taken from publicly reported statistics. Spending data comes from the Office of Postsecondary Education of the U.S. Department of Education Equity in Athletics Disclosure website. All coeducational postsecondary

22 +

Emporia State University

institutions that have intercollegiate athletics programs are required to report their information. Data on graduation rates comes from the Federal Graduation Rate Report from the NCAA, which includes all student-athletes who receive athletics aid. On-field performance was calculated by awarding 10 points for every regular-season conference victory and 20 points for each postseason conference tournament win. Since the 2009-10 school year, the first year of the study, Emporia State teams won eight MIAA regular season or post-season tournament championships, finished second eight times and made the semifinals in each of the six sports with a post-season tournament. The conference success has led to success on a national scale with 13 NCAA postseason appearances among the seven sports, highlighted by the Lady Hornets winning the 2010 NCAA Division II Basketball National Championship.

Emporia State University’s School of Library and Information Management offers master’s level courses in six locations — Emporia and Kansas City in Kansas, Salt Lake City and Orem in Utah and Portland, Oregon, and Denver, Colorado with a doctoral program in Kansas City. While the students work through hybrid courses that combine online and classroom sessions, most will never meet other students from outside their geographic area. For 15 master’s-level students, however, a trip to London allowed them to meet each other and learn about librarianship and archives practices in the United Kingdom. Emporia State’s Office of International Education helped organize the trip, which was nearly like coming home for Dr. Andrew Smith, associate dean of SLIM, who hails from Greenock, Scotland. “SLIM is committed to helping our students develop an international perspective, as it is now common for U.S. libraries to have users from all over the world, and librarians provide much better service if they have

experienced a different culture first hand,” Smith said. “The students also benefit from seeing library practice in other countries, from discovering new ideas for libraries and by developing fresh perspectives.” While in the United Kingdom, the group toured the British Library, the Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals headquarters, Camden Council central library at Swiss Cottan, the Wellcome Library of the Wellcome Trust, the Wiener Library for the study of the Holocaust and genocide and the libraries of the British Film Institute, the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art and the Egypt Exploration Society. “We are very fortunate to have so many libraries that are both willing and eager to share their libraries and their experience with us,” said Smith. “This kind of exchange benefits not just our students, but our host libraries, as they learn of current practice in American libraries. “We have already received invitations to return next year, when our second London library trip takes place.”

The Lady Hornet basketball program was recognized as one of only two athletic programs in the MIAA to be both the most efficient and the highest performer on the court during the four-year period. Data also showed that during the four seasons, Emporia State spent just 71 percent of the average for the entire MIAA conference. “I believe those who support Emporia State Athletics — students, ticket holders, donors — will be pleased to know the we’re getting the most out of every dollar we have,” said Weiser. “An investment in Hornet Athletics is spent wisely and helps bring success to our student-athletes on the field and in the classroom.” Annual Report +

23


Learning Spaces As paper, pens and textbooks have given way to electronic alternatives, a collaborative effort has ensured that Emporia State students have the physical and virtual spaces needed for success. Two new spaces on campus are proving especially popular. The main floor of William Allen White Library has been transformed into a Learning Commons, complete with saturated wireless so students can bring their own electronic devices, flexible furniture for working individually or in groups and vending machines.

open up the space and, more importantly, allow the space to be open 24-7. On holidays and after closing time, the library elevators are locked down and new doors close off the circulation desk and other floors in the library. Students, faculty and staff, however, just need to swipe their Hornet cards at the main door for access to the Learning Commons.

Richel Learning Space in Cremer Hall — home to the School of Business — also includes a Learning Commons as well as group study rooms outfitted with conference style furniture, mobile projector Other improvements to the space came from carts and floor-to-ceiling whiteboard walls. The student suggestions, said Dr. third component in Richel is a John Sheridan, dean of University classroom space with upgraded computers and technology for “I have enjoyed seeing Libraries and Archives. presenting lessons and controlling students’ work inspiring “Two of the most successful classroom computers. other students to work. features — beanbags and a Creating both areas was a I am eager to see what microwave — came directly cooperative effort that included we come up with next from student suggestions,” Sheridan said. Information Technology and in collaboration with the crews from University Facilities for students.” The Library Learning Commons remodeling of the spaces. also has become a popular Both the library, bottom of -Dr. John Sheridan gathering space. Since opening in September, it has been used for opposite page, and Richel, a wedding, two commencement top of opposite page, include receptions, film showings, a program on paranormal university-provided computers on which students study of the library and pizza nights for students. can access Skylab, through which students have access to a virtual PC desktop complete with the Students are using the space — attendance is up software they need to work on projects. Students’ 22 percent over previous 24-7 periods during finals work is stored in the Cloud and can be accessed week — and are encouraging their friends. from their own or other computers. The library project included more extensive remodeling under the direction of University Libraries and Archives. This remodeling included moving the first-floor circulation desk and offices upstairs to

24 +

Emporia State University

“I have enjoyed seeing students’ work inspiring other students to work,” Sheridan said. “I am eager to see what we come up with next in collaboration with the students.” Annual Report +

25


Children Inspire Glass Six Emporia children saw their imaginations come alive thanks to a cooperative effort of Emporia State University faculty and students. Inspired by the Kids Design Glass project at the Museum of Glass in Tacoma, Washington, codirectors Dr. Carol Russell, professor in the Department of Elementary Education/Early Childhood/Special Education in Emporia State’s Teachers College, and Fletch Russell, adjunct professor in the Emporia State art department, added a scholarly component to the program. They enlisted assistance from Patrick Martin and Roberta Eichenberg of the art faculty, along with Dr. Heather Caswell, assistant professor of elementary education/early childhood/special education and other faculty and students from elementary education, art therapy, early childhood and glass forming. The Museum of Glass program asks children to draw their ideas for something they would like to see made out of glass. The professional glass-formers at the museum then select one entry each month and produce two pieces — one for the museum and one for the child. In the Emporia program, children ages 5 to 10 began with their ideas, working with college students to develop their concepts and create stories about their characters and two-dimensional drawings. From there, the children worked with the students to build clay models. These early stages took place one-onone at the Emporia Arts Center in downtown Emporia. Then, the work headed to Emporia State’s glass studio where Eichenberg guided college students to learn techniques and team-working concepts to reproduce each child’s design in glass — first clear, then in color. The fifth day of the glass projects was actually six separate days. “Each child had a ‘day at the Hot Shop,’” said Carol Russell. “On their day, they would examine the clear model and give input for changes or modifications.

26 +

Emporia State University

“The children were in awe spending ‘their day’ of production,” she added. “The glass students observed the children’s enthusiasm and self-esteems as their designs took on three-dimensional glass forms.” The collaboration between the college students and children artists was a special part of the program, said Russell, by adding authenticity to the children’s designs. Organizing the program and collaboration seemed overwhelming at times, said Russell, who concluded the end results were beneficial for all involved: • Art therapy students worked directly with children and learned about their creative process; • Students in an elementary education children’s literature course received hands-on experience helping the children write their stories about their creatures; • Glass students learned techniques and teamwork concepts as they recreated the children’s designs in glass. The program, which received funding from the Kathrine K. White Faculty Incentive Grant and the C.F. Marshall Trust, continues to live on after the creative process concluded. The pieces have been exhibited in galleries both on-campus and off. The artwork is a resource for classroom discussions that analyze children’s art growth stages, art elements and creative writing. Photos and videos of the project have been incorporated into an online graduate course, Enhancing Artistic Creativity of the Young Child.

Ellie Tollakson, above, shows off Sea It Play, a flying seahorse she created during Children Inspire Glass. Below left, the artists pause for a photo during an exhibit of their work. From left are Anya Tollakson, Weslie Seimears, Charlie Seimears, Lauren Erickson, Eliot Rabas and Ellie Tollakson. Below right, Spike the Dragon, designed by Eliot Rabas, takes shape in the glass shop at Emporia State University.

“This project has been a learning process for all disciplines involved,” said Carol Russell. “The product was lovely, but the journey getting there was equally important. It is this journey that made this project unique and demonstrated the power of children’s creativity.” Annual Report +

27


Campus Master Plan Opinions shared from across Hornet Nation this past year will influence how Emporia State University presents itself in the future. Throughout the 2013-14 academic year, the Campus Master Plan steering committee worked with architectural consultants at Gould Evans of Lawrence to develop a vision to guide the campus. Along the way, representatives of Gould Evans asked questions and presented drafts to groups of faculty, staff, students, alumni and Emporia community members.

“It is full of contributions that have evolved to shape this plan that will guide us in our next 10 years and beyond,” said Pearson of the final plan, noting that some projects can begin now.

• Continued development of learning commons and classroom renovations and upgrades; • Renovation and addition to King Hall to consolidate the art program into one space; • Moving of University Facilities construction and maintenance shops and offices from central campus to the east side of campus; • Redevelopment of the current University Facilities site immediately east of Wooster Lake into a mixed-use project that would include student services, student success and housing; • Construction of a natatorium to enhance offerings at the student recreation center and allow use of the existing pool space in the HPER building for other services; • Creation of a new north entry with landscaping along Highland Drive, forming campus frontage on Interstate 35 wrapping around the north and east sides of campus; • Improvement of campus signage for a useful wayfinding system; • Demolition of antiquated portions of Morse Residential Complex to open the heart of campus to encourage visual and walkable path connections; and • Improvements to Union Square to create a more active, connected gathering space in the heart of campus.

“These are what we call ‘low-hanging fruit’” said Dennis Strait of Gould Evans, explaining that these projects, which may include landscaping and developing a color palette for campus, are affordable now and will illustrate where the campus is going.

“Emporia State is moving forward,” concluded Pearson. “The master plan is already influencing many projects that are in progress, each seeking to make our campus an engaging environment that is inviting and exciting, vibrant and modern.”

Among the questions explored: • Where should the main entrance to campus be located and what should it look like? • How can more green space be created in a way that will encourage its use? • Where should future academic buildings and residence halls be built? • Can a deeper relationship with the community be created by bridging the physical boundaries between campus and the city? “The development of Emporia State’s 150th-Year Campus Master Plan has been a rich, cooperative experience of campus, community and state stakeholders,” said Bobbi Pearson, executive director of campus master planning. All of the work culminated in a report to the Kansas Board of Regents in May.

28 +

Other projects would wait for need or funding, but the master plan will help guide those future decisions. In the report presented to the Regents, projects with the most immediate priority include the:

Emporia State University

new Visual Identity embraces University’s Future With a date-specific logo like the one Emporia State University used to celebrate its 150th anniversary, it was obvious that the university needed a post-sesquicentennial look. Complementing its new visual identity, a new address also serves as evidence that the institution is moving forward while paying homage to its heritage. As the sesquicentennial celebration drew to a close in February, Emporia State replaced the special award-winning 150 logo with a new visual identity that emphasizes the institution’s name. At the same time, the mailing address was changed to 1 Kellogg Circle in honor of Lyman Kellogg, the first president of what was originally called Kansas State Normal School. On maps, 1 Kellogg Circle is home to Plumb Hall, the university’s administration building, which includes a KSN logo in a medallion at the apex of the front façade.

The new visual identity centers around a word mark for Emporia State University, with the words “Emporia” and “State” more prominent than “University,” signifying the importance of the relationship between the university and the community of Emporia as well as the university’s importance in the state higher education system. Throughout the nearly yearlong process, which involved feedback from faculty, staff, students, alumni and community members, Art Director Kat Dorcas created more than 25 designs. For the final word mark, Dorcas chose the Life font, which is very traditional yet distinct from other serif fonts such as Times New Roman. “The Life font is a solid style that evokes the strong traditions we have at Emporia State University while also being modern enough to represent us well into the future,” said Umair Abbasi, who oversaw creation of the new visual identity as executive director of Marketing & Media Relations. The new identity also incorporates the “I’m A Hornet” brand introduced last year for student recruitment, which has quickly expanded to the university’s brand. The Power E, which debuted in the early 1990s, now is used as a spirit mark for Intercollegiate Athletics, intramural athletics and student clubs and organizations. Emporia State’s mascot, Corky, remains unchanged, although Dorcas created an additional silhouette style that emphasizes Corky’s iconic status in Hornet Nation.

Annual Report +

29


Legislative Update A new Honors College will take shape at Emporia State University over the next year, thanks to a $1 million appropriation from the Kansas Legislature, one of many positive highlights from the 2014 legislative session that started with a Regents visit to campus and later a stop here on the fall 2013 legislative bus tour. “The Honors College has been an end goal of ours at Emporia State University for quite some time,” said Dr. David P. Cordle, Emporia State provost and vice president for academic affairs. “Now with the support of the Regents, Governor Brownback and the Legislature, we have the resources to make it a reality. Great things are happening at Emporia State, and we expect the Honors College to help us continue that trend.” Brian Denton, Emporia State government relations officer, agrees.

The budget bill also allowed Emporia State University to sell the ESU Apartments and retain the proceeds rather than returning them to the state. Constructed in the early 1960s for married students, the apartments were built without state funds and were supported during the next 50 years from student fees.

“Emporia State University — and the Kansas Board of Regents university system — enjoyed a fruitful 2014 legislative session,” said Denton.

Once the complex is sold, the proceeds will be used to offset renovation of Singular and Trusler residence halls on campus.

“Telling our story is key,” Denton explained, “and it has been a team effort. The entire campus put its best foot forward time and time again. From the Regents visit to the bus tour to the recent governor’s visit, our staff, alumni and students have shared the unified message that Emporia State is an adaptive university where we get things done.

A non-budget bill that passed with positive benefits to Emporia State was the State Authorization Reciprocity Agreement. Under SARA, as it is called, Emporia State joins a consortium when applying to offer distance education to students who live in other states. Without SARA, Emporia State would have to apply to each individual state for approval.

“We asked the legislators to restore previous cuts because we are thinking differently,” Denton said. “President Shonrock is planning strategically. We are not just filling holes. Our return on investment is growing to the benefit of our students, community and Kansas.”

“Being part of a consortium saves us money and time,” said Dr. Kathy Ermler, dean of graduate studies and distance education.

In the budget bill that passed early in April, legislators restored funding cuts made the year before to higher education budgets. For Emporia State, the restoration brought a total of $1.28 million over two years, 2014 and 2015. The university also received nearly $100,000 in both 2014 and 2015

30 +

for a technical adjustment to earlier cuts. In 2014, these funds are being used primarily to purchase needed equipment to grow the new master’s degree in forensics program.

Emporia State University

Meanwhile, work on the new Honors College has already begun with the one-year appointment of Dr. Gary Wyatt as associate provost and director of the Honors College. During the summer Wyatt is working to plan the new program, with some changes to be incorporated into the current honors program for the 2014-15 academic year. The new Honors College will launch in fall 2015.

Kansas lawmakers join Emporia State University faculty, staff and students in showing the Stingers Up symbol during a visit to campus in October 2013.

Annual Report +

31


Emporia State University Institutional Statistics Mission Statement Emporia State University is a dynamic and

Business to its 10 Most Affordable Business

progressive student-centered learning community

Schools list for 2014.

that fosters student success through engagement in academic excellence, community and global involvement, and the pursuit of personal and professional fulfillment.

Vision Emporia State University will be a premier

Members of the Emporia State University Jazz Ensemble pose with their stuffed Corky outside the famous fountain at Lincoln Center in New York City.

Bright Lights, Big City They didn’t have to sing for their supper, but the 22 students who make up the Emporia State University Jazz Ensemble were required to perform during their trip to New York City. After all, an invitation to perform at Lincoln Center was the impetus for the trip.

32 +

The group, under the direction of Gary Ziek, applied to play April 12 and 13 at the New York City Jazz Festival. After sending audition tapes and repertoire lists, the group earned its first-ever invitation to the prestigious event.

left on the morning of April 11 and returned in the evening of April 14.

Although their festival performance came on Sunday afternoon, the ensemble also played a clinic and performance on Saturday morning. Their concerts included musical pieces by Mercer Ellington, Tom Kubis, Fred Sturm and Sammy Nestico.

“The students were on their own when they weren’t performing,” Ziek said. “They attended concerts at Birdland, The Blue Note and Carnegie Hall. They went to all the major museums and even a Yankees game.”

The group raised money for the trip with bucket drives at their performances during the school year. They also received a gift of $33,000, which paid for the air travel to New York City. The group

And no Emporia State trip would be complete without Corky joining the fun. The group took with them a stuffed Corky and made sure to document his adventures in the Big Apple.

Emporia State University

Although they had plenty of obligations for musical performances, the trip wasn’t all work.

• Affordable Schools named the School of

• College Atlas ranked the Emporia State University Newman Division of Nursing No. 14 in the Top 100 Nursing Programs in the United States.

Enrollment Headcount - 6,033 (Fall 2013)

comprehensive university focused on academic

• Undergraduate Students............................ 3,873

excellence, student success, leadership, and

• Graduate Students..................................... 1,854

community and global engagement.

• Non-Degree Graduate Students.................... 306

Institutional Accomplishments • A new dual-degree engineering agreement lets students complete their first three years at Emporia State before transferring to Wichita State University for two years of study. At the end, students have a bachelor’s degree in a science from Emporia State and an engineering degree from Wichita State. • U.S. News & World Report named Emporia State a Best College for Veterans. • Just two years into the five-year timeline, Now & Forever: The Campaign for Emporia State University is nearly at 60 percent of the $45 million goal. • The Hornet football team advanced to the NCAA Division II playoffs for the first time since 2003. • As a beta test site of a new electronic transcript system created by National Student Clearinghouse and Ellucian, Emporia State became the first client using Ellucian’s Banner administration system to offer the new service that allows students to request and receive their transcripts 24-7.

Student Demographics Percent of the total (Fall 2013) • White.........................................................73.6% • Black........................................................ 4.5% • Hispanic................................................... 5.5% • Asian........................................................ 0.6% • American Indian/Alaskan Native................ 0.3% • Hawaiian/Pacific Islander.............................0.1% • Non-resident Alien.......................................8.6% • Two or more races.......................................3.9% • Unknown.................................................... 2.9%

Personnel Total Staff and Faculty, 731 (Fall 2013) • Faculty........................................................... 248 • Full-time Administration/Staff......................... 483

Graduation Rate • Graduation rate*...........................................42% *Six-year rate based on 2007 freshman cohort

Annual Report +

33


Reflection As we reflect on the past year at Flint Hills Technical College we are excited and humbled by the support for our institution and the success of our students, programs and employees.

Dr. Dean Hollenbeck

The stories in this issue are a true testament to the power of education and how it changes lives. We have had students compete and succeed at the local, state and national levels. Our students and employees give back to the community and region through their educational skills and knowledge. We continue to develop partnerships to make our programs better, expand our offerings, recognize employer support and make our environment better for everyone. The level of collaboration and partnership between Emporia Public Schools, Flint Hills Technical College and Emporia State University is unique to the State of Kansas and is a definite point of pride for Emporia. Dr. Dean Hollenbeck President

Flint Hills technical College to Receive solar Panels from Westar The FHTC received a grant from Westar Energy to install solar panels on the Jones Education Center. This was the first grant of its kind to be given out in Kansas, and Westar is now reviewing proposals from other organizations for solar project funding. Three solar arrays, to be installed during the summer, will provide electricity to the Jones Education Center, 1702 Graphic Arts Road One will be mounted on the roof, and two on the ground. One array will be adjustable, allowing students to manipulate the panels seasonally, compare generation outputs and improve efficiency. FHTC President Dean Hollenbeck was excited at how this project came together. “Amy Becker, who is director of the Sustainability Center for the college, worked for a long time to bring this project together,” Hollenbeck said. “We want our Jones Education Center to be a net zero building and we want to be a leader in helping provide education about these technologies and this partnership will let us do that.”

Westar Energy has invited Kansas schools, non-profit organizations and government agencies to submit proposals for solar projects and, for selected projects, the utility will partner with them by providing funds to purchase and install the solar panels.

Projects Westar is looking for should be 10 to 30 kilowatts and must provide electricity to a facility in Kansas. Westar expects to provide funding for purchase and installation of about 15 to 20 solar systems. Projects will be selected based on the opportunity to provide education about solar energy, the characteristics of the site, the organization’s readiness to have the solar panels installed and geographic diversity. This program is in cooperation with the Environmental Protection Agency and the Kansas Department of Health and Environment. Full program details and the application are available at www.WestarEnergy.com/solarproject. The solar panels continue a tradition of support for the College. In 2012, Westar installed a wind turbine as part of the Wind For Schools program. Geothermal wells are also installed at the facility.

“Solar technology is improving, and with time it could

(Modified excerpt from Jan.9, 2014 Emporia Gazette)

Installing solar panels was part of the long term plan for the Jones Education Center. “When the building was built, we put all the infrastructure into the building to be able to add solar panels,” Hollenbeck said. “The cost of installing solar would have cost us tens of thousands of dollars, so this is wonderful partnership with Westar.”

34 +

Flint Hills Technical College

become a cost effective energy source for customers,” Mark Ruelle, Westar Energy CEO, said. “We’re installing solar on some of our own buildings and looking for opportunities to work with others to install solar panels. Through these projects we can assist some local organizations with their energy needs, and we and our customers can learn more about how solar panels perform under Kansas conditions and with these applications, and use that knowledge to make good decisions about how we might best produce electricity in the future.”

Annual Report +

35


Flint Hills technical College Ranked as top in Country Flint Hills Technical College was ranked in 2013 as one of the top technical/community colleges in the country by three separate ratings systems. Bankrate.com Bankrate.com ranked FHTC as No. 4 in the country out of the top 10 technical/community colleges. Bankrate undertook the task of ranking two-year community colleges and technical centers around the country to see where students could get the best, affordable start in their college careers. According to the Bankrate.com website, “Community colleges serve nearly half of all U.S. undergraduate students and play a crucial role in both workforce development and as a springboard to a four-year education. But few are recognized for just how far they go to serve students.” Using data from the National Center for Education Statistics, Bankrate ranked more than 900 public twoyear institutions to determine the best and brightest schools. The rankings were based on six criteria: graduation rate; student retention rate; the studentfaculty ratio; the school’s in-state tuition and fees; the percentage of full-time first-time undergraduates receiving financial aid; and the average amount of grant aid they received from federal, state and private sources combined. The data cover full-time freshman students who entered college in fall 2008. Bankrate selected FHTC as No. 4 based on dedication to 70 percent hands-on training and partnerships with local businesses, specifically the partnership with Kansas State University and Emporia Public Schools to build the Jones Education Center. Bankrate, Inc. is a web-based aggregator of financial rate information. In addition to rate data, Bankrate publishes original and objective personal finance stories to help consumers make informed financial decisions.

36 +

Flint Hills Technical College

2014 Military Friendly Schools ® Designation Victory Media, the premier media entity for military personnel transitioning into civilian life, named Flint Hills Technical College to the coveted Military Friendly Schools® list. The 2014 Military Friendly Schools® list honors the top 20 percent of colleges, universities and trade schools in the country that are doing the most to embrace America’s military service members, veterans, and spouses as students and ensure their success on campus. The Military Friendly Schools® media and website, feature the list, interactive tools and search functionality to help military students find the best school to suit their unique needs and preferences. The colleges, universities and trade schools on the 2014 list exhibit leading practices in the recruitment and retention of students with military experience. These schools have world-class programs and policies for student support on campus, academic accreditation, credit policies, flexibility and other services to those who served. Currently, FHTC assists approximately 30 students who are receiving veteran’s benefits through the Department of Veteran’s Affairs.

performance among America’s community colleges

The data focus on student retention and completion,

and recognizes institutions for exceptional student

considered from three perspectives:

outcomes in four areas: student learning, certificate and degree completion, employment and earnings,

• Performance: retention, graduation rates including

and high levels of access and success for minority

transfers, and degrees and certificates per 100

and low-income students.

“full-time equivalent” students • Improvement: awarded for steady improvement in

The Aspen Institute identified the top 150 community colleges through an assessment of institutional

Aspen Institute College Excellence Program Highlighting the critical importance of improving student success in America’s community colleges, the Aspen Institute College Excellence Program named Flint Hills Technical College as one of the nation’s top 150 community colleges eligible to compete for the 2015 Aspen Prize for Community College Excellence and $1 million in prize funds.

performance, improvement, and equity on student

The Prize, awarded every two years, is the nation’s signature recognition of high achievement and

each performance metric over time • Equity: evidence of strong completion outcomes for minority and low-income students

retention and completion measures. The Aspen Institute is an educational and policy studies Flint Hills Technical College and 149 other community

organization based in Washington, D.C. Its mission is

colleges were selected from a national pool of

to foster leadership based on enduring values and to

over 1,000 public two-year colleges using publicly

provide a nonpartisan venue for dealing with critical

available data on student outcomes. The formula

issues. The Institute is based in Washington, D.C.;

used to select the colleges was devised by expert

Aspen, Colorado; and on the Wye River on Maryland’s

analysts at the National Center for Higher Education

Eastern Shore. It also has offices in New York City

Management Systems in consultation with an expert

and an international network of partners. For more

advisory committee convened by the Aspen Institute.

information, visit www.aspeninstitute.org. Annual Report +

37


A Blessing in Disguise The Flint Hills Technical College graduated a record 304 graduates on May 17, 2014. According to President Dean Hollenbeck, this was the largest class to ever graduate from FHTC. “It is an exciting time for us. What we know about technical education is that 70 percent of the jobs that are out there are technical based. Our associate degree student’s salaries range from $32,000 to $65,000,” said Hollenbeck. Thirty-nine of the individuals that graduated in May were former Dolly Madison employees. Parent company, Hostess Brands, closed the Emporia factory in November 2012, leaving more than 500 workers unemployed. Immediately following the closure of the bakery, those left unemployed received information and assistance on applying for unemployment, job training and educational opportunities through KansasWorks, FHTC and other community agencies. Melissa and Brandon Lindburg are two former bakery employees who graduated in May. The couple has four children. When the Dolly Madison plant closed, they were uncertain of what the future held for them. While both were looking for new jobs, they also enrolled at FHTC. “It was traumatic,” said Melissa Lindburg. “We didn’t know how we were even going to make ends meet. I didn’t feel like even if there was a job opening that came up that it would be a secure job. There was so much uncertainty at that time. Pursuing nursing was the right choice for me. There are always jobs in nursing.” Melissa Lindburg had previously worked as a CNA before her time at the bakery. Enrolling in the Licensed Practical Nursing Program seemed like a good fit for her. While she began the nursing degree, her husband enrolled in the Welding Technology program. At first, going back to school was a challenge, but with graduation fast approaching they were thankful they did it. “Returning to school started out as a struggle,” said Melissa Lindburg. “But over time you adjust to

38 +

Flint Hills Technical College

it. I would encourage anybody to go back to school; you are never too old.” Both Melissa and Brandon have found full-time jobs related to their schooling. Brandon works at Sauder Fabrication and Melissa is working for Quest. What started out as a traumatic time for their family has now become a blessing. The couple reports they are better off now than before the plant closing. “Even now we are better off financially,” said Melissa

Fourteen of the 21 former Hostess employees who earned a 4.0 grade point average are pictured below. They were honored at a Rotary Club luncheon during the spring, along with other FHTC graduates.

Lindburg. “This was a door opened for us, free schooling, and we have just moved forward.” Returning to school with four children at home has served as an opportunity to teach their children about the value of education. Their example has served as a motivator for their oldest son, Derek Korte. Korte is a junior in high school but is already enrolled at FHTC and will begin attending classes in the fall. “Derek is 17 and he is a junior,” said Melissa Lindburg. “But they (FHTC) have already accepted him, and he will begin classes in the fall.” The Lindburgs’ story of success is one that has been duplicated by many of the former Hostess employees who are graduating. In the spring, the Rotary Club honored all 4.0 GPA graduates with a luncheon. Of the former Hostess employees who graduated in May 2014, 21 of the 39 graduated with a 4.0 GPA and were recognized at the luncheon. (Modified excerpt from May 17, 2014 Emporia Gazette by Jessie Voiers) Annual Report +

39


Employers Recognized at Champion Level Flint Hills Technical College recognized five area employers at the Champion Level through the Kansas Board of Regents’ (KBOR) Employer Engagement Initiative. The initiative is a focus of the KBOR Workforce Development team and was created as an opportunity to identify and recognize those partners who invest their resources in the state’s postsecondary programs. All five employers were recognized at the highest level and have been strong supporters of FHTC’s power plant technology program. The five employers receiving Champion Level recognition included: • Kansas City Power and Light (KCP&L) • Kansas Municipal Utilities • Sunflower Electric • Westar Energy • Wolf Creek Nuclear Operation Corporation “We are proud to be associated with all of these businesses and are grateful for their support and partnership,” said Dean Hollenbeck, FHTC president. “We know these partnerships are vital to our success as an institution and our student’s success, which is what we are all about.” The initiative helps ensure that Kansas businesses have a skilled, highly qualified workforce. The effort is supported by industry leaders, workforce stakeholders

and

postsecondary

institutions across the state.

40 +

Flint Hills Technical College

education

Kansas companies can utilize the system of industry endorsed credentials to standardize the skills and knowledge workers bring to the labor market. By enhancing and strengthening the Kansas workforce in this way, the state can expand economic activity throughout the state and increase job growth. As part of the initiative, employers sign a pledge, agreeing to the following: • Kansas needs to attract, develop and certify a world class, talented workforce, and • As the skills and talents of the workforce are enhanced, Kansas’ business and industry will remain competitive, and • A talented, certified workforce supports prosperity for individuals and economic growth for Kansas.

The employer agrees to join the initiative to support a qualified workforce by asking for industry credentials where appropriate as part of their screening and selection process. Employers also agree to reward, request or recognize industry credentials to help in determining and documenting essential work-related skills. There are three tiers of support including Support Level, Partner Level and Champion Level. All five employers recognized by Flint Hills Technical College received the highest level of Champion, which requires employers to prioritize credentialed applicants and participate in two additional opportunities which may include: • Providing paid/unpaid internships for students or faculty

• Interviewing students prior to graduation • Referring unsuccessful job applicants to college education programs • Providing professional development and industry certifications for instructors • Formal advocacy for education and/or workforce system at state or national level • Utilizing college system for incumbent worker training • Providing scholarships for students • Diversified regional business partnerships • Providing industry certifications for instructors The employers are recognized at the state level on the Kansas Board of Regents website and through the KBOR newsletter. Employers also receive a framed certificate. Annual Report +

41


Changing Lives through a Mission of Mercy Dental hygiene instructor Rhonda Weatherbie and four FHTC hygiene students took advantage of an opportunity to changes lives by working with nearly 750 volunteers providing dental care during the 13th Kansas Mission of Mercy. The event was held February 28-March 1, 2014, in Dodge City, where more than $800,000 in free dental care was provided by volunteer dentists and hygienists to almost 1,200 patients. This was Weatherbie’s ninth Mission of Mercy. “I enjoy volunteering. It is a way for me to provide services to people that can’t afford dental care. I attended my first Mission of Mercy when I was working for a dental office. It became addicting. Being a part of a huge volunteer organization gives me a really good feeling,” Weatherbie said. Weatherbie has also been on two mission trips to El Salvador to provide dental care.

fortunate. “The severity of the amount of need is overwhelming,” said Heston. “There are people living without teeth and they have no way to eat.” For student Chandra Bouton, a first time Mission of Mercy volunteer, the trip was an opportunity to decide whether to continue to volunteer for the event annually. Bouton said she would definitely return. “People traveled from all over to get free dental care. There were a lot of children that we helped that didn’t have teeth.”

When Weatherbie was hired as a dental hygiene instructor at FHTC she thought it was important to inform the “The severity of the students of the opportunities to amount of need is help others. She talked about the Mission of Mercy during a dental overwhelming. There are public health and ethics course people living without and four students made the teeth and they have no decision to volunteer.

way to eat.”

Due to the fact that students are limited in the care they can provide, they were encouraged to explore all aspects of the mission. Weatherbie said the students were able to assist dentists, surgeons, and hygienists, observe local anesthetic administration and work closely with children to clean their teeth. The students were also utilized in the patient education area where they started at 4 a.m. by visiting with patients about oral care. Students also worked in central supply handing out free dental supplies to patients. Students Kat Heston and Deborah Parnell had both participated in the mission previously. Both enjoyed the aspect of being able to help others that are less

42 +

Flint Hills Technical College

-Kat Heston

Student Emily Cline said she saw a lot of people who were in desperate need of dental care. “We helped a lot of people who were down on their luck and didn’t have dental insurance. In many situations a family emergency or illness took all of their money and dental care was put on the backburner.”

The students all agreed that the experience made them more compassionate and appreciative of others. “The patients were very grateful and thankful. They shared a lot of life stories with us and it was very touching,” Heston said. “Helping people turn their lives around puts more meaning into being a volunteer.” The students agreed that they would all return to volunteer at the Mission of Mercy and hope to meet annually to participate. Since inception in 2003, the Kansas Dental Charitable Foundation has treated more than 24,000 patients with $13 million in free dental care. Annual Report +

43


Students Place at State and National Competitions FHTC Students take First at State Phi Beta Lambda Competition Three Flint Hills Technical College students proved they were the best in the state while attending the Phi Beta Lambda (PBL) state competition in Arkansas City, Kansas, on February 28 and March 1, 2014. Josh Williams, a computer program design and development student, placed first in Computer Applications and first in Web Design. Allyson Oliva, a business administrative technology student, place first in Word Processing and third in Computer Applications.

The team of Williams, Oliva and Jessica Roby, business administrative technology student, placed First in Community Service Project. The students traveled to Nashville, Tennessee, to compete at the National Conference the end of June. Jessica Roby earned eighth place for the FHTC PBL chapter in Community Service. Although he did not place, Josh Williams advanced to the finals in Small Business Management Plan. PBL is a nonprofit educational association of students preparing for careers in business and business-related fields.

Ford/AAA Student Auto Skills Competition Automotive technology students made history by qualifying two teams for the Ford/AAA Student Auto Skills competition. Automotive technology instructors, Bret Pope and Robert Sieberns said Flint Hills Technical College has never qualified two teams for the competition. FHTC was represented by Lane Ikerd, a senior at Hartford High School, and Levi Cole, a senior at Olpe High School, on one team, and Michael Sigle and Dylan Meade, both juniors at Council Grove High School, comprised the other FHTC team. In order to qualify for the state competition, students had to complete an online exam. The 10 highest scoring two-person teams were selected to advance to the state finals for the hands-on competition, where each team had to correctly diagnose and repair a deliberately bugged vehicle.

44 +

Flint Hills Technical College

The contest was held April 17, 2014, at the Kansas Speedway in Kansas City, Kansas. Michael Sigle and Dylan Meade placed fifth and Lane Ikerd and Levi Cole placed 10th. “Mr. Pope and I are very proud of our students, their accomplishments, and how hard they worked preparing for, and during the contest. We would to thank John North Ford for their support of our student’s preparation before the competition,� said Sieberns, automotive technology instructor. Ford/AAA Student Auto Skills is a nationwide automotive technology competition for high school juniors and seniors interested in pursuing careers as automotive service technicians. Each year, more than 10,000 students representing more than 950 automotive technology programs in all 50 states compete in this event.

Annual Report +

45


Flint Hills Technical College Institutional Statistics Mission Statement

Enrollment

The mission of Flint Hills Technical College, as an

Headcount - 748 (Fall 2013)

associate degree granting institution, is to provide a diverse community of learners with lifelong educational opportunities for personal growth and preparation for professional and civic responsibilities that meet the needs of society.

Vision Flint Hills Technical College’s vision is to empower our graduates to compete successfully in the high-tech global workplace.

Institutional Accomplishments • The Flint Hills Technical College Foundation established 74 new scholarships during the

Hospitality/Culinary Arts Students Advance to National SkillsUSA Championships Two FHTC students came away with a gold medal and all four hospitality/culinary arts student competitors placed at the SkillsUSA state competition held in Lenexa, Kansas, on April 3, 2014. Megan McKanna won the gold medal in Culinary Arts, and Randen Davis won the gold in Commercial Baking. Donald Bess took the silver in Culinary Arts, and Dorothy Gill the bronze in Professional Baking. Students in the Culinary Arts competition had to first do a classical vegetable cut and poultry butchery segment, in which they displayed six different vegetable cuts and the deboning of a whole chicken. They were then required to produce a three-course menu. Competitors also had to take

46 +

Flint Hills Technical College

Headcount - 702 (Fall 2012) • Full Time Equivalency Students*.................... 600 *Headcount based on first day of classes

Unduplicated Headcount - 1098 (FY 2013-2014)

Student Demographics Percent of the total (Fall 2013) • White............................................................72% • Hispanic.......................................................22% • American Indian/Alaskan Native..................... 0% • Asian............................................................. 1% • African American........................................... 2% • Hawaiian/Pacific Islander................................0%

50/50/50 Campaign, allowing an additional

• Non-resident Alien..........................................0%

$44,200 in new scholarships for 2014-2015

• Unknown....................................................... 0%

• The Flint Hills Technical College Foundation

• Two or more races......................................... 2%

raised a record $47,000 at the annual auction to support student scholarships

a written vocational standards exam about culinary arts knowledge.

• FHTC began offering the power plant technology

The Commercial Baking competition challenges contestants to meet production and quality standards expected by industry. Students must scale, mix, prepare and bake six products (including breads, rolls, Danish, cookies and pies) and demonstrate cake-decorating skills.

• FHTC celebrated its’ 50th year anniversary

McKanna and Davis represented FHTC at the 50th annual National Leadership and Skills Conference (NLSC) June 23-27, 2014 at Bartle Hall in Kansas City. Randen received 9th place and Megan 14th place out of all 50 states.

• Full Time Equivalency Students*.................... 660

program in Topeka

Student Accomplishments • Graphic Arts Technology students collected 300 lbs. of food which was donated to the USD 253 Food for Students program

Personnel Total Staff and Faculty, 137 (Fall 2013) • Faculty (including adjuncts).............................. 73 • Staff (includes students/temps)........................ 64

Placement & Graduation Rates • Placement Rate*...........................................85% • Graduation Rate...........................................67% *Percentage of students employed or continuing their education after graduation

• The Phi Beta Lambda student organization teamed up with ESU to sponsor a “Be the

Completers

Match” donor drive. FHTC had 53 people sign

Students

up as bone marrow transplant donors

Certificate or AAS Degree, 505 (FY 2012-2013)

completing

a

certification,

Technical

Annual Report +

47


Emporia Public Schools 1700 West 7th Avenue Emporia, Kansas 66801 620-341-2200 | usd253.org

Emporia State University 1 Kellogg Circle Emporia, Kansas 66801 877-468-6378 | emporia.edu

Flint Hills Technical College 3301 West 18th Avenue Emporia, Kansas 66801 800-711-6947 | fhtc.edu

Emporia Public Schools, Emporia State University and Flint Hills Technical College do not discriminate on the basis of sex, sexual orientation, handicap, race, color, age, religion, marital status, or national or ethnic origin in educational programs, admissions policies, employment policies, financial aid or other college-administered programs. For questions or concerns regarding non-discrimination, contact one of the Human Resources Departments. Contributing writers; Nancy Horst, director of community relations, Emporia Public Schools; Lisa Kirmer, vice president of student services, Flint Hills Technical College; Gwen Larson, assistant director of marketing & media relations, Emporia State University. Design by Alicia Rangel, graphic designer, Flint Hills Technical College. Photos by Jason Brinkman, James R. Garvey and Dave Leiker.

48 +

Annual Report

Collaborate +

Collaborate 2014 Annual Report  

The second issue of Collaborate, a joint report highlighting the successes of the educational institutions in Emporia, Kansas,

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you