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Accessories? I can see why people might look at the dollops that follow and think of them as the culinary equivalent of a jaunty chapeau peacock feather or a fabulous consignment store bling ring. Pistachio Cream? Basil Lemon Drizzle?! Tomato Mint Chutney?!? At first glance, they may seem like add-ons, albeit tasty ones. However, there’s a whole lot more to these dollops of yum. In their own way, they’re like Allen to Burns, Kermie to Miss Piggy, or a bee to a buttercup—a complement that makes the whole shebang fly. And that’s the way I’d like you to look at these dollops: not as afterthoughts, but as the cherry that makes the sundae truly irresistible. In some cases, these recipes play an integral role in creating the taste and texture of a dish. Take vinaigrettes: They play an obvious role with salads, but I also like them as marinades for fish and meat. There’s nothing like a dish that’s marinated until the meat is so tender that it practically dissolves in your mouth. Remember, people in treatment often need this kind of additional palate pleasure, especially if they have impaired taste buds or a constant metallic tang in the mouth. The drizzles are useful here. I tell my clients that they’re an example of working from the outside in, ensuring that the first thing that hits the tongue has an explosive burst of flavor. Without this coaxing, some people may not feel like working their way through the more subtle flavors of the rest of the food—and the accompanying nutrients. The dollops here not only enhance the dishes they adorn, in many cases they also help carry the flavor of the dish. They’re designed to move taste around the mouth, seeking those islands of taste buds that are in the best shape to transmit maximum flavor. When I recommend that dollop X—say Tomato Mint Chutney—goes with dish Y—for example, Middle Eastern Chickpea Burgers—you can take it to the bank. (Okay, maybe to the table. Banks aren’t so reliable these days.) These dollops serve another purpose: They provide more delicious, nutrient-dense calories, which is so important for people who are trying to keep weight on, so use them whenever you can. I’ve designed many of these dollops to go with multiple dishes. Apricot Pear Chutney complements five of the recipes in this book, and Olive and Caper Relish also plays nicely off five. The Basil Lemon Drizzle is great over almost any fish dish or salad you can imagine. My advice? Always keep plenty of dollops on hand (I’ve also designed them to store nicely), because you’d hate to have a dish go out half-dressed. What would the neighbors say?

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