Page 1

essence Price | £3.00

Issue 76 | NOVEMBER 2016

Harper Emerging singer/songwriter Also inside this issue

FIESTA TIME The new ST200

ART OF AFRICA The flourishing market

essence

PETER HAHN Autumn style

Issue 76 | NOVEMBER 2016 www.essence-magazine.co.uk


Antidote turtleneck fisherman sweater PHOTO COPYRIGHT: MALIN LAUTERBACH/COURTESY OF JOHN STERNER

PHOTO COPYRIGHT: MALIN LAUTERBACH/COURTESY OF JOHN STERNER

Best traditions John Sterner is about bringing the heart and soul into garments. Pieces with a provenance that can be traced back to the source. Pieces that people connect with on a physical and mental level. The best knitwear in the world made entirely by hand using around a kilo of high-quality fleece. Each sweater will be a numbered piece and come marked with a yellow plastic ear tag, the same kind that sheep wear.

essence INFO

www.johnsterner.com

essence-magazine.co.uk | NOVEMBER 2016


Fashion | JOHN STERNER Marc Brady in the Antidote crewneck fisherman sweater PHOTO COPYRIGHT: MALIN LAUTERBACH/COURTESY OF JOHN STERNER

PHOTO COPYRIGHT: ANDERS KYLBERG/ COURTESY OF JOHN STERNER

Ellen Wetterholm in Antidote turtleneck fisherman sweater PHOTO COPYRIGHT: MALIN LAUTERBACH/COURTESY OF JOHN STERNER

NOVEMBER 2016 | essence-magazine.co.uk 1


JEREMY HOUGHTON Contemporary art favouring themes of light, space, transience and change

2016/2017 Artist in Residence for Land Rover Ben Ainslie Racing and the Americas Cup

www.jeremyhoughton.co.uk m 07981 655515 info@jeremyhoughton.co.uk


Ed_Cont_76_Layout 1 02/11/2016 22:34 Page 1

contents Issue 76 | NOVEMBER 2016

8 | Interview | HARPER

Louise Alexander-O’Loughlin chats to Harper, the alternative Pop/R’n’B artist, who has put herself firmly on the ‘one to watch’ list having performed at premier league football games and with YouTube sensation Conor Maynard, receiving over 43 million views.

14 | Art | AFRICAN ART

8

The contemporary African art market is in a healthy state and collectors are flocking to London in search of it, as Andrew Peters discovers.

24 | Gardening | HTA

The poet Ted Hughes described November as the month of the drowned dog, but there are far more attractive things to lift the spirit, none more so than the colourful cornus, or as it’s more commonly known, dogwood.

28 | Motoring | FORD

The new Ford Fiesta ST200 celebrates the marque’s 40th anniversary and is the most powerful production Fiesta ever made. Euan Johns discovers what all the fuss is about.

34 | Fashion | PETER HAHN

Now over 50 years old, fashion retailer Peter Hahn remains true to its motto ‘Our fashion – your style’. Only available in the UK online, Peter Hahn offers high-quality fashion from over 250 international designer brands.

28

Motoring | FORD

isbeautiful small

The new Ford Fiesta ST200 celebrates this year’s 40-year anniversary of the Fiesta brand. It’s the most powerful production Fiesta ever and Euan Johns discovers what all the fuss is about.

O

46 | Food | CRATES LOCAL PRODUCE

Crates chooses current seasonal offerings of Jerusalem Artichoke and quince, together with recipes to enjoy.

48 | Artisan food | EAT SURREY

Food writer Shirlee Posner of Eat Surrey introduces essence readers to Cellar Wines, a new and innovative wine retailer in the village of Ripley.

52 | Restaurant Review | THE EMYLN

Food writer Laura Scott recently visited The Emlyn Restaurant situated at the foot of Box Hill in Dorking and came away suitably impressed.

56 | Legal | MUNDAYS

“The Fiesta ST is truly beloved by owners and critics. The ST200 takes this special drivers’ car to a new level of power and performance. We think it’s a future classic in the making.” JOE BAKAJ, VICE PRESIDENT, PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT, FORD OF EUROPE.

52

58 | Finance | PMW

Restaurant review | THE EMLYN

Return of the native

A

s someone born and brought up in London, I still see myself as a reluctant Surrey dweller. Before writing for essence, my idea of a good meal would always involve hopping on a train back into London to try out the latest of many exciting new openings which seemed to happen on a weekly basis. But things are changing for the better in Surrey. It is so much more of a food destination now than ever before. I’m slowly coming around to the idea that ‘good chefs’ and ‘Surrey’ are words that belong in the same sentence together, especially having just enjoyed a memorable night of feasting at The Emlyn Restaurant, Box Hill. Surrey-born chef Nick Sinclair has recently returned to The Emlyn after an absence of four years determined to make his presence known on the Surrey food scene. He brought most of his kitchen team along with him from Brooklands Hotel so they could grow together and collectively make their mark on the food. The Emlyn is set within The Burford Bridge Hotel in an area of outstanding natural beauty within the Surrey Hills. Nick says: “I look out of my windows onto Box Hill itself as The Emlyn is situated literally at the foot

60 | Education | CRANMORE

Michael Connolly, Headmaster of Cranmore School, discusses the influence of school inspections.

68 | Events | SURREY

and a milk bread (both made in-house) with a smoked sea salt butter, a Marmite butter and an ajo blanco (a Spanish garlic and olive oil dip), setting us up for the meal ahead. The tasting menu was based around flavours and ingredients. To start ‘Maple Bacon’ - Scallop, Pineapple, Black Pudding, Liquorice Yoghurt and ‘Jersey Cow Curd’ Basil, Black Olive, Heritage Tomatoes. The black pudding in the ‘Maple Bacon’ is supplied by Butcher of the Year, Surrey Hills Butchers (based in Oxshott) and it was outstanding. Owner Simon Taylor provides all of The Emlyn’s meat and has a good working relationship with Nick. They work together to bring a range of superb quality meat to this restaurant. The ‘Jersey Cow Curd’ made a refreshing take on what could be seen as a tried and tested salad, and the tomatoes were served at the right temperature, which brought out their sweet flavour and balanced perfectly with the soft delicate curd cheese. ‘Celeriac’ – Apple, Walnuts, Cider Apples, Norbury Blue Cheese – served to us both, was a celebration of one of my favourite vegetables, the celeriac. It was my favourite course of the meal. Caramelised walnuts, with salt baked celeriac, >>>

Food writer Laura Scott recently visited The Emlyn Restaurant situated at the foot of Box Hill in Dorking, a renowned Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty.

Emlyn Restaurant

Simon Lewis, CEO at Partridge Muir & Warren Ltd, considers how families might benefit from a soon to be introduced tax-break that could be worth up to £140,000.

Rebecca Underwood visited Sweden’s second largest city, located by the Kattegat Sea on the western coast, and sole gateway to the North Sea and Atlantic Ocean.

>>>

NOVEMBER 2016 | essence-magazine.co.uk 29

Jessica De Noronha discusses issues raised by the new higher rate of Stamp Duty, and how it could affect individuals even if they don’t own a buy to let property.

62 | Leisure Breaks | GOTHENBURG

k, I’ll admit it. I’m a small car fanatic. With ever more vehicles on the road there’s a lot to be said for having a compact car that can weave in and out of traffic. I know, occasionally, there’s a need to hire a van to move things about, or having to ask a friend to help take rubbish away, but for the other 99% of the time there’s lots of enjoyment to be had in a smaller car. Stand up Ford’s Fiesta ST200. As the Fiesta brand celebrates its 40th year in existence, this sporty reincarnation leaves others on the starting line. At the risk of rekindling an old beer advert and showing my age, it looks good, feels good and by golly it does you good. Good to be seen in and good to drive, what more could you want? Perhaps an open top, but for those who haven’t noticed, summer days are over for the moment. The Fiesta ST200 is going to be a firm favourite in the hot hatch sector. This update is, as may be expected, a faster and more powerful version of the ST. The in gear acceleration has been improved and third gear has become a truly mighty tool, removing any second thoughts about overtaking, with plenty to spare. The enhanced interior includes partial leather charcoal Recaro front seats with silver stitching. Illuminated scuff plates incorporate the ST200

52 essence-magazine.co.uk | NOVEMBER 2016

of Box Hill – what can be more inspiring than that? There is unlimited potential here. Surrey is in effect an agricultural economy and we want to work with the best of the local producers, showcase their products and grow their visibility together. We have taken the first step in establishing our kitchen garden and will have four beds over around a quarter of an acre of land here at the hotel. Our plans are to start beekeeping here as soon as we can too, and who knows what else we might find ourselves doing!” Nick and his team are on the right track and the restaurant is only going in one direction – upwards. It won the best restaurant category at Surrey Life’s Food and Drink Awards this year and I wonder whether Nick may just be in the running for best chef category within the next couple of years, along with other Surrey talents Daniel Britten (The White Horse), Matt Worswick (The Latymer) and Matt Edmonds (The Grantley Arms). What impressed me most about Nick was the fact he was the only chef (in the time I’ve been writing this column) to come out and have a proper chat with me, introducing himself and letting me know what he has been doing for the last few years. As a chef myself, I always appreciate how hard other chefs work, so it was a treat to meet someone with a genuine love for what he is doing. For the meal, my guest and I sampled The Emlyn’s six course tasting menu with wine flight at £90 per person. The restaurant is spacious: the tables spaced well apart from each other with velvet banquettes as well as armchairs in hues of blue and grey reflecting a tasteful, understated style which follows the same theme in the lounge bar area of the hotel. Service is exceptionally good. Joao, our sommelier, talked us through the wine pairing choices for our meal highlighting flavour notes along the way. There were two tasting menus on offer, a meat and a vegetarian, and we went for both. To start, we were served warm soda bread rolls

As a chef myself, I always appreciate how hard other chefs work, so it was a treat to meet someone with a genuine love for what he is doing.

Nick Sinclair

NOVEMBER 2016 | essence-magazine.co.uk 53

74

Linda Seward’s detailed diary of the best of what’s on in theatre, music, exhibitions, arts and the countryside.

74 | Furniture | APARATTUS DESIGN

Portuguese company Aparattus Design currently exports mainly to Africa, France and Spain. Now looking to expand its presence in the UK, this innovative firm produces some very stylish and modern furniture.

Follow us on Facebook

Follow us on Twitter

NOVEMBER 2016 | essence-magazine.co.uk 3


Page 4 Adverts Issue 75_Layout 1 04/10/2016 20:32 Page 1

Homewood Furniture produces bespoke home furniture solutions for your study, bedroom and living areas. Website www.homewoodfurniture.co.uk Telephone 01932 450176

Fire work displays

FOR ANY OCCASION 01483 417475 www.flashpoint-fireworks.co.uk info@flashpoint-fireworks.co.uk

4 essence-magazine.co.uk | NOVEMBER 2016


Ed_Cont_76_Layout 1 02/11/2016 22:34 Page 2

42

PHOTO COPYRIGHT PAUL WILKINSON PHOTOGRAPHY LTD

PHOTO COPYRIGHT JIMMY NELSON B.V.

20

essence 76 COVER: Harper, copyright ICU label; photo by Ray Michael.

8

erratum October’s cover image was by Francesca Barrow not courtesy of.

essence team

Acting Editor: Andrew Guilor Contributing Editor: Louise Alexander-O’Loughlin Publishing Manager: Rebecca Peters Production Manager: Linda Seward Designer: Sharon Smith Senior Designer: Jason Mayes telephone: 01932 988677 email: editor@essence-magazine.co.uk Advertising Manager: Andrew Peters telephone: 07980 956488 email: marketing@essence-magazine.co.uk Advertising Sales: telephone: 01932 988677 email: marketing@essence-magazine.co.uk Advertising Sales (supplements): telephone: 07971 937162 email: katie@ktmedia.co.uk Contributors: Andrew Peters, Euan Johns, Louise Alexander-O’Loughlin, Shirlee Posner, Jessica De Noronha, Simon Lewis, Michael Connolly, Jacqui Casey, Rebecca Underwood, PJ Aldred, Jennifer Sutton, Linda Seward, Jane Pople.

essence magazine

Maple Publishing Limited, the publishers, authors and printers cannot accept liability for errors or omissions. Any artwork will be at owner’s risk. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced in any form without the written permission of the copyright holder and publisher, application for which should be made in writing to the publisher. The opinions expressed in this magazine are not necessarily those of the publisher.

essence is posted by Royal Mail to key addresses in Cobham, Oxshott, Esher, Weybridge, Guildford and outlying areas. Properties in all the major private estates, including St George’s Hill, the Crown Estate and Wentworth Estate, receive the magazine 10 times per year. essence is also distributed to selected estate agents and is available at city businesses, London hotels and Heathrow airport lounges.

PHOTO COPYRIGHT ICU LABEL

Creative spirit If you had to produce a list of the best things about being human, what would be included? For us here at the magazine, pretty high on the list would be our creative spirit and the ability to produce art in all forms. Of course, music would be at the top, and in this issue of essence we interview Harper, a huge talent and emerging young singer songwriter who draws inspiration from her early life experiences. Music, of course, is the first thing that comes to mind when David Bowie’s name is mentioned, but later this month his varied art collection goes on sale. It displays another side of the creative genius, demonstrating the huge breadth of creativeness of which we are capable. That breadth is also displayed in African art, now on the up, which has provided inspiration for many of the great masters, including Picasso. The art form is enjoying a golden period and essence looks at how London has become a hub for this burgeoning market. Also in this issue of essence, Peter Hahn and Theory offer quite a few autumn fashion options, we examine the exciting Ford Fiesta ST200, a worthy offering to celebrate the marque’s 40th anniversary, and find a foodie gem at the bottom of Box Hill. As usual, there’s beauty, legal, finance and education advice, together with the pick of activities highlighting food and events.

The essence team

Design and production www.domino4.co.uk © Maple Publishing 2016

NOVEMBER 2016 | essence-magazine.co.uk 5


Q U I N T E S S E N T IAL LY

T RAV EL

YOUR PERFECT GETAWAY TAILOR-MADE Your Travel Specialist will tailor-make your perfect getaway, whatever the occasion; treating you to competitive prices, exclusive offers & VIP benefits at the finest hotels across the globe. Let Quintessentially Travel inspire, guide & surprise you on your travels.

Image used for purpose. Terms & Conditions apply.


To book, please contact Quintessentially Travel on +44 (0)20 7022 6560 or email info@QuintessentiallyTravel.com & quote ‘ESSENCE’.

Q U I N T E S S E N T I A L LY T R AV E L . C O M


8 essence-magazine.co.uk | NOVEMBER 2016


Interview | HARPER

THE ONE TO WATCH... Louise Alexander-O’Loughlin talks to HARPER, a newcomer to the music industry who has put herself firmly on the ‘one to watch’ list. The alternative Pop/R’n’B artist has performed at premier league football games, and on a Drake cover with YouTube sensation and pop star Conor Maynard, receiving over 43 million views. MTV has its eye on her as a promising new artist for 2017 and Clash Magazine describes her as ‘evocative, intimate pop music with a stylish twist’. The world is clearly her oyster as she releases her ‘No Love In The Jungle’ single in aid of the NSPCC and The National Autistic Society this November. Q Who is Harper? A I’m a singer/songwriter, signed to ICU Label based in South London. I write and perform my own music which is alternative RnB/Pop. Q Tell me a bit about your roots. A I grew up in Bedminster, Bristol and moved to a small town in South Wales when I was seven after my parents separated. I lived there until I was 18 when I moved to London. Q That must have been daunting. A Yes it was, extremely daunting, and initially unfriendly and slightly isolating. However, if I wanted a career in music, then that was where I needed to be. My mum pushed me, literally, off to Westminster University to take my degree in commercial music. In fact, that’s what I based my new single ‘No Love In The Jungle’ on. Q When did you realise you could sing? A I always knew I was in tune when I was little. Then, during one holiday, there was a karaoke and my dad told me to go up and sing for fun. I still remember it to this day. I sang ‘Falling’ by Alicia Keys with all my heart and my dad nearly fell off his seat. Q No Love In The Jungle? Tell me about your single. A It’s officially released on 28 November and is a rolling, dark edged song about survival in the city. It’s about betrayal and loneliness in the shadow of the concrete jungle. It sounds a bit depressing, but it’s actually a very upbeat song with exotic drum patterns. I always aim to write a song people can’t stop singing to the point where it becomes irritating. That’s the secret of a great pop song. Q Do you feel the same way you did about London? A I love London, I always have done. I just find it sad that people don’t talk to each other, for instance on the Tube. If I just started speaking to someone, they would think I was mad. I suppose coming from a small village in Wales, it’s a huge change. I get the whole Monday morning ‘being miserable thing’, but it makes me sad how we eventually all become like each other. Why does it have to be like this?

>>>

NOVEMBER 2016 | essence-magazine.co.uk 9


Q You’ve already released two EPs, so this release isn’t your debut. I know I sound like I know what I’m talking about, but what’s an EP? A An EP is a ‘taster’ of my music – it’s not a full album and yes, I have released two, Blood Sweat Tears and SKIN, freely available online. No, it’s not my debut single, but it’s the first single I’m releasing for sale to the general public. I’ve dedicated this single to charity, thereby aiding and bringing people together. Q Harper, did you set out to be famous? A No not at all… I just wanted to do what I love as a job – that’s the dream isn’t it? I completed my commercial music degree and to be honest was lucky to have been found by ICU Label. Q What is ICU Label? A An independent record label headed up by Elliott Govinden, founder and CEO. He’s a businessman as well as music producer, and has a great ear for music. I’m so grateful to him and his team at ICU Label for their support. Q Did you ever consider going onto the X-Factor or Britain’s Got Talent? A Not really. I really applaud people who go on those programmes as it shows guts. I guess for me it’s always been about pursuing songwriting and then ICU Label heard me sing, they signed me and that was it. Now I get to do both. Q Do you write your own songs? A Yes, I do. Melodies and lyrics are so important. As a deep thinker, I write about things that resonate with me. I, as with many artists, use songwriting as a form of therapy. I love to write down how I feel and as a consequence my thoughts turn to lyrics. Q Why did you choose the NSPCC and The National Autistic Society to support? A I really admire the work both charities carry out. I was physically and verbally abused at school which made me feel bad, but I’m fully aware that what I went through is mild compared to the horrific treatment some children are experiencing both at home and school

10 essence-magazine.co.uk | NOVEMBER 2016


Interview | HARPER

on a regular basis. The National Autistic Society is doing some incredible work in understanding autism and enabling children to cope far better with life going into adulthood. Part of being an artist is being able to share messages and if this single does that then I’m happy. Q Peter Wanless, NSPCC CEO and Mark Lever, The National Autistic Society CEO, are right behind you and supporting your new single. How does that feel? A Amazing. I feel very honoured and happy they both recognise I want to do all I can to help both charities. Q What is your most exciting performance to date? A I was asked to perform in front of a sell-out crowd at West Ham Football Club during one of their premiership matches. The crowd and the buzz were incredible and I took the opportunity to sing a slightly controversial song themed around female empowerment: #GirlPower. Q Would you call yourself a feminist? A I would say I’m more of a realist. I just can’t stand people being treated unfairly because of some characteristic they may have that sets them apart from other people. A Could you give me an example? A Networking is so important in this industry and I was invited to a club that is a massive networking venue for artists to meet and generally hang out. When I found out that two of my friends had been turned away from the club for being ‘too fat’, I found that very disturbing and declined the invitation. Q Would you say you are a role model for teenagers? A I would be honoured to be considered a role model for teens. I have younger siblings who I try to set a good example for. Over the years, I’ve been a size six and a size 14 and suffered with image issues >>>

NOVEMBER 2016 | essence-magazine.co.uk 11


“At university I focused solely on music, however, when we did the single ‘SKIN’ no one knew I could dance and I think I shocked the team – not to mention the suspenders and hot pants... (sorry mum!).” Harper

Q You can certainly sing, but can you dance? A Yes, at university I focused solely on music, however, when we did the single ‘SKIN’ no one knew I could dance and I think I shocked the team – not to mention the suspenders and hot pants… (sorry mum!). Q How would you describe Harper v/s Sam? A I am both; the girl you see in the ‘SKIN’ video who is a little sassy and feisty, but also the girl that writes deep, soul-searching lyrics. I’m equally at home in hot pants as I am in ripped jeans and biker boots and absolutely love hunting for vintage clothes. Q What are you excited about that’s coming up in your diary? A So much! Obviously about ‘No Love in the Jungle’ being released in November, but not only that. I’ve been invited to the ‘This Morning’ show at the ITV studios to meet Ruth and Eamonn. I’ve grown up watching them and can’t wait. I’m not too proud to say I might even be a little starstruck. I’m also really excited to be going to the MOBO Awards this year. I’ve watched on a TV screen since I can remember, so I’m thrilled to be invited.

growing up. I can relate to the pressure on teenagers, even more so today with the growth of social media. I have reached where I want to be physically and mentally now, eat healthily and don’t smoke or touch drugs, but I may have the odd glass of red wine here and there. Girls (and boys) need to love themselves and work on themselves from the inside and not just the outside. Q What was it like working with Conor Maynard? A He’s done so well and really is a YouTube sensation. He and I get on so well together. We have banter, but I respect what he has done and I get inspiration from him. He’s been amazing and really supportive of my campaign. Q Were you surprised when your Drake cover song with Conor hit over 43 million views on YouTube? A Yes, completely… it was amazing to see the numbers rising. It was such a success that we decided to do another cover ‘All We Know’ by The Chainsmokers, which reached over one million views in just 48 hours.

12 essence-magazine.co.uk | NOVEMBER 2016

Q How do you spend your time off? A As an artist there is no such thing as time off. I’m always thinking about my next song. If I’m not in the studio, I’m networking at places like Fashion Week in London and club events (well, the ones that don’t judge people too much) and I’m constantly on my social media pages or at the gym. I do love cooking and spending time with family and friends. Q Are you careful with what you eat? A Well, I love my food almost as much as I love my music. I have such a sweet tooth, which can be dangerous, but life’s for living. Q Where would you like to be in a year’s time? A I’d like to be recognised for my music talent and songwriting. I’ve always said to myself “I’ll never go to Glastonbury until I can perform at Glastonbury”. So fingers crossed! v essence INFO

Follow Harper on social media @HarperTheArtist and visit the official website at www.HarperTheArtist.com


IMAGINE YOU ARE AT THE CINEMA... NOW IMAGINE IT IN your own home... Cre8tive Rooms specialise in designing and building bespoke cinemas for private residences. We offer impartial advice to find the perfect solution and always aim to exceed expectations.

Contact our Surrey office on 01483 668044 or visit www.cre8tiverooms.com

INTEGRATED TECHNOLOGY SOLUTIONS FOR PRIVATE RESIDENCES Home Cinema, AV & Home Automation Systems Golf & Sports Simulators Bespoke Garden Rooms


14 essence-magazine.co.uk | NOVEMBER 2016


Art | AFRICAN ART

LIGHT SHINES ON THE DARK CONTINENT The contemporary African art market is in a healthy state and collectors are flocking to London to discover it, as Andrew Peters finds out.

T

hings are suddenly moving fast in Africa’s art market. After a decade in which Bonhams had Africa to itself, there are now suddenly three other international auction houses in the field. Over the past few years, London has become established as a pioneer of African art. Last month saw the start of the season with Bonham’s biannual ‘Africa Now’ auction which began in 2008. With lots ranging from £2,000 to £120,000 plus, it is currently the largest of its kind following an explosion of interest in modern and contemporary art from Africa. Created by artists from a multitude of cultures, African contemporary art reflects the complex heritage of this dynamic continent and demonstrates tremendous potential for investment. Africa Now sales include the very best of post-war and contemporary art from across the African continent in various media, including painting, sculpture and drawing. CNN recently reported that values in African art had grown between fivefold and tenfold during the last decade. Barnebys, the world’s leading art and auction search engine, echoes these findings. Unsurprisingly, Sotheby’s has now set up a contemporary African art department and is set to hold its first sale in 2017. Christie’s recently held an exhibition of a South African sculptor in London when Stanislaw Trzebinski was invited to participate in a collaborative exhibition between Christie’s and the South African Southern Guild Gallery. The exhibition showcased some of South Africa’s top designers and artists. In January this year, Phillips sent Arnold Lehman, former director of the Brooklyn Museum, on a recce to South Africa, generating a great deal of media attention. South Africa’s strongest home based auction house, Strauss & Co, was headed by the legendary Stefan Welz, who unfortunately died this year. So the home team is having to scramble to meet this new threat from abroad: four hungry international auction houses. All of this new interest and energy is creating huge excitement in the two countries, South Africa and Nigeria, whose art dominates auction sales abroad. But the ripple effect is being felt in all of Africa’s 54 sovereign states. How and why this sudden attention on Africa? The answer is, in part, that Bonhams, which has led the way and established an international market for contemporary African art, has been breaking world records for a decade. The work of the late Irma Stern –

>>>

Pictured left: Soly Cisse, untitled 2014, oil on canvas. Right: Romuald Hazoume, Azonto 2013, found objects, plastic cloth and synthetic fibres

NOVEMBER 2016 | essence-magazine.co.uk 15


PHOTO COPYRIGHT: VICTOR RAISON/COURTESY OF 154

Peju Alatise, ‘Unconscious Struggle’ PEJU ALATISE ‘Unconscious Struggle’

South Africa’s leading artist – would have commanded prices in the hundreds of thousands of pounds ten years ago; now her work is making millions. Her painting ‘Arab Priest’ made £3.1m at a Bonhams’ sale a few years ago. This dramatic rise in prices has been seen too with work from Jacobus Hendrik Pierneef, Gerard Sekoto and William Kentridge. The Ghanaian-born, Nigeria-based Professor El Anatsui dominates prices in North Africa. His bottletop tapestries command £1m plus figures in London and New York. Giles Peppiatt of Bonhams holds eight of the ten world records for South African art and says of the African phenomenon: “The fact is that modern and contemporary African art is today one of the hottest properties on the art block. Africa is the new China when it comes to art. When the Tate, the Smithsonian and other similar institutions start putting on exhibitions of contemporary African art, then one knows that something strange and wonderful has occurred and that real change is in the air.” Pontus Silfverstolpe of Barnebys adds: “The Romans had a phrase for this: ‘There is always something new out of Africa’. Today that new thing is art, and the scramble is to acquire it, as the educated view in the capitals of the world is that South African and African art is a bull market, with one’s investment liable to return a handsome profit in the El Anatsui Diaspora, 2012. Archival dyes printed on cotton cloth, years ahead.” Of course, Picasso and many of his contemporary artists saw in Africa the wellsprings hand stitched. Signed, dated and numbered. Edition 33/35 Parkett Editions New York publisher. Dyenamix, New York of their own creative drive. They acknowledged Africa’s creative genius and their work partner. PHOTO COPYRIGHT: ARTNET AUCTIONS pays homage and tribute to it. Now African artists are pursuing some of that acclaim and the sums earned by those master artists whose names are household words. Another significant factor in Africa’s art renaissance attracting attention is the new contemporary art museum being built on the Waterfront in Cape Town. The Zeitz MOCAA museum will be the biggest “African art is taking a long overdue turn in the art museum in Africa and the gravitational pull of this huge spotlight of world interest. There is a growing new development will bring art tourists to South Africa for the first time. The Zeitz MOCAA Museum of Contemporary understanding of the relevance of the continent’s Art Africa is a major new cultural institution that will artists whose themes are universal. And there is focus on collecting, preserving, researching and exhibiting also a groundswell of interest from collectors and cutting-edge contemporary art from Africa and its diaspora. It is a unique, not-for-profit partnership between the V&A investors who have seen prices climbing steadily.” Christophe Person, head of strategy and development, PIASA Waterfront and Jochen Zeitz. Zeitz MOCAA will be housed in the historic  Grain Silo  at the V&A Waterfront, with the V&A committing over R500 million to the development required for the establishment of the museum. This investment will further the development of art in Africa and acknowledges the important cultural and financial contribution the visual arts sector makes. The artist describes Unconscious Struggle as a critique of the tradition of child marriage. The work expresses her concern that religion in Nigeria is often used to justify gender inequality and violations of human rights. These rights are not protected by the legal system. The sculpture renders visible the vulnerability of these young girls, and the need for government intervention. Faced with the reality of adolescent pregnacy, the viewer is forced to question whether such practices as child marriage can be morally right.

16 essence-magazine.co.uk | NOVEMBER 2016


Art | AFRICAN ART

Willie Bester (born 1956), Transition, painting mixed media, 1994. Private collection. PHOTO COPYRIGHT: THE ARTIST

South Africa: The Art of a Nation This exhibition, now on at the British Museum, is not a catalogue of the country’s greatest hits. There is nothing by the darling of the South African art auctions, Irma Stern, or by Marlene Dumas, one of the most expensive living female artists. Here, the artists (an impressive bunch nevertheless) play second fiddle to the story being told.

Nnenna Okore, Everything Good Shall Come to Pass, 2014

Considered by many to be the leading collector of contemporary art from Africa and its diaspora, Jochen Zeitz will commit his collection as the founding collection, underwrite the running costs of the museum and provide a substantial acquisition budget to allow it to acquire new important artworks over time to remain on the edge of contemporary cultural production. The museum will open to the public in early 2017. In London and New York, the Africa 1:54 Contemporary Art Fair has also added to the buzz with galleries from the continent exhibiting some of their best new work. The Fair has grown from its inception in 2013 from 6,000 visitors to last year welcoming over 15,000. Touria El Glaoui, the Fair’s director, is glad that African galleries have a platform to sell (what amounts to 70 per cent of sales) to collectors abroad, but hopes for slower and more consistent growth to ensure it is not just a fad. Interest is not merely confined to London. On November 17 in Paris, PIASA, one of France’s most distinguished auction houses, will hold its third sale of contemporary African art, ‘Origins and Trajectories’, featuring the work of 50 African artists. PIASA’s auction is part of a busy schedule in Europe for African contemporary art. After the 1:54 Fair and the AKAA Fair in November, 2017 will be very busy with an exhibition scheduled at the Foundation Louis Vuitton, and another at La Villette ‘Aperta Africa’, curated by Simon Njami of Revue Noire. The Paris Art Fair at Le Grand Palais in March will be dedicated to Africa. France and Africa have a long-intertwined art history. As early as the time of the ‘cabinets de curiosité’, artefacts from Africa were collected as these objects were seen as symbols of the African culture. At the turn of the 19th and 20th century, the Surrealists and Cubists saw the intrinsic art value of these African artefacts. Today, classical African art remains a powerful component of the French art market, opening the way for the development of this new trade in contemporary African art being integrated into the global art market that still has its centre of gravity in Paris. >>>

South Africa has a long tradition of creative practice. Some of the oldest art objects in the world were discovered within its provinces – excavations have found examples of Paleolithic cave paintings and jewellery items made from snail shells – while William Kentridge, Johannes Phokela and Francki Burger prove the strength of the cultural scene today. This exhibition draws together items from across the centuries to document South Africa’s history in a powerful visual display. It not only pays testimony to problematic periods of colonialism and apartheid, but also celebrates the many different peoples who have contributed to the nation’s accomplishments. It takes visitors from the earliest recovered object, a three-million-year-old pebble with facial features etched into it, to a recent video by Candice Breitz, a white South African artist who inserts herself as a minority figure into a popular TV soap about middle class black South Africans. At each stage, from antiquity to colonialism, through resistance to apartheid, and the tenuous transition to democracy, works of art from different periods of time are displayed together to provide new perspectives, challenging historical assumptions of the past.

essence INFO

The exhibition runs until 26 February 2017 at the British Museum, Great Russell Street, London WC1B 3DG. Telephone: 020 7323 8299 Website: www.britishmuseum.org

Xhosa Snuffbox in the shape of an ox, South Africa, late 19th Century PHOTO COPYRIGHT: THE TRUSTEES OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM

NOVEMBER 2016 | essence-magazine.co.uk 17


Irma Stern, Still LIfe with Lillies

Refreshingly, fifteen African women artists will lead the sale in Paris and Christophe Person, head of strategy and development at PIASA, points out that women increasingly dominate this valuable and rapidly expanding market, achieving stronger prices than many male artists from the continent. He Katia wearing the Grand StarfishStunning NecklacePatrick Mavros African jewellery. comments: “It surprises many people who are new to this market to find that contrary to Above: Grand Starfish Necklace £500. Below, right: Ndoro Graduated Pendant popular perception it is women who are in the lead in contemporary African art. Their & Wire Choker £300, Link Bracelet £250 themes are universal and connect powerfully with international collectors. And the price and Graduated Earrings £150 their work commands is generally ahead of male artists on the continent.” This success has been hard won on a continent where women are still engaged in a fight for equality, he adds. “The success of these women artists acts as a beacon of female emancipation in Africa.” Names like the figurative South African artists Irma Stern and Marlene Dumas have, in the past 20 years, become well known to the collecting fraternity who have led the interest in contemporary African art and have bid keenly at auction to secure works by these two white daughters of Africa. Stern’s top work, titled ‘Arab Priest’, sold for £3m to the Qatari Government. Africa’s women artists are countering the trend of female inequality, at least in the arts. In the 2014 African Art Market Report, of the seven top African artists listed, four were women. And some of these women are achieving prices in the millions for their work, namely Dumas and Stern. wEl Anatsui (Ghanaian, 1944) wMehretu Julie (Ethiopian, 1970) female wKentridge William (South African, 1955) wStern Irma (South African, 1894–1966) female wShonibare Yinka (Nigerian, 1962) wDumas Marlene (South African, 1953) female wMutu Wangechi (Kenyan, 1972) female So the future looks bright for art from the Dark Continent as the market continues to go from strength to strength. Momentum is growing with international exhibitions and young artists showing at some of the major galleries. v jewellery-catalogue-2011-pages.indd 28

essence INFO

www.barnebys.co.uk www.christies.com www.bonhams.com www.sothebys.com www.piasa.fr

18 essence-magazine.co.uk | NOVEMBER 2016

26/10/2


L-L-4%@%)G,((,23%B;0":#2$4 In spired by a li t tle orph aned Ele who we rescu ed fr om be ing st uc k in the m u d on Mpata farm , the Zo zo scu lp tu res are pl ay f ul c a r ic at ur e s of

Jewellery | PATRICK MAVROS

an ador able eleph an t.

Mavros: adornment from Africa

>,3#'%64:$'#D4 “A fine c iga r de se rv e s t he r e spe ct of a fine a sht r ay, a silv e r a lta r of of f e r ing , a n e le vat ion whe r e t he se n se s of sig ht, sm e ll a nd tou c h m ay be e n joy e d in t hat

The Patrick Mavros brand was founded 35 years ago when the then-soldier, Patrick, carved a pair of earrings for his wife, Catja. She wore them to the hair salon, where her hairdresser fell in love with them and instantly requested a pair for herself.

one hou r of life t hat t he cig a r g ive s to i ts a dm ir e r . ”

*" From this loving gift, the business was born into what is recognised today as a uniquely African and distinctively exotic, luxury jewellery brand. The Mavros sons, Alexander, Forbes, Patrick Jnr and Benjamin, pm-desk-table-catalogue-2015-print.indd are also all passionately involved in the business.

40

From day one the boys were engrossed in the workshop, experimenting with materials and designs: starting with heavy, rough-hewn rock crystals dug up from the farm, suspending them from fishing line for their adoring and patient mother to wear! Marrying intricate craftsmanship with an intrepid family heritage, the Mavros family has not only designed some of the most extraordinary jewellery creations in Africa, but has also created around it an environment just as magical and bold. At home, the workshops, family homestead, wildlife sanctuary and the studio are all built to form a small village on the family estate in the wild hills outside Harare in Zimbabwe. 26/10/2011 18:05

essence INFO

London Flagship Store 104–106 Fulham Road, London SW3 6HS Telephone: 020 7052 0001 Website: www.patrickmavros.com

Top: Inspired by a little orphaned elephant, these Zozo sculptures are playful caricatures, priced: £200–£1,900. Above: Lion and Monkey Ashtray £7,500 pm-desk-table-catalogue-2015-print.indd 31

“Patrick Mavros on Fulham Road is one of my absolute favourite shops. Everything in there is wild, fierce and beautiful – luxury jewellery and sculptures inspired by Africa.” Francesca Barrow, CEO Faconner

NOVEMBER 2016 | essence-magazine.co.uk 19


Before They Pass Away by Jimmy Nelson Between 2010 and 2014, photographer Jimmy Nelson travelled the world to document some of the most fantastic indigenous cultures left on the planet today. essence found out more about this inspiring project. ALL PHOTOS COPYRIGHT: JIMMY NELSON PICTURES B.V.

P

hotographer Jimmy Nelson, born in the UK in 1967, came to realise from a life spent travelling that his camera was the perfect tool for making contact and building intimate and unique friendships and relationships with hitherto unknown and understood communities in some of the farthest reaches of the planet. Jimmy wanted to discover how the rest of the world is threatening to change their way of life forever. But, most importantly, he wanted to create an ambitious aesthetic photographic document that would stand the test of time. Jimmy entitled his project ‘Before They Pass Away’ and it is Maori, Taupo Village, North Island, New Zealand, 2011 intended to be a controversial catalyst for further discussion as to the authenticity of these fragile disappearing cultures. Jimmy is not a studied scientist, but rather a self-trained ethnologist and visual anthropologist who through curiosity is trying to find answers. He wants to tell stories that leave room for a recipient’s questions. With the project, Jimmy wanted to create awareness about the fascinating variety of culture and history-charged His fascination for the rapidly symbols of the people, reflecting their rites, customs and traditions. vanishing harmony between Jimmy merely shows us the man and nature takes us tip of the iceberg with his images, to places we thought had consciously choosing just thirty-five of the threatened tribes and cultures, disappeared long ago. based on their geographical and traditional extravagance, but above all for their illuminating beauty. What drives him is not compassion for poverty or illness, but passion for painted bodies: mirrors of pure souls, messages in flesh, worn as a second skin. His fascination for the rapidly vanishing harmony between man and nature takes us to places we thought had disappeared long ago. He asks us, will we sever the fragile umbilical cord to our extraordinary primeval past, thus potentially finding ourselves alone without a cultural purpose? >>>

20 essence-magazine.co.uk | NOVEMBER 2016


Photography | JIMMY NELSON

Kazakh, Altantsogts, Bayan Olgii, Mongolia, 2011

Nenet, Yakim, Brigade 2, Yamal Peninsula, Ural Mountains, Russia, 2011

Jimmy

NOVEMBER 2016 | essence-magazine.co.uk 21


Tibetans, Buddhist Monks, Ganden Monastery, Tibet, 2011

It is Jimmy’s hope we will make a different choice and gather around the digital fireplace of humanity and continue for generations to tell stories of our great grandparents and their importance even in the twenty-first century. Renowned American cultural anthropologist Margaret Mead once said: “Having been born into a polychromatic world of cultural diversity, it is my fear that our grandchildren will awake into a monochromatic world not ever having known anything else.” v essence INFO

Before They Pass Away by Jimmy Nelson Published by teNeues; www.teneues.com Cover photo © Jimmy Nelson Pictures B.V. Maasai, Tanzania

22 essence-magazine.co.uk | NOVEMBER 2016

Trade Edition: Published by teNeues • Size: 29x37cm/112/5x141/2 in. 424 pages, hardcover with jacket • 402 colour photographs Text in English, German, and French • €128, $150, £100 ISBN 978-3-8327-9759-1 Small Format Edition: Published by teNeues • Size: 25x32cm/95/6x123/5 in. 304 pages, hardcover • 320 colour photographs Text in English and German • €49.90, £45 (not available in North America via teNeues) ISBN 978-3-8327-3318-6 Websites: www.jimmynelson.com, www.facebook.com jimmy.nelson.official, www.twitter.com/Jimmy_P_Nelson, www.instagram.com/jimmy.nelson.official


Literature | REVIEW

The Food Lover’s Handbook With over 20 years’ experience working in the food trade industry, food lover Mark Price looks at forty of our favourite foods – from everyday essentials such as tea and coffee, fruit, vegetables and cheese to luxury and indulgent products like chocolate, caviar and oysters. The Food Lover’s Handbook is beautifully illustrated and Mark Price discusses some of the most popular foods, explaining their history and usage, how to buy the very best available and reveals the truth behind the varying costs. Learn about the tools needed to be able to make informed decisions about what to buy and how much to spend. A timely and topical guide for foodies and everyday shoppers, this book dispels unhelpful food myths and provides fact-based, unbiased accounts of food origins and the morals behind different production methods. Mark joined the John Lewis Partnership in 1982 as a graduate trainee and had numerous roles during his 34 years with the company, becoming managing director of Waitrose in 2007 until March 2016. Mark became a life peer and was appointed Minister of State for Trade and Investment. By Mark Price RRP: £14.99 320 pages • Paperback • Illustrated throughout ISBN: 9781473528659 Published by Ebury Press www.eburypublishing.co.uk

Going to Extremes

The Adventurous Life of Harry de Windt Harry de Windt (1856-1933) was a man who, by any standards, was a personality, a marked presence in the world of Victorian and Edwardian literature and social life. He was a member of the literary circle around Oscar Wilde, he was active in the world of the turf and he crossed vast tracts of the British and Russian empires for the sheer thrill of it. This book traces his life and adventures, at home and abroad, and also gives an account of his early work on military service in Sarawak, Malaysia, his expert knowledge of the Russian prison system and his later Great War role running a POW camp. Many of De Windt’s books recall epic journeys against the odds: From Paris to New York by Land, Savage Europe, Siberia As It Is and others. His autobiographical work, My Restless Life, perhaps sums up his nature. Stephen Wade is a professional writer specialising in the history of crime and the law in Britain and Ireland, family heritage and nineteenth-century history. A former teacher, university lecturer and writer in residence in prisons, he has written more than twenty books. By Stephen Wade RRP: £19.99 200 pages • Paperback • 20 illustrations and three maps ISBN: 9781473863545 Published by Pen & Sword Books Limited www.pen-and-sword.co.uk

The Tudor Murder Files In the Tudor age, the murder rate was five times higher than it is today. From the dark days of Henry VIII to the turbulent times of Shakespeare, James Moore’s book is the first to chart the period’s most gripping murder cases in all their grisly detail. The book brings to life the violent crime wave that gripped the sixteenth century, both at home and abroad. Enter a world in which stabbings were rife, guns were used for the first time to kill victims and in which culprits frequently escaped justice. Gruesome punishments ensued for those who dared to commit the gravest of crimes. Discover how one murderer was horrifically pressed to death, another boiled alive for poisoning his victims and meet some of history’s most notorious serial killers, including one considered so barbaric she was labelled a vampire. James Moore is a professional writer who specialises in bringing to life forgotten aspects of history. His work has appeared in titles such as The Daily Express, Sunday Telegraph and The Daily Mirror and he is also the author and co-author of seven other books, all of which have achieved widespread coverage in national and local media. By James Moore RRP: £14.99 216 pages • Paperback • 32 illustrations ISBN: 9781473857032 Published by Pen & Sword Books Limited www.pen-and-sword.co.uk

From Journey’s End to The Dam Busters

The Life of R.C. Sherriff, Playwright of the Trenches Kingston playwright R.C. Sherriff came to fame with his First World War drama Journey’s End, which was based on his own experiences as a young officer on the Western Front. Its success made him a household name and opened the door to a highly lucrative career as a novelist, playwright and screenwriter in Hollywood and in Britain. Many of his films The Invisible Man, Goodbye Mr Chips, The Four Feathers, Odd Man Out, Quartet, and, of course, The Dam Busters, are still well known. This book rediscovers Sherriff using his own words: his letters, diaries, published and unpublished manuscripts to shed light on a man who ironically gained his greatest success from the trench warfare he found so difficult to bear. Roland Wales worked as an economist at the Bank of England for many years, and then as policy director at the Labour Party. He became interested in R.C. Sherriff when his two sons attended Sherriff’s old school, Kingston Grammar. He produced several Sherriff-themed theatrical nights and worked closely with the Surrey History Centre in its successful bid for Heritage Lottery Fund support of the Sherriff Archive. By Roland Wales RRP: £25.00 400 pages • Hardback • 30 illustrations ISBN: 9781473860698 Published by Pen & Sword Books Limited www.pen-and-sword.co.uk

NOVEMBER 2016 | essence-magazine.co.uk 23


2pp_Gardening_Layout 1 02/11/2016 20:07 Page 1

Colourful cornus

The poet Ted Hughes described November as the month of the drowned dog, but there are far more attractive things to lift the spirit, no more so than the colourful dogwood, says The Horticultural Trades Association (HTA).

T

o create a beautiful garden with year-round appeal it’s essential to pick the best plants, and few celebrate the seasons more than colourful cornus. Commonly called dogwoods, these reliable and hardy shrubs provide a luscious leafy backdrop to summer flowers. As a final fanfare, their foliage is transformed into a rainbow of colours through autumn before fluttering away to reveal brilliant wand-like stems. This seasonal transformation is just the start of a host of new planting partnerships that can be enjoyed right through until spring. During winter the brightly coloured stems of dogwoods catch sunlight to create dazzling displays. Small gardens might only have space for a single plant, so position it where the low piercing winter sunlight will shine through, catching stems in its spotlight. No wonder varieties have been given names like ‘Winter Beauty’ and ‘Midwinter Fire’ as the intense rays of the sun really bring those fierycoloured stems to life. Take a look at the whole range of shrubby dogwoods to discover varieties with different foliage and stem colour combinations from ‘Flaviramea’ with green leaves and golden-yellow stems, ‘Spaethii’ with variegated, yellow-edged green leaves and red stems, or the white margined leaves and red stems of ‘Elegantissima’. In addition, many shrubby dogwoods also carry clusters of tiny flowers through summer. These are usually a creamy-white colour, and often lead on to form dense heads of white berries in autumn.

Popular dogwood varieties for the garden For summer foliage and winter stems: Cornus alba varieties – such as ‘Elegantissima’, ‘Aurea’, ‘Spaethii’ and Siberian dogwood ‘Sibirica’ Cornus sericea varieties – such as Golden-twig dogwood ‘Flaviramea’ and dwarf Kelsey’s Gold Cornus sanguinea varieties – such as ‘Midwinter Fire’ and ‘Winter Beauty’ Small trees with attractive flowers and foliage: Cornus controversa ‘Variegata’ (Award of Garden Merit – AGM) Cornus kousa varieties like ‘Miss Satomi’ (Award of Garden Merit – AGM) Cornus ‘Venus’ For winter flowers: Cornus mas – dainty yellow flowers in winter, red fruits in late summer

Cornus Alba Sibirica Variegata, Dogwood

24 essence-magazine.co.uk | NOVEMBER 2016


2pp_Gardening_Layout 1 02/11/2016 20:07 Page 2

PHOTO COPYRIGHT: EUAN GUILOR

Gardening | HTA

Top tips for planning and planting 1. Where dogwoods are specifically being grown for their winter stems they’ll need annual pruning. This is simply done by cutting all stems down to their woody base close to ground level every spring. This encourages new stems to develop during the year, and it’s these that will be enjoyed the following winter.

PHOTO COPYRIGHT: VIKTORIART, DREAMSTIME.COM

2. For those who fancy having a go at propagating their own dogwoods, then try taking hardwood cuttings. Once leaves have fallen, lengths of stem can be prepared and inserted into slits in the ground filled with gritty sand. Heel in firmly and keep watered if conditions are dry. Cuttings should root over spring/summer and produce well rooted new plants by next autumn.

Winter Jasmine

Shrubby dogwoods grow well in almost any soil, even moist sites and heavy clay ground. They’ll grow best in a sunny position, but will tolerate some shade. Contrasting colours always work well when developing planting combinations, so consider planting groups of two or more dogwoods together. Also try planting dogwoods in large patio containers to create seasonal displays with a difference, under-planting them with low winter bedding, leafy perennials and small shrubs. >>>

NOVEMBER 2016 | essence-magazine.co.uk 25


2pp_Gardening_Layout 1 02/11/2016 20:07 Page 3

Literature | IVY PRESS

Snowdrops

PHOTO COPYRIGHT: JONATHAN BUCKLEY

Planting partners for winter displays varieties • Ajuga varieties • Bergenia ‘Sunshine’ • Brachyglottis hellebore (Helleborus argutifolius) • Corsican mezereum • Daphne odora • Daphne varieties • Euphorbia elliptica ‘James Roof’ • Garrya varieties • Heuchera varieties (eg M. aquifolium, ‘Charity’, and more • Mahonia ‘Nigresens’ • Ophiopogon varieties (eg ‘Sundowner’) • Phormium cockburnianus • Rubus varieties • Skimmia (Galanthus varieties) • Snowdrops x bodnantense ‘Dawn’ • Viburnum tinus ‘Eve Price’ • Viburnum • Winter Flowering Jasmine (Jasminum nudiflorum)

There are dozens of plants to choose from as partners for dogwoods. Some can be planted behind them as a background to enhance the visibility of their stems, while others provide flowering companions through winter. Several low growing plants, like bergenia and heuchera, can be planted around clumps to carpet the ground, or underplant with early flowering bulbs like snowdrops, crocus and narcissus. Cornus are a wide and varied family of shrubs and small trees, so if dogwoods take your fancy look at the rest of the family to discover other great garden performers like the Wedding Cake Tree (Cornus controversa ‘Variegata’) and flowering trees like Cornus kousa and ‘Venus’. Also look out for the Cornus mas, the Cornelian Cherry, which forms tiny clusters of yellow flowers on bare winter stems that turn into glossy-red cherrylike fruits later in summer. Choose carefully and your garden displays really will become a celebration of colourful cornus. essence INFO The Horticultural Trades Association (HTA) is the trade association for the UK garden industry. Website: www.the-hta.org.uk

26 essence-magazine.co.uk | NOVEMBER 2016

Heirloom Plants A Complete Compendium of Heritage Vegetables, Fruit, Herbs & Flowers

This book is the perfect companion for every home grower who wants to fill their garden with old and interesting varieties while helping to save threatened or forgotten plants. Heirloom plants often have a charm lacking in commercially produced varieties. Unless these seeds are grown and saved, they will not only be forgotten, but lost too. Based on the seed catalogues of Thomas Etty, the book lists exciting cultivars, along with profiles and growing tips. Responsible gardening, certainly, but with more than a hint of romance; who could resist the lure of the splendid Hubbard Green Warty squash, or the Green Zebra tomato? Thomas Etty Esq is the UK’s only dedicated heritage seed company and was set up over twenty years ago by Ray Warner. The company name is inspired by Ray’s great, great, great grandfather who himself dealt in seeds in the nineteenth century. Ray is the dedicated seedsman behind this heirloom seed company with Thomas Etty Esq sourcing seeds dating from the seventeenth century to the end of World War II, all from smallscale seed suppliers from the UK and Europe. Lorraine Harrison is a keen practical gardener with a master’s degree in garden history. In addition to contributing to the gardening quarterly Hortus, she has authored a number of books, among them the bestselling Latin for Gardeners. “A strikingly produced compendium of heirloom vegetables, fruit and flowers.” – The Bookseller By Lorraine Harrison & Ray Warner, seed catalogues written by Thomas Etty 224 pages • Hardback • Illustrations throughout ISBN: 9781782403173 RRP: £18.99 essence INFO Published by Ivy Press Website: www.ivypress.co.uk


Page 27 Adverts_Layout 1 02/11/2016 21:11 Page 1

IInterest n t er est Free F r ee Credit C r edit Now Available No w A v ailable

www.kindlestoves.co.uk london@kindlestoves.co.uk

natural energy at the heart of your home Approved for Smoke Control Areas Full Supply and Installation Service High Efficiency, Cleanburn Stoves Family Run & Fully HETAS Approved

FFor or br brochures, ochures, advice advice or tto o book a sit site e visit - visit our sho showroom: wroom:

1 Station Station R Road, oad, TTeddington, eddingt edd e on, TTW11 W11 9AA

0208 9733995

I NT ER I O R DES I G N & BES P O KE S O FT FU R N I S H I N G S

T 0203 590 6728 M 07768 396332 E studio@ruthmarshallinteriors.com www.ruthmarshallinteriors.com

FOLLOW US ON TWITTER & FACEBOOK

NOVEMBER 2016 | essence-magazine.co.uk 27


Motoring_ST_Layout 1 02/11/2016 20:05 Page 1

“The Fiesta ST is truly beloved by owners and critics. The ST200 takes this special drivers’ car to a new level of power and performance. We think it’s a future classic in the making.” JOE BAKAJ, VICE PRESIDENT, PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT, FORD OF EUROPE.


Motoring_ST_Layout 1 02/11/2016 20:05 Page 2

Motoring | FORD

isbeautiful small

The new Ford Fiesta ST200 celebrates this year’s 40-year anniversary of the Fiesta brand. It’s the most powerful production Fiesta ever and Euan Johns discovers what all the fuss is about.

O

k, I’ll admit it. I’m a small car fanatic. With ever more vehicles on the road there’s a lot to be said for having a compact car that can weave in and out of traffic. I know, occasionally, there’s a need to hire a van to move things about, or having to ask a friend to help take rubbish away, but for the other 99% of the time there’s lots of enjoyment to be had in a smaller car. Stand up Ford’s Fiesta ST200. As the Fiesta brand celebrates its 40th year in existence, this sporty reincarnation leaves others on the starting line. At the risk of rekindling an old beer advert and showing my age, it looks good, feels good and by golly it does you good. Good to be seen in and good to drive, what more could you want? Perhaps an open top, but for those who haven’t noticed, summer days are over for the moment. The Fiesta ST200 is going to be a firm favourite in the hot hatch sector. This update is, as may be expected, a faster and more powerful version of the ST. The in gear acceleration has been improved and third gear has become a truly mighty tool, removing any second thoughts about overtaking, with plenty to spare. The enhanced interior includes partial leather charcoal Recaro front seats with silver stitching. Illuminated scuff plates incorporate the ST200

>>>

NOVEMBER 2016 | essence-magazine.co.uk 29


Motoring_ST_Layout 1 02/11/2016 20:05 Page 3

logo, alloy-metal pedals and gear control contrast dark materials with silver effect detailing. Despite all this, the interior appears a little cheap considering the price, perhaps even a little tardy, but I’ll forgive that as it’s such a beautiful machine to drive. The ST200 offers a bolder exterior design that looks the business, available in an exclusive storm grey colour with distinctive 17 inch alloy wheels. Red painted calipers feature alongside the ST-specification large trapezoidal grille, front spoiler and side-skirts, body-colour rear diffuser element and large rear roof spoiler. All very swish. Straight or bendy roads, all are consumed with equal vigour, making the car great fun to drive. Blindfolded drivers could be forgiven for thinking the ST200 was a far more expensive sports car: it’s that delightful and addictive. Sprinting from 0 to 62 mph in 6.7 seconds and delivering fast in-gear acceleration, the hatch has enhanced suspension and steering to elevate its award-winning handling and ride quality. This is a car best driven on what it is designed for: namely open roads, but for sheer enjoyment, it’s pretty useful on the mundane school run. No car can be that much fun to drive every single day, but this one comes close to shattering this perception. The ST200 really is the car to beat in the hot hatch sector, costing just under £23k. So, forget the huge people carriers, and think small, after all small is beautiful.  essence INFO Website: www.ford.co.uk

30 essence-magazine.co.uk | NOVEMBER 2016


Motoring_ST_Layout 1 02/11/2016 20:05 Page 4

40 years of Fiesta In the 40 years from 1976-2016, Ford sold 4,339,149 Fiestas in the UK alone, with European Fiesta sales set to surpass 18 million before the end of the year. Over four decades, more than one in every 20 cars sold in the UK was a Fiesta. In 2014, the Ford Fiesta became the UK’s best-selling car of all time, overtaking the Ford Escort. It’s not only the best-selling car in the UK this year, it has been the UK’s most popular car every month for the last seven years. 1975 Fiesta name chosen personally by Henry Ford II for its alliteration with Ford, its spirit and its celebration of Ford’s new connection with Spain 1976 Production begins in Valencia, Spain in May 1977 UK sales of the Fiesta begin Export of Fiesta models for the US market begins 1979 Millionth Fiesta built for worldwide sales. 1981 Ford introduces the new Fiesta XR2 with a 1.6-litre engine: the first 100mph Fiesta 1982 Fiesta is best-selling car in its class in Britain and Germany for six years running 1983 Aerodynamic new Fiesta MkII and Fiesta 1.6-litre diesel introduced 1987 Best sales year in Britain with 153,000 Fiestas sold 1989 Fiesta MkIII launched Fiesta is first small car with ABS Fiesta MkIII has the first Ford engine to meet pending European emissions standards due to take effect in 1996 – and 1.6-litre engine options Fiesta XR2i joins the range 1990 Introduction of Fiesta RS Turbo at Turin Motor Show 1992 Fiesta RS1800 introduced Introduction of 1.8-litre, 16-valve Zetec engine 1993 Driver airbag becomes standard 1996 Introduction of the new Fiesta MkIV with all-new rounded, aerodynamic shape and oval grille 2001 All-new Fiesta MkV introduced. Production begins in Cologne and Valencia of the new Ford Fiesta 2002 All-new Ford Fiesta MkV launched 2005 2.0-litre 150PS Fiesta ST launched: the most powerful Fiesta ever at the time. 2006 Fiesta launched with voice activation and Bluetooth 2008 All-new Fiesta MkVI goes into production in Cologne, Germany, Valencia, Spain and Nanjing, China 2012 Introduction of the Fiesta MkVII, the first Fiesta to be equipped with the three cylinder 1.0-litre EcoBoost engine 2013 Fiesta ST Awarded Top Gear Car of the Year 2014 Powershift launched Fiesta becomes best-selling vehicle ever in the UK, surpassing the 4,105,961 registrations achieved by the Ford Escort 2016 Fiesta ST200 launched with a specially developed 1.6-litre EcoBoost engine that delivers 200PS – the fastest-ever production Fiesta Fiesta becomes best-selling car in the UK every month for seven years in a row

• • • • • • • • • •• •

“The Fiesta ST has been a hit with performance drivers because of its go-kart-like handling and powerful engine. The revised Fiesta ST200 chassis enhances composure and control, and improves passenger comfort as well.” DARREN PALMER, SMALL CAR VEHICLE LINE DIRECTOR, FORD OF EUROPE

• • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • •

NOVEMBER 2016 | essence-magazine.co.uk 31


WWW.MARKGIUSTI.COM

Unit 6, 50a Kensington Church Street, London W8 4DG


Natural style Now over 50 years old, fashion retailer Peter Hahn remains true to its motto: ‘Our fashion – your style’ and to its use of natural materials. Only available online in the UK, Peter Hahn has stores in Germany and Switzerland offering high-quality fashion from over 250 international designer brands. essence chooses two to ponder. Our first choice, Uta Raasch, has a feminine look with playful details. Bows, gathering, layered tiers and drapes combine with sophisticated feminine contouring to create a graceful look. Exclusive designs, premium quality and excellent craftsmanship meet the highest demands of individuality and style. The exclusive Inkadoro label represents a fascinating encounter between traditional South-American craftsmanship and contemporary design. Exclusive knitwear creations made from alpaca, merino wool and high-quality cotton combine with artistic intarsia and modern jacquards. Collections feature traditional Inca patterns, alongside modern interpretations, with vibrant colours to lift the mood.

essence INFO

www.peterhahn.co.uk

Uta Raasch blazer £239 Uta Raasch top £85 Uta Raasch scarf £69

34 essence-magazine.co.uk | NOVEMBER 2016


Fashion | PETER HAHN

ALL PHOTOS COPYRIGHT PETER HAHN

NOVEMBER 2016 | essence-magazine.co.uk 35

>>>


Uta Raasch 100% wool hat £85 Uta Raasch pure silk blouse £135 Uta Raasch skirt £209 Peter Kaiser boots £225

36 essence-magazine.co.uk | NOVEMBER 2016


Fashion | PETER HAHN Inkadoro cardigan £315

Uta Raasch dress £194

Uta Raasch buckled pumps £165

NOVEMBER 2016 | essence-magazine.co.uk 37


Uta Raasch silk blouse £130 Uta Raasch ¾ sleeve top £85 Uta Raasch skirt £209 Peter Kaiser boots £225

38 essence-magazine.co.uk | NOVEMBER 2016


New Lindberg Ads June 2016_Layout 1 01/06/2016 18:30 Page 1


Standout style Based in New York, Theory makes comfortable, sophisticated modern clothing. The Theory woman is fashion relevant and conscious of quality: she keeps herself in shape and is confident about how she looks and feels in the clothes. For autumn, Theory introduces a collection of new accessories. This crafted assortment of handbags builds on Theory’s understated and sophisticated style.

essence INFO www.theory.com

Perry bag, smooth calf leather, red

40 essence-magazine.co.uk | NOVEMBER 2016


Fashion | THEORY

T-Bar Bags: smooth calf leather, cognac with ecru stitching; suede, carob; and smooth calf leather, claret

Whitney bag, smooth calf leather, claret

Standard tote, suede, brown

NOVEMBER 2016 | essence-magazine.co.uk 41


2pp_Ramond_Layout 1 02/11/2016 20:00 Page 1

Mother

knows best

Totally self-taught, world-renowned chef Raymond Blanc is no stranger to long days and hard work. Citing these as just two of the secrets to his success, the celebrated chef of Belmond Le Manoir Aux Quat’Saisons has accomplished so much in his career. From his award winning restaurants, to television shows and cookery schools, he has worked his way up from a kitchen hand to one of the greatest chefs of our time. Here he talks to Jane Pople about his success and what he thinks it takes to become an expert. Q Raymond, what first inspired you to begin your career as a chef and what keeps you there today? A I was born in beautiful Besançon, in the Franche-Comté region of France, just between Burgundy and the Jura mountains – a truly amazing place where I learnt so much. I was really inspired by my mother, Maman Blanc. She taught me everything! How to garden: planting, nurturing the vegetables and fruit, when to pick them, how to use them… we used fresh, local and seasonal produce to create meals for the family, wholesome meals full of goodness. I always remember these times and today I visit my Maman as often as I can and still we garden, we cook and I never stop learning from her. Q What do you think is the secret to becoming an expert in your chosen field? A For me, you have to be willing to learn from all those around you and to be dedicated. The hours are hard, long, long days and evenings, but be patient, willing to learn and help those around you. I am so lucky that I have a fantastic team at Belmond Le Manoir and at Brasserie Blanc – we help each other and that is so important. Q What is your favourite meal of the day and subsequent dish? A Oooh, I like every meal! For me, in between meetings and being in the kitchen, simple fresh bread and cheese is perfect. I am lucky that I can have the freshest ingredients from our kitchen garden at Belmond Le Manoir – and bread baked daily, so I’m a little spoilt. My favourite cheese is Comté cheese, of course, from my region of France, and I also enjoy a glass of red wine every so often. Q What has been the highlight of your career to date and why? A I have many highlights… but two things stand out for me. In 2008, I was awarded an honorary OBE (Order of the British Empire) by Her Majesty The Queen. How amazing. This was in recognition of raising awareness about the importance of healthy food as a central element of family life – something, as I said before, I learnt from a very early age. More recently, in 2013, I was awarded the insignia of Chevalier in the Ordre National de la Légion d’Honneur – a huge honour for me.

42 essence-magazine.co.uk | NOVEMBER 2016


2pp_Ramond_Layout 1 02/11/2016 20:00 Page 2

Star chef | RAYMOND BLANC

ALL PHOTOGRAPHY BY PAUL WILKINSON PHOTOGRAPHY LTD

Q What is the best advice anyone has ever given you? A One of the best lessons I’ve learnt is not to follow fashion — whether it’s food or design, whatever. Follow fashion and sooner or later you will trip up. Everything I do, I do for my guests. Q What is the secret to running a successful restaurant? A I think you must work closely with your team and ensure that every day you are striving to exceed expectations in all you do. Everything I do, I do for my guests – and this is something my team shares. Q What are the three most important qualities a good chef should possess? A Patience, dedication and passion. Q If you weren’t a professional chef and restaurateur, what would you be and why? A I would be a gardener, without doubt. I love being in the garden and work closely with my head gardener at Le Manoir, Anne Marie. She has worked with me for 30 years, so we have a great friendship and partnership. Q How would you spend your perfect day off? A If I wasn’t in the garden, I would go fishing! Take a book and enjoy time to relax and fish.  essence INFO This autumn, Belmond Le Manoir aux Quat’Saisons celebrated its 25th anniversary. Telephone: 01844 278881 Websites: www.amara.com, www.belmond.com/le-manoir-aux-quat-saisons-oxfordshire This article first appeared in The Lux Pad, www.amara.com/luxpad.

NOVEMBER 2016 | essence-magazine.co.uk 43


Baking | JEN’S CUPCAKERY

Spiced pumpkin cake

with maple and rum drizzle This sumptuous, spiced sponge, packed with cinnamon, ginger and pecans, will have them all fooled. I find it fun to hold back on the lead ingredient and let people guess – they never get the main pumpkin element! Moist and moreish, this delicious seasonal sensation is warmed with a rum and maple glaze, then drizzled with a maple cream cheese icing and topped with the satisfying crunch of sugared pecans. It keeps well for several days if allowed!

Ingredients 165g brown sugar Two eggs 60ml maple syrup 160ml vegetable oil 340g fresh or tinned pumpkin 250g self-raising flour 60g chopped pecans Half teaspoon bicarbonate of soda One teaspoon ground allspice Two teaspoons ground cinnamon One teaspoon ground ginger For the rum maple glaze 28g unsalted butter, 78g maple syrup, 57g dark rum For the sugared pecans 100g pecans halved, 30g icing sugar For the maple frosting 375g cream cheese, 200g unsalted butter, 80ml maple syrup, 320g icing sugar Method w Heat oven to 180°C/350°F and grease a bundt tin or if preferred, line an eight inch x 12 inch shallow cake pan. w Beat eggs, sugar, maple syrup and oil in a mixing bowl for around five minutes until creamy, then add the pumpkin and chopped nuts. w Stir in all the dry ingredients: flour, bicarbonate and spices, then transfer to the chosen tin. Bake for about 35–40 minutes, depending on depth of tin, testing with a skewer. w Whilst the cake is baking, make the rum glaze by melting the unsalted butter, maple syrup and rum until boiling. Then simmer for about five to eight minutes and leave to cool. w Once baked and whilst still in the tin, brush the rum glaze generously over the cake. w Leave for five minutes and then turn out on to wire rack. w Make the sugared pecans by running them under water, spreading them on baking paper, dusting with the sifted icing sugar and then place in the oven for around 10 minutes. Take out and leave to cool. w Make the cream cheese drizzle by creaming the butter and cream cheese. Then add the icing sugar and maple syrup to taste. It will be a looser consistency than the usual buttercream, so drizzle over rather than pipe. w Place the cooled cake on a plate, drizzle with the maple cream cheese and top with the sugared pecans.

essence INFO

TOP TIP: For the cake to be child appropriate, substitute water for rum in the glaze.

44 essence-magazine.co.uk | NOVEMBER 2016

Website: www.jenscupcakery.com Telephone: 07751 553106 Email: mail@jenscupcakery.com Facebook: www.facebook.com/jenscupcakery Twitter: @jenscupcakery Blog: http://ilovejenscupcakery.wordpress.com


2015 T OL D LIS

G

2015 SIL VER

2015 T OL D LIS

2015 SIL VER

BECOME A SQUERRYES MEMBER AND ENJOY A 15% DISCOUNT! Squerryes membership represents a journey of taste, celebration and friendship. With no membership fee and a minimum investment of just 12 bottles per year we will welcome you to enjoy private tastings and to host exclusive events within the house and gardens of the 17th century Estate. For further details visit www.squerryes.co.uk/membership @Squerryes (for instagram, facebook and twitter) Telephone 01959 562345

B R 2015 E ONZ

B R 2015 E ONZ

Squerryes Estate has a unique combination of rock, soil and microclimate, which produces some of the finest sparkling wine in the world.

2015 E MM END

D

D

O

C

2015 E MM END

The estate’s 35 acre vineyard has produced two award winning vintage sparkling wines. Long cool summers provide the perfect growing conditions for the Chardonnay, Pinot Noir and Pinot Meunier vines. In 2004 a Champagne House tried to purchase some of the south-facing escarpment after research found similarities with that of the Cote des Blancs region of Champagne. We are one of the last vineyards in Europe to harvest, the wine only truly expressing itself after 30 months of lees aging, giving time for the elegant nuances to develop.


Food_Crates_Layout 1 02/11/2016 20:08 Page 1

Crates Local Produce is located centrally within the historic market town of Horsham and bursts with fresh, seasonal food sourced directly from local producers. For more details see www.crateslocal.co.uk. Follow on Twitter @crateslocal or Facebook page Crates Local.

At their best right now Seasonal and local food offers taste, health and even economic benefits. Crates Local Produce highlights the amazing seasonal produce available from our region.

PHOTO COPYRIGHT: SEAGAMES50 | DREAMSTIME.COM

PHOTO COPYRIGHT: ANDREI STANCU | DREAMSTIME.COM

Jerusalem Artichoke

Quince

A vegetable that perhaps has the most misleading name of all. It is neither a type of artichoke nor has any connection with Jerusalem. It is one of the most interesting looking of all root vegetables and was first cultivated by Native Americans. As part of the daisy family, the flowers resemble sunflowers and early Italian settlers named it ‘girasole’, the Italian for sunflower. It is thought this changed to Jerusalem, whilst the other part of its name is thought to have been coined from the vegetable’s artichoke-like taste. With such a nutty and sweet flavour, artichokes make a brilliant addition to any collection of roasted vegetables. As with other root vegetables, they can also be fired, sautéed, mashed or puréed to make delicious soups. Unlike potatoes, Jerusalem Artichokes contain very little starch and are rich in fructose which make them a healthy choice for diabetics and gives them a sweet flavour. Resembling ginger root, the vegetable will store well in a cool environment and can be either just scrubbed or peeled before cooking.

Believed to pre-date even the cultivation of apples, it is thought that early references to what was later translated as apples may have actually been quince. For the Ancient Greeks, this highly perfumed fruit formed a ritual at weddings with the bride nibbling the quince before entering the bridal chamber ensuring the first kiss to be pleasant. Today’s quinces are still perfumed, but considered too sour to eat raw. However, the fruits are perfect for preserves, puddings and traditional quince cheese as they are high in pectin. This ancient fruit is fairly hard to source nowadays, but is still grown traditionally in orchards with apples and pears, although the trees number far less. It is unlikely to find any supermarket stocking quince, but local markets, greengrocers or specialist food shops will often have a supply for a limited time during their short season in the autumn. Quinces are a favourite of jam makers and work sublimely with apples or pears for any pudding, or even wine makers looking to ferment a good dessert wine.

46 essence-magazine.co.uk | NOVEMBER 2016


Food_Crates_Layout 1 02/11/2016 20:08 Page 2

Food | CRATES LOCAL PRODUCE

Winter root gratin www.crateslocal.co.uk

Quince Ratafia (liqueur) www.crateslocal.co.uk

Serves two or four as a side dish

Makes one litre

Ingredients: 700g Jerusalem Artichokes One small to medium size celeriac 200ml double cream 200ml whole milk 50g hard cheese: cheddar or parmesan 40g butter Two cloves garlic Fresh nutmeg Salt and pepper to taste

Ingredients: Two large quinces, ripened to yellow 75ml vodka or brandy One to two cups of granulated sugar Quarter teaspoon cinnamon Quarter teaspoon ground ginger Quarter teaspoon mace or replace with nutmeg Sparkling white wine or water to top

Method: w Pre-heat the oven to 170°C/ gas mark 3 before preparing the root vegetables. w Peel or scrub the Jerusalem Artichokes, slice thinly and place in a bowl of cold water with some lemon juice to prevent browning. Peel the celeriac and slice to same thickness as the artichokes and set aside. w Mix together the milk, cream, grated nutmeg and seasoning. w Grease an ovenproof dish with around half the butter and arrange the drained artichokes in layers, interspersed with layers of celeriac, adding crushed garlic and seasoning to each layer. w Pour over the milk and cream liquid, add small dabs of the remaining butter and finish with grated cheese. w Bake for at least one hour and ten minutes, allowing the top to golden. Serve as a delicious winter main or side.

Method: w Rub down the quinces, removing any grey fluff from the fruit and rinse. w Grate the fruits, including the peel and core, and put into a bottling jar of at least one litre. w Pour in enough sugar to reach up to a third of the way up the jar. w Add the spices and fill with the brandy or vodka, seal and gently shake the jar. w Keep in a dark place, turning two or three times a week. w Strain after around a month. w Serve neat, on ice, or with soda water adding a slice of lemon.

essence INFO Crates Local Produce 24a Carfax, Horsham, West Sussex RH12 1EB Telephone: 01403 256435 Website: www.crateslocal.co.uk Follow on Twitter @crateslocal or Facebook page Crates Local

NOVEMBER 2016 | essence-magazine.co.uk 47


Art Food_Layout 1 02/11/2016 22:44 Page 1

The world of wine Food writer Shirlee Posner of Eat Surrey introduces essence readers to Cellar Wines, a new wine retailer in Ripley.

W

hen Cellar Wines opened in Ripley, it was impossible to predict what an impact this unassuming new wine retailer would have on wine loving local residents. Ripley itself has emerged over the last few years as a bit of a culinary hotspot; Drakes, a Michelin star restaurant, is situated opposite Cellar and Pinnock’s, an award-winning coffee shop, has been pivotal too, plus a fantastic farm shop at A. Luff & Sons at Ripley Nurseries on the outskirts of the village. In addition, local community leaders set up a monthly farmers’ market loved by locals and those further afield too! That said, it was a good bet that a wine shop would also be well received. Cellar Wines is housed in a historical fifteenth century building which during the Second World War was purchased by a pharmacist, Kenneth White. He is revered for being the first producer of penicillin

48 essence-magazine.co.uk | NOVEMBER 2016

for civilians and the shop now has a blue plaque to commemorate his contribution. So, with a listed building and a mission for excellence, this little shop opened quietly. When one of the founding partners left, the original investor (who prefers to remain anonymous) took the helm and really unique elements started to unfold. Originally focused on French wines, Cellar now embraces the globe, bringing in superb South African wines from rebel wine makers the Kloof Brothers, Galician artisan producer Benito Santos (I love the labelling on this wine) and, of course, awardwinning wines from Surrey itself. For those who have stood in a supermarket staring at an unappealing display of wines, then this shop is a must. A bottle of ‘The flower and the bee’ costs only £12.80 here from an artisanal Spanish producer with vines growing on organic soil, while in contrast a bottle of High Clandon Cuvée Reserve Vintage costs £45. In fact, all the bottles of wine have an interesting story and I would be proud to take any to a wine and food event. For those who like advice on what to buy, then manager Andy is on hand to help. What I love about the staff at Cellar Wines is their brilliant customer service. There is no wine snobbery at play, just a desire to share their knowledge of the truly eclectic and interesting selection of wines and spirits with customers. Prices start at the accessible for all and rise to aficionado status. Guidance from knowledgeable staff, a great selection of tasting samples and a fantastic range of expertly curated options creates an exciting retail experience. Judging by the rave reviews of the shop, it’s a shared opinion. Local vineyards are featured and celebrated at Cellar Wines too. It’s been a hugely important decade in England for winemakers and we have several award- winning vineyards in Surrey. Greyfriars and the Albury Estate for example are within ten miles of the shop, as is Clandon. In addition to wines, customers will find local superstar craft gin Silent Pool and newcomer Mews too. Craft beers are also on offer such as Hop Art based in


Art Food_Layout 1 02/11/2016 22:44 Page 2

Artisan food | EAT SURREY

Tomato and chilli jam I make a batch of tomato and chilli jam every Christmas to use as gifts: it’s become expected! This is a lovely, hot, spicy relish that’s great in a fried egg sandwich or on a gorgeous cheese board. Be sure to use proper Asian fish sauce and not a supermarket own label as these don’t deliver on flavour. On its own, fish sauce smells pretty awful, but it’s the essence of many Asian dishes and a winner here. Ingredients 500g fresh vine tomatoes Four medium size red chillies, remove tough stalk and roughly chop Four cloves garlic, peeled 50g fresh ginger, peeled and roughly chopped 30ml Asian fish sauce 300g coconut or palm sugar 100ml red wine vinegar One bunch green onions, washed and finely chopped Method Wash and roughly chop the tomatoes. Purée half the tomatoes with the chillies, garlic, fresh ginger and fish sauce in a blender until smooth (the tomato seeds contain pectin and help the jam to set). Pour the purée into a thick-based saucepan and add the sugar and vinegar. Bring to the boil slowly, stirring frequently. Add the remaining tomatoes and green onions. Simmer the mixture over a really low heat for one and a half hours, skimming off any foam that develops. Stir regularly, making sure the jam does not get stuck on the sides or base of the pan. Towards the end of the cooking time, prepare a jar to store. Either one large (one litre) or a couple of smaller jars will do*. Place a shallow dish in the oven set on low with about two to three centimetres of cold water in the base. Place the jars and lids in the dish and leave in the oven for eight to ten minutes. Pour the jam into the warm jars and cool to room temperature. When cool, seal the jars and store in the refrigerator. The jam will keep for three months.

• • • • • •

*If making the jam for gifts, use six smaller jars. Shirlee Posner, eatsurrey.co.uk

Manager Andy Walton

Farnham. A collaboration by native Belgian and Italian beer makers whose products are gaining a large following is in evidence with stylish labels and a catchy name showcasing delicious beer with four core styles. To support the wine on offer, Cellar also has a delightful cheese counter with a range of local and imported cheeses and a selection of Cornish charcuterie, including a fantastic smoked chorizo. It’s the best I have tried outside Spain and at a recent wine tasting at Cellar it was a shared sentiment. Local cheeses include Surrey’s famous Norbury Blue and Dirty Vicar from Michaela Allum in Box Hill. A goat’s cheese cheddar and a delicious Italian cheese named ‘3 Latti’ (made from a combination of cow, goat and ewe milk) also feature. A supporting range of interesting cheese biscuits, Miller’s Damsels and Mondovino cheese crackers in packaging that oozes sixties’ glitz and cocktail bar culture are available. Choose from wild mushroom plus other equally tantalising flavours complementing the cheeses on offer. But the icing on the cake is the range of interesting accompaniments Cellar stocks to create the perfect cheeseboard which I discovered when I attended a tasting of South African wines. Cellar Wines calls itself a ‘boutique’ and here’s why. It’s a shop, a bar, a lounge and an event venue, it even has a small outside terrace at the back. Book a private party, supper club, buy a ticket for a wine tasting or design a bespoke event: anything is possible here and that’s surprising in what is a relatively small space. In a lock-up down the road, Cellar keeps a range of chairs, tables, linenware, wine >>>

NOVEMBER 2016 | essence-magazine.co.uk 49


Art Food_Layout 1 02/11/2016 22:44 Page 3

PROVIDER OF glasses and crockery: in fact anything needed for a stunning evening of food and wine. Arriving at the wine tasting evening, it was amazing to see how the shop had been transformed into an intimate venue. We were greeted on arrival with a glass of our first wine from the Waterford Estate (Sauvignon Blanc), delicious and crisp it set the tone. I have to be honest, I was not sure what to expect as other wine tastings experienced have been boring, fusty and bit highbrow for me. Our tutor for the evening at Cellar was a breath of fresh air. Easy to talk to and a walking encyclopedia of wine, it was impossible not to be in awe. She led us through the six wines of the evening, embellishing each with interesting stories of the vineyards, their geographic locations and how this affected the resulting wine. It was an interesting political history too, as for a long time South African products were restricted because of Apartheid. Not only was our tutor a brilliant speaker, but she also wasn’t too prescriptive about how to drink wine, she was more advisory. This meant we could drink at our own pace and we weren’t forced into naming fruit/nut/food notes and other associations that I have felt under duress to do at previous events. One of the highlights of this wine tasting was the addition of cheese and charcuterie nibbles that were in perfect harmony with the wine. Whoever put the programme together knew what they were doing. For example, Keens Cheddar on olive oil crackers with Piccalilli was served with my favourite wine of the evening, Mullineux Kloof Street Red 2014 (£17.50). Stichelton Toast with Killeen Goat Gouda and Pickled Cherries were stunning with the Mullineux Straw Wine, our final tasting and a dessert wine which made a perfect finish. The pickled cherries were fabulous and are now on my list for Christmas Day offerings. My absolute favourite accompaniments though were Wyfe of Bath cheese on water crackers with Acacia Honey & Truffle served with a Chenin Blanc. I thoroughly recommend a visit to this enterprising wine boutique. Cellar Wines is one of the most creative businesses I have been to recently. But take it one step further and attend one of the tasting events because it’s an education, not only in wine, but in food pairing too! Be warned, Cellar is not open on Sundays or Mondays, but it does have an online shop.

CREATIVE PR SERVICES, COPY WRITING & FOOD PHOTOGRAPHY TO ARTISAN FOOD PRODUCERS

Shirlee’s food reviews of independently owned cafes, restaurants, artisan food producers and farm shops in Surrey. A supporter of the local food movement with an aim to promote, support and champion their work. I always tell a personal story by taking the time to meet the people behind the products or the brand. Read my reviews here www.eatsurrey.co.uk Twitter: @eatsurrey Instagram: @eatsurrey Telephone: 07917 891881 Email: eatsurrey@gmail.com

essence INFO Cellar Wines The Old Cellar, High Street, Ripley, Surrey GU23 6BB Telephone: 01483 610610 Websites: www.cellarwines.co.uk and eatsurrey.co.uk Shirlee Posner is a food writer and blogger at www.eatsurrey.co.uk and provides social media management, web copywriting and food photography.

50 essence-magazine.co.uk | NOVEMBER 2016

Member of the Guild of Food Writers


Adverts Issue 68_Layout 1 03/02/2016 15:12 Page 4


Restaurant_Review_Layout 1 02/11/2016 20:06 Page 1

Return of the native Food writer Laura Scott recently visited The Emlyn Restaurant situated at the foot of Box Hill in Dorking, a renowned Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty.

Emlyn Restaurant

A

s someone born and brought up in London, I still see myself as a reluctant Surrey dweller. Before writing for essence, my idea of a good meal would always involve hopping on a train back into London to try out the latest of many exciting new openings which seemed to happen on a weekly basis. But things are changing for the better in Surrey. It is so much more of a food destination now than ever before. I’m slowly coming around to the idea that ‘good chefs’ and ‘Surrey’ are words that belong in the same sentence together, especially having just enjoyed a memorable night of feasting at The Emlyn Restaurant, Box Hill. Surrey-born chef Nick Sinclair has recently returned to The Emlyn after an absence of four years determined to make his presence known on the Surrey food scene. He brought most of his kitchen team along with him from Brooklands Hotel so they could grow together and collectively make their mark on the food. The Emlyn is set within The Burford Bridge Hotel in an area of outstanding natural beauty within the Surrey Hills. Nick says: “I look out of my windows onto Box Hill itself as The Emlyn is situated literally at the foot

52 essence-magazine.co.uk | NOVEMBER 2016

of Box Hill – what can be more inspiring than that? There is unlimited potential here. Surrey is in effect an agricultural economy and we want to work with the best of the local producers, showcase their products and grow their visibility together. We have taken the first step in establishing our kitchen garden and will have four beds over around a quarter of an acre of land here at the hotel. Our plans are to start beekeeping here as soon as we can too, and who knows what else we might find ourselves doing!” Nick and his team are on the right track and the restaurant is only going in one direction – upwards. It won the best restaurant category at Surrey Life’s Food and Drink Awards this year and I wonder whether Nick may just be in the running for best chef category within the next couple of years, along with other Surrey talents Daniel Britten (The White Horse), Matt Worswick (The Latymer) and Matt Edmonds (The Grantley Arms). What impressed me most about Nick was the fact he was the only chef (in the time I’ve been writing this column) to come out and have a proper chat with me, introducing himself and letting me know what he has been doing for the last few years. As a chef myself, I always appreciate how hard other chefs work, so it was a treat to meet someone with a genuine love for what he is doing. For the meal, my guest and I sampled The Emlyn’s six course tasting menu with wine flight at £90 per person. The restaurant is spacious: the tables spaced well apart from each other with velvet banquettes as well as armchairs in hues of blue and grey reflecting a tasteful, understated style which follows the same theme in the lounge bar area of the hotel. Service is exceptionally good. Joao, our sommelier, talked us through the wine pairing choices for our meal highlighting flavour notes along the way. There were two tasting menus on offer, a meat and a vegetarian, and we went for both. To start, we were served warm soda bread rolls


Restaurant_Review_Layout 1 02/11/2016 20:06 Page 2

Restaurant review | THE EMLYN

and a milk bread (both made in-house) with a smoked sea salt butter, a Marmite butter and an ajo blanco (a Spanish garlic and olive oil dip), setting us up for the meal ahead. The tasting menu was based around flavours and ingredients. To start ‘Maple Bacon’ - Scallop, Pineapple, Black Pudding, Liquorice Yoghurt and ‘Jersey Cow Curd’ Basil, Black Olive, Heritage Tomatoes. The black pudding in the ‘Maple Bacon’ is supplied by Butcher of the Year, Surrey Hills Butchers (based in Oxshott) and it was outstanding. Owner Simon Taylor provides all of The Emlyn’s meat and has a good working relationship with Nick. They work together to bring a range of superb quality meat to this restaurant. The ‘Jersey Cow Curd’ made a refreshing take on what could be seen as a tried and tested salad, and the tomatoes were served at the right temperature, which brought out their sweet flavour and balanced perfectly with the soft delicate curd cheese. ‘Celeriac’ – Apple, Walnuts, Cider Apples, Norbury Blue Cheese – served to us both, was a celebration of one of my favourite vegetables, the celeriac. It was my favourite course of the meal. Caramelised walnuts, with salt baked celeriac, >>>

As a chef myself, I always appreciate how hard other chefs work, so it was a treat to meet someone with a genuine love for what he is doing.

Nick Sinclair

NOVEMBER 2016 | essence-magazine.co.uk 53


Restaurant_Review_Layout 1 02/11/2016 20:06 Page 3

celeriac purée and remoulade, chunks of salty local Norbury blue cheese with sweet apples was a dreamy combination of flavours. ‘Red Mullet’ – Coconut Broth, Squid, Carrots, Ink Gnocchi and ‘Asparagus’ Egg Yolk, Brioche, Beurre Noisette formed the third course. The mullet was bathed in an aromatic spicy coconut broth both rich and decadent, while the asparagus was beautifully refined in taste and looks, disappearing in a few heavenly bites. ‘Lamb’ – Peas, Baby Spinach, Jersey Royal Terrine, Sweetbreads, Girolles and ‘Courgette’ Artichoke, Lemon, Basil and Ricotta formed the main course of the meal. The quality of the lamb was outstanding with the sweetbreads adding another surprise element to the dish and something we don’t see enough of on menus outside of Michelin restaurants. The courgette stuffed with a delicate lemon, basil and ricotta mousse demonstrated how this chef doesn’t see vegetarian food take second place to meat. ‘Strawberry and Clotted Cream’ – Hibiscus, Black Pepper, Strawberry Sorbet. Presentation should only matter if the food lives up to its looks. This pink and white splash of a dessert could not have highlighted the essence of strawberry with more success, an absolute winner. ‘Dirty Vicar and Ale’ – Cheesecake, Chocolate and Ale Cake, Malt Purée, Granola, Ale Ice Cream.

54 essence-magazine.co.uk | NOVEMBER 2016

Another local cheese, Dirty Vicar, was made into a softly scented cheesecake that crossed both sweet and savoury borders at the same time. The stand-out part of this last course was the incredible beer flavoured ice cream. It brought together the dish with a depth of flavour that is hard to define. The wines we enjoyed with every course were well judged, if a little sweet on one occasion, and it would be fantastic if the restaurant could expand its British wine selection as my favourite wine of the evening was a ‘Bacchus’ by Denbies Vineyard, just over the road from The Emlyn. The Emlyn definitely deserves to be put on the food map in a way that it has not been up until now. With a team this good in the kitchen more people should know about it. I think the lack of social media presence is part of its problem. Whether this is a good or bad thing, let’s face it: businesses need it to be in on it. The future is looking bright for Nick and his team, they simply need a helping hand in the marketing of this gem.  essence INFO Emlyn Restaurant Box Hill, Dorking, Surrey RH5 6BX Website: www.emlynrestaurant.co.uk Telephone: 01306 884561 Laura Scott: www.howtocookgoodfood.co.uk


Beauty_Layout 1 02/11/2016 20:08 Page 1

Beauty | EPSOM SKIN CLINICS

Close up on cosmeceuticals Skincare can be tricky to choose, especially with little guidance. Packaging and promises all mean consumers are drawn in, but how much long-term affect can these products have? Jacqui Casey of Epsom Skin Clinics introduces essence readers to cosmecueticals and why we should be excited about them.

I

t’s possible to separate skincare products into four different categories: high street, luxury, cosmeceutical and medical. Everyone is familiar with high street products and it is known that high street brands can barely penetrate the top layer of epidermis. This means they will provide a surface improvement and will smell and feel nice, but why treat the already dead layers of skin? A cosmeceutical will work to penetrate newer skin cells lower down in the epidermis. These are products only found in selected clinics and can be bought once recommended by, or after a visit to, a therapist. Cosmeceuticals have more pharmaceutical grade ingredients with a cosmetic benefit and have to have evidence of their efficacy. Ingredients contained within cosmeceuticals will vary to assist all different skin types and concerns, but they will be clinically proven to have a biological result within the skin. They will target the underlying structures to stimulate, improve and make the skin healthier long-term. Here are some ingredients to look out for: Vitamin A Vitamin A is an essential ingredient for supporting healthy bodily functions, but it offers amazing results when applied topically to the skin. It works as a resurfacer, gently sloughing the top layer of skin, which evens out tone and helps to thicken layers underneath, making wrinkles and fine lines appear diminished. It also aids in collagen production by halting the sugars that break it down.

Retinol Now is the perfect time of year to start using a retinol as care needs to be taken when using it in sunlight. Retriderm is a serum that contains retinol amongst other things such as hyaluronic acid known for its hydrating properties. It makes an incredible addition to any skincare routine. Vitamin C Our favourite antioxidant is Vitamin C, and not the type in a berroca. This Vitamin C is a crime-fighting ingredient which prevents free radical damage to the skin that causes premature ageing. It protects the cells lower down whilst also helping with inflammation and boosting radiance. Obagi Professional-C serums are available in three different percentages, 10%, 15%, and 20%, so there is something for everyone. Stem cells Stem cells are a buzzword at the moment as they can help regenerate and reform skin cells. They are made of growth factors which help with the division of cells, therefore helping new skin cells to form as well as targeting collagen and elastin production which firms the skin and prevents fine lines and wrinkles. So book with us for a consultation to find out how to get the best out of skincare and work on treating newer skin cells, not resurrecting dead ones!

PHOTO COPYRIGHT: TANNJUSKA | DREAMSTIME.COM

essence INFO Epsom Skin Clinics Website: www.epsomskinclinics.com Telephone: 01372 737280 (Epsom) or 020 8399 5996 (Surbiton)

NOVEMBER 2016 | essence-magazine.co.uk 55


Mundays_Layout 1 02/11/2016 20:03 Page 1

Stamp Duty’s potential pitfalls Jessica De Noronha is an Associate in the Property Department at Mundays and discusses the issues raised by the new higher rate of Stamp Duty, and how it could affect individuals even if they do not own a buy to let property. Jessica De Noronha, Associate Jessica has extensive experience working with property developers. Jessica acts for both developers and individuals in the acquisition and disposal of development sites by way of option and conditional contract. Jessica has experience in drafting and negotiating planning agreements with local authorities and development infrastructure agreements with local and statutory authorities. She has also acted on plot sales for regional and national house builders and has particular expertise in site set ups and management structures. Jessica De Noronha can be contacted on 01932 590636 or at jessica.denoronha@mundays.co.uk.

I

n recent years, the government has sought to use changes to Stamp Duty Land Tax (SDLT) to influence the residential property market. Most recently it has introduced a higher rate of SDLT for individuals buying additional properties and for all companies buying residential dwellings. The intention was to discourage ‘buy to let’ purchases, which in turn should free up properties for first time buyers. Whether that will be the effect remains to be seen. Of course, you pay SDLT when you purchase a property, so if you are not thinking about moving at this time this may not seem relevant. However, there are some unexpected nuances to the rules, and thinking about these now may benefit you in the future. How much is the additional SDLT? The higher rate is an additional 3% on top of the standard rate of SDLT. If the higher rate applies it is payable on the whole of the purchase price. When would it apply to me? The higher rate will apply if the following conditions are satisfied: • The property being purchased is a major interest in a dwelling; • The price paid is more than £40,000;

56 essence-magazine.co.uk | NOVEMBER 2016

• The property is not subject to a long lease; • At the end of the day on which the property is purchased you will own a major interest in another dwelling worth £40,000 or more and that property is not subject to a long lease; • The dwelling is not a replacement for your only or main residence. In the simplest of transactions, if you buy and sell your home on the same day you will not pay the additional rate. This will be the case even if you own another property, provided the property sold and the property bought are your ‘main residence’. If you have sold a main residence within the previous three years (or at any time if the purchase of the new main residence is before 27 November 2018) then the additional rate will not be payable. If you purchase a property which will be your main residence before your previous residence is sold, you will pay the additional SDLT but can claim it back when the previous main residence is sold, provided that is within three years. What is a ‘main residence’? This will depend on the facts. HMRC would look at the whole picture: where you spend your time, where your children go to school, where you are registered to vote and any other relevant


Mundays_Layout 1 02/11/2016 20:03 Page 2

Legal | MUNDAYS

Owning a property in a company name The government has sought to discourage the purchase of properties through corporate structures intended to avoid tax by imposing additional taxes on the acquisition, holding and disposal of properties by ‘non-natural persons’. A non-natural person is a company, a partnership where one of the partners is a company or a collective investment scheme.

PHOTO COPYRIGHT: GUPPYIMAGES | DREAMSTIME.COM

circumstances. Consideration should be given to this if you own multiple properties which you occupy from time to time and you are planning on purchasing a new main residence. What if I own another property but am not replacing my main residence? You will pay SDLT at the higher rate. Is there anything else I should know? The new rules are not straightforward and there are circumstances which may result in you paying the higher rate of SDLT which you may not initially think of. For example: • Properties owned overseas are taken into account. • Spouses and civil partners are treated as one entity, so if one of you owns an additional property you will pay the higher rate of SDLT on a subsequent purchase (subject to the above). This will be the case even if one partner owns one property and the other partner owns the other. • If only one purchaser of several would pay the higher rate, the higher rate would apply. This may be particularly relevant if you are assisting your children with property purchases. • Be wary of trusts. Depending on how the trust is set up, the beneficiaries may effectively ‘own’ the property and therefore may pay the higher rate on a subsequent purchase. If there is a child who is the beneficiary of a trust, they

cannot hold property until they are 18 so the property would be legally held by the parents who therefore may be unwittingly caught by the higher rate. • Consideration should also be given if you inherit a property (or a share of a property) as you could be subject to the higher rate.

Buying Since 2012 there has been a 15% rate of SDLT for high value properties (payable on the whole purchase price). When this was introduced, the 15% rate was triggered at £2,000,000. In 2014 this was dramatically reduced to £500,000. There are exceptions to this, most notably the property business relief, but unless you fall within this the 15% rate is a huge disincentive to purchasing a property in a company.

What about companies? Companies will always pay the higher rate of SDLT. Depending on the circumstances, companies may also be subject to additional taxes in the acquisition and holding of a property.

Owning If you already own a property in a company name, Annual Tax on Enveloped Dwellings (ATED) will be payable (subject to some exemptions and reliefs). A return must be filed and there are penalties and interest for late submission or payment.

In conclusion, the new changes to SDLT affect more people than may have first been thought when they were introduced with a flourish by the government as an additional tax on ‘buy to lets’. If you own more than one property, or are planning on buying an additional property, it is worth considering the new rules and if necessary consulting with your solicitor or accountant to check the position.

Selling In 2013 the government brought properties which are subject to ATED within the capital gains tax regime. This applies to both UK and overseas companies. On completion of the sale of any property which is subject to ATED, capital gains tax will be payable on any gain.

essence INFO

Mundays LLP Cedar House 78 Portsmouth Road, Cobham KT11 1AN Telephone: 01932 560500 Website: www.mundays.co.uk

If you are considering purchasing or already hold a property in a company name, make sure that you consult with your solicitor and/or accountant to ensure you take this additional tax into account.

NOVEMBER 2016 | essence-magazine.co.uk 57


A welcome tax-break for property Simon Lewis, CEO at Partridge Muir & Warren Ltd considers how families might benefit from a soon to be introduced tax-break that could be worth up to £140,000.

W

e are now less than six months away from the introduction of a new and very important tax break that will benefit many families; potentially by as much as £140,000 once it takes full effect. The rules that will govern entitlement are complex so it is probably a good idea to assess what action, if any, can be taken to optimise your position. A quick reminder of how Inheritance Tax (IHT) works The IHT nil rate band is the value of an estate that is not subject to tax on death. Any amount above this level is taxed at the flat rate of 40%. There are some important reliefs and perhaps the most important, in the case of a married couple, is that transfers between spouses and civil partners are exempt. Therefore, it is often the case that where a joint estate is likely to be sufficient to trigger an IHT liability, this liability is crystallised on the death of the second to die. In recent years it has been possible for the surviving spouse to inherit the nil rate band not utilised on the first death. There are also exemptions for certain types of assets; principally business property relief and agricultural property relief. The purpose of these exemptions was to remove

Although the nil rate band had previously tended to be increased each year by the Chancellor, it has been stuck at £325,000 since April 2009 and it is not scheduled to increase again until April 2021. 58 essence-magazine.co.uk | NOVEMBER 2016

the necessity for businesses and farms to be broken up following the demise of their owners for the sole purpose of paying tax. Government realised that this had a detrimental effect on the economy. Although the nil rate band had previously tended to be increased each year by the Chancellor, it has been stuck at £325,000 since April 2009 and it is not scheduled to increase again until April 2021. The value of the average home in the UK has already increased by around 35% since April 2009; as this is often the biggest asset within an estate, the result is that more estates have been dragged into the tax net. What’s about to change? A new ‘Residence Nil Rate Band’ (RNRB) will give each individual who dies after 6 April 2017 an additional allowance to be used against their home (or their interest in their home) provided they leave the property to their direct descendants. Direct descendants include children, step-children, adopted and foster children but not siblings, nieces/nephews, wider family members or friends. Any unused RNRB will be transferrable between spouses or civil partners if it is unused on the first death. In 2017/18 the RNRB will be £100,000, rising incrementally, by £25,000pa, to reach £175,000 in 2020/21 and in line with the Consumer Price Index thereafter. Therefore, families could escape IHT on up to £1 million of their wealth because each parent will have a nil-rate band of £325,000 plus a RNRB of up to £175,000.


Finance | PMW

Not for everyone Some estates will not see any benefit from the RNRB because it will be reduced (known as tapering) by £1 for every £2 that the deceased’s net estate exceeds a threshold of £2 million. This represents a marginal tax rate of 60% for those estates that breach the limit but do not exceed it sufficiently to lose all of the allowance. The RNRB is completely lost for estates of £2.2 million or more in 2017/18. The upper threshold of initially £2 million will rise to £2.25 million in 2018/19, £2.3 million in 2019/20 and £2.35 million for 2020/21. Multiple residences Only one residential property will qualify for this relief. The personal representatives must nominate which residential property should qualify if there is more than one in the estate. A property which was never a residence of the deceased, such as buy-to-lets, cannot be nominated. Downsizing The family home doesn’t need to be owned at death to qualify for the RNRB. This is of help to those who may have downsized or sold their property to move into residential care or a relative’s home. The RNRB will still be available provided that: w The property disposed of was owned by the individual and it would have qualified for the RNRB had the individual retained it;

w The replacement property and/or

assets form part of the estate and pass to descendants; w The disposal of the property must have taken place after 8 July 2015 although there is no time limit on the period between the disposal and when death occurs. Planning to avoid the pitfalls Some families may unintentionally miss out on the RNRB by not ensuring that their estates are shared in the most efficient way. For example, many couples will hold the family home as joint tenants. On the first death this means the house passes to the surviving owner with no IHT because of the spousal exemption. The RNRB is not used on the first death and the surviving spouse inherits the full unused allowance; although if the combined estate on the second death is greater than £2 million, then both RNRBs could be lost due to the impact of tapering. Switching property ownership to tenants in common would allow each spouse to control how the property passes on death, and potentially preserve their entitlements to the RNRB by keeping each partner’s assets below £2 million. On the first death, the deceased could use their RNRB by leaving part of their share in the family home to their children. In turn, this would reduce the value of the survivor’s net estate. And this could be further reduced if the deceased also gives more away,

up to their ordinary nil rate band of £325,000. So, in total, the survivor’s estate could be reduced by up to £500,000. Care is required when using a trust as part of such planning. For example, the RNRB could be lost where the property is placed into a discretionary will trust for the benefit of the children or grandchildren on the grounds that they will not have a legally enforceable entitlement due to the discretionary powers of the trustees. It is usual for such trusts to have the potential to benefit other classes of beneficiary in some circumstances. However, some trusts for the benefit of children and grandchildren will not result in a loss of the RNRB. If the trust gives a child or grandchild an absolute interest or interest in possession in the home the RNRB can still be claimed. Other trusts such as Bereaved Minor Trusts, 18 - 25 Trusts and Disabled Persons’ Trusts will also retain the RNRB. A deed of variation may come to the rescue for some where property is passed to an individual but it can be impossible to vary a transfer into a discretionary trust which has a wide class of beneficiaries as agreement will be needed from all possible beneficiaries. Get advice There are now so many factors that need to be considered when carrying out estate planning that it makes sense to obtain professional advice. A careful balance between optimising tax efficiency and ensuring the financial security of all parties needs to be struck and a chartered financial planner is the ideal choice to help you avoid the pitfalls. v

essence INFO

Simon Lewis is writing on behalf of Partridge Muir & Warren Ltd (PMW), Chartered Financial Planners, based in Esher. The Company has specialised in providing wealth management solutions to private clients for 47 years. Simon is an independent financial adviser, chartered financial planner and chartered fellow of the Chartered Institute for Securities and Investment. The opinions outlined in this article are those of the writer and should not be construed as individual advice. To find out more about financial advice and investment options please contact Simon at Partridge Muir & Warren Ltd. Partridge Muir & Warren Ltd is authorised and regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority. Telephone: 01372 471 550 Email: simon.lewis@pmw.co.uk Website: www.pmw.co.uk

NOVEMBER 2016 | essence-magazine.co.uk 59


Cranmore_Layout 1 02/11/2016 20:04 Page 1

Greater expectations Michael Connolly, Headmaster of Cranmore School, discusses the influence of school inspections.

T

Independent schools have their own inspection framework under the auspices of the Independent Schools Inspectorate (ISI). In the main, inspections are carried out by teams which consist mostly of serving head teachers.

60 essence-magazine.co.uk | NOVEMBER 2016

here have been some notable milestones over several decades in which politicians have made decisions that turned out to have a long-term influence on educational policy and practice. The ‘Butler Act’ in 1944 aimed to provide a vision of how education might evolve in post war Britain. This included a tripartite system of secondary education which was never fully implemented. However, it also contained some pragmatic initiatives such as the provision of ‘school dinners’ and free milk, the latter famously withdrawn by Margaret Thatcher. Just over thirty years later, in 1976, Prime Minister James Callaghan gave a landmark speech at Ruskin College, Oxford. In one sense, it was a direct challenge to the custom and practice that teachers should be left to decide what children should learn and how they should be taught. At the heart of this debate was the concept that the provision of high quality education would enrich the lives of children and, in due course, have a beneficial effect on the economy with a much better

educated and skilled workforce. Not surprisingly, this led to a discussion about how to measure educational standards and, of equal importance, the need for consistency in all parts of the nation. The logical outcome was to ensure that there was a robust inspectorate which, inter alia, would become an enforcer of these new standards. The creation of Ofsted in 1984 was a statement of intent for the educational new world order. Of course, the drive to improve educational standards could not happen overnight. It was not until 1988 that Kenneth Baker, as Secretary of State for Education, introduced a National Curriculum which set out in precise terms what children should be taught up and down the land. He is also remembered for introducing statutory training days for teachers, so called Baker Days, recognising that some staff had taught for decades after their PGCE without any significant upgrade in their skills or knowledge. It has been a bumpy ride for teachers ever since with an endless stream of changes to standardised tests (SATs) as well as


Cranmore_Layout 1 02/11/2016 20:04 Page 2

Education | CRANMORE SCHOOL ALL PHOTOS COPYRIGHT: CRANMORE SCHOOL

public exams such as GCSE, AS and A-level. There has been a push to adopt new practices, particularly with regard to information technology, to equip young people for living in a digital age. Whilst teachers have generally coped quite well with the rapid pace of change, their bête noir continues to be the thorny problem of school inspections. One can understand their misgiving when one reads what the Chief Inspector, Sir Michael Wilshaw, stated when interviewed by the Times Educational Supplement last month: “We have got to challenge complacency, we have got to challenge mediocrity and we have got to challenge failure where we see it. And if Ofsted doesn’t do that, who is going to?” As blunt as it may sound, fundamentally he is correct, although it might be construed as implying that inspectors are actively seeking ways to detect failure. There is an answer to his rhetorical question, if not Ofsted, then who? Independent schools have their own inspection framework under the auspices of the Independent Schools Inspectorate (ISI). In the main, inspections are carried out by teams which consist mostly of serving head teachers. If nothing else, this ensures that those who are making the evaluations are involved in running schools themselves and have a natural empathy for the

challenges this entails. The criteria are sufficiently robust and cover compliance with all manner of regulatory requirements as well as looking at pupils’ achievements and personal development. As a headmaster myself, I must admit I hardly relish the prospect of the dreaded phone call to tell me that an inspection team will be descending upon my school within twenty-four hours. Nevertheless, I have always valued the endorsement of the subsequent inspection report confirming what an outstanding job my colleagues do day after day. Yes, I have also been an inspector for many years and so have the opportunity to see other schools in action. In my view, it’s a good thing to put ourselves under the spotlight of fellow professionals so

we can identify our strengths and aspects for development. For our most recent inspection, we were graded excellent in every single category, a plaudit which we shall work hard to maintain. 

essence INFO

Cranmore School has embarked on a programme of change progressing to full co-education for pupils aged two and a half to thirteen years. Children study the standard subjects as well as a stimulating curriculum including French, Mandarin, Spanish, Latin, Greek and a wide selection of extra-curricular activities. The excellent facilities include a golf course, swimming pool, fitness suite and also a Forest School so that the youngest pupils from the nursery onwards can experience real ‘outdoors education’. Telephone: 01483 280340 Website: www.cranmoreprep.co.uk

NOVEMBER 2016 | essence-magazine.co.uk 61


3pp_LesBrea_Goth_Layout 1 02/11/2016 20:06 Page 1

Ivar Johnsson's 'Woman by the Sea' bronze sculpture, looking out over Gothenburg.

Welcome to Gothenburg,

a Swedish

treasure

Gothenburg, Sweden’s second largest city, is located by the sparkling waters of the Kattegat Sea on its western coast, and as the sole gateway to the North Sea and the Atlantic Ocean, it is the largest of the Nordic ports. Rebecca Underwood visited to find out more.

G

ustavus Adolphus, founder of Gothenburg and King of Sweden from 1611 to 1632, endorsed the royal charter in 1621 and the city was designed and constructed by Dutch engineers, admired for their skill in draining and building on marshes. The Dutch held political authority until 1652, when the Swedes attained power, and in 1676 King Charles XI of Sweden ordered the construction of a series of zigzag shaped walls, lined with blasted rock, to protect the city. The fortifications were destroyed between 1807 and 1817, but a remnant of the bastion Carolus Rex XI remains on Esperantoplatsen, near to Feskekörka, one of Gothenburg’s many attractions. Feskekörka is an indoor fish market, known locally as the ‘fish church’ as the building resembles a Gothic church. Dating back to 1874, the fish market remains a hive of activity and is the ideal spot for a tasty luncheon. Visitors are welcome to select a pre-cooked fish dish from one of the little stalls, a microwave is on standby to heat it up, and then may wish to head for one of the little tables outside and take part in the popular sport of people-watching whilst admiring enchanting views of the canal. Fishing remained the dominant industry until the Swedish East India Company, founded in 1731, opened up trade with the Far East and Gothenburg’s harbour became Sweden’s main port. The Swedish East India Company was responsible for constructing the charming stone houses around the canals. The East India House, located on North Harbour Street, is a fine example of the Classic style, and in 1861 it became the Gothenburg City Museum. A number of exhibitions provide visitors with the opportunity to follow the history of Gothenburg from the prehistoric era to the present day, covering 12,000 mindboggling years. To learn more of Gothenburg’s seafaring history, continue to the Maritime Museum, which floats on a pontoon in the Göta River. A fleet of ships, boats and barges with military and civilian ties attracts hordes of visitors and includes a cargo ship, destroyer, lightship, minelayer, patrol boat, port ferry, tow boat and submarine. Tours narrated in English take

62 essence-magazine.co.uk | NOVEMBER 2016


3pp_LesBrea_Goth_Layout 1 02/11/2016 20:06 Page 2

Leisure breaks | GOTHENBURG PHOTO COPYRIGHT: PER PIXEL PETERSSON/COURTESY OF IMAGEBANK.SWEDEN.SE

PHOTO COPYRIGHT: EMELIE ASPLUND/COURTESY OF IMAGEBANK.SWEDEN.SE

Gothenburg streetcar

place at 11.30, 13.00 and 15.30 hours. And next to the museum stands the Seamen’s Tower, built to honour the memory of 684 Swedish souls lost on board vessels during WWI. Follow the 194 steps up to the top of the tower, which soars 49 metres into the sky, to be rewarded with a close up view of the bronze sculpture ‘Woman by the Sea’, created by Ivar Johnsson, which stands at the top of the tower looking out over the briny. Gothenburg’s two million annual visitors are keen to explore and admire an abundance of attractions, including Liseberg, Scandinavia’s largest amusement park and recipient of two Michelin Green Stars. Features include Aerospin, a Venetian carousel very popular with the ‘little ones’, and for brave hearts the Helix rollercoaster is the fastest and longest in Scandinavia. If that ride doesn’t raise the adrenalin, take a seat on Mechanica, which spins 360 degrees and soars 30 metres above the ground. For those of us without a head for heights, Liseberg’s Lustgård is an extensive park area featuring hundreds of trees, plants, waterfalls and artworks. It’s the ideal spot to take a breather and plan the rest of a day’s sightseeing. For art lovers, the Museum of Fine Art, located on Gotaplatsen, is a must with masterpieces created by Van Gogh, Picasso, Rembrandt, Degas, Pissarro, Renoir, Cezanne and Gauguin. Study the depth of colour of Monet’s 1907 painting of water lilies and then take a leisurely stroll around the Fürstenberg gallery to view Nordic art dating from the 1880s. To purchase gifts for loved ones and for a chance to rummage for a bargain in quirky little independent shops, then hop on a street car and head for Haga, Gothenburg’s first suburb, established in 1648 by Sweden’s Queen Kristina, daughter of King Gustavus Adolphus. Wander around little cobblestone pedestrian streets, admire the charming wooden

TRAVEL TIP

Avoid airport queues and book airport transfers on line with Blacklane for a reliable, punctual, first class service. Visit www.blacklane.com for more information.

NOVEMBER 2016 | essence-magazine.co.uk 63

>>>


3pp_LesBrea_Goth_Layout 1 02/11/2016 20:06 Page 3

PHOTO COPYRIGHT: SIMON PAULIN/COURTESY OF IMAGEBANK.SWEDEN.SE

Feskekörka (fish church) indoor fish market Caption

PHOTO COPYRIGHT: GÖRAN ASSNER/COURTESY OF IMAGEBANK.SWEDEN.SE

FESTIVE SEASON TIP

The Liseberg amusement park glitters with five million Christmas lights and is festooned with thousands of spruce garlands from November 18 until December 30. Liseberg is the location for Sweden’s largest Christmas market, featuring up to 80 market stalls enticing visitors with Christmas goodies galore. Sections of the park will follow a Christmas theme and Santa and his reindeers will be in residence waiting to receive requests for festive gifts from adults and children alike.

houses and explore intriguing antique shops overflowing with treasures. And of course the Swedes are famous all over the world for their interior designs and a wide array of interesting household goods and gadgets can be found in department stores such as Designtorget, located on Vallgatan Liseberg amusement park during the festive season and Lagerhaus on Postgatan. For a spot of up market and personal retail therapy, Avenyn, Gothenburg’s main boulevard, is crammed with chic boutiques enticing the most resistant passers-by to part with large amounts of Swedish Krona. For travellers seeking luxurious accommodation with the highest level of privacy, comfort and service, Avenue A1 is located on Avenyn and offers two to five bed apartments for shortterm rental. Each spacious apartment features contemporary furnishings, a comfortable seating area with a flat-screen television, and a fully equipped kitchen with a dining area, washing machine and free WIFI. Although Gothenburg offers a wide choice of high-end hotels, it is rather refreshing not to be restricted by set meal times and live as at home. Accommodation at Avenue A1 For those wishing to dine out, there are lots of cafés and restaurants nearby serving all manner of Swedish and international fare. Kometen, a very popular restaurant with locals, is located on Vasagatan, a short walk The East India House, located on away from Avenyn. Opened in 1934, Kometen serves Swedish dishes, including the most delicious pickled herrings and deep fried anchovies North Harbour Street, is a fine on toast with béarnaise. Be sure to book a table well in advance. example of the Classic style, and Or perhaps take a quick Fika break: the Swedish term for a coffee in 1861 it became the Gothenburg break, which should also include a selection of sandwiches and/or pastries, including the famous kanelbulle, a tasty cinnamon bun or a City Museum. Lussekatt, which is an ‘S’ shaped bun flavoured with saffron. And for the ideal afternoon tipple, it has to be a glass of Schnapps. Hold the glass aloft and offer a toast to Gothenburg, it truly is a Swedish jewel.  64 essence-magazine.co.uk | NOVEMBER 2016


Island Adventure New Adverts May 2016_Layout 1 23/05/2016 15:15 Page 2

BESPOKE EXPERIENCES IN SRI LANKA Create your own authentic, off-the-beaten-track, Sri Lanka experience with Island Adventures

www.islandadventures.lk info@islandadventures.lk


www.dsautomobiles.com


1 November 16_Layout 1 31/10/2016 15:38 Page 2

essence events

spotlight on... Katie Melua on tour with Gori Women’s Choir G Live, Guildford Wednesday 23 November Katie Melua will appear at G Live for one night only as part of her special winter concert series accompanied by the 25-piece Gori Women’s Choir. The tour coincides with the release of Katie’s new album ‘In Winter’ which was recorded in the singer’s home country of Georgia and extensively features the Choir, pictured right with Katie in the foreground. Award-winning singer, songwriter and guitarist Katie, since releasing her debut album Call Off the Search in 2003, has released six studio albums and is perhaps best known for singles ‘The Closest Thing to Crazy’ and ‘Nine Million Bicycles’. Gori Women’s Choir comprises singers who are masters of the ancient Georgian tradition of polyphonic singing, described as a ‘vocal orchestra’. Together, the Choir and Katie will perform material from ‘In Winter’, along with classic songs from the singer’s extensive repertoire. A night not to be missed.

Information: 01483 369350 or glive.co.uk

theatre Richmond Theatre Richmond Monday 7 to Saturday 12 November Shakespeare Revue A collection of witty music and skits originally produced by the Royal Shakespeare Company. Tuesday 15 to Saturday 19 November Pride and Prejudice A Regent’s Park Theatre production. Wednesday 23 to Saturday 26 November Ellen Kent’s La Boheme, Nabucco and Aida Productions from Opera & Ballet International.

Tuesday 29 November to Saturday 3 December Glyndebourne Tour 2016 A programme including Puccini’s Madama Butterfly and Mozart’s Don Giovanni. Tickets: 0844 871 7645 or atgtickets.com/woking

New Wimbledon Theatre Wimbledon Tuesday 8 to Saturday 12 November Cats Andrew Lloyd Webber’s award-winning and much-loved musical for one week only at the New Wimbledon Theatre. Information: 0844 871 7646 or atgtickets.com/wimbledon

Banstead & Nork Amateur Operatic Society

New Victoria Theatre

Banstead Community Hall

Woking

Thursday 24 to Saturday 26 November Broadway Blackout: What Happens When The Lights Go Out Family show in support of The Royal Marsden.

Wednesday 9 to Saturday 19 November Chitty Chitty Bang Bang Great musical fun. Wednesday 23 November Richard Alston Dance Company A new programme showcase.

68 essence-magazine.co.uk | NOVEMBER 2016

Information: 07858 759036 or ticketsource.co.uk

Photo copyright: Pip/BMG

Tickets: 0844 871 7651 or ambassadortickets.com/richmond


1 November 16_Layout 1 31/10/2016 15:38 Page 3


1 November 16_Layout 1 31/10/2016 15:38 Page 4

essence events

The Back Room of The Star Inn, Guildford

Information: 01483 278000 or

Saturday 19 November The best stand-up comedy.

cranleighartscentre.org

Information: gaghousecomedy.com

Dorking Halls

Guildford Shakespeare Company

Dorking Friday 25 November Rich Hall: Live 2016 Grouchy comedian on tour. Information: 01306 881717 or dorkinghalls.co.uk

Electric Theatre Guildford Wednesday 16 to Saturday 19 November Julius Caesar Based on Shakespeare’s classic play.

Guildford Cathedral Marquee Tuesday 6 December The Play’s the Thing Marking the end of the GSC’s tenth anniversary, a one-off performance of a revue show charting the story of the GSC to date, including an appearance from the Company’s Honorary Patron, Brian Blessed. Information: 01483 304384 or guildford-shakespeare-company.co.uk

Information: 01483 444789 or

Rose Theatre

electrictheatre.co.uk

Kingston-upon-Thames

Epsom Playhouse Epsom Friday 11 November Rob Beckett: Mouth of the South Talented comic talks about the big issues: Kit Kats and flatbread! Thursday 23 November Simon & Garfunkel Story Based on the great music duo. Information: 01372 742555 or

To Saturday 19 November All My Sons Arthur Miller’s first great Broadway success. Sunday 13 November Germaine Greer: The Disappearing Woman Strategies for changing the visibility of women in today’s society. Information: 020 8174 0090 or rosetheatrekingston.org

epsomplayhouse.co.uk

Woodfield Entertainers Farnham Maltings

Ashtead

Farnham

Thursday 15 to Saturday 17 December Alice in Wonderland A fun-filled pantomime.

Saturday 12 November Little Howard’s Big Show for Kids, by Howard Read Great, funny, interactive animation. Tuesday 29 November From Ibiza to the Norfolk Broads A play telling the tale of a young David Bowie obsessive. Information: 01252 745444 or farnhammaltings.com

G Live Guildford Wednesday 30 November Professor Brian Cox Live Join the professor on a journey through space and time...

Photo copyright: Rob Beckett 2016

Friday 18 November Austentatious Improvised Jane Austen.

Guildford Gag House Comedy

Rob Beckett, Epsom Playhouse

Photo copyright: Jane Hobson

Cranleigh

Richard Alston Dance Company, New Victoria Theatre, Woking

Information: 07941 105612 or woodfieldentertainers.co.uk

Yvonne Arnaud Theatre Guildford Tuesday 15 to Wednesday 16 November Sand in the Sandwiches Starring Edward Fox, a play celebrating poet John Betjeman. Thursday 17 to Friday 18 November Russian State Ballet and Opera House Performances of Swan Lake and Sleeping Beauty.

Information: 01483 369350 or

Information: 01483 440000

glive.co.uk

or yvonne-arnaud.co.uk

Photo copyright: Alessandro Pinna

Cranleigh Arts Centre

70 essence-magazine.co.uk | NOVEMBER 2016 Javier Cid as Macavity, Cats, New Wimbledon Theatre


1 November 16_Layout 1 31/10/2016 15:38 Page 5

spotlight on... Hampton Court Palace Ice Rink

Photo copyright: Hampton Court Palace/s.frack

Friday 25 November to Sunday 8 January 2017 Ice skating returns to Hampton Court Palace for what is now a winter tradition. Take a turn on this spectacular ice rink offering splendid views of the red brick Tudor front of King Henry VIII’s beautiful palace. Why not book an evening session on the rink and see the Palace lit up after dark whilst skating under the stars with friends and family? Alternatively, make a day of it: explore the Palace apartments and galleries, visit the Haunted Gallery, enjoy seasonal food, afternoon tea and The Dip-Dunk Lodge, and skate at a time which suits. We recommend booking early for this festive treat: off peak and peak tickets are available with special rates for families, students, pensioners and groups. Early bird discounts are also available with a first skate at 11am and last skate at 9pm. And don’t forget, spectators can access viewing areas for free. To coin a phrase, get your skates on!

Information: hamptoncourtpalaceicerink.co.uk

music Boileroom Guildford Various dates: see website Creative arts and music venue.

G Live Guildford Tuesday 15 November, 7.30pm The Damned 40th Anniversary Tour Punk legends perform.

exhibitions

Information: surreymusic.org

Cranleigh

Vivace Chorus

Tuesday 8 to Saturday 19 November Surrey Contemporaries An exhibition by Surrey-based artists.

Information: 01483 369350 or glive.co.uk

G Live, Guildford

Information: theboileroom.net

Guildford Chamber Choir Brockham Choral

Holy Trinity Church, Guildford

St Martin’s Church, Dorking

Saturday 19 November, 7.30pm Baroque Masters: Bach and Handel In support of the halow project.

Saturday 12 November, 7.30pm For the Fallen Marking the centenary of the Battle of the Somme.

The 200 combined voices of Elmbridge Choir and Elmbridge Ladies’ Choir bring a programme of seasonal songs to Claygate.

Information: 07704 802225 or guildfordchamberchoir.org.uk

Information: brockhamchoral.org

Saturday 12 November, 7.30pm All the World’s a Stage A tribute to Shakespeare in words and music, featuring the Guildford Shakespeare Company. Includes works from Tchaikovsky, Walton and Verdi. Information: vivacechorus.org

Harlequin Theatre Camberley Theatre

Redhill

Camberley

Thursday 24 November, 8pm Clare Teal and her Mini Big Band The UK’s Queen of Swing returns.

Friday 11 November, 7.30pm Ralph McTell Renowned English singer-songwriterguitarist celebrates 50 years as a professional musician.

cranleighartscentre.org

Gallery One Reigate Friday 18 November to Saturday 3 December Rafael Heredia Acclaimed Spanish painter sculptor. Information: galleryonereigate.co.uk

Caterham Beer Festival

High Street, Guildford

Information: 01737 276500 or

Soper Hall, Caterham Valley

harlequintheatre.co.uk

Saturday 12 November to Saturday 3 December Guildford Art Society The Society’s autumn exhibition. Information: 01483 444751 or

Information: 01276 707600 or

Surrey Mozart Players

camberleytheatre.biz

The Electric Theatre, Guildford

Information: caterhambeerfestival.com

Epworth Choir

Saturday 10 December, 7.30pm Including Ibert’s flute concerto.

Christ Church, Woking

Information: surreymozartplayers.com

Information: epworthchoir.org

Information: 01483 278000 or

festivals Friday 18 and Saturday 19 November This year, there’ll be a new Prosecco bar. Enjoy.

Monday 12 December, 7.30pm Family Christmas Concert Much-loved carol concert with St Andrew’s School Choir.

Cranleigh Arts Centre

guildford.gov.uk/guildfordhouse

Dorking Halls Winter Beer Festival Dorking Halls, Dorking

Surrey Music Holy Trinity Church, Claygate Saturday 26 November, 7.30pm Make Mine a Snowball!

Guildford House Gallery

Friday 18 and Saturday 19 November A great selection of beer and cider from across the UK, with live music. Information: dorkinghalls.co.uk

The Lightbox Gallery and Museum Woking To Saturday 31 December The Story of British Comics So Far: >>> Cor! By Gum! Zarjaz!

NOVEMBER 2016 | essence-magazine.co.uk 71


1 November 16_Layout 1 31/10/2016 15:38 Page 6

essence events

Cranleigh Arts Centre 01483 278000 or cranleighartscentre.org Farnham Maltings 01252 745444 or farnhammaltings.com Odeon Esher 0871 2244007 or odeon.co.uk/fanatic/film_times/s89/esher Odeon Epsom 0871 2244007 or odeon.co.uk/fanatic/film_times/s88/epsom Odeon Guildford 0871 2244007 or odeon.co.uk/fanatic/film_times/s92/guildford The Screen Walton 01932 252825 or screencinemas.co.uk The Ambassadors Cinema, Woking 0844 871 6743 or ambassadortickets.com/cinema

An interactive exhibition exploring the past, present and future of comics. To Sunday 22 January 2017 Camden Town Group: Art for the Edwardian Era An exhibition showcasing work by the Camden Town Group artists.

national trust

Information: 01483 737800 or

A few are shown here, but visit

thelightbox.org.uk

nationaltrust.org.uk for more.

Museum of Farnham

Leith Hill Place

Willmer House, Farnham

near Dorking

Tuesday 15 November to Saturday 28 January 2017 On View Objects reflecting the diverse history of Farnham.

Friday 25 and Saturday 26 November, 10.30am to 1pm Creative wreath-making A festive workshop using materials from nature. Booking essential.

Information: museumoffarnham.com

Information: 0344 249 1895

New Ashgate Gallery

Polesden Lacey

Farnham

Great Bookham, near Dorking

Saturday 12 November to Saturday 7 January 2017 Winter Exhibition More than fifty artists and makers display paintings, ceramics, jewellery, textiles and lots more. Perfect gifts for Christmas.

To Wednesday 30 November, 10am–4pm New rooms open A suite of new rooms to view. Tuesday 22 and 29 and Friday 25 November Creative wreath-making Create a beautiful festive wreath. Booking essential.

Information: 01252 713208 or newashgate.org.uk

Photo copyright: Painshill Park

cinemas

The illuminated Chinese Bridge, Painshill Park

National Trust properties offer perfect venues to explore.

St. Clement’s by Tony Watson (excerpt), Winter Exhibition, New Ashgate Gallery

Information: 01372 452048

Watts Gallery Compton, Guildford

Winkworth Arboretum

Tuesday 22 November to Sunday 19 February 2017 Untold Stories: British Art from Private Collections Great works of art usually kept behind closed doors.

Godalming Sunday 27 November, 2–3pm Tree planting workshop Learn from National Trust experts how to plant and look after trees. Booking essential.

Information: 01483 813593 or

Information: 01483 208936

wattsgallery.org.uk

nationaltrust.org.uk

72 essence-magazine.co.uk | NOVEMBER 2016 Military Vehicles Day, Brooklands Museum


1 November 16_Layout 1 31/10/2016 15:38 Page 7

out & about

Winter market and fair 50 stalls and exhibitors offering unique and bespoke Xmas gifts.

Birdworld

Kingston Christmas Market

Saturday 26 November to Saturday 24 December Magical Christmas Meet Santa and his reindeer. Information: birdworld.co.uk

Photo copyright: Jon Hawkins

Farnham

Information: guildford-cathedral.org

Kingston-upon-Thames Saturday 19 November to Saturday 31 December Wooden chalets selling festive arts, crafts and decorations. Information: visitkingston.co.uk

Roe deer, Surrey Wildlife Trust

Bocketts Farm Leatherhead

Loseley Park

Rural Life Centre

Thursday 24 November to Saturday 24 December Meet Father Christmas Hop on board the Santa Express to Santa’s magical hay barn workshop.

Guildford

Tilford, Farnham

Thursday 17 to Sunday 20 November, 9am–5pm The Rural Crafts Association Crafts for Christmas Talented makers and designers from all over the UK.

Saturday 12 November, 10.30am–3pm Christmas Craft Fair From woollens to woodturning, jewellery to jam, lots of Xmas present inspiration here.

Information: ruralcraftsassociation.co.uk

Information: rural-life.org.uk

courses

Painshill Park

Santa Fun Runs 2016

Watts Gallery

Cobham

Bushy Park and Richmond Park

Compton, Guildford

Wednesday 30 November, Thursday 1 and Friday 2 December, 5–8pm Painshill festive walk See enchanted follies and beautifully lit trees, the Crystal Grotto and enjoy festive music with a cup of mulled wine. Visit the Painshill shop for gifts and stocking fillers. Thursday 3 to Saturday 24 December, 10am–4pm Father Christmas at Painshill See Santa and his elves in the magical Crystal Grotto.

Sunday 27 November, 1pm (Bushy Park) and Sunday 4 December, 10.30am and 12.30pm (Richmond Park) Family-friendly, 5k runs in aid of Princess Alice Hospice.

Saturday 26 to Sunday 27 November Victorian Christmas Fair Free festive activities, Christmas carols in Watts Chapel and storytelling with Father Christmas at Limnerslease.

Information: bockettsfarm.co.uk

Brooklands Museum

Saturday 19 November, 10.30am–12.30pm Copse and loggers at Fir Tree Copse, Dunsfold Join ranger Leo Jennings to discover how ancient woodland can decline if left unmanaged. Information: surreywildlifetrust.org/

Weybridge Sunday 20 November, 10am–4pm Military Vehicles Day Over 80 vehicles on display from across the decades, along with wartime re-enactments. Information: 01932 857381 or brooklandsmuseum.com

Denbies Wine Estate Dorking Sunday 20 November, 10am–4pm Denbies Chocolate Fair Chocolatiers and chocolate makers offer advent calendars, luxury festive treats, chocolate gifts and more. Information: denbies.co.uk

Epsom Christmas Town Fayre

Information: 01932 868113 or painshill.co.uk

Information: pah.org.uk

Information: 01483 813593 or

Surrey Wildlife Trust

wattsgallery.org.uk

Various locations Wednesday 16 November, 7.45–10pm Deer in Surrey, White Hart Barn, Godstone An illustrated talk by Nigel Davenport, chief executive of SWT. Refreshments available.

WWF Living Planet Centre Woking Saturday 26 to Sunday 27 November, 3.30–6pm Festive Fayre Carols, gifts and decorations. Information: wwf.org.uk

Epsom Sunday 27 November, 11am–4pm Shopping, a fun fair and a food court.

RHS Garden Wisley

Information: thebestof.co.uk

Guildford

Wednesday 23 to Sunday 27 November Christmas Craft and Design Fair Find that special Christmas gift browsing some of the finest craftspeople in the country. Wednesday 30 November to Monday 2 January 2017 Christmas Glow Jigantics light installation in the garden with giant illuminated flowers.

Friday 18 to Saturday 19 November

Information: rhs.org.uk/wisley

Godstone Farm Godstone Saturday 3 to Monday 26 December Meet Father Christmas Join Santa in his festive cabin. Information: godstonefarm.co.uk

Guildford Cathedral

Woking

farmers’ markets Camberley Saturday 19 November, 10am–3pm Cranleigh Every Friday, 9.30–11am Epsom Sunday 6 November & 4 December, 9.30am–1.30pm Farnham Sunday 27 November, 10am–1.30pm Guildford Tuesday 1 November & 6 December, 10.30am–3.30pm Haslemere Sunday 6 November & 4 December, 10am–1.30pm Milford Sunday 20 November, 10am–1.30pm Ripley Saturday 19 November, 9am–1pm Walton-on-Thames Saturday 5 November & 3 December, 9.30am–2pm Woking Thursday 3 November & 1 December, 9am–2pm

NOVEMBER 2016 | essence-magazine.co.uk 73


At the forefront Aparattus Design is a Portuguese company that exports mainly to Africa, France and Spain. Now looking to expand its presence in the UK, this innovative company produces some very stylish and modern furniture. >>>

ALL IMAGES COPYRIGHT APARATTUS DESIGN

74 essence-magazine.co.uk | NOVEMBER 2016


Furniture | APARATTUS DESIGN

“Reputation comes from consistent innovation at the highest level.” – Aparattus Design

NOVEMBER 2016 | essence-magazine.co.uk 75


F

ounded in 2015, Aparattus Design is a young company going places, and was born with a vision to create unique interiors that awaken a sensation of pleasure with innovative and modern design-led bold pieces. Aparattus’ new Forza and Rarus collections offer a new vision on interiors and design with the Forza collection inspired by modern architecture, creating a modern and luxurious ambience, and the Rarus showcasing a contemporary avant-garde collection to challenge tradition. Located in the north of Portugal, this furniture design company has its own production facilities and its activities cover a wide range, from developing creative projects and interiors to offering innovative product design. All furniture is handmade by expert, artisan craftsmen creating stunning and personal interior pieces for the home. A fundamental pillar of Aparattus Design is the establishment of a cordial and transparent Aparattus Design’s mission relationship with clients to provide an objective, efficient is to meet the needs of and intelligent service. Customer its customers, creating satisfaction is a priority for the and producing furniture company which also embraces executed flawlessly and a care for the environment as durable materials are sourced with excellent quality from fast growing trees. Aparattus collections range from classic through to modern, and aim to surprise with their inspiration and ability to capture innovative trends for a decor project. essence INFO

Website: www.aparattus.pt Email: info@aparattus.pt

76 essence-magazine.co.uk | NOVEMBER 2016


ALL IMAGES COPYRIGHT GIOBAGNARA

78 essence-magazine.co.uk | NOVEMBER 2016


Luxury accessories | GIOBAGNARA

THE SKY’S THE LIMIT For Italian company GioBagnara, luxury is more than skin-deep. In search of perfection, it cultivates a contemporary style in which leather, the material of choice, is reinvented every day. Each collection is born of expertise that has remained true to the demanding criteria of fine craftsmanship. GioBagnara’s speciality in the luxury leather market has made it a world leader in the craft, and all designs are made in its Genoa workshop. Q What made you decide to focus on working with leathers for your designs? A In the early 1990s my parents opened a store that primarily sold luxury home accessories while incorporating a large variety of materials. At that time I understood that leather was a very unusual material for home accessories, and that with some tricks this wonderful material was usable for every application. So I started with a very eclectic collection that touched all sides of interior decoration, with strong colours and particular printings, using leathers from the fashion industry and not from the typical furnishing market. Leather is a major part of Italian culture, along with the fact it is worth investing in.

G

iorgio Bagnara is the founder and namesake of GioBagnara, and along with his wife Vanessa, they ensure every product is always of the highest quality. Giorgio talks to Jane Pople about how he believes open-mindedness and passion are the keys to success. Q Giorgio, what first inspired you to create your brand GioBagnara? A In 1939 my grandfather started a hardware store business. It was a typical emporium where one could find everything, which was unusual in Italy. My father introduced quality goods made of glass and porcelain in the seventies. Growing up in this environment, I found myself using tools and creating toys with scrap wood. My passion for creating started there and probably, I guess now, the concept of the emporium, as a place to find different categories of products in a single place, is the base of our brand.

Q What are the most rewarding and challenging aspects of working with your wife Vanessa? A As partners, the most rewarding and challenging aspect is the ability to cross boundaries and expand our work, thanks to our differences. Vanessa is always supporting me, she is the heart of the feminine taste in the GioBagnara products. By specialising in the jewellery collection and being a colour palette expert, she is able to reach our goal of a dual gender market. She is the one who introduced GioBagnara’s products to the fashion world. Q GioBagnara has become a global presence in leather home accessories, world renowned for its values of quality and design, what do you think is the secret to this success? A We believe that open-mindedness, passion and constant research are what carry GioBagnara forward as it continues a neverending evolution. Since the production and administration of the company are set in the same building, we have direct control of the manufacturing process. Thus it is easier to create bespoke and unique items. In the beginning of the business, we offered only coloured leathers, which was unusual for people to see. I believe branching off from the typical colour palette and incorporating unique leather types are the secret of the business’s success. By paying attention to detail, we are able to create products that are truly special, unique and timeless.

NOVEMBER 2016 | essence-magazine.co.uk 79


‘encyclopedia’ of leather goods. With no subcontractors we can supervise every aspect and be sure the finalised product’s quality meets customer expectations.

Q GioBagnara is often described as the expert in quality and handcraftsmanship with leather – what do you think is the key to being an expert? A Leather is a ‘natural’ and extremely challenging material. To be an expert, one must know the limits of the material while also keeping in mind the end use of the product. After the designer knows the purpose of the product, one can then plan the construction process of the piece and how the leather will be fitted. Q Many of the highly-skilled workers you have working in your factory have been there for many years, what do you think is the driving force behind this loyalty? A In my business, talented craftsmen are the centre of every production process. I’ve never thought to count the number of times that each piece is held in someone’s hands during the process of its creation. The human factor is an essential component in my company; for instance, repetition of the practice is the only way a worker can acquire the proper skill to make edges smooth and apply the perfect quantity of colour. I don’t think you can have quality without a human approach. I have made the workshop in Genoa a pleasant environment by setting the company on a refurbished old dock in the centre of the city. It’s close to the sea and main attractions of the historical harbour. Q How long can it take from initial design to finished piece? A This depends on the complexity of the item. The time for research and development of a new product can last from between one week and several years. With the GioBagnara catalogue, I’ve tried to reach a lot of different aspects of the modern ‘lifestyle’, creating a true

80 essence-magazine.co.uk | NOVEMBER 2016

Q What is the best advice anyone has given you? A The sky is the limit. This is a constant reminder to myself. In Italy, we have a long tradition of quality and craftsmanship, so our customers expect the finest leather goods. Q What has been the biggest challenge you have faced in your career and how did you overcome it? A Our biggest challenge was probably the acquisition of the Rudi Rabitti brand which has now changed to Rabitti 1969, to highlight the history of the company. I was searching for the right products that would complement GioBagnara. Rabitti had a long tradition of using saddle full grain leather and it appeared to be the missing link in our company offerings. The acquisition was a long process that took almost two years, but now I am starting to see the positive results of all my efforts. essence INFO

Website: www.giobagnara.com This article first appeared in The Lux Pad, www.amara.com/luxpad.


TOURBILLONS

lalique.com

Lalique ad.indd 1

27/02/2015 15:00


Full Page Ad.indd 1

24/10/2016 15:48

essence 76  
essence 76  

essence magazine is a premier lifestyle publication available in print and online. The printed magazine is distributed via Royal Mail to Sur...