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E S T E B A N A R E L L A N O

THE LAKE STANDLEY LAKE HIGH SCHOOL 2017


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ESTEBAN ARELLANO

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O F F I C I A L

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ESTEBAN ARELLANO

T R A N S C R I P T


Standley Lake High School

Page 2 of 2

9300 W. 104th Av. Westminster, CO 80021

Tel: {303)982-3311

Fax: (303)982-3312 fiuilil111g Rri,�hl futur,•J

Arellano, Esteban G.

Student ID: 2124909

12687 Locust Way Thornton, CO 80602-4664

State Student ID: 6832415922 Date of Birth: 03/01/1999 Current Grade: 12

Class Rank (weighted): 5 of 261 Class Rank (unweighted): 1 of 261

Graduation Credit Summary - High School

Standardized Test Scores Name CSAP 09 Math CSAP 09 Reading CSAP 09 Writing CSAP 10 Math SAT Critical Reading SAT Essay SAT Mathematics SAT Writing SAT Writing Multiple ACT State Composite ACT State English ACT State Math ACT State Reading ACT State Science

Cumulative GPA (weighted}: 4.714 Cumulative GPA (unweighted): 4.000

Date 03/10/2014 03/10/2014 03/10/2014 03/10/2014 11/07/2015 11/07/2015 11/07/2015 11/07/2015 11/07/2015 04/19/2016 04/19/2016 04/19/2016 04/19/2016 04/19/2016

Score**

A A A A 720 9 800 760 76 35 35 36 33 35

Grad Requirement Req Cmp Wv Algebra I 1.000 1.000 0.000 American History 1.000 1.000 0.000 Civics 0.500 0.500 0.000 Econ/Contemp lss 0.500 0.500 0.000 Elective 8.500 11.750 0.000 English 4.000 3.500 0.000 Fine Arts/CTE 0.500 0.500 0.000 Geography 0.500 0.500 0.000 Geom or Higher 2.000 2.000 0.000 PE/Health 0.500 0.000 0.000 Science 3.000 3.000 0.000 World History 1.000 1.000 0.000 Totals 23.000 25.250 Notes on Credit Summary:

TBC 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.500 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.500 0.000 0.000

lnPrg 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 3.000 0.500 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000

Core course credits that exceed the specific graduation requirement are automatically rolled into the Elective category. Req: Credits required Cmp: Credits completed Wv: Credits waived (Credits must be completed in another Grad Requirement category) TBC: Credits to be completed lnPrg: Credits In progress •work in Progress (Not incl in GPA) +Weighted ..Standardized Test Scores - CSAP Key A-Advanced

PP-Partially Proficient

P - Proficient

U - Unsatisfactory NT - Not Tested

Transcript generated on 1/31/2017

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R E S U M E

ESTEBAN ARELLANO EDUCATION Standley Lake High School Westminster, Colorado 2013 - 2017 Harvard College Cambridge, Massachusetts 2017 - 2021

HONORS NSPA 1st Place Magazine Page/Spread (2016) Al Neuharth Free Spirit Journalism Scholar (2016) CHSPA 1st Place News Feature (2015) CHSPA 1st Place Lifestyle News Feature (2014) NSPA Newspaper Pacemaker (2014)

CONTACT 12687 Locust Way Thornton, CO 80602 (720) 273-9073 estebangarellano@gmail.com @Hey_Its_Esteban

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ESTEBAN ARELLANO

EXPERIENCE The Lake Newsmagazine

Editor-in-Chief (2016 - Present), Editor (2014 - 2016), Staff (2013 - 2014) Led newspaper staff of over 40 students; edited and produced stories, photography, and design; managed online social media content; published 24 issues of award-winning material. Colorado Democratic Party

Fellow (2016) Oversaw volunteer base in the Boulder area; organized voter events; met with voters for “One-on-One” meeting sessions; participated in weekly organizer meetings; completed voter registrations, voter phone calls, and voter canvassing sessions. Office of State Senator Jessie Ulibarri

Intern (2016) Performed standard office administrative tasks; responded to constituent communications; managed office social media accounts; designed social media platform infographics for upcoming bills in the Senator’s office. YouthRoots

Intern (2015 - 2016), Board Member (2014 - 2015) Learned about philanthropic process; assessed needs of Denver-area youth; connected with local businesses to raise over $70,000 for non-profits; analyzed non-profit grant request applications; donated money to most effective organizations; worked on interview selection committee for future Board Members; completed outreach sessions to future members.


L E T T E R S

O F

R E C O M M E N DAT I O N

Standley Lake High School 9300 West 104th Avenue Westminster, CO 80021 Phone: 303-982-3311 Fax: 303-982-3312 http://jeffcoweb.jeffco.k12.co.us

To Whom It May Concern:

January 31, 2017

It is my great pleasure to recommend Esteban Arellano for the Dorothy Greer Scholarship. Esteban exemplifies best in student journalism. He is passionate, he is Letter of Recommendation: Estebanthe Arellano informed, he is inquisitive, and he is creative.

To Whom It May Concern:

Throughout the two years that I have worked directly with Esteban on the Standley Lake High School Newsmagazine, The Lake, I have come to trust his opinion I amand thrilled to recommend Esteban Arellano for the Dorothy Greer Scholarship. As one of my expertise. Esteban has been a Section Editor and now Editor-in-Chief; his commitmostment conscientious, respectful, and mature students, Esteban is in the top 1% of all the students I to the success of The Lake is unquestioned.

have taught over the past 17 years. He is the best of the best, and he shines above others because of his ability to the articulate hisstaff points of view bothtospeech and writing inpart a smooth innateThis year, editorial traveled as ainteam Indianapolis to take in the and flawless manner. I whole-heartedly support commitment to continue his education, national journalism convention. Not onlyEsteban’s did The Lake win recognition as a finalist for Esteban received theapplication. award for Design of the Year. It is rewarding to and Ithe amPacemaker, pleased to but be an advocate for his see the hard work and care of our students pay them back in rewards. Esteban works for the rewards he it with a grace and refreshing to see I My impressions of receives Esteban and and handles my observations of him asmaturity a studentthat are is extremely positive. a high school senior. first in met Esteban when he was a freshman in my 9th grade pre-IB English class. Last year,

Esteban’s enrollment in my 11th grade IB course required him to apply existential principles to The majority of the time as adviser, I have found I will spend time honing a classic literature and analyze how critical theory allows a reader to reach new depths. Despite student’s passion to help them become a stronger writer or designer. It is the lucky times taking a full load of IB classes and undertaking the role of Student Body President as a junior, when as an adviser the best I can do is not distract or derail a student who has all the Esteban producing I often use a model other skill excels as wellinashis thework, passion. Estebanwriting is that student whoaswas able tofor take his students. passion and hone his skills, of which I have no doubt he will continue to improve and master.

As editor-in-chief for The Lake News Magazine, our school’s national award-winning journal, Esteban continually confirms interests and in his community. In anplay article titled, “A I am confident thathis journalism thesurrounding role of the media will always a part Esteban’s futuregoals, and with that in mind believe he will always stay involved in StateinSplit: In Attempt to Stop School Violence, Recent Gun Legislation Divides Colorado,” the media in somea 2015 way. high-school graduate about his ease in obtaining an AR-15 in under Esteban interviewed 30 seconds; he then continued to artfully weave additional interviews from students, teachers, I look to watching his progress. organizations, andforward lawmakers. In another article titled, “Welcome to Jeffco: District Prepares for Recall Election,” Thank you, he writes, “Welcome to the Jefferson County School District, where a tug-ofwar competition has surfaced between the teachers’ union and the school board majority, where M.A.Ed overLynn 1,000Schwartz, teacher resignations have been submitted in the past two years, and where students are standing up, yelling for change.” His work on this important piece included spending his The Lake Adviser lunch periods on the phone with various members of the school board, attempting to clarify answers on a difficult subject. Esteban is a leader and a role model among his peers. He’s kind-hearted, genuine, and humble about his innumerable successes. He encourages others around him to participate, emphasizing others’ strengths and continually building their confidence. He’s opinionated, witty, and fearless. When he takes charge, he insightfully crafts questions for others to lead them toward a desired outcome. 7


Standley Lake High School 9300 West 104th Avenue Westminster, CO 80021 Phone: 303-982-3311 Fax: 303-982-3312 http://jeffcoweb.jeffco.k12.co.us

January 31, 2017

31, 2017 LetterJanuary of Recommendation: Esteban Arellano To Whom May Concern: LetterItof Recommendation: Esteban Arellano I am thrilled to recommend Esteban Arellano for the Dorothy Greer Scholarship. As one of my most conTo Whom It May Concern: scientious, respectful, and mature students, Esteban is in the top 1% of all the students I have taught over the past 17 years. He is the best of the best, and he shines above others because of his innate ability to I amhis thrilled Esteban for in thea Dorothy Greer Scholarship. one of my articulate pointstoofrecommend view in both speechArellano and writing smooth and flawless manner.As I whole-heartmost conscientious, respectful, and mature students, Esteban is in the top 1% of all the students edly support Esteban’s commitment to continue his education, and I am pleased to be an advocate for hisI have taught over the past 17 years. He is the best of the best, and he shines above others because application.

of his innate ability to articulate his points of view in both speech and writing in a smooth and My impressions of Esteban and my observations him as a student are extremely positive. I first met flawless manner. I whole-heartedly supportofEsteban’s commitment to continue his education, Esteban was a to freshman in my 9th pre-IB English class. Last year, Esteban’s enrollment in andwhen I am he pleased be an advocate forgrade his application.

my 11th grade IB course required him to apply existential principles to classic literature and analyze how critical theory allows a of reader to reach newobservations depths. Despite taking full loadare ofextremely IB classes positive. and undertaking My impressions Esteban and my of him as aastudent I th the role of Student Body President as a junior, Esteban excels in his work, producing writing I often first met Esteban when he was a freshman in my 9 grade pre-IB English class. Last year, use as a model for otherenrollment students. in my 11th grade IB course required him to apply existential principles to Esteban’s

classic literature and analyze how critical theory allows a reader to reach new depths. Despite

As editor-in-chief for The Lake News Magazine, our school’s national award-winning journal, Esteban takingconfirms a full load IB classes andsurrounding undertakingcommunity. the role of Student Bodytitled, President as aSplit: junior, continually hisofinterests in his In an article “A State In Esteban excels in his work, producing writing I often use as a model for other students. Attempt to Stop School Violence, Recent Gun Legislation Divides Colorado,” Esteban interviewed a 2015 high-school graduate about his ease in obtaining an AR-15 in under 30 seconds; he then continued to Asweave editor-in-chief The Lake News Magazine, our school’s national artfully additionalfor interviews from students, teachers, organizations, andaward-winning lawmakers. Injournal, another continually his interests in for hisRecall surrounding community. an articletotitled, “A articleEsteban titled, “Welcome to confirms Jeffco: District Prepares Election,” he writes, In “Welcome the JefState Split: In Attempt to Stop School Violence, Recent Gun Legislation Divides Colorado,” ferson County School District, where a tug-of-war competition has surfaced between the teachers’ union Esteban a 2015 high-school his ease in obtaining an AR-15 under and the schoolinterviewed board majority, where over 1,000graduate teacher about resignations have been submitted in theinpast two seconds; he then continued to up, artfully weave additionalHis interviews fromimportant students, piece teachers, years,30 and where students are standing yelling for change.” work on this included organizations, and lawmakers. In another article titled, “Welcome to Jeffco: District Prepares for spending his lunch periods on the phone with various members of the school board, attempting to clarify answers on aElection,” difficult subject. Recall he writes, “Welcome to the Jefferson County School District, where a tug-of-

war competition has surfaced between the teachers’ union and the school board majority, where

Esteban is 1,000 a leader and a role model among peers. He’s kind-hearted, genuine, and humble about his over teacher resignations have his been submitted in the past two years, and where students innumerable successes. He encourages others around him to participate, emphasizing others’ strengths are standing up, yelling for change.” His work on this important piece included spending his and continually building their confidence. He’s opinionated, witty, and fearless. When he takes charge, he lunch periods on the phone with various members of the school board, attempting to clarify insightfully crafts questions for others to lead them toward a desired outcome.

answers on a difficult subject.

Because of his motivation to excel in all he does, Esteban is an outstanding nominee for the Dorothy Greer EstebanHe is aisleader and a role modeland among peers. He’s genuine, andhis humble Scholarship. an extremely talented drivenhisindividual whokind-hearted, continually demonstrates desire to about his innumerable successes. He encourages him to participate, emphasizing do well. Esteban perfectly reflects the individual that youothers seek, around and I recommend him without hesitation.

others’ strengths and continually building their confidence. He’s opinionated, witty, and

Pleasefearless. contact me at aburns@jeffco.k12.co.us if I can be of further assistance. When he takes charge, he insightfully crafts questions for others to lead them toward a

desired outcome.

Sincerely,

Amy Burns English Teacher 8

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ESTEBAN ARELLANO

Our mission: to provide a quality education that prepares all children for a successful future.


Standley Lake High School 9300 West 104th Avenue Westminster, CO 80021 Phone: 303-982-3311 Fax: 303-982-3312 http://jeffcoweb.jeffco.k12.co.us

January 31, 2017 Letter of Recommendation: Esteban Arellano To Whom It May Concern: I am thrilled to recommend Esteban Arellano for the Dorothy Greer Scholarship. As one of my most conscientious, respectful, and mature students, Esteban is in the top 1% of all the students I have taught over the past 17 years. He is the best of the best, and he shines above others because of his innate ability to articulate his points of view in both speech and writing in a smooth and flawless manner. I whole-heartedly support Esteban’s commitment to continue his education, and I am pleased to be an advocate for his application. My impressions of Esteban and my observations of him as a student are extremely positive. I first met Esteban when he was a freshman in my 9th grade pre-IB English class. Last year, Esteban’s enrollment in my 11th grade IB course required him to apply existential principles to classic literature and analyze how critical theory allows a reader to reach new depths. Despite taking a full load of IB classes and undertaking the role of Student Body President as a junior, Esteban excels in his work, producing writing I often use as a model for other students. As editor-in-chief for The Lake News Magazine, our school’s national award-winning journal, Esteban continually confirms his interests in his surrounding community. In an article titled, “A State Split: In Attempt to Stop School Violence, Recent Gun Legislation Divides Colorado,” Esteban interviewed a 2015 high-school graduate about his ease in obtaining an AR-15 in under 30 seconds; he then continued to artfully weave additional interviews from students, teachers, organizations, and lawmakers. In another article titled, “Welcome to Jeffco: District Prepares for Recall Election,” he writes, “Welcome to the Jefferson County School District, where a tug-ofwar competition has surfaced between the teachers’ union and the school board majority, where over 1,000 teacher resignations have been submitted in the past two years, and where students are standing up, yelling for change.” His work on this important piece included spending his lunch periods on the phone with various members of the school board, attempting to clarify answers on a difficult subject. Esteban is a leader and a role model among his peers. He’s kind-hearted, genuine, and humble about his innumerable successes. He encourages others around him to participate, emphasizing others’ strengths and continually building their confidence. He’s opinionated, witty, and fearless. When he takes charge, he insightfully crafts questions for others to lead them toward a desired outcome.

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Our mission: to provide a quality education that prepares all children for a successful future.


AC T I O N

P H OTO S

TOP ENGAGING IN A DISCUSSION ABOUT THE FUTURE OF JOURNALISM AT THE 2016 AL NEUHARTH FREE SPIRIT JOURNALISM CONFERENCE (COURTESY OF THE NEWSEUM INSTITUTE). MIDDLE SNAPPING PHOTOS OF THE LANDMARK 2015 JEFFCO RECALL CAMPAIGN FOR OUR SOCIAL MEDIA ACCOUNTS. BOTTOM INTERVIEWING OUR PRINCIPAL ABOUT A NEW SCHOOL DOOR POLICY WITH MY CO-EDITOR-IN-CHIEF.

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E S SAY

I A P P ROAC H E D N E WS PA P E R F R E S H MA N Y E A R AS I D I D M O ST OF HIGH SCHOOL: brimming with naïve stereotypes. I imagined a class filled with kids obsessing over notepads and donning vintage reporter caps. But from the minute I walked through the door of room B135, I realized I had stumbled upon something unlike anything I had ever experienced. For once, I had entered into a room where I was not the youngest. I found a space where I could immerse myself with 30 other dreamers who persevered to accomplish their goals. I found an environment where I would not follow, but I would lead, and be able to have my own say in what we created. And our creativity knew no limits. With each piece, we asked ourselves: how can we make this the best that we have ever accomplished. Whereas others may have just photographed dress rehearsals of the spring musical, we built an entire outdoor photo set to capture the spirit of the 30+ cast and orchestra members. In a search to expand our definitions of community, our staff set out on 2 a.m. trips to the Denver Diner to interview complete strangers. This creativity followed us into late-night newsroom sessions as we edited photo after photo and compiled groundbreaking and award-winning designs. But most importantly, in B135, I found a space to channel my love of politics that had been brewing over the past couple of years. While I previously had been pushing myself into political campaigns, I saw an opportunity to push myself into ways to tell these political stories. But I quickly learned that I would have to break the restraints of my age to be able enter the very “adult” world of politics. I first realized this when The Lake decided to tackle a very real subject for high school students: school safety. I chose to specifically focus on the role that gun control is playing in school safety. I sent out over twenty requests for interviews from some of the leading politicians, lobbyists, and gun control experts in

the area, only to have every door shut in my face. These adults did not want to deal with a student. And for a while, I forced myself into this “student” box; a place where I was not important, and where I could not write this story. But after a few days of pitying myself, I decided I was not going to accept it. I stood up, called everyone again, and again, and again. I would introduce myself as “Esteban Arellano, a journalist, wanting to write a story about gun control.” I was no longer “Esteban Arellano, a high school student.” I had unshackled myself from my limiting role as just a high school journalist. Through this free spirit attitude and perseverance, I was able to finally get returned calls. Lobbyists and politicians were willing to talk to me, and because of that, I was able to tell a story that needed to be told, and gain the confidence to know I could do it again. It was this perseverance that pushed me into my most meaningful journalistic work: a comprehensive analysis of a recall campaign that swept our district’s Board of Education. I knew that the recall—an issue that had enveloped our district since my first day in JeffCo—was such an important story that needed to be told wholly. With that, lunches were spent meeting with union presidents and board members. On weekends I ventured out to anti-recall fairs and canvassing trips with teachers. And while my friends spent Thursday nights in bed, my team and I would experience the frenzy of the board meetings. What emerged was a story and collection of photos that I felt holistically captured the spirit of the district. Over the past four years, I have seen journalism as a tool to share the real world and real voices with our readers. Whether it be something as fun as a Homecoming football game, or as grave as a school tragedy, the real world and its voices has completely shaped my journalistic work. Despite still being a student, since my very first day of walking into B135, I’ve encountered a world that I can truly share is my staff’s and mine. The Lake has taught me that journalism and storytelling can come in all different shapes and sizes. After all, I am a real journalist who wants to tell real stories.

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W R I T I N G THE WRITING IS UNEQUIVOCALLY THE MOST CRUCIAL COMPONENT OF A JOURNALISM PACKAGE. IT’S THE PIECE THAT ALLOWS US AS JOURNALISTS TO SPEAK AND CONNECT WITH THE PEOPLE WE CARE ABOUT. BEFORE BEGINNING ANY PIECE, WE ASK OURSELVES: IS THIS SOMETHING PEOPLE WILL ONLY BE ABLE TO READ IN THE LAKE? WITH THIS AS OUR PRIMARY FOCUS, WE GO OUT TO OUR COMMUNITY TO TELL THE STORIES THAT NEED TO BE TOLD.

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H

e was silent when I asked him his name. Based on his broken English, I assumed he didn’t understand my question. “Oh, I can’t,” he said after a long pause. “Just call me...Mike.” Initially I was confused by his pseudonym, but after speaking with him for a few minutes, I learned that he gave it because “Mike” was not living his true life. He has always been on the road. As a kid, he went on the road all the way from Mexico to the States, chasing the American Dream to forge a better world for himself. In doing so, he completely shed his past life. By the age of 27, he took a job as a truck driver, pushing himself onto the road again. He started out locally, and then as he gained more experience, he asked for longer and longer routes. Six years into work he bought his own truck, spending weeks away from his family.

had to go back on the road. But still wanting to be with his family, he decided to bring his oldest with him. “When my oldest kid was five, he worked with me for six months,” he said. “I liked it, and he used to like it too.” But being a parent on the road became difficult. “One time we drove to Tennessee and we were at the Driver’s Lounge in Tempe, there were no other drivers,” he said. “I put the TV on SpongeBob SquarePants. A couple of drivers came in, and asked, ‘Are you watching that?’ They asked me if I was a driver and laughed. I said yes. It was embarrassing.” That was the tipping point for him. When he made a stop back through Denver, he left his son at home to start school, and continued on with the long routes that he still works today. I asked him if he wants his son to ever join him again in the future.

“I got two kids, and I want them not to forget about me,” he said. “I want them to call me ‘daddy’ still.”

“I want him to have more choices than just that,” he said. “It’s the American dream. I am not sure it’s possible anymore.”

Mike tried to return to Denver and his family, but when his pay was cut, he

Beaten down in America, Mike is now considering returning to Mexico, where

STORIES FROM THE DINER Silverware scratching across plates, dishes clattering in the kitchen, lone figures occupying the stools at the counter. Anything a typical diner would look and sound like. But there’s more. There’s more than just hash brown grease and black coffee. We wiped away some of the grill smoke to uncover the intricate lives of the people inhabiting the Denver Diner at the wee hours of the night. Here are some of the stories that were served up to show you that there is more to strangers than glances in passing.

his father has a ranch. He wants to go back to his true home. “People are humble [there],” he said. “They’re free to the world. They’re free THIS STORY WAS THE to do whatever they want.” MOST ADVENTUROUS He wants to return to a world where he can be himself. “I just don’t know if I am the real me here,” he said. “It’s been hard to come here to the US, because I had all of these big dreams. But I can tell you, driving a truck all my life with my son wasn’t a part of it.” So at the diner, I didn’t get to see the real Mike, who is still left in Mexico.

PIECE I’VE EVER PURSUED. A FEW OF US JOURNIED TO THE DENVER DINER AT 2 A.M. TO CAPTURE A SLIVER OF LIFE NOT OFTEN SEEN. THROUGH THESE INTERVIEWS AND TALKS WITH MY FELLOW EDITORS AND ADVISOR, I LEARNED A NEW DEFINITION OF COMMUNITY THAT I COULD FOLLOW FOR THE REST OF MY JOURNALISTIC CAREER.

When I asked him if I could take his picture, he got up, put on his coat, told me to take a picture of the empty stool, and got back out on the road.

5:05 A.M. When I first met Jim Hopkins, he was sitting quietly, drinking coffee at 5:05 on a Saturday morning. I asked him what he was doing and he replied that he was taking a break. As the conversation continued, he explained that he was a part-time driver for Uber and was taking his mid-shift break just before the sun appeared over the mountains. By the end of the conversation, it became clear that he was also taking a break to consider the possibilities for the next chapter of his life. “I was born in Denver and I had a courier service where I delivered prescription meds to skilled nursing facilities, assisted living homes, and Alzheimer’s units,” Hopkins said. Things seemed pretty stable for Hopkins until 2008 rolled around and shook up his entire life. “After the downturn, for the next few years after that, it was as though I was getting hired to get laid off and then hired to get laid off again,” Hopkins said. “Looking back, it’s like my thirties, forties, and fifties sucked.” Hopkin’s work in IT and running a courier service were important parts of his life, but they don’t come close to rivaling his true passion. For 18 years, Hopkins spent part of the year teaching handicapped kids how to ski at Winter Park. The job wasn’t easy, but it gave Hopkins a sense of purpose and inspired one of his most cherished memories. “Not all of the students could communicate with you verbally,” Hopkins said. “This one student just obeyed me to a fault—all of my verbal instructions or hand gestures or whatever. But he never said anything, so it was hard to gauge if I was getting through to him. Well, we were required to eat lunch with our students and then when we were ready to go, he offered me his chips. It was really a recognition that everything was okay and that there was communication—even if it wasn’t in a conventional sense.” Now retired—from his old job and from skiing—Hopkins takes a few hours a week to drive people around the city he loves. Above: Jim Hopkins sits at the diner and talks about his life. He spent eighteen years teaching handicapped kids how to ski and now works as an Uber driver.

20 March 2016 | Issue 4

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W R I T I N G

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t’s a hot Tuesday afternoon, and high school students fill the streets outside of their schools, chanting “Recall”.

It’s a Thursday night, at the boardroom down in Golden and teachers swarm in, wearing blue shirts that read: “Stand Up for All Students”. It’s a cool Saturday morning, and students, teachers, and parents are filing through the neighborhoods to leave huge orange and blue door hangers on front porches. Welcome to JeffCo. Welcome to the Jefferson County School District, where a tugof-war competition has surfaced between the teachers’ union and the school board majority, where over 1,000 teacher resignations have been submitted in the past two years, and where students are standing up, yelling for change. There is turmoil now in JeffCo, and the first ripples date back two years. The school board majority, comprising of Julie Williams, John Newkirk, and Ken Witt took hold in the election of 2013. After a long district-wide history of voting for teacher unionbacked candidates and large increases in district spending, the election of the reformist “WNW” ticket put an end to this. The trio cited increase in school choice, fiscal accountability, transparency, and rewarding JeffCo employees as their top priorities. “The three candidates were interested in reform and not sticking with the status quo,” Sheila Atwell, the director of JeffCo Students First, an organization that supported the majority’s 2013 election, said. However, many in the JeffCo community feared that their cam-

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ESTEBAN ARELLANO


paigns, which were each funded by large, conservative political groups, such as Americans for Prosperity, would bring outside political agendas into the district. “These people are not education reformers,” Wendy McCord, a district parent, said. Concerned district members feared their premonitions were coming true when Cindy Stevenson, a nationally-recognized district superintendent for 12 years, announced that she would retire in June, leaving many to feel she was forcefully ousted by the majority. But Board member Julie Williams highlighted that this was not the case. “There has been an agenda since the day we were elected,” Williams said. “She didn’t want to work with the conservative Board because we are looking at moving the Board in a different direction than the way it was for the past 40 years. Change is hard.” This resignation was quickly sped up in February 2014, when she announced in an emotional Saturday board meeting that her resignation would go into effect immediately. “I can’t lead or manage,” Stevenson said at the meeting, “because I am not respected by this Board of Education.” Board member Lesley Dahlkemper was quick to blame the majority for the hasty resignation. “I want to be really clear, this is about the three board majority,” she said. “I want to ask the three member of the majority how this decision is good for 85,000 kids.” The Board quickly set out to find a replacement by contracting an independent nationwide-search for the best candidate. However, once the results came in, the majority quickly discarded them, and named a sole-finalists for the position: Dan McMinimee, assistant superintendent for Colorado’s Douglas County School District. But this decision was met with worry amongst the district, with many fearing the increase in salary that the majority offered McMinimee, as well as the possibility for him to bring to Jeffco a reformist-minded agenda that was implemented in Douglas County. Fast forward to August of 2014. The annual teacher compensation negotiations between the district and the teachers’ union circled around the question of how teacher evaluations should affect the salary of a teacher

This new plan, which became known as “pay-for-performance”, struck out the 2008 program of compensation based on specific steps in favor of pay increases for teachers rated “highly effective” and “effective”. It also proposed to raise the minimum district-wide salary from $33,616 to $38,000. “To my mind, it’s disrespectful to give every teacher the same raise regardless of the job that they are doing,” Atwell said. “That’s what the old way of paying them was.”

But this new proposal worried Dahlkemper, Fellman, and teachers across the district who had agreed to sacrifice any raises since 2008 in light of the Great I AM MOST PROUD Recession.

OF THIS STORY. SINCE I WAS A FRESHMAN IN NEWSPAPER, A TALK OF A RECALL ELECTION HAD BEEN

QUIETLY SIMMERING IN THE CLASS. WHEN IT FINALLY CAME ABOUT MY JUNIOR YEAR, I LIVED AND BREATHED THE RECALL. I SPENT LUNCHES ON THE PHONE WITH SCHOOL BOARD MEMBERS, FOLLOWED CAMPAIGN EFFORTS ON THE WEEKENDS, AND EVEN MET WITH LATE-NIGHT STUDENT REBELLION GROUPS TO FIND MY STORY. WHAT EMERGED WAS A PIECE SO FAR-REACHING AND PERTINENT THAT IT SHOOK UP THE DISTRICT ON THE EVE OF THE ELECTION.

These discussions were interrupted, however, when an independent analysis of Jeffco’s teacher evaluation system found it not to be a “sufficiently valid and reliable basis on which to make salary determinations”.

Furthermore, teachers feared the sense of competition the program could create. “The more teachers that are being highly effective, the smaller percentage raise that everybody gets,” McCord said. “The idea that they are trying to pit them against each other is really antithetical to the whole profession of education.” The Board approved the plan in a 3-2 vote, which prompted the teachers’ union, Jefferson County Education Association (JCEA), to issue a vote of no confidence in Ken Witt. This decision was accompanied by an ever-growing amount of teachers leaving the district. According to numbers reported by the district, since the majority took office in November 2013, over 700 teachers have submitted their resignation, with many moving to other districts with the promise of a higher salary. “When you have over 700 teachers leave the school district, there is a problem,” John Ford, president of JCEA, said. “Through our exit interviews, through those teachers, we are finding those same common things over and over again: teachers are not feeling valued and they are not feeling respected.” The board majority and their supporters, however, attributed the rise in teacher turnover to a nationwide trend. “I think that across the nation, a lot of teachers have been leaving the field because they aren’t being given the flexibility to really teach,” Williams said. “And frankly, if a teacher doesn’t want to be in Jeffco, there are other teachers that do.”

Atwell is not concerned by the teachers that are leaving the district. “From the research that we have done, teachers that are rated ineffective - a lot of them have left,” she said. “I don’t know that I would be terribly worried if an ineffective teacher leaving the district.”

However, these recommendations were rejected by the Board in a 3-2 vote, with the majority claiming they did not fulfill the district’s goals of having an effective teacher in every classroom.

However, the issue of compensation and teacher turnover was quickly overshadowed a few weeks later when, in light of changes to the AP United States History curriculum, Williams proposed to form a curriculum committee to ensure materials do not “encourage or condone civil disorder”, which many saw as a form of censorship.

Instead, during a final discussion of the recommendations, board president, Ken Witt, announced his own compensation proposal.

This proposal electrified the district and the nation, with students walking out of class and filling the sidewalks in protest.

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W R I T I N G

“Julie Williams’ proposal to censor AP US History and then the comments that followed I think is where [the distrust] all really started to manifest itself,” Ford said. It was this issue that gained national attention and birthed numerous student organizations, such as JeffCo Students for Change, which led a series of walkouts protesting the proposal last year. The interactions between these student-organizations and the majority brewed more dissatisfaction with the board. During a board meeting on May 7, Witt called attention to a social media post mentioning burritos favorited by one of the student leaders of Jeffco Students for Change. McCord, along with many others, filed a formal complaint against Witt for bullying the student by accusing them of favoriting “racial epithets” towards Lisa Pinto, a Hispanic staff member for the district, and for violating a minor’s privacy by asking for the post, which revealed the student’s identity, to be displayed. This incident pushed McCord to start a recall election. “That, for me, was the final straw,” she said. From there, she partnered with two other parents to form Jeffco United for Action and filed a petition for recall in late-June of 2015. “There’s been a lot of hard work leading up to this moment,” McCord said at a rally. “But the fight has just begun.” The movement quickly grew. Only 17 days after the recall efforts were announced, more than 37,000 signatures were collected for each candidate, over twice what was needed. “It’s not surprising,” Williams said, on the large amount of signatures. “We do have 15,000 employees in the district, and so if you just times that by two, that’s your 30,000 signatures.” The collection of the required signatures is not the end of the process. In November, there will be a vote on the ballot on the recall of each individual Board majority member, the candidate to potentially replace that majority member, as well as the candidates for the regular elections of Dahlkemper’s and Fellman’s seats, as they will not be running for reelection. Now, in a district where a large portion of voters do not have a direct connection to those involved in education, a mad dash grassroots race on both sides has emerged to sway uninformed voters. “Our role really is educating the public in Jefferson County about what is going on, about the decisions that the Board is making and sometimes isn’t making,” McCord said. Jeffco United for Action has printed yard signs printed with “Recall Witt, Newkirk, and Williams”, door hangers with information about the Board, and has published several articles about their grievances with the Board on their website. Students across the district have also started protests to demand the recall.

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ESTEBAN ARELLANO

These citizens argue that the Board has wasted taxpayer money in the compensation of McMinimee and a board attorney, caused over 1,000 educators to leave the district, attempted to censor US History classes, and violated Colorado open meeting laws. With the potential replacement of all five board seats, a new slate of candidates has emerged, including Ron Mitchell running for Ken Witt’s seat, Brad Rupert for Williams’ seat, Susan Harmon for Newkirk’s seat, Ali Lasell for Fellman’s seat, and Amanda Stevens for Dahlkemper’s seat. “I really don’t believe that party politics should enter the boardroom,” Rupert said. “Our priority should be providing an excellent education for every student.” However, Atwell finds fault in the recall. “The recall petition really talked about things that were either flagrantly wrong or just didn’t rise to the level of a recall or the amount of discord and angst that it’s caused,” she said. She points out that the effort does not cite that Superintendent McMinimee’s offered salary included potential bonuses and retirement whereas Stevenson’s didn’t. Moreover, the board majority and their supporters fear that a 5-0 union-supported slate will disturb the staggered terms of the board members, and will not allow for diversity in the district. As the district draws closer to Election Day, teachers found old wounds reopened with the approval of a new contract that gave teachers a 1% raise. However, JCEA reluctantly approved the contract, disappointed with it’s short expiration date in summer of 2016. “I know of no other one-billion-dollar organization that negotiates for six months only to come out with a 10-month agreement in its employee association,” Dahlkemper said. “Denver Public schools just approved a 5.5% salary increase for its teachers. In Jeffco, we approved 1%.” But Williams defends the approval. “As far as the 10 month contract, I think it’s the right thing to do,” she said. “It is prudent to be able to look at it next year and see where does it need tweaking.” The slate, however, has used this new contract to their advantage in their campaigns. “I think, if elected, we need to take a hard look at the current contract, whether the term of it is appropriate, whether the compensation package within it is appropriate,” Rupert said. “We are simply no longer competitive.” This opinion is what has fueled the distrust between the Board majority and the teachers’ union and a surge of overall support for a new group of board members in the past few months. “Teachers are not feeling valued. They are not feeling respected,” Ford said. “That’s why we are here: how do we save public education in Jefferson County?” With so much on the line for the recall election, all sides are anxious to see which Jeffco will welcome them come election day.


Behind the

more. “After that, I knew that I had to be in a high school,” he said. In 2002, after a stint at Pomona as a student teacher, Mr. Reed landed at Standley Lake High School. Based on his dark adolescence and the Columbine shooting, he came to the school with a goal.

English teacher brings light to students Mr. Ben reed finds school assemblies absolutely ridiculous.

“I was trying to make fun of them, trying to satirize high school assemblies,” he said. “The whole thing is just such an absolutely ridiculous spectacle. I wear the glasses because I have to have a different persona when I step up there.”

And he has never painted a Day Without Hate poster.

It was here behind these glasses that he found a way to bring light to high school, the very place where he had found so much darkness when he was younger.

So then why does he run them? His current role is largely influenced by his past.

He used this passion to collaborate with a group of students who approached him in 2007 with an idea to unite the school in wearing white.

Look at Ben Reed, the teenager, and you won’t recognize him. During high school, Mr. Reed faced long bouts of depression and loneliness.

Eight years later, Day Without Hate has become an institution, with thousands of kids participating across the world.

“I was jaded and bitter in high school,” Mr. Reed said. “When you are feeling down, you are down, and that is all there is in the world.”

“With Day Without Hate, I haven’t ever painted a poster,” he said. “But I can give students that opportunity, and that is something that I am really proud of.”

Flash forward to his senior year. After an Outdoor Lab trip, he knew that he wanted to be a teacher. He turned down the prestigious Journalism program at the University of Missouri, and enrolled at the University of Colorado-Boulder to become an elementary school teacher.

Now after a successful 13 years of working to give students new opportunities, Mr. Reed is moving on. He is taking a job at the district as a Resource Teacher for the Gifted and Talented Department. “I am going to miss working with the Standley Lake kids and the poster parties,” he said. “Maybe I will come over to the school and finally make a poster.”

He moved to Boulder, where everything would change his Junior year. The shooting at Columbine High School in 1999 shook the nation, and impacted Mr. Reed even more.

Although he is leaving the students who he worked with to create a safer school, he will still maintain a role in Day Without Hate, although on a broader level.

“After that, I knew that I had to be in a high school,” he said. In 2002, after a stint at Pomona as a student teacher, Mr. Reed landed at Standley Lake High School. Based on his dark adolescence and the Columbine shooting, he came to the school with a goal. “I wanted to show my students that people can be better than who they are. It’s been a goal of mine my whole life,” he said. “Ultimately, humanity is flawed and messed up, but I still have hope for us.”

“I think that, as a teacher, I’ve had a lot of successes,” he said. “What I’ve learned is that the jagged edges of times that exist during your high school years get smoothed out as you grow older.”

It was with this goal that he started to run school assemblies.

AN ADVERTISER BOUGHT A ONE-PAGE AD FOR EACH ISSUE UNDER THE CONDITION THAT IT BE A PROFILE ABOUT A TEACHER, AND ONE HAD TO BE MY OWN NEWSPAPER ADVISOR. ALTHOUGH I WAS INITIALLY RELUCTANT, I PURSUED THE STORY AND LEARNED HOW TO WEAR SEVERAL HATS IN THE CLASSROOM.

| Esteban Arellano

13

M

r. Ben Reed finds school assemblies absolutely ridiculous.

And he has never painted a Day Without Hate poster. So then why does he run them? His current role is largely influenced by his past. Look at Ben Reed, the teenager, and you won’t recognize him. During high school, Mr. Reed faced long bouts of depression and loneliness. “I was jaded and bitter in high school,” Mr. Reed said. “When you are feeling down, you are down, and that is all there is in the world.” Flash forward to his senior year. After an Outdoor Lab trip, he knew that he wanted to be a teacher. He turned down the prestigious Journalism program at the University of Missouri, and enrolled at the University of Colorado-Boulder to become an elementary school teacher. He moved to Boulder, where everything would change his Junior year. The shooting at Columbine High School in 1999 shook the nation, and impacted Mr. Reed even

“I wanted to show my students that people can be better than who they are. It’s been a goal of mine my whole life,” he said. “Ultimately, human-ity is flawed and messed up, but I still have hope for us.” It was with this goal that he started to run school assemblies. “I was trying to make fun of them, trying to satirize high school assem-blies,” he said. “The whole thing is just such an absolutely ridiculous spectacle. I wear the glasses because I have to have a different persona when I step up there.” It was here behind these glasses that he found a way to bring light to high school, the very place where he had found so much darkness when he was younger. He used this passion to collaborate with a group of students who ap-proached him in 2007 with an idea to unite the school in wearing white. Eight years later, Day Without Hate has become an institution, with thousands of kids participating across the world. “With Day Without Hate, I haven’t ever painted a poster,” he said. “But I can give students that opportunity, and that is something that I am really proud of.” Now after a successful 13 years of working to give students new oppor-tunities, Mr. Reed is moving on. He is taking a job at the district as a Resource Teacher for the Gifted and Talented Department. “I am going to miss working with the Standley Lake kids and the poster parties,” he said. “Maybe I will come over to the school and finally make a poster.” Although he is leaving the students who he worked with to create a safer school, he will still maintain a role in Day Without Hate, although on a broader level. “I think that, as a teacher, I’ve had a lot of successes,” he said. “What I’ve learned is that the jagged edges of times that exist during your high school years get smoothed out as you grow older.” 17


W R I T I N G

. . . you believe That we will

Win

They play in front of a bare crowd. After all, “Not many people go to the Freshman football games,” Foutz said. As they prepare for their next play, a scream comes from the crowd.

Jake Foutz ‘17 shares what the chant means to him Standing on the football field, Jake Foutz ‘17 believes. He believes in dedication. He believes in winning. He believes in his band of brothers. But why should he believe? As a freshman, he did not make his way up the ranks. He did not make varsity, but merely plays quarterback on the freshman team. But that doesn’t affect his belief. He trooped his way through a game against Broomfield last year, his team nearly conquered. But that didn’t affect his belief. They play in front of a bare crowd. After all, “Not many people go to the Freshman football games,” Foutz said. As they prepare for their next play, a scream comes from the crowd. “I!” Foutz turned to see a group of upperclassmen football players. The boys carried on their chant, as Foutz and his team carried out their

“I!” Foutz turned to see a group of upperclass-men football players. The boys carried on their chant, as Foutz and his team carried out their play. And as the crowd jumped, screaming, “I believe that we will win!”, Foutz on the field carried his team to a victory. play. And as the crowd jumped, screaming, “I believe that we will win!”, Foutz on the field carried his team to a victory. That does affect his belief. Here at Standley Lake, his belief is present amongst the whole school. It is heard amongst the loud rumbling crowds during football or basketball games. It is heard in the silent classroomsw. But more than anything, it can be felt inside of everyone. “It’s a sense of pride,” Foutz said. “I learned the chant my first day of high school, and I became a part of the Gators.” This belief, this strong craving for victory, for personal excellence, is what pushes Foutz. It is what pushes this small, unimportant Freshman to want something better for himself. “The freshman team is a good preparation,” Foutz said. “But it just pushes me harder to become a better version of myself.” He should believe, because one day, he hopes to be lead the chant. He should believe, because after all, he is a Gator.

this is so. . .

MY FIRST STORY I EVER WROTE WAS A SMALL PROFILE ABOUT A FELLOW FRESHMAN WHO DREAMED OF BECOMING A FOOTBALL QUARTERBACK. THE BEST PART WAS SEEING HIS WISH COME TRUE FOUR YEARS LATER.

18

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ESTEBAN ARELLANO

That does affect his belief. Here at Standley Lake, his belief is present amongst the whole school. It is heard amongst the loud rumbling crowds during football or basketball games. It is heard in the silent classroomsw. But more than anything, it can be felt inside of everyone.

tanding on the football field, Jake Foutz ‘17 believes.

“It’s a sense of pride,” Foutz said. “I learned the chant my first day of high school, and I became a part of the Gators.”

He believes in dedication. He believes in win-ning. He believes in his band of brothers.

This belief, this strong craving for victory, for personal excellence, is what pushes Foutz.

But why should he believe? As a freshman, he did not make his way up the ranks. He did not make varsity, but merely plays quarterback on the freshman team.

It is what pushes this small, unimportant Fresh-man to want something better for himself.

// esteban arellano

S

But that doesn’t affect his belief. He trooped his way through a game against Broomfield last year, his team nearly conquered. But that didn’t affect his belief.

“The freshman team is a good preparation,” Foutz said. “But it just pushes me harder to become a better version of myself.” He should believe, because one day, he hopes to be lead the chant. He should believe, because after all, he is a Gator.

JOURNALISM FOR ME HAS BEEN ABOUT FLEEING MY COMFORT ZONE. THIS PIECE FORCED ME INTO THAT AS I MET WITH LEADERS ON BOTH SIDES OF THE GUN CONTROL DEBATE AND FOLLOWED A STUDENT WHO RECENTLY PURCHASED AN AUTOMATIC RIFLE. “A STATE SPLIT” SERVED AS A TURNING POINT IN MY CAREER, ALLOWING ME TO ADVOCATE FOR MYSELF IN THE NEWSROOM. IT WAS ALSO AN INCREDIBLY SOBERING EXPERIENCE THAT LED ME TO QUESTION MY OWN BELIEFS AND STEREOTYPES I HELD SO CLOSELY.


O gun.

n his eighteenth birthday, Tyler Davis ‘15 bought a

He drove down to his aunt and uncle’s gun store in Monument. For $10, he put his name, social security, and some other personal information into a state-mandated background check. Thirty minutes later, he drove off with his AR-15, a lightweight rifle. “I have already taken it out for a test drive for target practice,” Davis said. Buying it was quick and it was easy. However, many wonder if it should be that easy. After a slew of violent mass school shootings, including Columbine High School in 1999, Virginia Tech in 2007, and Sandy Hook Elementary in 2012, American politicians immediately sought reform. Nearly a month after the 2012 school shooting in Newtown, Conn., where 26 children were fatally shot, President Barack Obama released a report entitled “Now is the Time.” In it, he called for “closing of background check loopholes” and “banning of military-style assault weapons and high capacity magazines.” In 2013, Gov. John Hickenlooper signed three controversial bills into Colorado law. The laws require universal background checks for every gun purchase to be paid by the buyer and limit ammunition magazines to 15 rounds. This signing made Colorado one of the quickest states in the na-

tion to respond to recent violence. Eileen McCarron, president of Colorado Ceasefire, a non-partisan gun control political committee that was “integral” to the 2013 vote, said, “The awful tragedies caused by too readily available firearms to people who should not have them, had to stop.” However, these new laws were quickly opposed by gun owners. The bills passed with no Republican votes in the Colorado legislature and quickly aroused gun owners who feared the infringement of their second amendment rights. “The rights to keep and bear arms are rights that you cannot just take away from somebody arbitrarily,” Steve Schreiner, President of The Colorado Firearms Coalition, said. This fear of infringement was epitomized in Sept. 2013, when Schreiner’s organization helped gather over 16,000 signatures petitioning for the recall of state senators Angela Giron and John Morse. The senators, from Districts 3 and 11 respectively, were crucial in passing of the new gun control laws passed in 2013. The two senators were repealed two months after the gun control laws were passed and replaced by Republicans. “In 2013, the legislators were definitely not listening,” Schreiner said. “They had their own agenda and they followed it, and they passed laws that are against our right to keep

and bear arms.” The matter was taken to court where gun shop owners, police chiefs, and various other gun rights groups sued Gov. John Hickenlooper over the bills that they believed to limit their second amendment rights. But earlier this year, a federal judge upheld the gun control laws, after believing the plaintiffs lacked standing in their case. McCarron agrees with the court’s decision. “There is nothing that takes the gun away, there is nothing that intrudes on their second amendment rights,” she said. “It’s common sense.” Despite the disputed constitutionality of the laws, Schreiner fears that these new laws will not even be effective. “The magazine bill, which is the most traumative [sic] of the four, is null and void on its face,” he said. “There are people who have magazine outlets where you can order the magazine on Tuesday, and on Saturday you go across the state line to pick it up. The public does not like the laws.” Schreiner is right. According to a poll released by Quinnipiac University, the percent of Americans who support the controversial new bills dropped 4% last April. At the same time, opposition of the bills rose to 56%. What’s more, many accuse the law of being vague. The law allows large-capacity magazines lawfully obtained before Jul. 1, 2013 to be kept without restrictions. Many sheriffs are now refusing to enforce the law. “The first chance that we get, we will repeal [the laws],” Schreiner said. “But, to do that, we need a pro-gun House, Senate, and the governor’s office. That is not necessarily easily achieved as you can see from the last elections.” In the meantime, politicians and gun rights groups across the nation have now turned to different means of keeping

schools safe. In Utah, legislation has allowed teachers to carry their concealed weapons without having to inform administration. While it’s still illegal for teachers to carry weapons on campuses in Colorado, the idea is gaining momentum amongst politicians and teachers alike. In early November, over 500 teachers, a majority of them women, attended a free concealed carry class organized by the Centennial Gun Club. It is expected that in the upcoming legislative session, a bill could be introduced to that could allow teachers in Colorado to carry guns. “Gun-free school zones are attractive to criminals, and they will take advantage of that,” Schreiner said. “If you have armed administrators and teachers who are properly trained, then we will have a very safe school environment.” In an interview with CBS4, Gov. Hickenlooper said, “I’m certainly open to that discussion.” But this sentiment is not shared by advocates of gun control, Democrats, and some teachers. “The day that teachers start carrying guns would be my last day,” Spanish teacher, Mr. Marcos Gonzalez said. “The idea of me carrying my gun in front of my students breaks my heart.” McCarron agrees. “The problem is teachers would never have the level of training of a policeman or a security guard,” she said. “Colorado could beef up its safety by having a greater security presence at schools.” As both gun rights and gun control advocates push for their own agenda, they both work to stop gun violence in schools. “We would love to completely end gun violence,” McCarron said. “But we are coming to learn that it is not very feasible.”

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A N

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I

f you are a Sophomore, Junior, or Senior, feel free to continue, but this is not about you. This is about the “low man on the totem pole.” The Freshy. The freshman. Congratulations! You have officially made it through one year of what should be the “best four years of your life.” So was it everything that you thought it would be? No, it probably wasn’t. All the beauty and glory that was promised to you in your dreams and High School Musical can be redeemed next year. All the parties, self-picked classes, independence, all that you know so little about, is not really a staple of your grade. You had a different year.

able to carry yourself to Sonic and back in that little 30 minute lunch. And you wouldn’t even dare to ask one of the upperclassmen to take you. Because they won’t. Why is it that those kids, just a few years your senior, hate you so much? Well for one, you are kinda “icky”. You loudly talk about the weirdest things. You still think that hanging out in the commons is cool. And if you even have the smallest friendship with an upperclassmen, you think you’re suddenly popular.

An ode to the freshman

No, no, no, you had no parties. Friday nights were filled with homework. If you were a so-called “overachiever”, and managed to get all of this homework done, then you spent the remainder of your weekend brutally navigating every single social media app you had: something to quench your Fear of Missing Out. What happened to these “all-night ragers” that you always saw in the The Promise movies? Yes, in the movies they did seem somewhat wild and out of control, The FORMALITIES but a small (albeit maybe huge) part of you craved that. You desperately wanted to break that innocent, middle school mold of yourself, and maybe just live a little.

If you are a Sophomore, Junior, or Senior, feel free to continue, but this is not about you. This is about the “low man on the totem pole.” The Freshy. The freshman. Congratulations! You have officially made it through one year of what should be the “best four years of your life.” So was it everything that you thought it would be? No, it probably wasn’t.

All the beauty and glory that was promised to you in your dreams and High School Musical can be redeemed next year. All the parties, self-picked classes, independence, all that you know so little about, is not really a staple of your grade. You had a different year. No, no, no, you had no parties. Friday nights were filled with homework. If you were a so-called “overachiever”, and managed to get all of this homework done, then you spent the remainder of your weekend brutally navigating every single social media app you had: something to quench your Fear of Missing Out. What happened to these “all-night ragers” that you always saw in the movies? Yes, in the movies they did seem somewhat wild and out of control, but a small (albeit maybe huge) part of you craved that. You desperately wanted to break that innocent, middle school mold

We strive to deliver the latest news in the freshest and most unique way. Our ultimate goal is to allow our community to utilize The Lake for all their news by creating an easy-to-reach outlet that is entertaining to all.

of yourself, and maybe just live a little. But unless you are some magnificent Freshman god, that probably didn’t happen you. Did you ever eat your nasty middle school lunch, and fantasize about the time when you could eat lunch at Sonic, Taco Bell, Subway, Panda Express, or Qdoba everyday? Yeah, it turns out those places require money in exchange for food. And for that day when you managed to get +$7, you still didn’t get a delicious lunch. Because those places are far away! And again, unless you are some magnificent Freshman god, your legs are not able to carry yourself to Sonic and back in that little 30 minute lunch. And you wouldn’t even dare to ask one of the upperclassmen to take you. Because they won’t. Why is it that those kids, just a few years your senior, hate you so much? Well for one, you are kinda “icky”. You loudly talk about the weirdest things. You still think that hanging out in the commons is cool. And if you even have the smallest friendship with an upperclassmen, you think you’re suddenly popular. And let’s not forget about the worst thing; you still have not made it out of the brutal hell that is

tHE PEOPLE Chaye Gutierrez // Editor-in-Chief Sabrina Pacha // Editor-in-Chief Ben Reed // Advisor Aina Azlan // Cartoonist

puberty.You were the tallest kid in your middle school class, but you are tiny compared to these massive Juniors and Seniors. You still have braces, or worse--gnarly teeth that haven’t been straightened yet. If you’re a guy, then your voice still awkwardly cracks at the worst times. If you’re a girl, then your feet are probably huge, and you haven’t yet figured out how to wear the “right” amount of makeup. But please, don’t think that I am trying to be negative. In fact, this is probably going to best thing that you are going to read about all of your flaws. Because a funny thing about those flaws: everyone has them. 100% of Seniors were once Freshman. They made it all the way through this year, and you did too! Don’t think of these little hiccups as high school ruiners, because everyone hiccups. And think about it this way: there are only two more years until you’ll be a Senior too! There’s only one more year until you can drive. And when you come back from summer, you will be a magnificent high school god, and you will be invited to that party. So in the meantime, get out there, and keep on being yourself. It’s just a part of high school.

And let’s not forget about the worst thing; you still have not made: it out of the brutal hell that is puberty. You were the tallest kid in your middle school class, but you are tiny compared to these massive Juniors and Seniors. You still have braces, or worse--gnarly teeth that haven’t been straight-ened yet. If you’re a guy, then your voice still awkwardly cracks at the worst times. If you’re a girl, then your feet are probably huge, and you haven’t yet figured out how to wear the “right” amount of makeup.

But please, don’t think that I am trying to be negative. In fact, this is probably going to best thing that you are going to read about all of your flaws. Because a funny thing about those flaws: everyone has them. M ay 2 0 1 4 // 3 1 100% of Seniors were once Freshman. They made it all the way through this year, and you did too! Don’t think of these little hiccups as high school ruiners, because everyone hiccups. And think about it this way: there are only two more years until you’ll be a Senior too!

Jamey Burky // Team Editor Cassidy Conlon // Team Editor Kylynn Delohery // Team Editor

Olivia Koontz // Team Editor Alie Settje // Team Editor Emma Staton // Team Editor

Staff Writers // Esteban Arellano Marcus Asmus Sarah Bennett Jorday Gray Nicole Heetland Bethany Keupp Brittany Marks Emma Marlow Natasha McCone Meg Metzger-Seymour

Ty Milliken Jeremy Minnick Tina Muscarelli Maddy Newlon Laurel Nordquist-Zukin Shylah Ogle Kelsey Paquet Ripley Ricketts Brendan Roby Morgan Rubendall Morgan Whitley

Opinions or expressions made by students in this publication are not expressions of board policy. The district and its employees are immune from any civil action based on any expression made for or published by students. The Lake is an open forum for and by the students, faculty, and community of Standley Lake High School. The Lake is willing to accept and print any appropriate articles submitted by the students of SLHS and reserves the right to edit any of these articles. We will not print letters sent to us without a name and signature. Submit letters to standleylakenewspaper@gmail.com

But unless you are some magnificent Freshman god, that probably didn’t happen you. Did you ever eat your nasty middle school lunch, and fantasize about the time when you could eat lunch at Sonic, Taco Bell, Subway, Panda Express, or Qdoba everyday? Yeah, it turns out those places require money in exchange for food. And for that day when you managed to get +$7, you still didn’t get a delicious lunch. Because those places are far away! And again, unless you are some magnificent Freshman god, your legs are not

20

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ESTEBAN ARELLANO

There’s only one more year until you can drive. And when you come back from summer, you will be a magnificent high school god, and you will be invited to that party. So in the meantime, get out there, and keep on being yourself. It’s just a part of high school.


A N

I

E D I TO R I A L

t’s not.

And I think that in honor of Day Without Hate on April 24, we all need to have a little talk about it. For generations we have had a discussion about bullying. At Standley Lake, I would like to think that we are all pretty accepting of those different from us, whether it’s based on gen-der, race, or sexual orientation. But now it seems that calling someone a “f--” doesn’t have anything to do with their sexual orientation, but rather all of the stereotypes of being gay. People are called “gay” if they’re being a little bit too emotional, caring a little too much, or just being a little too feminine. It’s if they take too many selfies, or care too much about their clothes, or like music a little too much.

to assert their own manhood because they live in this self-created society where masculinity is defined by a rigid and outdated set of norms. But they have failed to realize that by calling someone “gay”, they are really limiting their creativity and what they have to offer this world. They’ve created a homogenous genera-tion of dull slur-throwers that refuse to accept anyone different than themselves. That budding photographer who loves to shoot nature landscapes has stopped because he was tormented after posting some of his master-pieces online. That fashion expert now lives in a boring line of gym shorts and Nike shirts that the athletes have dictated.

The other F word

I don’t even understand why it has become the insult it is. It doesn’t make sense. This insult is based on an uncontrollable phenomenon (that’s right, uncontrollable) that attacks a promi-nent part of our community. Calling someone “gay” or a “f--” is just like me calling someone “straight”, ridiculous and just completely inapplicable.

For everyone who thinks calling someone a “F--” is okay It’s not. And I think that in honor of Day Without Hate on April 24, we all need to have a little talk about it. For generations we have had a discussion about bullying. At Standley Lake, I would like to think that we are all pretty accepting of those different from us, whether it’s based on gender, race, or sexual orientation. But now it seems that calling someone a “f--” doesn’t have anything to do with their sexual orientation, but rather all of the stereotypes of being gay. People are called “gay” if they’re being a little bit too emotional, caring a little too much, or just being a little too feminine. It’s if they take too many selfies, or care too much about their clothes, or like music a little too much. I don’t even understand why it has become the insult it is. It doesn’t make sense. This insult is based on an uncontrollable phenomenon (that’s right, uncontrollable) that attacks a prominent part of our community. Calling someone “gay” or a “f--” is just like me calling someone “straight”, ridiculous and just completely inapplicable. No matter how irrelevant the word may be, it has become many people’s biggest weapon of choice. And in doing so, they have created a ridiculously unfair double standard.

People call someone a “f--” for posting too many selfies online, and yet no one stands up to them after they post too many pictures of their car or their (nonexistent) six pack.

allowed to encompass academic and athletic prowess. So despite the changing definition of femininity, why do the “rules” of masculinity stay so rigid?

They harass someone that prefers a certain type of music, while no one makes fun of them for their favorite music.

They shouldn’t, and people’s use of words like “gay” and “f--” is what keeps them in place. They’ve made a culture where everyone needs to be a narrow-minded jerk to fit in. And do you know what my favorite part is? They then go on Twitter and complain about how everyone is so “fake”.

All they have done is made everyone scared to be themselves, including themselves. They call people “f--” to assert their own manhood because they live in this self-created society where masculinity is defined by a rigid and outdated set of norms. But they have failed to realize that by calling someone “gay”, they are really limiting their creativity and what they have to offer this world. They’ve created a homogenous generation of dull slur-throwers that refuse to accept anyone different than themselves. That budding photographer who loves to shoot nature landscapes has stopped because he was tormented after posting some of his masterpieces online.

So for everyone’s benefit, I would like to propose a solution: just let the word die all together. Everyone can finally start doing what they want without living in fear that someone will come around and strike them down. They can take all the selfies they want and listen to all of the Beyonce their hearts desire. And if someone still wants to remain an ignorant idiot, go ahead! Just unfollow and ditch all of the people busy pursuing their passions and go back to the 1930s when saying that word was acceptable. | Esteban Arellano

This isn’t a new phenomenon. For generations boys have been accused of being “less than a man”, “gay”, or “girly”. Over the span of this generation, modern femininity has been allowed to encompass academic and athletic prowess. So despite the changing definition of femininity, why do the “rules” of masculinity stay so rigid?

That fashion expert now lives in a boring line of gym shorts and Nike shirts that the athletes have dictated.

They shouldn’t, and people’s use of words like “gay” and “f--” is what 45 keeps them in place. They’ve made a culture where everyone needs to be a narrow-minded jerk to fit in. And do you know what my favorite part is? They then go on Twitter and complain about how every-one is so “fake”.

This isn’t a new phenomenon. For generations boys have been accused of being “less than a man”, “gay”, or “girly”. Over the span of this generation, modern femininity has been

No matter how irrelevant the word may be, it has become many people’s biggest weapon of choice. And in doing so, they have created a ridiculously unfair double standard.

People call someone a “f--” for posting too many selfies online, and yet no one stands up to them after they post too many pictures of their car or their (nonexistent) six pack. They harass someone that prefers a certain type of music, while no one makes fun of them for their favorite music. All they have done is made everyone scared to be themselves, including themselves. They call people “f--”

So for everyone’s benefit, I would like to propose a solution: just let the word die all together. Everyone can finally start doing what they want without living in fear that someone will come around and strike them down. They can take all the selfies they want and listen to all of the Beyonce their hearts desire. And if someone still wants to remain an ignorant idiot, go ahead! Just unfollow and ditch all of the people busy pursuing their passions and go back to the 1930s when saying that word was acceptable.

ONE OF MY FAVORITE THINGS ABOUT JOURNALISM HAS BEEN FINDING MY VOICE THROUGH EDITORIAL—WHETHER THAT BE AS LIGHTHEARTED AS A CELEBRATION OF THE AWKWARD OR AS CRITICAL AS A DENUNCIATION OF HOMOPHOBIA.

21


P H OTO G R A P H Y A FEW MONTHS INTO JOURNALISM, I DISCOVERED SOME OF OUR AUDIENCE DOESN’T READ A WORD WE WRITE, AND INSTEAD JUST GLANCES THROUGH AT THE PICTURES. THE CLICHE STATES THAT “A PICTURE IS WORTH A THOUSAND WORDS”. ALTHOUGH IT’S OVERUSED, THE SAYING THEN BECAME A FOCUS FOR THE NEXT THREE YEARS AT THE LAKE. WHILE A STORY CAN HOUSE THE QUOTES AND DESCRIPTIONS OF A PERSON, PHOTOGRAPHY IS THE ULTIMATE WAY TO SHARE WHAT I SEE WITH MY READERS. THROUGH CREATIVE PORTRAITS OR SPEEDY SNAPS AT A GAME, I AIM TO TELL A RICH STORY THAT PAIRS WITH MY ACTUAL WRITING.

22

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ESTEBAN ARELLANO

PERHAPS MY MOST PROVOCATIVE AND INTERESTING PHOTOGRAPHY EXPERIENCE I’VE HAD, THIS STORY LED ME TO THE HOME OF A STUDENT WHO RECENTLY PURCHASED AN AUTOMATIC RIFLE. THE PIECE TAUGHT ME HOW TO ADVOCATE FOR MYSELF IN THE NEWSROOM, AS MY USE OF IT MET HESITANCE FROM SEVERAL MENTORS


23


HIGH SCHOOL JOURNALISM IS INCOMPLETE WITHOUT THE QUINTESSENTIAL HOMECOMING GAME. BUT WHILE ALL EYES ARE ON THE FIELD, I’VE BEEN MORE INTERESTED IN TURNING MY LENS ON MOMENTS LESS RECOGNIZED. INSTEAD, I LIKE TO SHOOT THE TUXEDOED MARCHING BAND CONDUCTOR WHO ALSO HAPPENS TO BE HOMECOMING KING, OR THE GIRLS—DONNING THEIR BOYFRIENDS’ JERSEYS—WHO WATCH EAGERLY FROM THE SIDELINES. THROUGH THESE SHOTS, I BELIEVE THE VIEWER CAN GET JUST AS CLEAR A PICTURE OF HIGH SCHOOL SPORTS. 25


P H OTO G R A P H Y

26

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ESTEBAN ARELLANO


YOU CAN LEARN A LOT FROM A PLACE. WITH THAT, I DECIDED TO PHOTOGRAPH THIS ALMOST-EMPTY DINER IN ORDER TO TELL THE STORY OF THE 2 A.M. STRANGERS THAT INHABITED IT. 27


P H OTO G R A P H Y

ONE OF MY FAVORITE THINGS ABOUT THIS COLLECTION IS FINDING THE INTERSECTION BETWEEN PEOPLE AND POLITICS. AS AN AVID PHOTOGRAPHER OF BOTH, I LEARNED WITH THIS STORY THAT I CAN TELL THE STORY OF THE POLITICAL TRAUMAS OF THE DISTRICT BY TELLING THE VISUAL STORY OF THE PEOPLE INVOLVED IN IT.

28

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ESTEBAN ARELLANO


29


30

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ESTEBAN ARELLANO


FOR ME, PHOTOGRAPHY HAS ALSO BEEN COMPRISED OF THE STEPS THAT GO INTO A PHOTO AFTER IT’S BEEN TAKEN. TO THE LEFT, I WEAVED A SET OF PHOTOGRAPHS OF A STUDENT IN AN EXPLORATION OF MODERN MASCULINITY. TO THE RIGHT, I ESTABLISHED A TRI-TONE COLOR THEME THAT WE CARRIED THROUHGOUT AN ISSUE THIS YEAR ABOUT WHAT TO EXPECT AFTER INAUGURATION DAY.

31


D E S I G N DESIGN HAS BECOME A STAPLE OF MY JOURNALISTIC WORK. OVER THE PAST FOUR YEARS, I HAVE LEARNED THAT THE VEHICLE OF A STORY CAN BE JUST AS CRUCIAL AS THE WRITING AND PHOTOGRAPHY IN IT. A FEW YEARS AGO, A MENTOR TOLD ME, “WITHOUT KNOWING YOUR MAGAZINE, I CAN OPEN UP ANY PAGE AND INSTANTLY KNOW IT’S THE LAKE.” I’VE TAKEN THIS TO HEART, PUSHING MYSELF TO MAKE UNIQUE DESIGNS THAT FEEL AIRY AND SIMPLE, YET ENTIRELY TUNED AND RELEVANT FOR EACH INDIVIDUAL PIECE IN OUR MAGAZINE.

32

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ESTEBAN ARELLANO


you talk at least once a week

The Top 4 Apps That You Need to Make it Through the Year

do you talk/text everyday?

does he/she reply with more than one word?

yes

yes

yes

yes

football

mrs. B

wolfram-alpha $2.00 Remember when encyclopedias were the enemy in middle school? Well, they aren’t when they can fit in your pocket! Imagine every single gross encyclopedia/ textbook that you have ever touched crammed into one tiny app...except it is awesome! This bad boy does everything from math to defining new words. Our favorite part is its equation solver. Just plug in any equation, and it will crank out its solution, graph, step-by-step process, and so much more.

What’s the craziest thing that happened at the Homecoming game? “My favorite chant is ‘Shake Your Booty’. At the Homecoming game, the crowd chanted at Mrs. B to shake it...and she did!”

“I took a selfie with Mrs. B. Also, Mr. Sargent had a pretty cool beanie cap that his wife made for him on.”

taylor mcrae ‘15

adam williams ‘15

“The craziest thing that happened at a football game was when the Poms did their performance at the end, and they made a ‘15 with their poms. It hit me that I’m a senior. It’s my year and I’ve waited to see that ‘15 spelled out.”

“The craziest thing is that it’s our last Homecoming game. It’s just weird to think about that after four years, you go everyday and you just get to hang out with your friends, and it’s just weird that it’s your last. I wouldn’t want to spend it any other way than with my best friends.”

tori baca ‘15

Isaac castaneda ‘15 | Mezgan Aslamy

GO GET ‘em Students go wild as Connor Durant ‘15 scores a touch down at the Homecoming Football Game.

quizlet FREE Stop carrying around all those pesky flashcards and put them in your phone.

do your friends approve?

you’ve known each other for at least 3 weeks

NO

yes

SO YOU WANT TO ASK SOMEONE OUT

you are not ready for a relationship with them. Save yourself some embarassment and do not date

yes

no

when you cross paths, do you talk?

YES You two are perfect for a relationship. Go pick up some roses pronto!

yes

Start by choosing if you’ve talked with your crush or not.

do you have the same friends?

*Take it with a grain of salt. 90% of us here at The Lake are single*

Notability FREE

yes

Handwritten notes are so last year. Get this app, and you can type, draw, or highlight all of your notes straight from your computer, phone, or tablet.

do you have the same interests? does he/she favorite your pictures? have you gone on a date before?

If you log on to Infinite Campus to check your grades (if you still

yes!

yes

MAYBE

they’re either not into you, or you don’t know each other well enough. text them, and just talk about it!

yes

campus check your grades), you are doing portal it wrong. Get this app, log in once, and quickly check your grades. FREE

the idea of meeting parents. . .

eh...

yes

| Brittany Marks and Esteban Arrellano

| Esteban Arrellano

the drink beat It’s fall. It’s time to put away those old ice drinks for some nice toasty teas and coffees. So ditch the pumpkin spice lattes for these top drinks to spice up your brisk fall morning.

10 October 2014 | Issue 1

Mountain sound

What your phone case says about you bling case

state case

Anna Mounts ‘18 daydreams of California. When you daydream of your happy place, this is the state that comes to mind. You want to surround yourself with it why not surround your phone with it?

pink case

sports case

Tazo Earl Grey Tea

Earl grey has been known for containing the soothing flavors of bergamot oil. Maybe this fall you’d like to switch it up and add a little spice. A half a teaspoon of cinnamon and a little bit of milk will work wonders for that crisp cloudy day.

Ball is life. Whether you love the You may have gotten this case for free Lakers like Shannon Patrick ‘18, you when you bought those sweat pants, have an unmatched love for your team or you are pretty obsessed with that and everyone who thinks otherwise is store, like Ty Hammack ‘17. wrong. | Emma Marlow | Natasha McCone | Emma Medley

Caylie Hartman ‘15

kellen muller ‘16

Mr. zehnder

“I’m a big fan of Kansas.”

“Kentucky.”

“Duke.”

“Because it’s KU they usually have a big expectation.”

“Well just staying hot because they’re doing really good right now.”

“They’re not quick enough inside. They’re rated like fourth or fifth in the nation right now (as of Jan 16th, 2015).”

“Not to always go for a good team because it’s just a good team.”

“Don’t pick the underdog, they are going to lose.”

“Go check out ESPN.”

5 hrs.

adventure time

10 hrs.

house of cards

22 hrs.

orange is the new black

23 hrs.

american horror story

1 day, 2 hrs.

The walking dead

1 day, 14 hrs.

Parks and Recreation

1 day, 14 hrs.

breaking bad

1 day, 23 hrs.

mad men

standley lake’s guide to march madness

10 March 2015 | Issue 4

Tazo Passion Tea

| Brittany Marks

You Me and Apollo

In order to get you ready for March Madness, we asked people here at SLHS: who are you rooting for? what challenges will that team have to overcome? what advice do you have for teams trying to make their own bracket?

Get it at any grocery store

Despite the lack of caffeine, you’ll have your senses popping with the exuberance of flavor. There’s no going wrong with a mixture of rose, hibiscus, orange peel, and of course, a hint of passion fruit. No need to add anything to this tea. It’s tart and sweet enough to speak for itself.

Spring break is coming up. If a Netflix marathon is first priority on your list of plans, here’s the breakdown of the time it takes to watch the shows you should watch, or the shows you have already been watching.

Black Mirror

Just like Bjorn Bireklund ‘18, you’re just trying to change the world one sequin at a time. You just have a sparkly personality and you stand out like a diamond in the rough.

we have a roof

Caribou Cross Fox Decaf

Step up your Netflix game

Close up on one of colorado’s most unique bands

You Me and Apollo is a symbol of what people love about Colorado. They sing about friends. About Nature. About Home. Best recognized by their one-of-a-kind forms of indie and alternative rock, their sound attracts everyone from casual listeners to music critics. You Me And Apollo won the Americana award in 2014’s ”Unsigned Only Music Competition” for the song “I Don’t Want to Be Loved” and has been named one of the best Colorado bands by Paste Magazine. Unfortunately, the band split up in late 2014 after the release of their latest album, but their music lives on in their avid fans. | Gordon Saur Our favorite song is:

Get it at Caribou Coffee

This blend is a darker roast that has a hint of berry to help your cold fall morning be a little warmer. It goes down smoothly when you take that first sip and it doesn’t take a refined palette to know that this coffee is erupting with flavor. This coffee can deliver not one, but two flavors!

2 days, 12 hrs.

the office

2 days, 23 hrs.

friends

3 days, 15 hrs.

Get it at any grocery store

| Emma Marlow | Emily Leo

Study Space Here are a few unfamiliar places for you to give a shot at for your next study sesh.

two rivers 77th and wadsworth Two Rivers is a great cheap place to study by yourself or with a group. With free Wi-Fi and an outlet under the seats, it is easy to plug in your laptop and work. Everyone who works there are friendly, and make it pleasant to be there. Once you order, you can sit at a booth seat, or a large table for groups. Two Rivers is a fantastic place to come right after school until they close at 6 o’clock.

dexter

3 days, 16 hrs.

gossip girl

3 days, 19 hrs.

Ziggi’s COffee

grey’s anatamoy

4 days, 18 hrs.

Gilmore Girls

4 days, 19 hrs.

104th and federal Imagine walking into a place you’ve never been before, and having it feel like home instantly. That is the feeling Ziggi’s Coffee gives you. They offer a wide variety of tea and coffee flavors including frozen coffees and frappuccinos. They carry snacks that you can enjoy on the extremely comfortable couches.

Dress your best

We know that you’re sick of wearing the same old thing on Saint Patrick’s Day, a plain old green t-shirt. We have some tips for you to look your best, but mostly so you don’t get pinched. Wear normal colors like white, black, or grey, and add green accents to your outfit. Or get a green manicure with either normal green polish or green french tips. Put a green handprint on your face to show your St Patty’s day spirit, or whip out an army green coat. | Emma Marlow | Emma Medley

| Emma Medley | Gordon Saur

11

11

EVER SINCE I JOINED STAFF, I FELL IN LOVE WITH DESIGN. THIS FIRST CAME ABOUT WHEN I WAS ABLE TO DESIGN A STYLE FOR OUR SHORT READS SECTION, THE RIGHT ANGLE (TRA). THROUGH A LOT OF EXPERIMENTATION WITH COLORS AND PHOTOS, I CREATED A DESIGN STYLE THAT WE CARRIED THROUGH FOR AN ENTIRE YEAR.

33


D E S I G N

THE

BEST THINGS SINCE

SLICED BREAD

1

2015 WAS AN EXCITING YEAR FOR BOOKS, MOVIES, MUSIC, AND TECHNOLOGY. HERE ARE THE FAVORITE THINGS THAT WE TRIED THIS YEAR, FOR YOU TO ENJOY TOO. BUT DON’T WORRY: JUST BECAUSE IT’S NOW 2016 DOESN’T MEAN YOU STILL CAN’T JAM TO BIEBER.

MUSIC 1 RODEO BY TRAVI$ SCOTT Rodeo is eccentric, unpredictable, and absolutely consuming. That’s the first thing that you need to know about up-and-coming rapper Travi$ Scott’s sophomore album. Its wild and maximal sound rivals Kanye West, yet at the same time, Rodeo is nothing at all like anything Yeezus has ever made. Travi$ Scott has made his own style by not having one: one minute he is Yeezus himself and the next he is Kid Cudi.

“Travis Scott’s new album, Rodeo, encompasses a lot of genres,” Cassie Gardner ‘16 said. To see what he is all about, check out his songs “Apple Pie” or “Impossible”. His versatility is even seen in the wide array of artists on the album: Kanye West, The Weeknd, Future, 2 Chainz, and many more make an appearance. In other words, listen to Rodeo if you want to be entirely reintroduced to the rap game.

2 25 BY ADELE All of this hubbub about Adele is very, very well-deserved. She greets us with the hauntingly real first line: “Hello, it’s me” (a phrase that has already gained so much popularity and one that tell us that we are in for a treat). But the hearty and wildly popular “Hello” is like a delicious appetizer that at once fills our appetite and leaves us desperate for more. Luckily, there are 11 more songs. Adele is not afraid to upset a few with her heart-wrenching “When We Were Young” and “All I Ask”. But don’t think “25” is just a tissue-consuming opera: songs like “I Miss You”, “Water Under the Bridge”, and “River Lea” pack a huge punch and a break from all the sadness. Adele’s 25 is the most authentic music of the year.

| Esteban Arellano

3 PURPOSE BY JUSTIN BIEBER Justin Bieber released an album this year, receiving positive reviews because it is an improvement from Bieber’s past couple of years.

“My favorite album this year was Purpose because it’s a good comeback from his very rude and selfish phase,” Maylynn Marlow ‘17 said. If you want to get your groove on, Purpose is an excellent album to listen to. Bieber’s album consists of a mix of R&B, EDM, and pop. One of the best songs on his new album is, “What Do You Mean?” which entails a mix of all the genres. The album also includes multiple piano ballads in which Bieber reflects upon his personal missteps. In an effort to show he’s a better person, Bieber says, “I try my best not to let this happen again.” Bieber’s outros coupled with the R&B in Purpose is what makes it a great album and one of the best in 2015. | Maxin Uhrich

| Esteban Arellano

2

5

3

APPLE WATCH—FROM $350 SAMSUNG GEAR S2 FROM $299 FITBIT SURGE—FROM $250

20

30

50

% OF SLHS STUDENTS CHOSE RODEO AS THE BEST ALBUM OF 2015

% OF SLHS STUDENTS CHOSE 25 AS THE BEST ALBUM OF 2015

% OF SLHS STUDENTS CHOSE PURPOSE AS THE BEST ALBUM OF 2015

20 January 2016 | Issue 3

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ESTEBAN ARELLANO

4

TECHNOLOGY 4

WEARABLES

2015 has seen a massive amount of new technology available to the consumer, the most popular being wearable technology. This new wave of tech, with products like Samsung Gear, the Apple Watch, and the Fitbit Surge, works as a connection to your phone, supposedly helping with productivity and fitness.

5

PHONES

By now, you’re probably tired of hearing about Apple technology, but the truth is, they have a lot to offer with capabilities to connect devices, and they also have the largest available library for apps, games, and music. And, at the center of Apple’s growing universe is the new iPhone 6s. Capable of 4K video, with the best camera available for a phone, the 6s takes the prize for best phone of 2015.

HOVERBOARDS Forgetting the little Segway things that people on YouTube ride, several versions of the hoverboard have appeared for the first time since 1985. Using magnets, Lexus has made a real hoverboard, capable of going over water by means of a track laid into concrete, like a magnetic train. Although it is not available to consumers, the Lexus invention is the closest thing we’ve seen to Marty McFly’s board. Currently, though, the only “hoverboard” you can buy is the Onewheel which works like a skateboard with one wheel in the middle, allowing you to move back and forth like a hoverboard. | Gordon Saur

21


WHAT’S GOING TO BE THE NEXT BEST THING?

“I like Pitch Perfect 2 because the movie was really funny and I also liked the music in it.”

ALBUM

ISS

SIM ON E TAN GER INE

| Esteban Arellano

| Gordon Saur

22 January 2016 | Issue 3

DR AM

- ZACH TURNER '16

FAR FROM THE MADDING CROWD

NIGHT

GRANDMA

THE OV ER

CH ILD RE N

RC EA WA K

EN S AR TIA EX-M N AC HIN A FUR IOU THE M S7 AN FR OM U.N.C .L.E. ANT-M AN

I

TH EM

:T HE FO

"I really enjoyed Straight Outta Compton. I liked the storyline and I’m a fan of hip hop.”

BY THE SEA

50 SHAD ES OF GR EY INSID E OUT PAD DIN GTO THE N PEA NU CIN TS DE MO RE TH VIE LLA EG O O D DIN O SA UR

“I liked the special effects, and the movie had a great plot.”

- ELLIOT MCNEAVE ‘18

ACTION

ND LA W O RR O M NS TO INIO AX M DM EN MA SM G KIN RLD THE WO SSIC JURA RT 2 RY PA KINGJA MOC

“Finding Nemo” is a staple for most kids. The sequel, which focuses on the eccentric Dory (voiced by the hilarious Ellen Degeneres), is bound to be just as great.

SC I- F

MISSION IMPOSSIBLE

FINDING DORY EXPECTED: JUN. 17, 2016

2 CK RE W AIN TR SPY L RO IRL CA ISH G DAN THE KLYN BROO

ALOHA

2 AVENGERS

BY ANTHONY DOERR

The book All The Light We Cannot see is the best book of 2015. Winning the Pulitzer Prize for fiction and becoming a bestseller, this fantastic work of of literature has a lot to offer. The book tells the story of two children living in two different countries during World War II and how their paths cross. The first we meet is Marie-Laure, a girl living in Paris who has gone blind and is forced to memorize the streets of her city, Nazi occupied Paris, and then, the orphan boy Werner, who eventually crosses paths with Marie-Laure in the famous French city of Saint-Malo. With ties to history throughout its pages, All the Light We Cannot See gives the reader a connection to the characters. But it is not the tremendous characters, the familiar setting, or the fresh take on history that gives this book the crown for best of 2015. Author Anthony Doerr’s telling of the story, with his vibrant details and ability to keep us turning the pages, makes us feel like he experienced the book first hand. Doerr is truly a masterful storyteller, making All the Light We Cannot See a book to be saved in history.

ANT THE REVEN EIGHT ATEFUL THE H N PTO COM S UTTA JOB TO IGH VE STE STRA EED CR S PIE FS Y O JO E G ID BR

STA RW AR S

BOOKS

D TE

MOST LIKELY TO WIN AN OSCAR

SELMA *

ALL THE LIGHT WE CANNOT SEE

MOVIE

CO ME DY

‘71

E ROMANC

SPOTLIGHT

GOOGLE CARDBOARD

DO C.

A

EVER EST THE BIG SHORT

- JONAH STATON ‘17 WE’RE YOUN PITC G HP ERFE SIST CT 2 ERS TH ED UF TH F EI NT ER N

TE EN AG EG IRL

IRIS

YIN ED TH

APP EN ED M

AMY

D AN

FA

AT H

S WN R TO PAPE O MB TRU OM RO L GIR G PE DO

RL EA

DIA RY O WH

If you have seen people walking around with a cardboard box strapped to their heads, don’t worry, you will be soon. This cheap invention by Google is a stunning first leap into Virtual Reality, where you can immerse yourself in scenes around the world.

“It was really funny and I recommend not watching it with your parents.”

WHILE

ND EA

Sia has already blown us away with “Chandelier”, “Wild Ones”, and “Elastic Heart”. Based on the exhilarating single “Alive”, this is going to be a crazy album.

HE NAMED ME MALALA

M

THIS IS ACTING BY SIA EXPECTED: JAN 29, 2016

TECHNOLOGY

- KALE KIZER ‘17

MOVIES

- ABBY GRANIER ‘17

SPECTRE

PSSSSSST If you are a quirkier, more curious listener, check out Return to the Moon by EL VY, a new side project of The National’s Matt Berninger. This album ties Berninger’s deep baritone voice with unusual sounds that come together to make for an interesting listen and a sure favorite.

“I really liked the movie Selma because it shined the light on the civil rights movement.”

“I liked Jurassic World because I thought the dinosaurs were cool and I enjoyed the development of the story line and the transitions between scenes.”

- ELI UHRICH ‘19

“[‘Inside Out’] is really an original movie, you don’t see other movies like it.”

- BROOKE OLDS ‘17

23

WE ALWAYS SEEM TO TURN SOME HEADS WHEN WE TALK ABOUT “STD’S”. HOWEVER, “STORY TELLING DEVICES” ARE ONE OF THE MOST CRUCIAL ELEMENTS IN A GOOD MAGAZINE DESIGN. WE LOVE TO FIND NEW WAYS TO PULL READERS INTO STORIES, AND THINGS LIKE STATISTICS, INTERVIEWS, AND PULLED QUOTES ACHIEVE JUST THAT. FOR “THE BEST THINGS SINCE SLICED BREAD”, I CHOSE TO BASE AN ENTIRE PIECE AROUND THESE STD’S. 35


D E S I G N

36

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ESTEBAN ARELLANO


I NEEDED A BALANCED AND POWERFUL DESIGN FOR ONE OF THE MOST IMPORTANT STORIES IN MY CAREER. I FEEL THIS DESIGN ACCOMPLISHES JUST THAT, BALANCING A LONGER STORY, A LARGE SERIES OF PHOTOS, DETAILED STD’S (STORY TELLING DEVICES), WHILE ALSO MAINTAINING A REFRESHING SENSE OF WHITE SPACE.

37


D E S I G N

STORIES FROM THE DINER Silverware scratching across plates, dishes clattering in the kitchen, lone figures occupying the stools at the counter. Anything a typical diner would look and sound like. But there’s more. There’s more than just hash brown grease and black coffee. We wiped away some of the grill smoke to uncover the intricate lives of the people inhabiting the Denver Diner at the wee hours of the night. Here are some of the stories that were served up to show you that there is more to strangers than glances in passing.

5:05 A.M. When I first met Jim Hopkins, he was sitting quietly, drinking coffee at 5:05 on a Saturday morning. I asked him what he was doing and he replied that he was taking a break. As the conversation continued, he explained that he was a part-time driver for Uber and was taking his mid-shift break just before the sun appeared over the mountains. By the end of the conversation, it became clear that he was also taking a break to consider the possibilities for the next chapter of his life. “I was born in Denver and I had a courier service where I delivered prescription meds to skilled nursing facilities, assisted living homes, and Alzheimer’s units,” Hopkins said. Things seemed pretty stable for Hopkins until 2008 rolled around and shook up his entire life. “After the downturn, for the next few years after that, it was as though I was getting hired to get laid off and then hired to get laid off again,” Hopkins said. “Looking back, it’s like my thirties, forties, and fifties sucked.” Hopkin’s work in IT and running a courier service were important parts of his life, but they don’t come close to rivaling his true passion. For 18 years, Hopkins spent part of the year teaching handicapped kids how to ski at Winter Park. The job wasn’t easy, but it gave Hopkins a sense of purpose and inspired one of his most cherished memories. “Not all of the students could communicate with you verbally,” Hopkins said. “This one student just obeyed me to a fault—all of my verbal instructions or hand gestures or whatever. But he never said anything, so it was hard to gauge if I was getting through to him. Well, we were required to eat lunch with our students and then when we were ready to go, he offered me his chips. It was really a recognition that everything was okay and that there was communication—even if it wasn’t in a conventional sense.” Now retired—from his old job and from skiing—Hopkins takes a few hours a week to drive people around the city he loves. Above: Jim Hopkins sits at the diner and talks about his life. He spent eighteen years teaching handicapped kids how to ski and now works as an Uber driver.

20 March 2016 | Issue 4

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“I feel like I’m an ambassador to the city,” Hopkins said. “I actually get kind of choked up about it because I’m really pleased how much people like Denver. It’s a nice feeling.” As Hopkins mentioned he should get back on the road, I asked him a final question that seemed to stop him in his tracks: what are your plans for the future? Hopkins paused for a few moments and then responded in a hesitant yet assured manner. “I think they’re probably still being formulated,” Hopkins said. “I look at it as I’m in my third trimester. 0-30, 30-60, and 60-90. I just want to live it in comfort and enjoy it.” As Hopkin’s break came to a close, he finished his coffee and walked back to his car. I’m not sure that he knows exactly where he’s headed, but I’m sure Hopkins will end up right where he, and everyone else, needs him to be. l | Christina Rudolph

1:26 A.M.

“YOU KN OW W HAT YOU’R E

He was silent when I asked him his name. Based on his broken English, I assumed he didn’t understand my question.

D OIN G EVENTUALLY —IT PICKS

“Oh, I can’t,” he said after a long pause. “Just call me...Mike.”

- SCOTT MAR LOW E

Initially I was confused by his pseudonym, but after speaking with him for a few minutes, I learned that he gave it because “Mike” was not living his true life.

11:00 P.M.

YOU ALON G THE WAY . ”

He has always been on the road. As a kid, he went on the road all the way from Mexico to the States, chasing the American Dream to forge a better world for himself.

Scott Marlowe seemed content, as he sat reading a paperback book in his flowery hawaiian shirt. As I approached him and introduced myself, he greeted me with a warm smile.

In doing so, he completely shed his past life. By the age of 27, he took a job as a truck driver, pushing himself onto the road again. He started out locally, and then as he gained more experience, he asked for longer and longer routes. Six years into work he bought his own truck, spending weeks away from his family. “I got two kids, and I want them not to forget about me,” he said. “I want them to call me ‘daddy’ still.” Mike tried to return to Denver and his family, but when his pay was cut, he had to go back on the road. But still wanting to be with his family, he decided to bring his oldest with him. “When my oldest kid was five, he worked with me for six months,” he said. “I liked it, and he used to like it too.” But being a parent on the road became difficult. “One time we drove to Tennessee and we were at the Driver’s Lounge in Tempe, there were no other drivers,” he said. “I put the TV on SpongeBob SquarePants. A couple of drivers came in, and asked, ‘Are you watching that?’ They asked me if I was a driver and laughed. I said yes. It was embarrassing.” That was the tipping point for him. When he made a stop back through

Above: There is an empty stool where “Mike” previously sat. The real “Mike” was never there, only the ghost of who he once was and the possibility of who he may become. Right: Scott Marlowe shares his perspective on life and how the Air Force brought him to Colorado. After another ten years, he found his passion in computers and realized that life is never set in stone.

Denver, he left his son at home to start school, and continued on with the long routes that he still works today. I asked him if he wants his son to ever join him again in the future. “I want him to have more choices than just that,” he said. “It’s the American dream. I am not sure it’s possible anymore.” Beaten down in America, Mike is now considering returning to Mexico, where his father has a ranch. He wants to go back to his true home. “People are humble [there],” he said. “They’re free to the world. They’re free to do whatever they want.” He wants to return to a world where he can be himself. “I just don’t know if I am the real me here,” he said. “It’s been hard to come here to the US, because I had all of these big dreams. But I can tell you, driving a truck all my life with my son wasn’t a part of it.” So at the diner, I didn’t get to see the real Mike, who is still left in Mexico. When I asked him if I could take his picture, he got up, put on his coat, told me to take a picture of the empty stool, and got back out on the road. l | Esteban Arellano

22 March 2016 | Issue 4

At first he was somewhat hesitant to answer my questions, but as we continued on, he became more vocal, sharing what drew him to Colorado. “The Air Force brought me here,” he said. “I like planes.” Marlowe quickly moved through the military flight ranks. “I got a job working at Lowry as an instructor after three years, which is really crazy because normally you have to be five or six years in before you become an instructor, but that was a strange set of circumstances,” Marlowe said. “I learned a lot. I’d say if you ever have the chance to be an instructor, do it.” He said that in itself, teaching is just as much of a learning experience for the teacher as it is for the students.

In spite of the pressures that are on our plates, Marlowe realizes that we can never really judge the value of issues other people deal with. “A lot of things that you think are just kind of crazy and stupid end up being things that people really have to deal with sometimes,” Marlowe said. “That dog meant a lot to that kid and I had to sit him down and explain to him that you can’t go home because your dog died.” After spending several years in the military, Marlowe decided he wanted to pursue something different, and this brought him into a world he had never really experienced. “After ten years I had to make a lot of decisions,” Marlowe said. But he emphasized that adjusting to a civilian life wasn’t particularly challenging. “I don’t think I’ve really had a whole lot of hard decisions outside of my job, which is kind of nice,” Marlowe said.

in the realm of technology, where he now resides as a database administrator and systems engineer. He said he wasn’t always completely sure which direction his life would take, but that his passion revealed itself over time. “What you’re good at kind of picks you along the way,” Marlowe said. “For me that was computers.” Marlowe recognizes that in life, things reveal themselves over time. “You know what you’re doing eventually—[it] picks you along the way,” Marlowe said. With that, Marlowe went back to his book and his coffee, leaving me with the realization that even when we think we’ve got a locked plan of what our future is going to look like, life can turn around and surprise us with a new opportunity that just might send us in the direction we were hoping for. l | Emily Leo

He went on to pursue a college degree,

“If you really want to master something, you have to teach it—no matter how many times you’ve already done it,” Marlowe said. “You learn so much. Teaching anything—no matter what it is—it helps you a lot with how to interact with people on a regular basis and it expands your horizons hugely.” With this, he made it easier to understand that even when you reach positions of authority and merit in life, you still have room to grow and evolve. Though he was appreciative in his reminiscing of his time as an instructor, Marlowe mentioned that sometimes there were difficult situations that were not always easy to maneuver. He spoke of the strict rules regarding periods of leave from the air base. “About six weeks in as an instructor, a student came to me and told me his dog died and he wanted to go home on leave,” Marlowe said. “I was in equal parts, [thinking] ‘that’s so terrible’ and also wanting to laugh because it’s so ridiculous, but you can’t laugh because it’s real.”

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OUR STAFF AFFECTIONATELY REPURPOSED A POPULAR CAMPAIGN SLOGAN: MAKE WHITE SPACE GREAT AGAIN. FOR ME, WHITE SPACE IS THE BREAD AND BUTTER OF MY DESIGN STYLE; IT ALWAYS CHALLENGES ME TO BALANCE STORY ELEMENTS, AND I BELIEVE IT WAS WHAT LED ME TO WIN THE NSPA’S 1ST PLACE MAGAZINE DESIGN HONOR FOR THIS PIECE.

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D E S I G N

finally watched Star Wars

came out to myself The fact of the matter is that I did not come out to myself for many years after I first realized that I was gay. I could not bring myself to say the word lesbian aloud for many months even after I had accepted that I had no interest in kissing boys. Like so many things in life, I put it off until the last possible second, until I had no choice but to face the thoughts that I had refused to look in the eye for as long as I could remember. When I finally did, I remember thinking how different it was to see the world through eyes that weren’t lying to themselves. Everything was in color now; life was so much more vibrant once I started refusing to censor my own thoughts. I had spent so many years forcing myself to think in ways that I thought were normal, obsessing over boys and sex because as long as I was accepted it didn’t matter that I was being dishonest. Things are so much better now that I am honest. I am so happy that I let my demons out of the closet—it made room for so many other things. | Sara Cooley

am on the pursuit of happiness You all know the song “The Pursuit of Happiness” by Kid Cudi and well, I’m on my own pursuit of happiness. The song is obviously about your pursuit of happiness but I also believe it’s about how people can’t tell you how to live and I also think it’s how you get through the times of your life that are bad. It’s about how you go so low in life and how you bring yourself back from that place. So I’ve been through many rough times that bring me to those low places and I’m constantly on my pursuit. I’m always thinking of ways that help me to bring me closer to the end of my pursuit, whether it’s music, friends, or socializing. Every journey has to end somehow and at different times and my pursuit will take as long as I need. | Ty Milliken

Everything fell into place. I got all the references. I finally understood why people talked weirdly and laughed about someone named Yoda. I finally understood the weird two-buns-on-the-side-of-your-head hairstyle. I finally understood what a Wookie was. I witnessed the Star Wars franchise’s love for dismemberment, (seriously, I’m waiting for Rey’s hand to get cut off), and the tragic story of Anakin Skywalker (did anyone else find his whole thing with Padmé weird? Dude, she was like 12 when you were 5). And now, I truly understand why The Force Awakens made over a billion dollars. After all, it’s been 30 years since Return of the Jedi. I can only imagine the pain of waiting for the progression in story. And it doesn’t bother me at all that *spoilers for The Force Awakens* dies (why...). Needless to say, the Star Wars tag is now my best friend on Tumblr (the fan theories are too real). And now, when Episode VIII rolls around December 2017, I will no longer be uncultured as I once was. By the way it’s “No, I am your father”, not “Luke, I am your father”. Everything I’ve been told is a lie.

see true equality This world we live in claims to be equal and fair, but I’m just not able to see it. Gay people are abused, Mexicans are hated, Muslims are designated as terrorists, and yet we claim to be a land of equality and freedom? This is something I can’t wrap my head around. If I fight for equality, I will fight for all. I won’t pick and choose specific groups that I just so happen to like. When I finally see “America, the land of the free and brave” I will be proud to be an American. We’ve fought and we’ve cried for equality throughout our history and we settle for this? . How can we accomplish world peace if we jump to conclusions about so many people? Muslims aren’t terrorists. Gays aren’t abominations. Mexicans aren’t rapists. Stop taking somebody else’s word for it and open your eyes. When I see true equality, I’ll be an American and I’ll be proud of it. | AJ Ehrhardt

| Kevin Han

when I A COLLECTION OF MINI-EDITORIALS

get to where I’m going When I get where I’m going, I’ll be a makeup artist for movies and tv shows. Makeup artists make the shows that you watch everyday look awesome. I discovered this shortly after I began season 5 of The Walking Dead and started Supernatural—both shows I’m kinda obsessed with. It was the beginning of what I really want, I had bounced around from career to career and then found what I really wanted to do. Picture this, it was a Sunday afternoon I started trying some out-there makeup, it started as a simple cut with a bruise. It was good enough to scare my mom and my aunt. This was my first attempt at the bloody gore side of makeup, and it worked. Soon after I got obsessed and couldn’t stop. Halloween was a trip or more of a pleading “if you need makeup for Halloween or know someone that does, give them my number please.” I talked to and showed as many people as possible, desperately waiting for someone to ask another question and start a conversation.Then I landed a “job”. When I say “job” it was two of my good friends that I had showed some pictures of my work, and they asked me to do some makeup on them. The setup was shaky, we met in the lunchroom during our shared off hour on a Wednesday block day. It turned out good. Well good is a stretch. It was good for what supplies I had. Then I kept getting better and better at not only regular makeup but both glam and gore—the fun and gross, messy side of it all. I have spent countless dollars just to get the perfect bruise and the perfect color of dried blood (still working on that one). One thing that I will not do is a clown. Never. Ever. No. The Joker doesn’t count as a clown, anyway. | Grace Johnson

die grow up When I grow up I’ll no longer be able to hang out with the ‘homies’ as often I do. I won’t be attending the same school, we will be going our separate ways and continuing on with our own lives. I see my friends almost every day of the week and before I know it, I won’t be saying, “See ya next break!” Cherish and appreciate every moment that you spend with your friends. Soon, you won’t be with them as much as you are now. When I grow up, I won’t be able to walk into my mom’s room and ask for a back massage. Ever since I started playing sports in Pre-K, I knew I could rely on her to get the kinks and aches out of my body. Momma is always going to be there, but when I grow up, it’s not going to be the same as it is today. | Maxin Uhrich

found my outlet I wasn’t exactly looking for one. It just came to me. It was the summer right after sophomore year and I was in the midst of new (kinda old, really) found feelings. I didn’t really know what to do with those feelings, considering my original plan had been to ignore them until they eventually and hopefully went away. I had an empty journal just laying around, so I picked up a pen, flipped to a blank page, and began writing. That’s when I found my outlet. And for the last 10 months, I’ve half-filled journals upon journals with little late night or early afternoon thoughts. When I found my outlet, everything else seemed to fall into place. I’ve learned to channel my black and white emotions into colorful words on a blank piece of paper and create something beautiful instead of keeping it bottled up. I’ve learned to speak in metaphors-- because I’ve taught myself to see the comparison to beauty in every situation. I’ve learned that not everything in life has to be ignored, that it’s always best to acknowledge the hard things. And when I found my outlet, I found myself somewhere along the way.

People are going to laugh when they hear the story, and then feel terrible and instantly apologize. It’s going to be like a scene out of a Stanley Kubrick or Quentin Tarantino movie. Absolutely cinematic. I don’t know what it is just yet, but it will be something glorious. Why? Because people always remember how others die. Kurt Cobain—Heroin. Elvis Presley—Something to do with the toilet. Tom Simpson—High on speed, drunk, leading the tour de France, and having your heart explode riding your bike up one of the hardest mountains in the world. Your death is your last moment in life to make an impression, to give those around you emotion. So I’m going to make sure people feel bad about laughing. | Gordon Saur

| Kayla Pray

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28 April 2016 | Issue 5

CONTRAST CAN BE SUCH A SUBTLE YET POWERFUL TOOL. IN ADDITION TO FULL-LENGTH EDITORIALS, OUR MAGAZINE ALSO PUBLISHES COLLECTIONS OF MINI-EDITORIALS WITH A COMMON THEME. FOR THE DESIGN ABOVE, I EXPERIMENTED WITH A BLACK-AND-WHITE CONTRAST TO ENUNCIATE THE CONTRAST IN THE EDITORIALS THEMSELVES.

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the lake

ONE OF THE MOST REWARDING PARTS OF BEING EDITOR-INCHIEF IS HAVING THE PRIVILEGE TO DESIGN THE COVER EACH ISSUE. YET IT’S ONE OF THE MOST DAUNTING TASKS BECAUSE IT REQUIRES DISTILLING AN ENTIRE ISSUE INTO A MEANINGFUL VISUAL PACKAGE.

the lake 3 girls 480 seconds 1 Journey Standley Lake High School | 9300 W 104th Avenue | Westminster, CO 80021 | USA | Planet Earth | Milky Way Volume 28 | Issue 1 October 2016

Inauguration Day 2017: The future of america

NAMASTE

&

CHILL

Standley Lake High School | 9300 W 104th Avenue | Westminster, CO 80021 | USA | Planet Earth | Milky Way Volume 28 | Issue 3 January 2017

9300 W 104th Avenue | Westminster, CO | 80021 | USA | Planet Earth | Milky Way Volume 27 | Issue 6 May 2016

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