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People pride themselves on eating at regular intervals, like clockwork, but cancer and associated treatment can often make one’s appetite timepiece go kaflooey. Why? Mostly two reasons: Certain cancers—among them throat and stomach cancers— depress appetite, either because they make eating or digestion difficult, or because the cancer itself affects the brain’s hunger center. Then there’s treatment. Some chemotherapies drive blood sugar down, while certain steroids used to counteract chemo side effects raise blood sugar; the net effect is to again throw off common eating patterns. So those three square large meals you’re used to? Well, perhaps you’ll be up for that, but as often as not, you’ll need to get your nutrition whenever you’re hungry, regardless of the hour, or whether you just ate a half-hour ago. That’s why these anytime foods are so important: Whenever you get a craving to eat, you’ll want something at hand that you’ll find desirable, easily accessible, and nutrient dense. Nutrient dense just means that ounce for ounce, there are no wasted calories; every bite carries a load of the macronutrients you need to get through the day. Remember the story of the tortoise and the hare? Mr. Slow and Steady had the right idea: a small but consistent effort at eating can have wonderful cumulative effects. As you’ll see elsewhere in the book, many experts suggest that when you’re battling cancer, you try to get in six small meals or snacks a day. The best way to do that is to concentrate not on how much you eat, but how often. The idea is that you want to stay nourished throughout the day, which is where these anytime foods come in. As the name implies, anytime foods are snacks designed to be portable, stor-able, and accessible anytime the mood hits. Plus, these recipes are nutrient-dense, and of course I plan on blowing your mind with the taste. I’d rather see you take a single satisfying nibble every few hours than try to force yourself to eat when you clearly don’t feel like it. That creates a negative association with food, which you can’t afford. I’ve taken an expansive approach to these anytime foods in the hope that they’ll remind you of some of your favorite snacks. Dips, salads, wraps—they’re all designed to provide long-lasting energy with each bite. Toasted nuts are really a no-brainer. They’re a wonderful nutrient-dense food, and it only takes a bit of prep to turn them into tiny taste sensations. You can eat them straight or use them as a topping for salads, oatmeal, and other dishes. Either way, they’ll provide extra nutrition and a big dose of yum. Plus, they’re highly portable, earning them a spot on my short list of great to-go foods. They’re an ideal snack anytime you’re on the road. And speaking of portable, at the end of the chapter you’ll find two recipes that I like to think of as “wrap, roll, and carry.” These easy and delicious mobile meals are packed with protein. In a very real sense, I’m trying to engage you in high-performance eating, just like athletes or hikers who eat certain high-energy foods with a sense of purpose. By

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