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Sweet and Savory Yogurt Yogurt is a wonderful international culinary staple that’s been subverted by American agribusiness. Contrary to popular belief, genuine yogurt is anything but the thick, overly sweetened blend you’re likely to find in the refrigerated section at your local grocery store. Designed as quickie substitutes for breakfast, too often they’re laden with copious sugar for a rapid ride on the glucose express. Real yogurt—the healthier version known to the rest of the world—is generally much lighter. It’s also served in a wider variety of contexts, such as Indian raitas, served as a condiment, and Greek tzatziki, a combination of cucumbers and yogurt served as a dip, condiment, or spread. Yogurt (the name is Turkish) is meant to refresh, and this version is an ideal topping on cucumbers, lamb, or Middle Eastern Chickpea Burgers. When I first proposed this blend, one of my recipe testers looked at the long list of ingredients and asked, “all this for yogurt?” And then she took a taste … MAKES 4 CUPS

20 unsulfured dried apricots ⅔ cup golden raisins ⅓ cup finely chopped and loosely packed fresh flat-leaf parsley ⅓ cup finely chopped and loosely packed fresh cilantro ⅓ cup finely chopped and loosely packed fresh mint leaves ⅓ cup coarsely chopped Maple-Glazed Walnuts 1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil 1½ teaspoons maple syrup 1 teaspoon freshly squeezed lemon juice ¼ teaspoon sea salt ¼ teaspoon ground cumin ⅛ teaspoon ground cinnamon 2 cups organic plain yogurt Soak the apricots and raisins separately in hot water for 10 minutes, then drain well and pat dry. Set aside the raisins and chop the apricots into bite-size pieces. Stir all of the ingredients together until thoroughly combined, then do a FASS check. You may want to add a pinch of salt, a spritz of lemon juice, or a bit more sweetener. Cover tightly and chill for 15 minutes before serving.

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