Issuu on Google+


“He who leaves a trace, leaves a wound.” Henri Michaux “It is better to do aesthetics than to discuss them” John Berger “As soon as we are born we feel that we are a detached fragment (…)” Octavio Paz


The world goes Crash!

In the 1950s, white boys and girls of Los Angeles went out in the evenings in their large convertible cars to show their lack of concern, their youth and their opulence. American boys do cruising at a human velocity; their objective is not to show off the power of their car, but the perfect beauty of the machine and its symbolic power. They want to see each other’s faces on passing each other, like a bloodless duel fought with gestures. The boys sit with their arm out of the window, blasÊ, full of confidence. The present and the future are splendid. The girls, wedged between two boys, in those seats that are almost sofas, with their fashionable hairstyles, fashionable glasses, fashionable dresses, have not yet been liberated from boys or from fashion. Boys and girls comfortably seated on the mobile leather sofa, with the breeze caressing their bodies and the endless car bonnet as the point on their infinite horizon, showing off three beautiful rearview mirrors in their 59 Chevrolet Impala, showing off being able to gently turn a steering wheel as large as a lorry, the air filter the size of a typical king-size Majorcan pastry, the enormous boot in which an entire family fits when it is time for tea, the padded suspension, the lines fleeing into infinity, the sensual shapes, and the chrome hubcaps as perfect as mirrors and as shiny as silver dollars. Their only concern is to choose the colour of the fridge, the model of the television set or the brand of the coffee machine. The world is a blue sky in which the future is shining.


These ethics and these aesthetics of waste have left a deep wound. What seemed

accordingly. A world in which it is clear that there is not enough petrol, prime-quality

to be a golden era turned out to be tinted with the colour of failure. Even Javier

ham or lavatory paper for everyone, so we will have to use the technology - not to

Mariscal, absolutely fascinated by the aesthetic of the 1950s, has perceived the

squeeze out the natural resources but to preserve them. A world which – let us be

certainty of this wound. And as he is one of those who prefers to do aesthetics

optimistic like Javier is – can be better, fairer, more intelligent and more sustainable.

rather than discuss them, he has expressed his perception in the language that is

A world which, without giving up beauty, does not cause wounds.

his, a language that some say is art and others say is only part. Whatever it is, there is Crash!, able to express the precise moment when this fascination goes up in the

Mariscal, the child who read TinTins, impressed by a cartoon in Tintin in Tibet which

air, fragments and expands. Crash! is the end of an era, but it is also the beginning

offered the first frozen image of an instant of chaos that set in his retina the slow

of another new one.

motion violence of Sam Peckinpah and who imagined how he would draw this unimaginable Big Bang that scientists tell us about, condensed his aesthetic career

The multiple pieces that were dispersed at this moment of chaos will be ordered

in Crash! and almost, without realising it, pronounced a new ethic. Because crouched

by the new times and transformed into other things which, without losing their

behind each shape is an idea, a vision of reality and a commitment. This occurs

nature, will shape another world. A world in which the certainty that the resources

whether one is an artist or not; an eternal diatribe when talking about Mariscal and

are limited enables one to act accordingly, to develop accordingly, to design

which, like so many other things, this regenerating Crash! will take with it.

Ă€ngels Manzano


Crash! 602 X 272 X 210 cm. mixta. Acero inoxidable, hierro, resina, piezas de autom贸vil recicladas, polipiel y moqueta Modelado: Taller Gecco Estructura, acabados y pintura: Taller Pere Casanovas

Pellaires 30-38

08019 Barcelona

T. 34 933 036 940

F. 34 932 662 244

estudio@mariscal.com

www.mariscal.com


Dossier Crash