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H I G H H O LY D AY I S S U E

KE H I LAT H JESH UR UN BULLETIN

VOLUME LXXXVIII, NUMBER 1

SEPTEMBER 5, 2018

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25 ELUL 5778

New Jews With an Old Song BY RAB B I C H A I M S T E I N M E T Z

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NLY IN ISRAEL COULD THERE BE AN ORGANIZATION LIKE KOOLULAM. IT DESCRIBES ITSELF AS A “SOCIAL-MUSICAL INITIATIVE AIMED AT BRINGING

TOGETHER PEOPLE FROM ALL CORNERS OF THE DIVERSE, MULTI-CULTURAL ISRAELI SOCIETY. OUR IDEA IS TO STOP EVERYTHING FOR A FEW HOURS AND JUST SING – TOGETHER...” THEIR PERFORMANCES FEATURE A DIVERSE GROUP OF ISRAELIS

IN THI S I SSU E SERMON BY RABBI STEINMETZ

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SERMON BY RABBI WEINSTOCK

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SIMCHAT TORAH CHATANIM

6

COMMUNITY NEWS

8

UPCOMING EVENTS

13

CLASSES

18

THINGS TO KNOW

20

BNEI MITZVAH

23

WITHIN OUR FAMILY

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HOLIDAYS

30

FALL SHABBAT CALENDAR

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from every ideology and religious background. Hundreds of people volunteer to sing together, precisely because they know they are different from each other, yet at the same time, very much the same.

“Alive, alive, alive - Yes, I’m still alive! This is the song which grandfather Sang yesterday to father And today I [sing] I’m still alive, alive, alive The people of Israel live”

For Yom HaShoah, Koolulam produced a unique sing along. Partnering with Beit Avi Chai and Zikaron BaSalon, a group of 600 Holocaust survivors and their families sang Ofra Hazah’s hit song “Chai”1, which has the following chorus:

The video of this sing along was highlighted in Jewish media across the world. But the media accounts left out a significant point: “Chai” was actually composed in response to the Holocaust. It was written by Ehud Manor, the famed Israeli composer, to be performed by the Israeli entrant in the 1983 Eurovision contest in Munich, Germany. Manor wanted to declare, before the German nation and the entire world, that we, the Jewish people, were still alive. When the song was performed, the backup singers all wore yellow, the color of the hated yellow star. Manor recounts how he was emotionally overwhelmed when the singers sang the words “Am Yisrael Chai” on the German stage.

‫חי‬, ‫ חי‬,‫חי‬.. .‫ אני עוד חי‬,‫ כן‬ ‫ זה השיר שסבא‬ ‫ שר אתמול לאבא‬ .‫ והיום אני‬

,‫חי‬, ‫חי‬, ‫ אני עוד חי‬ ….‫עם ישראל חי‬

1 You can watch it on youtube at youtu.be/Vuh1-jDi7Qw

The very existence of this song forces us to wrestle with a mystery: How is it that “Am Yisrael Chai?” How did the weaklings of exile find their way to redemption after 1,900 years? What continued on page 2


2 continued, NEW

JEWS WITH AN OLD SONG

happened 70 years ago was unparalleled; a wandering people rebuilt their state after 1,900 years in exile, and a people that had sustained a Holocaust found the strength and courage to defeat powerful adversaries with far larger armies. And now, 38 years later, a group of Israelis were returning to Germany and proudly singing “Am Yisrael Chai.” How did this happen? This question was actually posed well before the State was established, by the founders of the Zionist movement. They wondered how the Jew of exile would ever manage to build an independent state. To this, they offered two answers: a “New Jew,” and an old song. The New Jew answer is actually an old one. According the medieval thinkers Avraham ibn Ezra2 and Maimonides3, the generation that left Egypt was not capable of entering Israel because their character was weak; only their children, challenged daily by the desolation of the desert, would be courageous enough to conquer Israel. After the exodus, the Jews still needed to wait

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prayers in the face of their executioners. But now… let us once more become deep-chested, sturdy, sharp-eyed men.4 For some, New Jew theory was an attack on established religious and communal norms; and it was seen this way by many in the Orthodox community. Remarkably enough, this theory was adopted by Rabbi Avraham Isaac Kook. In a highly controversial passage, he wrote that exercise for the sake of making one stronger to build the land of Israel was so holy, that when young people engage in sport to strengthen the power and spirit for the sake of the might of the entire nation, that holy service raises God’s Presence higher and higher, equal to (reciting) the songs and praises that David, King of Israel, expressed in the book of Psalms.5 To Rav Kook, a secular soldier’s pushups are equal to a pious man’s prayers. But many felt that the heart and soul of Zionism came from an “old song,” a dogged refusal by Jews to ever forget their spiritual home, the land of Israel. In 1902, the founding manifesto of the religious Zionist Mizrachi movement

never to forget Jerusalem: “If I forget you, O Jerusalem, May my right hand forget her skill. May my tongue cling to the roof of my mouth If I do not remember you, If I do not exalt Jerusalem Above my chief joy.”

What makes these words exceptionally powerful is their context. This chapter comes right after 16 straight chapters of Psalms that were recited in the Temple service. When read in context, it is apparent that Psalm 137 comes to respond to a worry: perhaps these previous mentioned songs of the Temple will be reduced to nostalgia, sentimental tokens of a forgotten past. That is why Psalm 137 is placed exactly where it is, to proclaim loudly from the first moments of exile that the Temple

BUT MANY FELT THAT THE HEART AND SOUL OF ZIONISM CAME FROM AN “OLD SONG,” A DOGGED REFUSAL BY JEWS TO EVER FORGET THEIR SPIRITUAL HOME, THE LAND OF ISRAEL.

for a new generation of leaders before entering the land of Israel. Early Zionist thinkers also saw the need for a “New Jew.” Max Nordau, in a 1903 letter, said that his motto was: We must think of creating once again a Jewry of muscles.” He explained that “the fear of constant persecution… turned our powerful voices into frightened whispers, which rose in crescendo only when our martyrs on the stakes cried out their dying 2 Exodus 14:13 3 Guide for the Perplexed 3:32

declared: We have always been united by that ancient hope, by the promise which lies at the very roots of our religion, namely, that only out of Zion will the Lord bring redemption to the people of Israel.6 This hope is expressed most powerfully in an old song, Psalm 137. In it, those exiled to Babylonia in 586 B.C.E. vow 4 “Jewry of Muscle”, Max Nordau in The Jew in the Modern World, Paul R. Mendes-Flohr, Jehuda Reinharz, pages 547-548 5 Orot HaTechiyah 34 6 The Jew in the Modern World, page 549

Psalms are not going to be a relic of the past, but rather a blueprint for the future. Jews vowed they would eventually return to Jerusalem and sing the songs of the Temple once again. “If I forget you O Jerusalem” is “the song which grandfather sang yesterday to father,” the song which declared that Israel is not just part of the Jewish past, but also the Jewish future. This old song, composed on the river banks of Babylon, gave us hope throughout exile. Eliezer Ayalon (Lazar


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Hirschenfeis) was a Holocaust survivor whose entire family perished in Treblinka. He came to Israel in 1945, and fought in the War of Independence (as did thousands of other survivors). In an interview in 20087, Ayalon recalled, The love of this country that was imbued in me by my parents from early childhood made me decide that I am going to Eretz Yisrael. And this powerful love of Israel changed his destiny. He concludes the interview by saying: Here I am right now, I have two married children, five grandchildren and one great-grandson. Three generations born and raised from the ashes of the Holocaust. Today I am the happiest man in the world. Such is the power of an old song. Clearly, both answers were correct. The miracle that occurred 70 years ago was the product of new Jews singing an old song. It took the courage and daring of a new generation combined with the hopes of 2,000 years to bring us back to our homeland. And that incredible spirit of new Jews singing an old song still lives, 70 years later. THROUGHOUT HISTORY, SUCCESSIVE GENERATIONS HAVE CONTINUED TO SING THE SONGS OF THEIR GRANDFATHERS AND GRANDMOTHERS; AND NOW THIS NEW GENERATION OF ISRAELIS SINGS IT TOO.

One story which exemplifies this is told by Danny Gordis8. In 2004, The Pelech School in Jerusalem dedicated a Sefer Torah. This Torah had been brought to Israel by a group of 12th grade students who went on a heritage trip to Poland in 1990. (It was restored by another class, 14 years later). The students had gone 7 yadvashem.org/articles/interviews/ayalon.html 8 Daniel Gordis, Saving Israel: How the Jewish People Can Win a War That May Never End, pages 20-23

to the Krakow market, and noticed someone selling “Jew Dolls,” crude caricatures of Hasidic Jews studying from a book. They took a closer look at the “books” the dolls were holding, and realized they had been cut out of a Sefer Torah. So they asked the seller where these parchment fragments came from, and he explained that his uncle had taken the Torah scroll after the war from a synagogue in Luminova. Immediately, they began negotiations to buy what remained of the Torah, and the girls pooled their pocket money

ushered the remaining girls by and the Torah made it out. The belt broke!! And the Torah was carried by these courageous teenage girls back to Israel. Gordis then wonders how the girls knew to do this: How did they know that this Torah simply had to come home? Why, in a world in which last year’s news is ancient history, did they know that the story of the Jews of Leminova, whoever they were, is their story, too?

THE MIRACLE THAT OCCURRED 70 YEARS AGO WAS THE PRODUCT OF NEW JEWS SINGING AN OLD SONG. to buy the damaged Torah scroll. But then they had a dilemma: what should they do with it? It was illegal to take the Torah out of Communist Poland; it was considered to be the property of the state. Gordis explains what happened next: They talked it over, and after a while, …‘ha-lev gavar al ha-sechel’ –‘the heart trumped reason.’ They decided to smuggle the Torah out of Poland and to bring it home to Jerusalem. At the airport, however, each of them was required to put all their bags onto the x-ray machine. The first girl in the line, when she was told to put her bags on the belt, passed the Torah to the next girl in line. When that girl was told to do the same thing, she surreptitiously passed it to the girl behind her. And so forth. For the next few minutes, the Torah silently made its way back the line, until it seemed that they were not going to get it out. And then, the belt broke. The machine just quit. The Polish authorities, too concerned with fixing the belt to inspect all the bags being brought through, just

How did they know? The answer is: because they are new Jews, but singing an old song. That is why these girls smuggled the Torah from Leminova to Israel; and that is why their parents and grandparents smuggled and struggled their way into Israel as well. Watching the Holocaust survivors and their Sabra descendants sing together was a magical moment of new Jews singing an old song. Throughout history, successive generations have continued to sing the songs of their grandfathers and grandmothers; and now this new generation of Israelis sings it too. They might live in a new world, with new technologies and perspectives; but inside their heart echoes the words “Am Yisrael Chai”!! <

For information on Manhattan Kosher Establishments visit

CKJ.org/Kosher_Restaurant_List


4 IN DEFENSE OF DWELLING APART

KEHILATH JESHURUN BULLETIN

In Defense of Dwelling Apart BAL AK 5 77 8 | BY RA B B I E L I E WE I N S TO C K

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NE OF THE MOST MEMORABLE MOMENTS IN HEBREW UNION COLLEGE’S HISTORY WAS THE “TREIF BANQUET” IN 1883.

OVER 200 DISTINGUISHED GUESTS, JEWS AND NON-JEWS ALIKE, GATHERED AT CINCINNATI’S EXCLUSIVE HIGHLAND HOUSE RESTAURANT TO CELEBRATE A MILESTONE IN THE HISTORY OF AMERICAN JUDAISM. HUC (HEBREW UNION COLLEGE) HAD JUST ORDAINED ITS INITIAL GRADUATING CLASS OF FOUR HOMEGROWN AMERICAN RABBIS. THE EXPECTED KOSHER MEAL TURNED OUT TO be anything but as little neck clams, soft-shell crabs, and a “Salade of Shrimps” appeared on the menu along with ice cream and cheese that would follow the meat courses. Suffice to say, it caused quite a stir. HUC has done it again. Last month, Michael Chabon, a Pulitzer Prize winning novelist, spoke at HUC’s graduation ceremony and, in the words of the JTA news report, “delivered a diatribe against Jewish in-marriage, as well as Israel’s occupation of the West Bank.” A few memorable highlights: “Endogamous marriage is a ghetto of two…Any religion that relies on compulsory endogamy to survive has, in my view, ceased to make the case for its continued validity in the everyday lives of human beings.” “I abhor homogeneity and insularity, exclusion and segregation, the redlining of neighborhoods, the erection of border walls and separation barriers. I am for mongrels and hybrids…for integrated neighborhoods and open borders...I am for ambiguity, ambivalence, fluidity, muddle, complexity, diversity, creative balagan.” Now, maybe Chabon was trying to stir up some passion. Is it really so bad?

As Sylvia Barack Fishman, Steven M. Cohen, and Jack Wertheimer wrote, it is tempting to ignore the speech as the “performance art of a personal psychodrama in a public setting,” but “Chabon’s ideas have cachet, especially in culturally and political progressive circles.”

shouldn’t bother us.

I don’t know how to convince Michael Chabon, but I do know that his worldview is a distortion of one of Bilam’s statements. (Bamidbar 23:9)

Usually, assimilation is the pathway to success. A nation that is different needs to fit in order to thrive. The Jews are different.

‫הֶ ן־עָ ם לְ בָ דָ ד יִ ְשׁכֹ ּן ּובַ ּגֹויִ ם ל ֹא יִ ְת חַ שָ ּׁב׃‬

‫ ואינו‬.‫אבל לא כן עם ישראל כשהוא לבדד‬ .‫מתערב עמהם ישכון במנוחה ובכבו‬

There is a people that dwells apart, not reckoned among the nations.

USUALLY, ASSIMILATION IS THE PATHWAY TO SUCCESS. The simple explanation of this verse is that Jews dwell separate. We’re alone. We don’t factor within the world. Think about it. What percentage of the world’s population is Jewish? (The answer is hard to find even with Google.) Just 0.2%! Understood in this way, Bilaam’s blessing is that Jews should be left alone. We don’t matter that much. We won’t bother the world, and the world

Halevai - if it were only so! Rabbi Naftali Tzvi Yehuda Berlin, the Netziv, explains the verse differently. It is the key to Jewish survival and continuity.

When Jews remain apart and do not try to mix in and assimilate with their host nation, then we can successfully dwell in tranquility and with honor. On the other hand:

‫ כאשר הוא רוצה להיות מעורב עמם‬.‫ובגוים‬ ‫ אינו נחשב בעינם להתחשב כלל‬.‫לא יתחשב‬ ‫לאדם‬

When Jews choose to assimilate and be like the other nations, we will not succeed and, in fact, the nations will not view us as worthy of respect. Jewish particularism is part of who we are. Rabbi Joseph Soloveitchik wrote in Kol Dodi Dofek:


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DEFENSE OF DWELLING APART

Even if a Jew ‎reaches the pinnacle of social and political accomplishment, he will ‎not be able to free himself from ‎the chains of isolation. Paradoxical fate watches over the isolation ‎and uniqueness of the Jew, ‎despite his apparent integration into his non-Jewish environment. Michael Chabon cannot tolerate walls, insularity, or exclusion. He views the blessing of Bilam as a curse. Chabon’s statements represent a growing view in the Jewish community that we cannot close ourselves off from the rest of the world. Indeed, our Jewish values demand that we engage beyond our own community. If we remain a nation alone, we deprive the world of our gifts and ignore the needs of others. And what if Judaism gets in the way? Leave it behind. It’s true that our commitment to our Jewish values may lead us to be more insular or inwardly focused. This bothers many progressive Jews – especially the younger generation. It need not be that way. As Rabbi Jonathan Sacks has written:

KEHILATH JESHURUN BULLETIN

Singular, distinctive, countercultural – yes: these are part of the Jewish condition. But alone? No…By being what only we are, we contribute to humanity what only we can give…

‫הֶ ן־עָ ם לְ בָ דָ ד יִ ְשׁכֹ ּן‬

– We have our own way of life.

‫ – ּובַ ּגֹויִ ם ל ֹא יִ ְת חַ שָ ּׁב׃‬Embracing non-Jewish values is not the answer when remaining proudly Jewish creates tension with the modern world. We read the world differently.

toward the Soviet Union, but she also appealed to Kissinger’s identity as a Jew. Unimpressed, Kissinger responded, “I would like to inform you that I’m first an American citizen, second Secretary of State, and third a Jew.” To which Meir replied, “In Israel, we read from right to left.” Am levadad yishkon. We are a nation that dwells alone. Embracing that reality is an essential part of our Jewish identity and, at the same time, need not cut us off from humanity. In ways

CHABON’S STATEMENTS REPRESENT A GROWING VIEW IN THE JEWISH COMMUNITY THAT WE CANNOT CLOSE OURSELVES OFF FROM THE REST OF THE WORLD.

Golda Meir had many interactions with Secretary of State Henry Kissinger during and after the Yom Kippur War. The Prime Minister marshaled many reasons for assisting Israel - the country’s geo-strategic importance, its promotion of democracy, its attitude

we can’t always appreciate, that unique dwelling is a benefit to us and to the world. We must take pride in this truth and share this pride in how unique we are and how special it is to read from right to left. That is how we succeed both as Jews and as citizens of the world. <

Dr. Elana Stein Hain to Deliver Teshuvah Lecture The eleventh annual Florence Fishel Cohen Teshuvah Lecture will be given by Dr. Elana Stein Hain, Scholarin-Residence and Director of Faculty at the Shalom Hartman Institute of North America, where she serves as lead faculty, directs research teams, and oversees the content of lay and professional leadership programs. A widely well-regarded teacher and scholar, Dr. Hain earned her doctorate in Religion from Columbia University with a dissertation on the topic of legal loopholes in rabbinic literature, sponsored by Professor

David Weiss Halivni. She is a graduate of the Yeshiva University Graduate Program in Advanced Talmudic Studies and the Cardozo Interdisciplinary Fellowship in Jewish Law and Legal Theory and has taught across the country and in Israel, including as a member of the Wexner Institute faculty. Dr. Hain’s topic, On Forgiveness and Memory: Must We Forgive and Forget? will delve into a model of forgiveness that is an ongoing process rather than a one-time asking for forgiveness. The naming of the lecture in memory of

Florence Cohen, which will be held in the Heyman Auditorium on Thursday evening, September 13, at 7:30, was made possible by a generous commitment from the Nathan and Louise Goldsmith Foundation. The Directors of the Foundation knew Florence personally because all of its meetings are held in Rabbi Lookstein’s office. They appreciated the devotion and love that Florence demonstrated toward the Rabbi, the congregation, Ramaz and the Nathan and Louis Goldsmith Foundation Board Members during her forty year tenure. They felt it would be appropriate to memorialize such a cherished member of the KJ administrative staff in this special way. <


6 RABBI HASKEL LOOKSTEIN, RABBI MAYER MOSKOWITZ, AND LIONEL ETRA

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Rabbi Haskel Lookstein, Rabbi Mayer Moskowitz, and Lionel Etra C H O S E N FO R TO RA H H O N O RS O N S H E M I N I AT Z E R E T A N D S I M C H AT TO RA H

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HE OFFICERS OF THE CONGREGATION ARE PLEASED TO ANNOUNCE THAT RABBI HASKEL LOOKSTEIN, RABBI MAYER MOSKOWITZ, AND LIONEL ETRA, OUR RABBI EMERITUS AND TWO DISTINGUISHED MEMBERS OF THE

CONGREGATION, HAVE BEEN CHOSEN FOR THE HIGHEST TORAH HONORS OF THE YEAR. THEIR INSTALLATION WILL TAKE PLACE BEFORE THE MUSAF SERVICE ON SHEMINI ATZERET, MONDAY, OCTOBER 1ST.

City Human Rights Commission. Rabbi Lookstein, a graduate of Ramaz School (’49), received his B.A. from Columbia College, and earned his Master’s Degree in Medieval Jewish History and his PhD in Modern Jewish History from the Bernard Revel Graduate School of Yeshiva University. He was ordained by Rabbi Joseph B. Soloveitchik and Dr. Samuel Belkin as a graduate of the Rabbi Isaac Elchanan Theological Seminary in 1958. RA B B I HAS K E L LO O KS T E I N

What more fitting way to recognize the sixty years that Rabbi Haskel Lookstein has spent in the KJ pulpit than to bestow upon him the honor of being the Chatan Torah this Simchat Torah? Our beloved Rabbi, now Emeritus, has been the Rabbi of Congregation Kehilath Jeshurun since 1958 and Principal of the Ramaz School since 1966. He is the Joseph H. Lookstein Professor of Homiletics at Yeshiva University where he has been teaching since 1979. He also serves as a Vice President of the Beth Din of America. Rabbi Lookstein has served as President of the New York Board of Rabbis, Chairman of the National Rabbinic Cabinet of UJA, and President of the Synagogue Council of America. He also was a Commissioner of the New York

The Rabbi’s doctoral dissertation was published in 1985 under the title Were We Our Brothers’ Keepers: The Public Response of American Jews to the Holocaust 1938-1944. His biography, authored by Dr. Raphael Medoff, is titled Rav Chesed, and captures the many roles Rabbi Lookstein has played in his 60 years as Rabbi of KJ. These are the facts of Rabbi Lookstein’s life and professional career. What is particularly notable, however, and doesn’t necessarily find a place in his standard bio, is Rabbi Lookstein’s political activism on behalf of Jews, notable and anonymous, all over the world. Many trips to the former Soviet Union, rallies for Natan Sharansky, going toe to toe with the extremism that has at times characterized the office and policies of the Chief Rabbinate of Israel, Rabbi

Lookstein’s public support of Jews is not only a passion, but simply a way of life. Even closer to home, no family life cycle event in the KJ community has ever been complete without Rabbi Lookstein. He has shared the happiest and the saddest of times with generations of families, dancing and crying – offering just the right words for the occasion. In July 2011, when the community stood in front of our beloved synagogue as it was engulfed in flames, Rabbi Lookstein’s sadness was unmistakable. He took a day to take in the enormity of our loss and then got to work, rallying the troops, looking to the future, finding opportunity in the ashes. Rabbi Lookstein also has an abiding love of -- and derives unmistakable joy from -- davening for the amud, for which he credits Mr. Joseph Adler and his father, Rabbi Joseph H. Lookstein, of blessed memory. In 2012 Rabbi Lookstein presented a full audio resource of all the tefillot with instructions for pronunciation and phraseology, as well as his own special emphasis and interpretation of certain words, to enable anyone to learn how to be a shaliach tzibbur. This wonderful resource can be found on the Ramaz website at Ramaz.org/nusach. Married to Audrey in 1959, the


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Looksteins are blessed with eight children and children-in-law, sixteen grandchildren (and four grandchildrenin-law) and four great-grandchildren. In his non-professional life, Rabbi Lookstein is a rabid rooter for the Mets, Giants, Knicks and Rangers, in addition to being an avid tennis player. It is truly a nachas moment for KJ to honor their beloved Rabbi with the singular honor of Chatan Torah.

RA B B I M AYE R M O S KOWI T Z

Rabbi Mayer Moskowitz, our Chatan Bereishit, has been a dynamic and passionate teacher and role model for students at Ramaz as well as for adults and families in the KJ community. Rabbi Moskowitz is a child survivor of the concentration camp Transniastra in the Ukraine. He came from a lineage of great Chassidic masters and is the son of Rabbi Avraham Chaim Moskowitz of Czernowitz, Romania. He came to Palestine illegally on a ship carrying 750 orphans under the leadership of Aliyat Hanoar. He graduated from Mikveh Yisrael, an agricultural high school. After discovering his mother had also survived the Holocaust, he came to New York to join her. He graduated from Herzeliah Hebrew College and received Semicha from Tifereth Yerushalayim under the leadership of Ha’Rav Moshe Feinstein.

Rabbi Moskowitz devoted his life to Jewish education, both in formal and informal settings. He considers it a privilege to have educated thousands of students at Yeshivat Etz Chaim in Borough Park, Herziliah Hebrew Teachers College, Camp Massad and Ramaz. At Ramaz, he served as an Upper School teacher, Guidance Counselor, Director of Hebrew Dramatics, Educational Director and Chairman of the Bible Department. He was later appointed Headmaster of the Ramaz Lower School where, among his other responsibilities, he introduced innovative programs for students, teachers, and parents. Each week he taught a class for both secular and Judaic studies teachers on Parshat Ha’Shavua as well as a Learn-In for parents. During his tenure as Head of the Lower School he taught a Lunch and Learn series at KJ. This past year he has continued this tradition by teaching a course in Yiddish for the young at heart. On two occasions, Rabbi Moskowitz led a group of Ramaz seniors on a mission to the former Soviet Union, as well as participating as a survivor and educator on the March of the Living with Ramaz seniors.

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Rabbi Moskowitz is the author of two books. The first is a collection of his essays and poetry, “A Memoir of Sanctity” published in both Hebrew and English. The second book is a recently published children’s book, “I Have a Friend,” also available in Hebrew and English. He is presently working on a book of his poetry. Rabbi Moskowitz and his wife, Barbara, are the proud parents of seven children, one having graduated from the Ramaz Upper School and another having taught at the Ramaz Upper School. They have twenty-one grandchildren, two having graduated from the Ramaz Upper School, and twenty great-grandchildren. Seven grandchildren and seven great-grandchildren live in Israel. In retirement, Rabbi Moskowitz continues to learn with his dear friends and colleagues, Rabbi Yehoshua Bakst and Rabbi David Eliach, as well as with former students, friends and great grandchildren in preparation for their Bar/Bat Mitzvot.

Rabbi Moskowitz served in many capacities at Camp Massad - gardener, counselor, head of Machon and Director of Massad Aleph and Bet. He strongly believes in the power of Jewish Camping. It was at Massad that he met Rabbi Haskel Lookstein, who then introduced him to his father, Rabbi Joseph Lookstein. This was the beginning of a fifty-three year love affair with Ramaz and KJ. Rabbi Moskowitz has been an integral part of the KJ community. Rabbi Joseph Lookstein asked him to be the Baal Tefillah for the auxiliary service on the High Holy Days at KJ. He served in this capacity for many years creating a special Kehillah of daveners.

L I O N E L E T RA

Chatan Maftir Lionel Etra has been linked to Ramaz and KJ from early childhood, the connection with KJ having been initiated by his great grandfather, Aaron Etra, almost a century ago. His


8 continued, RABBI HASKEL LOOKSTEIN, RABBI MAYER MOSKOWITZ, AND LIONEL ETRA

parents, Max J. and Reba, were affiliated with KJ and Ramaz since 1948 (Reba is still a proud member), and Lionel and his brothers, William and Richard, attended Ramaz from the earliest grade through high school. Lionel has been a committed congregant through his regular worship and generous contributions, always appearing at the very start of our Shabbat and holiday services and leading the Pizukei d’Zimrah for more than 20 years. Lionel’s ties to KJ were reinforced by his close bond to his late father with whom he walked to Shul (and whose seat he now occupies) and his friendship with Rabbis Joseph and Haskel Lookstein. Rabbi Haskel was his Bar Mitzvah teacher and camp counselor and taught him almost everything he knows about reading the Torah and Megillot and so much more. After Ramaz, Lionel graduated from Columbia College and Harvard Law School. He has practiced law for approximately fifty years, the last forty-one of which with the firm of Roberts & Holland LLP where he is Of Counsel and, in addition, he has engaged in a number of investment activities. When not worshipping or working, Lionel pursues long-established routines and hobbies, including his interests in photography, classical music, and reading (mostly, but not entirely, non-fiction). Lionel exercises daily, relishing his Central Park run and the opportunity to draw inspiration from the bucolic gem in the heart of our bustling metropolis. He is, in every sense, a Renaissance Man with a multiplicity of spiritual and intellectual interests – and we are delighted that Lionel Etra is our Chatan Maftir. <

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COMMUNITY NEWS

kj welcomes... ASSISTANT Rabbi Meyer Laniado Rabbi Laniado has served as a Rabbi in the Sephardic community for four years as an Associate Rabbi at Congregation Magen David of West Deal and as a Rabbi at Hillel Yeshiva Middle and High School. He received semicha from Yeshiva University – RIETS and the Sephardic Bet Din of Queens. He holds a B.S. in Management from Yeshiva University – Sy Syms School of Business and has a Masters in Talmudic Studies from Yeshiva University – Bernard Revel Graduate School of Jewish Studies. Rabbi Laniado is married to the former Talia Ovadia, a graphic designer – and they just welcomed their first child, a daughter, Adina. We are delighted to welcome the Laniados to the KJ community.

Leead Staller Our Rabbinic Intern for 2018-2019, Leead Staller is a third year student at RIETS and a graduate of the University of Pennsylvania with degrees in both History and Philosophy. At Penn, Leead focused on research projects, writing a history thesis on British Christian Hebraism and a philosophy thesis on the epistemological value of evolutionary psychology. Prior to college, he studied for two years at Yeshivat Har Etzion in Israel and goes back for regular visits. He is also a Wexner Graduate Fellow, a loyal reader of The New Yorker, and is an avid fan of music of all genres, ranging from Dvorak to Kanye.

Freddie Rodriguez We are delighted to welcome KJ and Lower School Building Superintendent Freddie Rodriguez. Freddie comes to us with a great deal of building management experience and extensive knowledge of what it takes to run a building like ours efficiently. In the short time he has been with us, Freddie has demonstrated his commitment in the long hours he spends here making sure everything is working smoothly. He is proactive, looked up to by his loyal crew, and manifests a “can do” attitude even in the face of adversity.


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KEHILATH JESHURUN BULLETIN

COMMUNITY NEWS

Architectural Award earned by Rohr Chapel

T

HE AIA PRESENTS THE SMALL PROJECT AWARDS TO RECOGNIZE SMALL PROJECT PRACTITIONERS FOR THEIR HIGH QUALITY WORK AND TO PROMOTE EXCELLENCE IN SMALL PROJECT DESIGN.

This year, one of the recipients was FXCollaborative (formerly FXFowle), the architectural firm who designed the Rohr Chapel. They transformed the Ramaz Lower School Gymnasium, creating a modern composition of space and objects that re-imagines the traditional synagogue at an intimate scale for quiet meditation, connection, and prayer. The Chapel is inspired by ancient texts that describe the Holy Ark as a simple, acacia wood box in the Wilderness of Sinai. The deep blue ceiling’s pyramidal form creates an asymmetrical soffit that can be read as both “roof” and “celestial sky,” and features a luminous opening from which a Ner Tamid light is suspended. Vertical maple strip panels on the walls reinforce the metaphor of the stark wilderness, while the Jerusalem Stone wall fragment behind the Ark is a symbol of the Wailing Wall.

PHOTO CREDIT CHRIS COOPER

ALL WHO PRAY IN THE ROHR CHAPEL, OR CELEBRATE LIFECYCLE EVENTS THERE, CANNOT HELP BUT BE MOVED BY THE BEAUTY AND INTIMACY OF THIS SACRED SPACE.

The UJA@KJ Partnership UJA@KJ is a partnership between KJ and UJA-Federation of New York that aims to make a difference in our community through meaningful programs and volunteer opportunities. Through UJA@KJ, KJ members participate in unique speaker events, exclusive briefings, special Shabbat programs, and volunteer projects and site visits to UJA’s agencies. We hope you’ll join us this year at all our programs, including our holiday volunteer projects. Save the date for our annual Thanksgiving meal at Project Ore on Sunday, November 18, 2018. Further details will follow soon.

connect:

CKJ.org/UJAKJ

For more information about these or any other events, or to get involved with UJA@KJ, please contact UJA@KJ staff person REBECCA ZIMILOVER at zimiloverr@ujafedny.org or 212.836.1356. UJA@KJ chairs: Sophia Gomberg | Samantha Rubenstein


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COMMUNITY NEWS

WELCOME TO KJ SISTERHOOD KJ Sisterhood is a network of women across multi-generations who aspire to make a difference and enrich their connections with the KJ community. Throughout the year, Sisterhood programs include: Jewish study, health & wellness, the arts, chesed and hospitality. SISTERHOOD PRESIDENT: CARLA TANZ

Fall 5779 Events AUTHOR EVENING

D R . MA R K M E I ROWI T Z

Men’s Club The KJ Men’s Club, chaired by Dr. Mark Meirowitz, offers something for everyone in KJ and the broader Jewish community. Some of our programs include Kiddush Discussions led by fascinating speakers; film screenings featuring directors, producers, and actors; the annual Men’s Club Shabbaton in memory of former president Dr. Stephen Stowe; and the Sunday Supper Lecture series. The Men’s Club also presents guest speakers at the weekly Seudah Shlishit and invites the community to a Shavuot Eve Dinner, where Divrei Torah from Ramaz School students are showcased, followed by a stimulating Shavuot Lecture.

Kiddush Discussions

• OCTOBER 13 - KJ member Dr. Jeffrey Ascherman, Republican candidate for State Assembly • OCTOBER 20 - KJ member Dr. Jeffrey Ascherman, Republican candidate for State Assembly • OCTOBER 27 - City Council Speaker Corey Johnson • NOVEMBER 3 - Shoshana Bryen, Senior Director of the Jewish Policy Center • NOVEMBER 10 - Steve Savitsky President of B’nai Zion (former president of the OU)

OCTOBER 30, 2018 AT 7:30 PM in the Heyman Auditorium at KJ. Author Evening with Sandra E. Rapoport, author of The Queen & The Spymaster: A novel based on the Story of Esther. Chairs: Lani Kollander and Karen Lerman.

PRE-CHANUKAH BOUTIQUE

NOVEMBER 18TH, 2018 10AM – 4PM in the Heyman Auditorium at KJ. Shop for Chanukah gifts, women’s and men’s clothing, jewelry, home accessories and much more. Chairs: Marylene Friedman and Sharon Garfunkel.

SOTHEBY’S TOUR in December. A yearly favorite! Date to be announced. We would love to have your participation. You can co-chair an event or offer your home as a venue. Or just come to an event to be with friends or meet new people. Contact us at sisterhood@CKJ.org if you would like more information on how to get involved.

donate to the KJ Benevolent Fund DEAR KJ FAMILY: As summer wanes and we turn our attention to matters of charity, repentance and prayer in anticipation of the High Holy Days, we ask you to be our partner in helping those in need. The KJ Benevolent Fund enables members of our community who face serious financial difficulties to get back on their feet. This beautiful act of tzedakah represents the ultimate in Jewish values; we help families discreetly, and give them back their independence and dignity. You can help us continue our beautiful tradition by making a donation to the KJ Benevolent by visiting our secure website at CKJ.org/PAY, indicating that the gift is for the Benevolent Fund.

May God reward all of us with a New Year of health, happiness, blessing and peace. Sincerely, Chaim Steinmetz

connect with the kj community ckj.ORG/COMMUNITY


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COMMUNITY NEWS

The Kesher community offers an exciting array of programs and events surrounding Shabbat, Holidays and community interests. As its name suggests, Kesher’s main goal is to create a “connection” amongst this group of KJ members in order to provide a warm and welcoming entry into the larger KJ community and contribute to their social, educational and family needs. The Kesher Minyan meets weekly at 9:30 a.m. in the Ramaz Lower School’s 8th Floor Nakash Gymnasium, at 125 East 85th Street followed by a hot kiddush. For the bouncing tots at Kesher, the KJ Youth Department runs a weekly Tot Shabbat program at 10:00 am in the Weiner Movement Room, which is located right next door to the service. Throughout the course of the year, Kesher offers a variety of social events which include a Progressive Shabbat Dinner for new members, Shemini Atzeret Luncheon, Motzei Shabbat Movie Night, Sunday Basketball, New Mothers Breakfast, and a Challah Bake. New to Kesher is a Wellness Series, which involves classes covering the topics of health screenings, CPR and cooking. We also have various child-oriented events including a Chanukah Concert, Purim art project, father and child Sunday morning learning, Chesed projects and periodic Friday night Tot-Shabbat Dinners. We continually try to expand learning opportunities for community members, including parenting lectures, and other exciting topics of interest to Kesher members in our Living Room Learning Series. (All ideas are welcome!) Kesher strives to make all new mothers feel at home. Be sure to call (212) 774-5670

when you have good news to share, so we can plan celebrations, activate our Meals-for-New-Moms program, and arrange for the proud dad to receive an aliyah. We will also tell you everything you need to know to cater your brit milah or simchat bat with Foremost or 8th Day Caterers. Nursing mothers enjoy a dedicated New Mother’s Lounge, located in the spacious anteroom of the Lower Level women’s restroom. Boasting comfortable amenities and furniture, the lounge offers nursing mothers privacy and dignity, and is reachable by riding the little elevator to the “C” level and following signs. For the baby, you can visit any one of our 6 “Koala” brand Baby Changing Stations located in the Lower Level, Lobby, Second and Eighth Floor restrooms.

CONNECT WITH US: Sign up for the Kesher Weekly Newsletter: CKJ.org/emaillist CKJ.org/Kesher Kesher@CKJ.org kesher_news

share ideas with us:

Kesher presidium - Brittany Cogan, Elisa Septimus, and Ariel Stern - at kesherwelcome@gmail.com

Congratulations to Wilman Zumbana!

At a pre-summer reception at the Ramaz Upper School, his twenty years of employment at KJ and Ramaz was celebrated with a heartfelt standing ovation in appreciation for all he does to keep KJ and the Ramaz Lower School running smoothly.

From Danielle Herbst, KJ Social Worker As the KJ Social Worker, my mission is to support the needs of the larger KJ Community, providing both group and individual services. Over the last year, based on community needs, we’ve developed a panel of programs that will continue in the coming year, and we are always looking for suggestions for new topics. Please feel free to send me your ideas! A sample of our programs include: the KJ Caring Committee, Ahava @ KJ, a fertility support group, single parents by choice, and a mental health education and awareness lecture series. In addition to the group format, we offer individual supportive counseling sessions for anyone in our community. If you are looking for someone to consult with and who can provide support as needed, please contact Danielle. Connect: Socialworker@CKJ.org CKJ.org/Socialworker


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COMMUNITY NEWS

Greet our Greeters!

I

N THE SPIRIT OF MAKING BOTH MEMBERS AND GUESTS FEEL AT HOME AT KJ, OUR HOSPITALITY COMMITTEE HAS INITIATED A GREETERS GROUP WHEREBY KJ VOLUNTEERS WISH “SHABBAT SHALOM” TO PEOPLE AS THEY ENTER THE BUILDING,

PASS OUT PRINTED SHABBAT ANNOUNCEMENTS, AND POINT THEM IN THE DIRECTION OF THE MINYAN OF THEIR CHOICE. FEEDBACK HAS BEEN VERY POSITIVE. BOTH MEMBERS AND GUESTS ENJOY BEING WELCOMED TO KJ. GUESTS, IN PARTICULAR, WHO ARE NOT FAMILIAR WITH OUR SYNAGOGUE, REALLY APPRECIATE BEING GREETED BY A FRIENDLY FACE. HERE’S AN OPPORTUNITY TO MEET SOME OF OUR GREETERS, AND LEARN WHY THEY HAVE BECOME A PART OF THIS GROUP.

Debra Frohlinger

Danielle Herbst

I love meeting new members and visitors - we get some very interesting people coming to KJ for the first time, and I am forever being inspired by their stories of life.

The mitzvah of greeting people or “Hachnasat Orchim” dates back to biblical times. Making people feel welcomed and at home when they’re at KJ is one of my missions as the KJ Social Worker.

Susan Hecht

Carla Tanz

I enjoy welcoming people into Kehilath Jeshurun and offering warmth when people enter the building, just like Avraham Avinu of old.

Being a greeter at KJ is a nice way to be helpful to others and ensure I get to shul early. This small gesture makes so many people smile, which is what KJ is all about.

DO YOU HAVE A YEN TO HELP PUT KJ’S BEST FOOT FORWARD? BE A GREETER! Contact socialworker@CKJ.org for more information and to become a part of this welcoming group.

A MEANINGFUL DEDICATION THROUGHOUT 5779, ALL OF THE REFRESHMENTS SERVED AT ADULT EDUCATION OFFERINGS WERE MADE POSSIBLE BY A GENEROUS GIFT FROM THE FAMILY OF JANE AND ISHAIA GOL IN MEMORY OF JANE’S LATE MOTHER, MILDRED (MOLLIE) MOVERMAN, MALKA RACHEL BAT NAFTALI V’ SHAYNA, WHOSE LOVE OF PEOPLE AND LOVE OF LEARNING ANIMATES OUR PROGRAMMING.


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UPCOMING EVENTS SEPTEMBER 5, 2018

OCTOBER 2, 2018

Five Hidden Messages Within the High Holiday Liturgy

In the Footsteps of Miriam

P R E - H I G H H O L I DAY C L AS S WI T H D R . N I C K G U RA

Wednesday, September 5 7:30 pm SEPTEMBER 15, 2018

Shabbat Shuva Drasha F E AT U R I N G RA B B I C H AI M S T E I N M E T Z

Authenticity in the Age of Apology: The True Meaning of “I’m Sorry” September 15 Following Mincha at 6:15 pm in the Main Synagogue

Following the splitting of the Red Sea, Miriam led women in prayerful song and dance. It is in this spirit that KJ’s female population is invited to do the same. Women’s Tefillah at KJ is open to women and girls of all ages and backgrounds. We meet every year on Simchat Torah morning (this year on October 2) for davening, hakafot, and Torah reading, and on Purim night (March 20) for a women’s megillah reading. We also sometimes meet on Shabbat to celebrate a Bat Mitzvah, as we will on November 3. If you are planning a Bat Mitzvah and would like the Women’s Tefillah Group to be part of that experience, please let us know

and we would be thrilled to help. FOR MORE INFORMATION about Women’s Tefillah or to learn how to read Torah, lead davening, or read megillah, please contact Naamit Kurshan Gerber (nkurshan@hotmail.com), Riva Alper (riva@CKJ.org), or Rachel Kraus (rhkraus@CKJ.org).

OCTOBER 9, 2018

K

J TO HOST TOURO LAW CENTER PROGRAM FOUR-PART SERIES ON JEWISH LAW, ISRAELI LAW, AND AMERICAN LAW IN COMPARATIVE JURISPRUDENCE FEATURING RETIRED ISRAELI SUPREME

COURT JUSTICE ELYAKIM RUBINSTEIN, RECENTLY APPOINTED DISTINGUISHED PROFESSOR AT TOURO LAW

Touro Law Center has initiated programing exploring the Israeli legal system as a symbol of Israel’s dedication to promoting democracy, human rights, and the rule of law. The centerpiece of the program will be a series of presentations by retired Israeli Supreme Court Justice Elyakim Rubinstein, in conversation with other prominent figures. Justice Rubinstein is uniquely qualified to headline this program, having served as both Vice President of the Supreme Court of Israel and Attorney General of Israel. The program will focus on the emergence and abiding relevance of Jewish Law (Mishpat Ivri) as an important component of Israeli jurisprudence, supplemented by a consideration of comparisons and contrasts with aspects of American jurisprudence. More generally, the project will highlight the success of the State of Israel in promoting democracy, human rights, and the rule of law over the course of the past seventy years. The first part of this 4-part series, Balancing National Security and Civil Liberties in Israel and the United States, will take place on Tuesday evening, October 9, at 7:30. The first program will feature Rabbi Chaim Steinmetz in conversation with Justice Rubinstein and the Hon. Michael Mukasey, lawyer and former federal judge who served as the 81st Attorney General of the United States.


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UPCOMING EVENTS BOOK TALK

In Good Faith BY S C OT T S HAY

I

T IS A SPECIAL PLEASURE TO INTRODUCE MY NEW BOOK IN GOOD FAITH: QUESTIONING RELIGION AND ATHEISM (POST HILL PRESS, 2018) TO MY FELLOW CONGREGANTS AT KJ. WHEN

I STARTED WRITING THE BOOK, I WAS FRANKLY UNSURE I WOULD BE ABLE TO FINISH IT (NOT TO MENTION UNCERTAIN I WOULD FIND A PUBLISHER--- WHICH KEPT ME UP AT NIGHT MORE THAN ONCE).

For the first three years of writing, as many of you know, I told no one the subject of the book except for close family and friends. As we are now in Elul, I ask “mechila,” to anyone I may have offended by being so evasive. Only as I entered year four of the project did I feel comfortable telling people over Kiddush what the book was about. Yet despite my long silence on the book, the KJ community has been an important part of this project since its inception. KJ readers (no I did not include any names!) may recognize the questions and conversations we have had while munching on brownie squares at Kiddush. Some of the sermons from our KJ rabbis and from guest speakers also provoked me to think about certain issues. From years of listening to the questions and challenges to faith in Hashem and the Torah from my KJ and other friends and colleagues in Jewish communal life and at work, I felt compelled to explore the answers myself. This book is the result. The book is organized around six major questions/issues. The first, and really the heart of the book, is explaining idolatry,

and why it must, as the Torah explains, be prohibited and combatted. The second is whether the charge levelled by atheists that the Torah is a backward, misogynous, racist, sexist, pro slavery, homophobic and genocidal text has any basis. The third is the age-old question of theodicy and particularly whether the Torah has anything relevant to say about good, evil, and free will now that we have discovered neuroscience. I wanted to write about the fourth issue, whether science makes belief in God irrational, for 15 years. To do so now, did require some refreshing of my somewhat forgotten biology and learning some new physics. The fifth question, one I have discussed with many KJ members, is whether the Bible is authentic or just a hoax written by some shepherds and priests with too much time on their hands circa 400 BCE. The last section pulls the whole book together by asking if belief in God is rational, why is it then presented as a matter of faith. And what does it mean to pray to an Almighty God? In writing the book I drew from Tanakh, Talmud, and even some Kabbalah. But I also widely researched in the fields of history, psychology, sociology, and the natural sciences with the conviction of our tradition that the seal of God is Truth. I hope that you will join me on the journey and find my reflections meaningful.

The community is invited to hear Scott Shay in dialogue with Rabbi Chaim Steinmetz, Rabbi Angela Buchdahl of Central Synagogue, and Rabbi Elliot Cosgrove of Park Avenue Synagogue to discuss this thought–provoking book at Congregation Kehilath Jeshurun. Date to be announced. FOR MORE INFORMATION: CKJ.org

Download the KJ App: CKJ.org/getapp

Access Everything KJ Right at your Fingertips.

save the date Rabbi Wieder will be our Guest Scholar Thanksgiving Shabbat NOVEMBER 23-24


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UPCOMING EVENTS OCTOBER 30, 2018 - BOOK TALK © Sandra E. Rapoport

The Queen & The Spymaster: A Novel Based on the Story of Esther BY SAN D RA E . RA P O P O R T

I am fascinated by Megillat Esther. It is a self-contained biblical story with fairy-tale elements: two beautiful queens; a mercurial king; a murderous villain; innocents in mortal danger; heroic protagonists; unlikely victories. But the Megillah is unique. It does not have a pat, happy ending. Granted, the story’s immediate threats are quelled; but in its final verses the mercurial king still rules, and ancient Persia’s Jews remain exiled from their homeland, living precariously as guests in a country not their own. It is entirely possible for a different Haman to strike again. The story is, actually, quite terrifying. Which might explain why Megillat Esther was, eventually, canonized: its exigencies remain real. While no one knows for certain precisely when the Megillah was written, or by whom, or if its characters ever lived, loved, struggled, plotted, rose or fell, the story has captivated us for over two millennia because it rings true. The story’s characters lived in a diaspora, as we do; and its dangers, temptations and challenges still persist today. The palace drama takes place over the course of two decades in the Achaemenid Dynasty, from 486-465 BCE. The action holds me by the throat: We read of political

rivalries in the Persian royal court. Of two queens, one of whom disobeys the king and disappears without a trace, and of a second queen who is not who she pretends to be. Of a personal affront that escalates to a genocide decree. Of a king who allows himself to be manipulated by an ambitious vizier. Of a peaceable people on the brink of annihilation, desperate for a hero. As exciting as the story is, it is the untold stories behind the story that fascinate me. At the Megillah’s pauses and points of high suspense, and because one of its canonical rules is that nothing is as it seems, I hear whispered secrets. These secrets fuel The Queen & The Spymaster, allowing me to recreate the story of Esther as a multilayered, multigenerational epic tale that had its origins on a bloody battlefield a thousand years before Esther, Mordechai and Haman were born. I have many questions, don’t you? Why does Vashti defy the king, courting death? Is she executed, or does she escape the hangman? The Megillah text is strangely silent about this. What happens to her? What is the real reason Haman and Mordechai detest one another? The Megillah hints at a centuries-old, dynastic political vendetta. What exactly is the pur that Haman consults, setting the day for the Empire-wide massacre? Could it be an ancient Temple oracle fallen into evil hands? What is the hidden significance of the “ten thousand talents of silver” that Haman promises to Xerxes to ensure the genocide? What is the true relationship between Mordechai and Esther? We know they are first cousins, and also guardian and ward. But the Talmud suggests they are husband and wife. What is Mordechai’s game? Is he a political opportunist? An instigator? Or is he a master political and military strategist, someone other than the man he seems? In The Queen & The Spymaster I have created a historical tale that hews to the Megillah text while addressing these questions and others, interweaving characters old and new. It is a thrilling story of an orphaned girl with a gift for languages and an innate political intuition. Of a man who engineers a military victory against monumental odds. Of God’s hidden hand. It is a story of Jewish survival. It is the Esther story you never knew. Sandra E. Rapoport is an attorney, Bible teacher and award-winning author. Her third book, Biblical Seductions, was a National Jewish Book Awards Finalist and a Boston Globe Top-Ten Bestseller. Her newly-released book, The Queen & The Spymaster, is a novel based on the story of Esther. Sandra will be the featured speaker at three events this year at KJ: an upcoming Seudah Shlishit on October 13th; a reading and book signing on October 30th; and a special talk and reading about Amalek and Purim on February 24th.


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UPCOMING EVENTS NOVEMBER 2-3, 2018

Norman and Tova Bulow Shabbat Scholar and Dinner KJ is delighted to welcome Rav David Stav, co-Chancellor of Ohr Torah Stone, Chief Rabbi of the City of Shoham, and Chairman of the Tzohar organization as our Norman and Tova Bulow Shabbat Scholar. He is a graduate of Yeshivat Mercaz HaRav and has qualification for Dayanut (Rabbinical Judge). We will be privileged to hear Rav Stav speak four times over Shabbat. The first time will be Friday night following a catered dinner at which time Rav Stav will speak on The Challenges of Family Values in Israel. The dinner reservation form and other information about the Shabbaton can be found at www.CKJ.org/bulowshabbat.

NOVEMBER 8, 2018

|

KJ Youth Department

FAMILY SEUDAH SHLISHIT October 13 - 5:00 pm

KJYD HIGH HOLIDAY CAMP Rosh Hashanah: September 10, 11 Yom Kippur: September 19

KJBL October 14, 21, 28 November 4, 11

KOL NIDRE NIGHT September 18 – 6:30 – 9:00 pm

YOUTH SHABBATONIM Grades 1-2, November 10 Grades 3-4, November 17

TASHLICH IN THE PARK September 10 - 4:30 pm BARNES & NOBLE ROSH HASHANAH STORY TIME September 16 - 10:30 am KJYD SUKKAH HOP September 25 COMMUNITY HOL HAMOED TEFILAH TOGETHER September 28 (no school) SIMCHAT TORAH BASH October 1 - 6:30 pm

MUSICAL HAVDALAH AND ICE CREAM PARTY November 10 - 6:00 pm FAMILY SHABBAT FRIDAY NIGHT DINNER November 9 SHABBAT MORNING TEFILAH TOGETHER October 6, 27 November 17 9:30 am FOR MORE INFORMATION: www.CKJ.org/youth

Kristallnacht Program

F E AT U R I N G D R . M O S H E AVI TAL : AUTHOR. SURVIVOR OF 6 CONCENTRATION CAMPS. EDUCATOR.

Thursday evening, November 8 at 7:30 pm at Congregation Kehilath Jeshurun Please join us in welcoming Dr. Moshe Avital, a noted Holocaust lecturer, who will address the community in commemoration of Kristallnacht. Also known as the Night of Broken Glass, it commemorates the night of November 9-10, 1938, when the Nazis attacked the Jews and their property – destroying synagogues, homes, and Jewish-owned businesses. Approximately 100 Jews were murdered and 30,000 were arrested and sent to concentration camps. Kristallnacht refers to the broken glass left in the streets after these pogroms. A native of then Czechoslovakia, which was torn apart by Germany in 1939, Dr. Avital was imprisoned in Ghetto Berhhovo (Beregszas in Hungarian). From there he was deported with his entire family to Auschwitz, Poland. He was transferred to Plaszow, then to Gross Rosen, then Bolkenheim, to Reichenau, and finally to Buchenwald, Germany. The United States Third Army liberated him on April 11, 1945. For fifty years, he served in various educational positions, the last twelve years as Director of Education and Culture at the Jewish Agency for Israel, American Section. Today, Dr. Avital is a writer and author and has been a steady contributor to the Hebrew press in America and Israel. Dr. Avital writes about the Holocaust, Israel, Zionism, Jewish Education, American Jewry, commentaries on the Bible, Jewish Prayer, Jewish personalities, and Jewish holidays.


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UPCOMING EVENTS NOVEMBER 10, 2018

Leah Modlin Annual Lecture on Caring and Community Service TO B E I NAU G U RAT E D O N S HAB BAT M O R N I N G , N OVE M B E R 1 0

K

J IS PLEASED TO ANNOUNCE AN ANNUAL LECTURE TO BE SPONSORED BY BARRIE MODLIN IN HONOR OF HIS BELOVED AND DEVOTED WIFE, LEAH.

Leah, the eldest of four children of Holocaust survivors who made aliyah in 1979, grew up in Englewood, where her father, Chazan Yitzchak Braun, of blessed memory, was the cantor of Congregation Ahavas Torah for over 30 years. Leah’s parents were the pioneers of the Orthodox community in Englewood, and their home was always filled with Shabbat guests. Her parents practiced the Mitzvah of Bikur Cholim on a regular basis, which no doubt inspired Leah to do the same. Leah is a graduate of Yeshiva University High School for Girls and received a degree in Fashion Design from Traphagen School of Fashion. She also studied Psychology and Philosophy at the New School. She has worked in fashion, interior design, and human resources. Leah’s belief that Tikkun Olam expresses V’Ahavta L’Rayacha Kamocha is evident in every way she interacts with people. She devotes her daily life to congregants who are in need of support, attention, and companionship. She believes wholeheartedly that every person needs to be cared for as a uniquely precious human being. She feels there are endless opportunities for kindness to our fellow members, and that everyone should feel that he/she is a valued part of our community. When Leah retired from work 21 years ago, she thought she’d like to do something truly meaningful and decided to devote her life to helping others. She realized that there are many people in our community who don’t have local family support, or any support at all, and Leah felt there was a real need for this population to be served with loving kindness, whether they were ill, lonely, depressed, or feeling marginalized in any way. She

co-organized the KJ Caring Committee, a community volunteer group who make phone calls, home visits, hospital visits, coffee dates, accompany to doctor visits, and a myriad of other offerings to seniors and those who are homebound. Over the years, she was consulted by other congregations on how to start a Bikur Cholim volunteer group, asked to speak about the mitzvah of Bikur Cholim to the graduating rabbinical class of the Jewish Theological Seminary, and was invited to be on the board of the Coordinating Council of Bikur Cholim sponsored by UJA Federation. She also participated on a panel at the Annual Bikur Cholim Conference. No one is better acquainted with Leah’s heartfelt care than her beloved family. She, her beloved husband, Barrie, and their sons Avery and Adam, moved to the Upper East Side in 1981, joined KJ and sent their children to Ramaz. Adam is married to Wendy Kreinen, a Ramaz graduate. They are KJ members whose children, Dylan (’18) and Julia (’21), are both Ramaz-educated. Avery is married to Ellen Hose and they have three sons who attended North Shore Hebrew Academy in Great

Neck where Avery was a past president. Avery & Ellen and Adam & Wendy are active members of their communities and they and their children have been deeply involved in chesed and community service projects all their lives – a lesson well learned from their parents. DECEMBER 1, 2018

SAVE THE DATE!

SATURDAY NIGHT FEVER ANNUAL KJ DINNER Celebrating the Musical Legacy of Chazan Mayer Davis Saturday night, December 1 Ramaz Upper School 60 East 78th Street - 8:00 pm CONNECT: CKJ.org/AnnualDinner AnnualDinner@CKJ.org


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CLASSES

SUNDAY DR. WILLIAM MAJOR MEMORIAL ADVANCED SHIUR IN TALMUD Rabbi Dr. Jeremy Wieder Begins SEPTEMBER 9 Class follows 8:30 am services and breakfast. Masekhet Avodah Zarah class with its classical commentaries.

POST BAR MITZVAH SUNDAY MINYAN AND BREAKFAST CLASS Corey Horowitz Begins SEPTEMBER 9 Boys in grades seven through nine are invited to join Corey Horowitz from 9:15 - 10:45 am for minyan, a Torah class, and breakfast.

MONDAY EXPLORING JEWISH THOUGHT Rabbi Chaim Steinmetz 8:30 AM - Begins OCTOBER 15

JEWISH LEARNING INSTITUTE (JLI) WRESTLING WITH FAITH Rabbi Elie Weinstock 7:00 PM - Begins OCTOBER 22

tuesday PARSHA FOUNDATIONS Rabbi Elie Weinstock 8:15 AM - Begins OCTOBER 16

GOD, THE WORLD, AND ME: AN EXPLORATION OF MAIMONIDES’ BOOK OF KNOWLEDGE Rabbi Meyer Laniado 7:00 PM

CRASH COURSE IN HEBREW READING Sara Rosen 6:30 PM - Begins OCTOBER 17

PRAYERBOOK HEBREW

RAMBAN AL HA-TORAH: THE COMMENTARY OF NACHMANIDES

Sara Rosen 7:30 PM - Begins OCTOBER 17

A class dedicated to the classic explanation of Nachmanides on the Torah Martin Kaufman 8:00 PM

WEDNESDAY NIGHT BEIT MIDRASH: THE WEEKLY MITZVAH Rabbinic Intern Leead Staller 8:30 PM

wednesday WOMEN’S PARSHAT HASHAVUA

KJ Conversations

Rabbi Haskel Lookstein 8:30 AM - Begins OCTOBER 10

Join Rabbi Weinstock and special guests to examine timely, relevant issues facing the Jewish community.

YIDDISH SHMOOZERS

Topics will include: Jews & Jews; Jews & Non-Jews; Is There a Mitzvah of Tikkun Olam?; Can We Talk About Anything Civilly Anymore?

Rabbi Mayer Moskowitz 11:30 AM - Begins OCTOBER 3

LUNCH AND LEARN FOR SENIORS OCTOBER 3 – Rabbi Elie Weinstock OCTOBER 10 – Rabbi Meyer Laniado OCTOBER 17 – Leead Staller OCTOBER 24 – Mitch Agoos OCTOBER 31 – Marty Kaufman NOVEMBER 7 – Israel Max NOVEMBER 14 – Karen Lerman NOVEMBER 21 – Dr. Gil Kahn NOVEMBER 28 – Susan Laubach 12:30 PM CO N N EC T : C K J. O RG/ E N R I C H T H E S O U L

MONDAYS AT 7:00 PM December 3, 10, 17 January 14, 21 and April 1, 8 DECEMBER 15 at 8:00 pm Let Our People Know: The Critical Need for Torah Study Throughout the Jewish Community A conversation with Rabbi Ethan Tucker, President & Rosh Yeshiva of Hadar (hadar.org)


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CLASSES

thursday PROPHETIC WOMEN “THE BOOK OF SAMUEL: WOMAN’S COMPLEX RELATIONSHIPS WITH MEN, CHILDREN AND GOD” Dr. Shera Aranoff Tuchman 8:30 AM - Begins OCTOBER 11

MEANINGFUL JEWISH LIVING A comprehensive year-long course covering major themes in Jewish law, practice, and thought. Explore how a 5,000 year old religion is more relevant today than ever before. Rabbi Chaim Steinmetz, Rabbi Elie Weinstock and Rabbi Daniel and Rachel Kraus 7:00 PM

shabbat HALAKHAH CLASS PRESENTING GREAT DECISORS OF JEWISH LAW AND NORMATIVE PRACTICE Rabbi Chaim Steinmetz 8:30 AM

PRE-MINCHA SHIUR ADDRESSING TOPICS OF INTEREST SOUL CYCLE A MONTHLY SPIRITUAL WORKOUT Rachel Kraus Women of the community are invited to participate in a monthly learning series which provides an opportunity to learn, to share, to engage, and to inspire each Rosh Chodesh. A variety of topics will be addressed in a different home each month. Location information provided monthly with RSVP to roshchodesh@CKJ.org

HOLIDAY WORKSHOPS Join us to examine the laws, customs, and traditions of the holidays. Gain new insights to enhance your experience. Rabbi Daniel & Rachel Kraus

JEWISH YOUTH CONNECTION KJ is proud to host the Jewish Youth Connection (JYC) Hebrew School to educate and inspire children who do not attend a Jewish day school. Founded by KJ members Scott and Susan Shay, JYC has become THE destination for a growing number of families as they seek to educate their children and connect to the Jewish community. To learn more and enjoy the 2018 year-end video -- and to get a sense of the power of the program -- visit us at JYC.info. With YOUR help, JYC can be even more successful. Please share this incredible program with others and help us recruit students from your friends, neighbors, associates, or anyone who has children for whom JYC would be appropriate. For more information, please contact Netanel Goldstein at netanelsgoldstein@gmail.com

CO N N EC T : C K J. O RG/ E N R I C H T H E S O U L


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THINGS TO KNOW

W Connection

Facility Usage Policy One of the many benefits that KJ synagogue members enjoy is complimentary access to KJ worship and catering facilities in connection with celebrating their own lifecycle event such as a brit milah, wedding, Bar/ Bat mitzvah, aufruf, etc. Unlike most synagogues, KJ does not charge its members a “Facility Rental Fee” when their own lifecycle event takes place at a time and at a location when our facilities would be open and running. KJ does, however, look to a celebrating family to cover any incremental costs associated with the event that KJ would not otherwise have incurred, such as opening a building or keeping it open when it might have otherwise been closed, thereby necessitating the activation of a shut-off system, and/or keeping maintenance and security workers past their work shifts; or a warm day/ evening event when the air conditioning would otherwise be deactivated. Specific details will be discussed with the KJ bookings agent on an event-by-event basis, but the general concept is that while KJ does not seek to enrich itself at the expense of its members’ lifecycle events, neither can KJ subsidize celebrations by absorbing their additional operating costs.

Dorot’s Holiday Package Delivery

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 16 Brighten the day of a senior! Deliver and package and visit with an older person.

The W Connection provides widows with easily accessible support services – emotional support, information and training to help them navigate the many challenges they face while dealing with their grief and the rebuilding of their lives. Its primary goal is to help women build healthy and productive lives while they adapt to the new realities created by their loss.

FALL MEETINGS: SEPTEMBER 20, OCTOBER 18, NOVEMBER 15, DECEMBER 20 AT 6:00 PM

Locations on the East Side and the West Side.

125 East 85th Street

FOR MORE INFORMATION: dorotusa.org

FOR MORE INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT: Gabriella Major: 212-879-4783

THE RAMAZ SCHOOL The Ramaz School located on the Upper East Side, in the heart of New York City, is a Modern Orthodox co-ed Day School for nursery through grade 12. Ramaz has an 80 year history of Jewish education, academic distinction, and nurturing of individual abilities and aspirations. Our Admissions Offices are open for inquiries! If your child will be 3 by September 1, 2019, please contact Shira Baruch or Judy Kahn at 212-774-8025 or email them at baruchs@ramaz.org or kahnj@ramaz.org respectively for admittance to our Early Childhood Center, Lower, and Middle Schools.

OPEN HOUSE FOR PROSPECTIVE UPPER SCHOOL FAMILIES WILL BE SATURDAY NIGHT, NOVEMBER 10. Please contact Shara Lipson, Director of Upper School Admissions, FOR MORE INFORMATION at admissions@ramaz.org or 212-774-8093.

WE LOOK FORWARD TO WELCOMING YOU.


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THINGS TO KNOW

KJ Synagogue Membership BE A PART OF THE JEWISH PEOPLE CONTACT KJ EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR LEONARD SILVERMAN AT 212-774-5680 OR LSS@CKJ.ORG CKJ.org/KJMEMBERSHIP

LEARN TO DAVEN LIKE A BA’AL TEFILLAH

Rabbi Haskel Lookstein’s 10 Nusach recordings, designed to help people learn how to be a shaliach tzibbur at daily services, Shabbatot, holidays, Rosh Hashanah, Yom Kippur and selichot around the year, are available free of charge on the Ramaz website at Ramaz.org/nusach THERE IS NO BETTER TIME THAN NOW TO AVAIL YOURSELF OF THIS WONDERFUL OPPORTUNITY!

eruv hotline FOR INFORMATION regarding the weekly status of the Manhattan Eruv call the ERUV HOTLINE 212-874-6100, ext. 3

ISRAEL ACTION CHECK OUT ARTZEINU, THE WEEKLY ISRAEL NEWS UPDATE AT ARTZEINU.ORG The Artzeinu Team: Raanan Gonansky, Bennett R. Katz, Karen Lerman, JJ Hornblass This site, well-organized by topic, provides easy access to numerous news sources and videos.

Sponsorships Are Welcome To support synagogue programs, we invite prospective Kiddush & Seudah Shlishit Sponsors to contact Riva Alper in the synagogue office at 212-774-5670 or Riva@CKJ.org. The base cost of a cake-and-wine Kiddush sponsorship is $500, to which is added the cost of any extra catered food ordered through Foremost Caterers. Multiple Kiddush sponsors may, at their discretion and initiative, agree to share the expense of extra catered food, but every co-sponsor must pay, separately and individually, the $500 base fee. Similarly, sponsoring Seudah Shlishit costs every co-sponsor $250.

SCHEDULING YOUR FAMILY’S BAR OR BAT MITZVAH If you are making a Bar or Bat Mitzvah at KJ between September 2019 and June 2020, please contact Riva Alper in the synagogue office at 212-774-5670 to reserve specific rooms for your services, celebratory meals/kiddushim, and other functions. If your child attends Ramaz and you are a member of KJ planning a Bar/Bat Mitzvah, Riva Alper must be notified directly of your plans. Reserving a date with Ramaz does not imply that it is reserved at KJ.

KJ Food Pantry The KJ Food Pantry provides kosher food weekly to New York’s hungry. Clients are referred to us through the synagogue and local service agencies. Each week clients come to KJ to receive food staples tailored to their diets, as well as a selection of fresh fruits and vegetables. Ramaz students pack the bags and staff the booth in the lobby of KJ, and Ramaz/KJ members also deliver packages to those who are homebound. For further information or to volunteer, please contact our Social Worker, Danielle Herbst at Socialworker@CKJ.org

The KJ Food Pantry wishes to thank D’agostino Supermarket for all their help.


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THINGS TO KNOW

DEDICATE chumashim and siddurim Members of the Congregation and others are invited to honor a friend or relative, celebrate a milestone event, or memorialize a loved one by dedicating Chumashim ($75 each) or Siddurim ($50 each) Visit CKJ.org/pay to dedicate.

ARE LO CAT ED I N O U R COM M UNITY AT:

419 EAST 77TH STREET (between First and York Avenues) Telephone: 212-359-2020 5 EAST 62ND STREET (just off Fifth Avenue) Telephone: 212-753-6058

SAVE A LIFE! DONATE BLOOD AT THE KJ/RAMAZ BLOOD DRIVE

THREE MODERN MIKVAHS

NOVEMBER 18

Congregation Kehilath Jeshurun / 125 East 85th Street / nybloodcenter.org/

Eyal KJ Hebrew teacher Sara Rosen has released a new iPad app based on her popular Hebrew reading program. The app is called Eyal and is suitable for all ages. Eyal is perfect for those with no prior reading experience and those with some experience

234 WEST 74TH STREET (between Broadway & West End Avenue) Telephone: 212-579-2011

TO JOIN THE KJ ONLINE COMMUNITY, VISIT KJ’S WEBSITE WWW.CKJ.ORG AND CLICK ON THE WORDS JOIN OUR EMAIL LIST!

who are still searching for fluency. All work can be self-checked so no teacher is required. FOR MORE INFORMATION, search for Eyal in the iPad App Store.

ORDER MAIN SYNAGOGUE MEMORIAL PLAQUES AND CEMETERY PLOTS ON THE KJ GROUNDS IN PARAMUS, NJ To order plaques for deceased loved ones (or to reserve for yourself after 120 years of health and blessing), visit CKJ.org/plaques To purchase burial plots at Beth El cemetery in NJ, visit CKJ.org/burialplots If you would like to speak with someone about either opportunity, please contact Comptroller Sy Yanofsky in the Synagogue Office at 212-774-5620 or Sy@CKJ.org

CREATE AN ENDURING LEGACY WHILE RECEIVING AN ATTRACTIVE REVENUE STREAM FOR LIFE Please consider participating in the Congregation’s Endowment and Planned Giving Program, through which you can create an enduring legacy of active participation in KJ through a Charitable Gift Annuity that pays handsomely. Contact Leonard Silverman at 212-774-5680 or LSS@CKJ.org for information.


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B N E I M I T Z VA H - FA L L 2 0 1 8

J O R DA N O L IVE R S HAL H OV

Mazal Tov to Rina and Amnon Shalhov upon the Bar Mitzvah of their son, Jordan, which took place at the Kotel, in Jerusalem, on July 28. Jordan read Parashat Balak and delivered a Dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;var Torah on the importance of words. Jordan is a seventh grade student at the Ramaz Middle School.

E Z RA I SA AC K A H N

Mazal Tov to Deborah Weinswig and Maxwell Kahn upon the Bar Mitzvah of their son, Ezra, at The Hamptons Synagogue in Westhampton Beach, on September 1, when he will read Parashat Ki Tavo. Ezra is a seventh grade student at the Ramaz Middle School.

E L L I OT DAVI S

Mazal Tov to Eugenia and Dr. Ira Davis upon the Bar Mitzvah of their son, Elliot, at Congregation Kehilath Jeshurun, on September 8, at which time he will read Parashat Nitzavim. Elliot is an eighth grade student in the Ramaz Middle School. Mazal Tov as well to proud KJ grandparents, Sara and Joseph Nathanson.

A L E XAN D E R MAS S E L

GAB R I E L L E YA I RA S I LVE R B E R G

L I A M G O M B E RG

Mazal Tov to Caroline and Morris Massel upon the Bar Mitzvah of their son, Alexander, at Congregation Kehilath Jeshurun on September 15, where he will read Parashat Vayelech and make a siyum on Masechet Makkot. Alexander also read Parashat Mattot-Masei at Camp Moshava. Alexander is an eighth grade student in the Ramaz Middle School. Mazal Tov as well to proud KJ grandfather, Harvey Arfa.

Mazal Tov to Rivka and Andrew Silverberg upon the Bat Mitzvah of their daughter, Gabrielle, on September 16, at the Highline Ballroom. Gabrielle will deliver a Dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;var Torah on Parashat Ki Tavo, and she will also make a Siyum on Masechet Brachot. Gabrielle is a sixth grade student at the Ramaz Middle School.

Mazal Tov to Yonina and Eric Gomberg upon the Bar Mitzvah of their son, Liam, at Congregation Kehilath Jeshurun on September 22, where he will read Parashat Haazinu and make a siyum on Seder Moed. Liam is a seventh grade student in the Ramaz Middle School. Mazal Tov as well to proud KJ grandparents Cheryl & Fred Halpern and Gail Propp.


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B N E I M I T Z VA H - FA L L 2 0 1 8

P H I L I P E F RO N

Mazal Tov to Elyse and David Efron upon the Bar Mitzvah of their son, Philip, in Jerusalem, on September 29, at which time he will read the Torah portion for Shabbat Chol Hamoed Sukkot. Philip is a seventh grade student at the Ramaz Middle School. Mazal Tov as well to proud KJ grandparents Janet & Mark Mittler and Herbert Efron.

J E R E MY P R O P P

Mazal Tov to Dina and Doug Propp upon the Bar Mitzvah of their son, Jeremy, at Congregation Kehilath Jeshurun, on October 6, when he will read Parashat Bereishit and deliver a D’var Torah. Jeremy is a seventh grade student at the Ramaz Middle School. Mazal Tov as well to proud KJ grandmother Eve Propp.

S I M O N F E RT I G

Mazal Tov to Nechama and Jason Fertig upon the Bar Mitzvah of their son, Simon, at Congregation Kehilath Jeshurun on Shabbat afternoon, October 20, at which time he will lead services and read from Parashat Vayera. Simon is an eighth grade student at the Ramaz Middle School.

WELCOME K J WA R M LY WE LC O M E S T H E FOLLOWING NEW MEMBERS WHO J O I N E D T H E C O N G R EGAT I O N B E T WE E N J U N E 2 2 AN D T H E DAT E O N WH I C H T H I S B U L L E T I N WAS P R E PA R E D FO R P R E S S , AU G U S T 2 0 :

O R L I RA B BAN I

B I A N CA S I LVE RA

Mazal Tov to Alexandra and Haskel “Zeke” Rabbani upon the Bat Mitzvah of their daughter, Orli, which will take place on November 3 at the KJ Women’s Tefillah. Orli will read Parashat Chayei Sarah and will deliver a D’var Torah. Orli is a sixth grade student at the Ramaz Middle School.

Mazal Tov to Bonnie and David Silvera upon the Bat Mitzvah of their daughter, Bianca, on November 22, at a Family Service at Congregation Kehilath Jeshurun, at which time she will read the Thursday Torah Portion of Parashat Vayishlach. Bianca is a sixth grade student at the Ramaz Middle School.

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Vera Bernstein Marjorie and Steven Edelstein Paula Etra Robert Fox Erika and Eric Kashi Brooke and Evan Kaye Lilly and Emil Lebovich David Roggin Sarah and Michael Rosenberg Sarah and Michael Sherman Dr. Chana and Meir Shubowitz Charlotte Simon Diana and Brad Stoler Jamie and David Toledano Anna and David Tykocinski


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W I T H I N O U R FA M I LY

BIRTHS MA Z AL TOV TO :

Asher Milton (Mordechai Asher). Mazal Tov as well to the proud KJ grandparents, Rhonda and Jeffrey Luxenberg.

May these children grow up in the finest tradition of Torah, chupah, and maasim tovim.

Diane and Honorable Robert Abrams upon the birth of a granddaughter, Hana Pearl, born to their children Becky and Dan Greenwald,

Lisa and Nathan Low upon the birth of their first grandchild, Charlotte “Charlie” Grace (Sara Anael) born to their children, Chantal and JJ Katz.

BNEI MITZVAH

Shiran and Ido Achrak upon the birth of their second daughter, Odem, big sister to Gaia.

Jennifer and Dr. Mark Meirowitz upon the birth of their second grandchild, Sloan Vivian (Yehudit), born to their children Lindsay and Alex Meirowitz.

Denise and Jason Brenner upon the birth of their second child and first son, Erich Zachary (Yitzchak Ayzic). Mazal Tov as well to the proud KJ grandparents, Ruthie and Ray Brenner.

Noemi and Danny Messing upon the birth of a grandson, Isaac Gus (Yitzchak Meir), born to their children Karen Messing and Matthew Millman.

Helen and Ruby Davis upon the birth of a grandson, Avraham David, born to their children, Erica and Rabbi Joshua Elsant of Hewlett.

Roni and Dr. Robert Pick upon the birth of a grandson, Isaac Asher (Yitzchak Asher), born to their children, Tonya Rosenblatt and Benjamin Pick.

Shlomit and Chaim Edelstein upon the birth of a granddaughter, Rivka, born to their children, Elizabeth and Rabbi Ariel Edelstein.

Helen and Dr. Daniel Potaznik upon the birth of a granddaughter, Zohara, born to their children, Chen and Yehuda Arye Potaznik of Jerusalem.

Rosie and Dr. Mark Friedman upon the birth of a grandson, born to their children, Malkie and Aryeh Friedman of Far Rockaway.

Tzivy and Seth Steinmetz upon the birth of their second son.

Jillian and Sam Genet upon the birth of their second child and son.

Hannah and Scott Topiel upon the birth of their second child and son, Nathaniel Asher (Netanel Ahron).

Lynnette Gruenhut upon the birth of a grandson, Avi, born to her children Esther and Jonathan Gruenhut.

Sue and Win Robins upon the birth of a great-granddaughter, Ziv Libi, daughter of Avigayil and Eitan Goldstein of Jerusalem.

Dr. Sarah and Elie Hirschfeld upon the birth of a granddaughter, Shira, born to their children Daniella and William Weddig.

Kiki (Hamada) and Jonathan Schaier upon the birth of their first child and daughter, Eliyanah Mirai (Eliyanah Shaindel).

Rachel and Matthew Luxenberg upon the birth of their first child and son,

Rosy and Charles Zami upon the birth of their first child and daughter, Sarah.

M A Z A L TOV TO :

Dr. Barbara Braffman and Benjamin Klapper upon the Bar Mitzvah of their son, Daniel. Raquel and E. Magnus Oppenheim upon the Bar Mitzvah of their grandson, Benjamin Oppenheim, son of Dr. Elissa and Simeon Oppenheim.

ENGAGEMENTS M A Z A L TOV TO :

Wilma and Ken Aschendorf upon the engagement of their daughter, Anna, to Adam Amsalem, the son of Michelle Domb of New York. Joy and Sam Dushey upon the engagement of their daughter, Sonia, to Jack Sitt. Kenneth Eckstein upon the engagement of his son Max, to Natasha Romanoff, the daughter of Debra and Richard Romanoff of Purchase, New York. Lynette and Steven Koppel upon the engagement of their daughter, Caroline, to Eric Weintraub, son of Bella and Dr. Barry Weintraub of New Rochelle. Mazal Tov as well to proud KJ grandmother, Yvonne Koppel. Carol and Jeffrey Kaufman upon the engagement of their daughter, Amalia, to Zachary Mandel, the son of Lois and Samuel Mandel of Ra’anana, Israel.


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W I T H I N O U R FA M I LY Elena and Jay Lefkowitz upon the engagement of their daughter, Talia, to Byron Edwards, the son of Susan and Mike Edwards of Teaneck. Nancy Greenwald Mehl upon the engagement of her daughter, Jennifer, to Neil Mazer, the son of Marcy and Dr. Ted Mazer of California. Jennifer is the step-daughter of Dr. Sydney Mehl, and sister of Jaclyn Mehl. May their weddings take place in happiness and blessing.

MARRIAGES MA Z AL TOV TO :

Paula and Barry Apfelbaum upon the marriage of their son, Michael, to Sarah Rose Marcus, daughter of Ivy and Jerry Marcus of Westchester. Debbie and Mark Cooper upon the marriage of their son, Zachary, to Daniela Zukor, daughter of Barbara and Dr. David Zukor of Montreal. Marylène and Alan Friedman upon the marriage of their son, David Aaron Friedman, to Carla Kalvin, daughter of Lynne and Dr. Alan Kalvin of Dobbs Ferry. Lauren and Ezra Merkin upon the marriage of their daughter, Jenny, to David Brenner. Debbie and Daniel Schwartz upon the marriage of their son, Yishai, to Nina Diamond, daughter of Florence and James Diamond of Toronto. Mazal Tov as well to the proud KJ grandmother, Gaby Major. Matthew Weinreich upon his marriage to Adiel Schmidt. Matthew is the son of Gaby and the late Howie Weinreich.

May the newlywed couples be blessed to build homes faithful to the traditions of the Jewish people.

Dr. Daniel Groisser upon the passing of his mother, Carolyn Groisser.

MILESTONES

Dr. Hirshel Kahn upon the passing of his father, Archie Kahn.

Sue and Win Robins upon the celebration of their 60th wedding anniversary.

Dr. Sherry Wiener upon the passing of her mother, Jean Steuer; grandmother of Jessica Kaplan and Amy Landy.

COMMUNAL HONORS CO N G RAT U L AT I O N S TO :

Marilyn Adler upon receiving the Lou Halstead Women of Leadership Award at the Association for Corporate Growth Annual Gala.

ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENTS CO N G RAT U L AT I O N S TO :

Marilyn and Greg Adler upon the graduation of their daughter, Melissa, from the Ramaz Upper School. Melissa will attend Midreshet Amit in the fall and the University of Pennsylvania upon her return from Israel. Raquel and E. Magnus Oppenheim, upon their granddaughter, Melitta H. Oppenheim, being awarded a fellowship to the Dr. Beth Samuels High School Summer Program to study at Drisha Institute. Melitta is the daughter of Dr. Elissa and Simeon Oppenheim.

CONDOLENCES O U R CO N D O L E N C E S TO :

Andrew Charles upon the passing of his mother, Elaine Charles. Linda Cohen Esses upon the passing of her father, Matthew Cohen.

Lisa Low upon the passing of her mother, Debbie Seelenfreund. Aliza Raskas Major upon the passing of her grandfather, Rabbi Murray Grauer. May they be comforted among all those who mourn for Zion and Jerusalem.

IN MEMORIAM Irwyn Gilbert

Irwyn was not an official member of our congregation but he was very much a part of the KJ family. A modest and humble man, he loved everyone in our community, especially the children. We all knew what a greeting from Irwyn was about. His smile was infectious, his interest in our lives was impressive and his concern for our well-being was constant. It was heart-warming to see the outpouring of the community at the graveside service and at the brief shiva held in our synagogue library. Irwyn would have been thrilled to know how many lives he had touched. He was a self-made shomer Shabbat who served our community as a mashgiach. He not only supervised our kashrut, he was the epitome of a kosher mensch.


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W I T H I N O U R FA M I LY - I N M E M O R I A M helen halper

Helen and the late Norman H. Halper were supportive and regular members of our congregation for over 50 years. She, in turn, was the daughter of the late Lillian and Samuel Lukashok, who themselves were longstanding KJ members. Helen’s brother is Herbert (and Judith) Lukashok, who will soon celebrate their own half-century of congregational affiliation. Helen was a loving and devoted mother to her two daughters, Ronnie and Deborah, who reflected that love back with care and attention that went far beyond what is expected of children. Granddaughter Lea, and grandson Aaron, were the apples of Helen’s eyes and she doted on her grandchildren with true affection. Helen was a highly intellectual woman who loved to read and who thought deeply about political, ethical and social issues. She was rarely without some piece of literature tucked under her arm, be it a writing on current events, a thoughtful treatise, or the latest novel. She dedicated years and years of her life to volunteering for the Jewish Board of Family and Children Services, which was a labor of love enabling her to impact many families beyond her own. Helen loved KJ. She looked forward to attending our services, classes and special programs. She relished the social connections that she and Norman made here at KJ. And she manifested at every opportunity her appreciation for the unique position that KJ holds in the Modern Orthodox world. She saw in KJ a vibrant beacon of community involvement that welcomes Jews from all religious stripes and educational backgrounds, and encourages them to grow Jewishly and support the Jewish world, writ large.

For all of these reasons, and more, Helen’s presence in our midst will be sorely missed. May her soul be bound up with the living, and may her legacy continue to inspire the coming generations.

Honorable Jerome Hornblass

Close to 600 people filled two chapels to overflowing at The Riverside to honor the passing and the memory of Judge Jerome Hornblass who, together with his wife, Ann, have been members of KJ for forty-one years. Jerry Hornblass made a real difference in the lives of many people including, especially, the KJ community. He was a specialist in Bikur Cholim, involving many people in this sacred mitzvah and fulfilling it himself by his regular visits to Memorial Sloan Kettering Hospital on Shabbat, Yom Tov and, particularly, on Rosh Hashanah where he sounded the shofar over the years for hundreds of patients, involving his sons JJ and Elliot in this mitzvah with him. JJ and Elliot, together with their sister, Jessica Feingold, are all Ramaz alumni and very active in their communities, following in the footsteps of their illustrious father. JJ is the Recording Secretary of KJ. Ann and Jerry’s home was wide open to guests on Sabbaths and holidays. So many lives were touched by the Hornblass warmth and impressive religious life in their home. All of the Hornblass grandchildren are either students in or alumni of Ramaz and other day schools. Clearly, Jerry has passed on a beautiful tradition of religious practice, chesed, personal generosity and Jewish pride to two generations and to all of us who admired and loved him.

Marcel Lindenbaum

A grandson of the illustrious Rabbi Moshe Avigdor Amiel, Marcel and his family fled Europe before the Holocaust. He came straight to Ramaz of which he was a distinguished alumnus. Together with his late wife, Belda, he made a great impact on the Modern Orthodox Jewish community. Marcel was a founder of the Orthodox Caucus which led to the establishment of the Beth Din of America, the widespread use of pre-nuptial agreements on Get and many other important innovations in Jewish life. He contributed powerfully to providing positions of leadership and influence for women in the Orthodox community. Together with Belda, he raised five children all of whom are Ramaz alumni as are many of the grandchildren. They carry the vision, the passion and the sense of responsibility of their parents, grandparents and great grandparents for the betterment of Jewish life here and in Israel. Marcel Lindenbaum, who greeted everyone with sweetness and an ever present smile, truly made a difference in our world. That difference will be felt long after his passing.

Robert Payne

At the age of fifteen, Robert Payne and his family were sufficiently prescient to flee Germany, two months before Kristallnacht. He came here with his parents who had been furriers in Germany and he reestablished their business on the Upper West Side of Manhattan. Robert Payne was the essence of refinement and sweetness. He greeted everyone with a smile right to his last days, with a loving twinkle in his eyes and with warmth and gratitude on his lips.


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W I T H I N O U R FA M I LY - I N M E M O R I A M Together with his wife, Anita, they had sixty-eight years of a beautiful marriage. He was extraordinarily loving to his children, both of whom are members of KJ (Nancy & Dr. David Payne, and Clarissa & Harry Uvegi) and he had such great nachas from his grandchildren, Hugo and Gabriella. He was first and foremost a family man and he was blessed to die in his own home surrounded by the family at just short of ninety-five years of age.

William Rosner

Bill Rosner was born in a displaced persons’ camp in Germany but you couldn’t tell it from the way in which he lived his life. He loved people; he loved Judaism; he loved our shul and Ramaz from which his two children, Adam and Beth, were graduated; he loved his wife, Marian, who was so devoted to him; and he loved his friends. He was very supportive of the Yeshiva d’Brooklyn in which he was educated as a child. He was very generous to KJ and Ramaz and he responded enthusiastically to appeals for their well-being. He sat in shul with a big smile on his face, reflecting his joy in being in an Orthodox shul surrounded by his friends. He very much admired Marian, her life’s accomplishments and her professional achievements. How proud he was when Senator Hillary Clinton came to their home during one of the Senator’s campaigns; not bad for someone who was born in a DP camp, the son of a butcher, and now hosting the then senior Senator of New York. We will all miss Bill.

chupah rental This beautiful Chupah, designed and embroidered by members of the KJ Sisterhood, can enhance your family wedding. For rental information please contact Riva Alper, 212-774-5670/riva@CKJ.org


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30 HIGH HOLY DAY SEASON HIGHLIGHTS

KEHILATH JESHURUN BULLETIN

H I G H H O LY D AY S E A S O N H I G H L I G H T S THE MONTH OF ELUL • Sounding of the Shofar each morning after Shacharit • Recitation of the entire Book of Psalms at KJ • Selichot Services Saturday night, September 1, 10:00 PM in the Main Synagogue, preceded at 9:15 PM by a collation in the Heyman Auditorium • Selichot Services each morning beginning Monday, September 3, a half hour before morning services.

ROSH HASHANAH • •

Beginning of God’s judgment Sounding of the Shofar around 10:00 AM on Monday, September 10, and Tuesday, September 11. (Those ill at home or hospital should contact Rabbi Elie Weinstock for special arrangements.)

RITUALS TO REMEMBER • Lighting of candles and Shehecheyanu • Rosh Hashanah Kiddush • Washing of hands and motzi over two round challahs and dipping the pieces in honey (continued through Hoshanah Rabbah) FIRST NIGHT • Rosh Hashanah greeting upon leaving shul:

YOM KIPPUR

• Avoidance of food, drink, washing, lotions and oils, and marital relations • Refraining from wearing leather shoes (wear a pair of non- leather footwear) • Men are strongly encouraged to wear a white kitel

SUKKOT

• All meals with bread or mezonot should be eaten in a Sukkah. • Lulav and Etrog will be used beginning Monday, September 24, and are not used on Shabbat. You may purchase a Lulav and Israeli Etrog through KJ by visiting CKJ.org/LulavandEtrog

SUKKAH MEALS IN THE KJ SUKKAH Sunday, September 23 – Dinner Monday, September 24 – Lunch and Dinner Tuesday, September 25 – Lunch Friday, September 28– Dinner Shabbat, September 29 - Lunch

‫לשנה טובה תכתבו‬

All reservations must be made online at CKJ.org/Sukkot The reservation form will be available beginning September 3. Deadline, space permitting, is Thursday, September 20 at 10:00 am

‫יהי רצון מלפניך ה׳ אלוקינו ואלקי אבותינו‬ ‫שתחדש עלינו שנה טובה ומתוקה‬

Members: Adults $45 Juniors* $35 Children** $20 Non-Members: Adults $50 Juniors*$40 Children** $35 *Ages 12-18 **Ages 2-11 You must reserve space for a non-catered meal in the Sukkah, as well.

“May you be inscribed for a Good Year.” • Dipping of apple into honey with blessing over fruit and “May it be Thy will to grant us a good and sweet year.”

FIRST DAY • Tashlich - Monday, September 10, 5:15 PM. Assemble at Central Park’s “Turtle Pond” just south of the Great Lawn near 85th St., or at Carl Schurz Park at 86th Street and the East River. SECOND NIGHT • The practice of reciting the Shehecheyanu on the second night is questionable, so we eat a new fruit not yet eaten this season after Kiddush and the motzi. We keep in mind that new fruit when reciting or listening to Shehecheyanu at Kiddush and/or the blessing over the lighting of the candles, thereby fulfilling the obligation. TSOM GEDALIAH (FAST OF GEDALIAH) • Wednesday, September 12 10 DAYS OF REPENTANCE (ROSH HASHANAH - YOM KIPPUR) • Accept new, improved behavior and responsibility in relating to God and one another

THE MIKVAH ON THE EVE OF YOM KIPPUR

Every year on the eve of Yom Kippur, there is a custom for men to immerse in the mikvah in preparation for this holy day. One does not have to be a holy person to participate in this activity. On the contrary, for those of us who are just trying to be observant Jews, it is an added inspiration and preparation for a great day of introspection. Our practice at KJ is that we observe this custom as a group before the morning service. All MEN are invited to assemble at the mikvah, 419 East 77th Street (between First and York Avenues) at 6:15 AM on Tuesday, September 18. Everyone will have the opportunity to immerse and then we will return to KJ for 7:10 Shacharit services.

HOSHANAH RABBAH • Sunday morning, September 30 at 8:00 AM • Close of the penitential season • High Holy Day melodies. Seven circuits around the shul with Lulav and Etrog and beating of the Aravot • President’s breakfast sponsored by Judy and David Lobel SHEMINI ATZERET • Yizkor recited • Chatanim presented to the congregation SIMCHAT TORAH I Evening – Monday, October 1 • BRING CHILDREN AT 6:30 PM to 125 East 85th Street Our joyous evening of Hakafot in the Main Synagogue (Evening Services begin at 6:30 pm) conclude with singing and dancing in the street, with Hakafot followed by a Simchat Torah extravaganza in the Ramaz Middle School featuring a festive dairy kiddush supper, ice cream bar, and a carnival of activities and entertainment for children of all ages. Divrei Torah from our community’s children will cap our holiday celebration. II Simchat Torah Day - Tuesday, October 2 • Youth groups • Hakafot with singing and dancing • Chatanim called to the Torah • Women’s Tefilah Group meets at 9:15 AM • Buffet kiddush lunch following services


31 SCHEDULE OF HIGH HOLY DAYS

KEHILATH JESHURUN BULLETIN

S C H E D U L E O F H I G H H O LY D AY S ROSH HASHANAH

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, ROSH HASHANAH EVE Selichot Service (Z’chor Brit) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:30 AM Candle Lighting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6:57 PM Evening Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6:45 PM MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 10, ROSH HASHANAH I All Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8:00 AM Tashlich . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5:15 PM Evening Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6:50 PM Candle Lighting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . After 7:50 PM TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 11, ROSH HASHANAH II All Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8:00 AM Evening Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6:50 PM Conclusion of Yom Tov . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:51 PM

TSOM (FAST OF) GEDALIAH

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12 Fast begins . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5:22 AM Morning Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6:45 AM Evening Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6:40 PM Fast ends . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:45 PM

DAILY SERVICES

THURSDAY-FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 13-14 Thursday Morning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6:45 AM Thursday Evening . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6:45 PM Friday Morning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:00 AM Friday Evening . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6:45 PM

SHABBAT SHUVA

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 15 Morning Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9:00 AM Learners and Intermediate Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9:30 AM Evening Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6:15 PM Shabbat Shuva Discourse by Rabbi Chaim Steinmetz Authenticity in the Age of Apology: The True Meaning of “I’m Sorry” Shabbat ends . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:42 PM

DAILY SERVICES

SUNDAY-MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 16-17 Sunday Morning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8:00 AM Monday Morning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6:45 AM Sunday & Monday Evenings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6:45 PM

YOM KIPPUR

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 18, YOM KIPPUR EVE Morning Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:10 AM Mincha Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2:30 PM Candle Lighting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6:42 PM Beginners Kol Nidre . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6:30 PM Kol Nidre . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6:50 PM WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, YOM KIPPUR DAY All Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9:00 AM Conclusion of Yom Tov . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:34 PM

SUKKOT

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, SUKKOT EVE Morning Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8:30 AM Candle Lighting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6:34 PM Evening Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6:45 PM MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, SUKKOT I Morning Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9:00 AM Evening Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6:45 PM Candle Lighting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . After 7:26 PM TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, SUKKOT II Morning Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9:00 AM Evening Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6:45 PM Conclusion of Yom Tov . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:24 PM

DAILY SERVICES - CHOL HAMOED SUKKOT

WEDNESDAY-FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 26-28 Wednesday, Thursday, Friday Morning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6:50 AM Wednesday, Thursday, Friday Evening . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6:40 PM Candle Lighting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6:25 PM

SHABBAT CHOL HAMOED SUKKOT

Morning Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8:45 AM Combined Learners and Intermediate Service . . . . . . . 9:30 AM Evening Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6:15 PM Conclusion of Shabbat . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:17 PM

CONCLUDING FESTIVAL DAYS

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, HOSHANAH RABBAH Morning Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8:00 AM Candle Lighting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6:22 PM Evening Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6:35 PM MONDAY, OCTOBER 1, SHEMINI ATZERET Morning Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9:00 AM Mincha followed by Ma’ariv and Simchat Torah Hakafot . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6:30 PM Candle Lighting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . After 7:14 PM TUESDAY, OCTOBER 2, SIMCHAT TORAH Morning Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9:00 AM Women’s Tefilah Group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9:15 AM Evening Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6:30 PM Conclusion of Yom Tov . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:13 PM

CHILDREN’S SERVICES SCHEDULE

ROSH HASHANAH I AND II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10:00 AM Junior Congregations (1st through 6th Grades) - 1:00 PM Nursery - Kindergarten (Ages 3-6) YOM KIPPUR KOL NIDRE NIGHT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6:30 PM Junior Congregations (1st through 6th Grades only) YOM KIPPUR DAY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10:00 AM Junior Congregations (1st through 6th Grades) - 1:30 PM Nursery - Kindergarten (Ages 3-6)

MEN: THIS KOL NIDRE NIGHT AND YOM KIPPUR DAY DRESS UP BY WEARING A WHITE KITEL YOU MAY OBTAIN ONE AT A MODERATE PRICE AT JUDAICA CLASSICS BY DOINA. PLEASE CALL 212-722-4271 TO PLACE YOUR ORDER.


32 SCHEDULE

KEHILATH JESHURUN BULLETIN

KEHILATH JESHURUN BULLETIN Congregation Kehilath Jeshurun 125 East 85th Street, New York, NY 10028 212-774-5600

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www.ckj.org

KEHILATH JESHURUN BULLETIN

Non-Profit U.S. POSTAGE PAID NEW YORK, N.Y. PERMIT NO. 2200

CONGREGATION KEHILATH JESHURUN 125 EAST 85TH STREET NEW YORK, NY 10028-0928

SYNAGOGUE OFFICIALS Haskel Lookstein.......... Rabbi Emeritus Chaim Steinmetz.............. Senior Rabbi Elimelech Weinstock................... Rabbi Meyer Laniado............. Assistant Rabbi Rabbi Daniel Kraus & Rachel Kraus..... ........ Directors of Community Education Rabbi Dr. Jeremy Wieder...................... ............................ Scholar-in-Residence Mayer Davis............................... Cantor Dr. Benjamin Zalta.................... Cantor Leonard Silverman.... Executive Director

OFFICERS OF THE CONGREGATION David Lobel........................... President Elias Buchwald.... Senior Vice President Jonathan Wagner.......... Vice President Surie Sugarman...... 2nd Vice President Dr. Nicole Agus........ 3rd Vice President Sidney Ingber........... 4th Vice President Dr. Larry Baruch................... Secretary Robert Schwartz................... Treasurer David Sultan........... Assistant Treasurer Morris Massel........ Executive Secretary Evan Farber............ Financial Secretary JJ Hornblass........ Recording Secretary Eric Gribetz....Administrative Secretary

LIVING PAST PRESIDENTS Fred Distenfeld Eric Feldstein Joel Katz

Chaim Edelstein Stanley Gurewitsch

AFFILIATE PRESIDENTS Carla Tanz........... President, Sisterhood Dr. Mark Meirowitz. President, Men’s Club Brittany Cogan.......... President, Kesher Elisa Septimus.......... President, Kesher Ariel Stern................ President, Kesher

OFFICE STAFF Riva Alper....................... Administrator Dina Farhi.............. Executive Assistant Danielle Herbst............... Social Worker Menucha Parry.................... Director of Member Affairs Aryana Bibi Ritholtz....... Youth Director Freddie Rodriguez....... Superintendent Sy Yanofsky....................... Comptroller Esther Zarnel Feierman....... Director of Communications and Programming

Are you receiving your KJ Bulletin late in the mail? Are you receiving double copies of the Bulletin? WE NEED TO KNOW! Please e-mail Riva@CKJ.org or call 212.774.5670. In preparing the Bulletin, we welcome all KJ members’ announcements of communal, academic and professional acheivements. Please e-mail Riva@CKJ.org or mail it to the synagogue, marked “ATTN: KJ Bulletin”

SHABBAT SCHEDULE

September

Lighting of Candles

Friday Saturday Sabbath Ends Evening Services Afternoon Services

31-1 7-8 14-15 21-22 28-29

Ki Tavo Nitzavim Vayelech/ Shabbat Shuva Haazinu Chal HaMoed

7:12 PM 7:00 PM 6:49 PM

6:45 PM 6:45 PM 6:45 PM

7:00 PM 6:50 PM 6:15 PM

8:06 PM 7:54 PM 7:42 PM

6:37 PM 6:25 PM

6:45 PM 6:40 PM

6:25 PM 6:15 PM

7:30 PM 7:17 PM

5-6 12-13 19-20 26-27

Bereishit Noah Lekh Lekha Vayera

6:14 PM 6:02 PM 5:52 PM 5:42 PM

6:25 PM 6:15 PM 6:05 PM 5:55 PM

6:05 PM 5:50 PM 5:40 PM 5:30 PM

7:06 PM 6:54 PM 6:45 PM 6:36 PM

2-3 9-10 16-17 23-24

Chaye Sara Toledot Vayetze Vayeshev

5:33 PM 4:26 PM 4:19 PM 4:15 PM

5:45 PM 4:40 PM 4:35 PM 4:30 PM

5:20 PM 4:15 PM 4:10 PM 4:05 PM

6:28 PM 5:20 PM 5:16 PM 5:12 PM

30-1

Vayeshev

4:12 PM

4:25 PM

4:05 PM

5:09 PM

7:00 AM Rosh Chodesh Weekdays

9:00 AM Sabbath mornings

october

november

december

SCHEDULE OF SERVICES 7:30 AM Weekday mornings

8:30 AM Sunday mornings

EVENING SERVICES Sept. 2-23..................... 6:45 PM Sept. 30-Oct 4............. 6:30 PM Oct. 7-11......................... 6:20 PM Oct. 14-18...................... 6:10 PM Oct. 21-25.................... 6:00 PM Oct. 28-Nov. 1.............. 5:50 PM Nov. 4-8....................... 4:40 PM Nov. 11-15..................... 4:35 PM Nov. 18-22.................... 4:30 PM Nov. 25-Dec. 20........... 4:25 PM Dec. 23-27.................... 4:30 PM

7:15 AM Mondays & Thursdays

DATES TO REMEMBER SUN - TUES., September 9-11 Rosh Hashanah

WEDNESDAY september 12 Fast of Gedaliah

TUESDAY - WED, September 18-19 Yom Kippur

SUNDAY - TUES., SEPT 23 - OCT 2

Sukkot, Hoshanah Rabbah, Shemini Atzeret, Simchat Torah Schedule on Pages 30-31 for above dates

TUESDAY - WEDNESDAY, Oct. 9-10

Rosh Chodesh Cheshvan Morning Services at 7:00 AM

THURSDAY - FRIDAY, NOV 8-9

Rosh Chodesh Kislev Morning Services at 7:00 AM

Thursday, November 22

Thanksgiving Day - Morning Services at 8:30 AM

sun - mon., dec 2-10 - Chanukah

Kehilath Jeshurun Bulletin  
Kehilath Jeshurun Bulletin