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CONTENTS MAY 2018

116

A bedroom escape realized by Moscow-based designer Irakli Zaria for a young family’s London home.

26 ELLE DECOR

STEPHAN JULLIARD

VOLUME 29 / NUMBER 4


contents The master bath of a Beverly Hills home designed by Commune Design.

124

Features Designer Irakli Zaria mixes midcentury furniture with Japanese antiques for a Russian couple’s London pied-à-terre in his ED debut. As told to Vanessa Lawrence

124

imbues a 1920s Spanish Colonial Revival with Hollywood glamour and Wild West motifs. By Ingrid Abramovitch

Gold, Golden, Gilded, Glittering

West World On a Beverly Hills street with a star-studded past, Commune Design’s Steven Johanknecht

28 ELLE DECOR

132

Let There Be Lindsey Lighting queen Lindsey Adelman and her family live in a 1920s Brooklyn townhouse, where the ceilings and walls are a showcase for her new collection of lighting debuting at this year’s Salone del Mobile fair in Milan. By Nancy Hass

140

Blue-Chip Special When a Chicago art collector and philanthropist moves into an apartment overlooking Lake Michigan, she turns to her longtime collaborator Timothy Corrigan to create sensational rooms worthy of her museum-caliber collection. By Jacoba Urist

148

Sibling Revelry Decorator Ariel Ashe and her sister, Alexi, decided to go in together on a Connecticut country home. Never mind that Alexi’s husband and young son are part of the package— luckily, she is married to talk-show host and comedian Seth Meyers, whose natural good humor keeps things light. By Lizzy Goodman

DOMINIQUE VORILLON

116


A n e w t a ke o n n e u t r a l . feat. T H E O R I G I N C O L L E C T I O N

Rugs for the thoughtfully layered home.


contents Departments 42

Editor’s Page

52

Contributors The people behind the stories

46 Louis Vuitton’s eau de parfum Le Jour Se Lève is perfect for day and night. $265 for 100 ml.; louis vuitton.com

What’s Hot

72

Mood Board ED editor at large Sophie Pera’s eye is always traveling

88

82

Salone Preview The standout pieces on view at Salone del Mobile

92

Showcase How the artistic directors at Hermès Maison bring their vision to life. By Vanessa Lawrence

Dispatches from the world of design

50

What’s Next Tory Burch in conversation with Ashley Hicks, Milan’s newest restaurant, and spring’s must-reads

98

Molteni&C ills its new wardrobes in a collaboration with Milan fashion designer Marta Ferri

Shortlist The 12 things Claiborne Swanson Frank can’t live without

Great Ideas A trip through the archives of ED’s international editions

Designer Ariel Ashe, in Dior, at a farm near her weekend home in Litchield County, Connecticut.

+

On the Cover

Irakli Zaria created a modern and colorful living space for the London apartment of his young, art-loving clients. A drypoint print by Russian artist Oleg Kudryashov sits atop a custom marble mantel. The cocktail tables in brass and colored mirror are from Galerie Glustin in Paris, which also manufactured the custom-designed screens along the wall. The armchairs and chandelier are all vintage Italian. Photography by Stephan Julliard.

148

30

FROM TOP: STUART TYSON/STUDIO D; ALEXEI HAY

40


JULIAN CHICHESTER

J U L IA NCHICHESTER.COM NEW YORK

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contents 82 Porcelain dessert plates by La DoubleJ.

88

100

ED Design Hotels A new documentary ilm celebrates the Carlyle, one of Manhattan’s greatest landmarks. By Whitney Robinson

104

Truth in Decorating Contemporary takes on wicker design. By Charles Curkin

Art Show

112

Artist Nancy Lorenz embraces chaos. By Ian Phillips

Resources

156

Enter our + Lee Industries Giveaway The ultra-sleek L1549-21 chaise longue is featured in a signature angora interior with contrasting ivory leather on the exterior and a polished stainless steel frame– a $4,500 value! See page 156 for sweepstakes rules, and visit leeindustries.elledecor.com for your chance to win.

32 ELLE DECOR

Where to ind it

160

Not for Sale A Heath Clay Studio clock by Heath Ceramics

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TOP LEFT: NICOLAS MATHEUS

Architect Anne Geistdoerfer’s home, which was recently featured in Elle Decoration France.


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“Since discovering Lail at a craft show last winter, I have amassed a collection of mugs and serving bowls—favorites all.” Dinnerware from $38; laildesign.net

36 ELLE DECOR

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SMART CONTROL

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editor’s page

ABOUT SIX YEARS AGO,

40 ELLE DECOR

to an astonishing London apartment by Georgian designer Irakli Zaria, in his ED debut (“Gold, Golden, Gilded, Glittering,” page 116); designer Ariel Ashe’s compound in Connecticut (page 148) that she shares with her sister, Alexi, and brother-in-law, the brilliant Seth Meyers (with gorgeous fashion by Marie Claire’s J. Errico); an apartment in Chicago that features a museum-worthy collection of important art (page 140); a Commune Design fantasy in Los Angeles that is equal parts Morocco and Montana (you’ll see what I mean in “West World,” page 124); and last but certainly not least, the incredible Lindsey Adelman, queen of lights, whose new house in Brooklyn (page 132) features pieces that we debut exclusively here, and that you’ll be able to see at ProjectB Gallery in Milan starting April 17. That will likely be my first stop as our entire team embarks on a Milanese adventure. After, we’ll take a break at the newest restaurant at the Galleria Vittorio Emanuele II, Cracco (see “Major Duomo,” page 56). We’ll order the Nicoise salad and a green juice (OK, fine, and a plate of spaghetti). But it’s the Studio Peregalli interiors that will have us coming back for more.

Whitney Robinson, Editor in Chief elledecor@hearst.com

Follow me on Instagram: @whowhatwhit

PHILIP FRIEDMAN/STUDIO D

I was on assignment in Italy, working on a story about bronze sculptor and jewelry designer Osanna Visconti di Modrone’s sprawling palazzo in Milan. It wasn’t my first time in the city, but I had been there only a handful of times and it was still a mystery to me. Paris, its closest match (as far as design and fashion are concerned) and where I had lived for a time during high school and college, this wasn’t. The Brutalist architecture was forbidding, the restaurants were hidden, and despite one grand hotel (the Principe di Savoia), everything except the boutiques that lined Via Montenapoleone, Milan’s answer to Madison Avenue, seemed closed off to tourists. Far from the Baroque splendor and dolce vita that is Rome, as I wrote at the time, Milan is a millennia-old city playing modern, full of fascist-looking industrial buildings. When it comes to sheer beauty, in the case of Eternal City versus infernal city, Rome wins. The real Milan, as I would soon find out, exists behind closed doors. From the sprawling parklike greens at the Versace palazzo on Via Gesù to the swimming pool at the front steps of the Villa Necchi (immortalized in Luca Guadagnino’s film I Am Love) and secret flower beds behind the Brera Academy, Milan’s private spaces tell a different story. I was thinking about this again during Milan Fashion Week this past February, when, during a break between appointments, I stumbled upon the most beautiful apartment entryway, with a gray terracotta floor and a perfectly proportioned marble torso on the far side of a decorative gate, just on the edge of the botanical gardens. I’m certainly not the only one to appreciate the sight. A book from Taschen— Entryways of Milan/Ingressi di Milano—that pays homage to nearly every interesting courtyard and entrance in the city was released last year. Milan is certainly a central theme of the issue you have in your hands, most notably because its annual Salone del Mobile, perhaps the greatest of furniture fairs, debuts a week after we hit newsstands (flip to page 88 for the ultimate preview of what’s in store this year). But so, too, is access to the world’s most unique spaces and places. In this issue, ED’s editors take you


Skorpio Keramik table Norma H Couture chairs Cellini lamps Airport bookcase

The Place we Live

cattelanitalia.com

contact@cattelanitalia.com

photo Emanuele Tortora


IRAKLI ZARIA

JACOBA URIST

ARIEL ASHE

Zaria recently visited Morocco’s “blue city” of Chefchaouen, and the hue is prevalent in a London apartment he designed (page 116). But it’s the daughter’s pink bedroom that he loves the most: “There’s something wonderfully naive about it.”

Writer Urist was impressed by designer Timothy Corrigan’s approach to the art-filled home on page 140. “Often, collectors feel they must mimic a whitebox gallery,” she says, “but Corrigan has designed the antithesis of that.”

For Ashe, the co-principal of interior design firm Ashe + Leandro whose Connecticut farm is featured on page 148, one room in particular is more important than the rest. “The bedroom,” she says. “When I’m home, I’m sleeping.”

LIZZY GOODMAN

LINDSEY ADELMAN

STEPHEN KENT JOHNSON

Writer Goodman speaks with her longtime friend Ariel Ashe about her home in Connecticut on page 148. “I’m taken by how thoughtful her style is,” Goodman says. “She makes fun of me for having too much useless stuff!”

Adelman’s lighting designs are both industrial and organic, and her Brooklyn home, featured on page 132, is full of her own pieces. What drove her to a life in lights, she says, is simple: “Being able to change the mood of a situation.”

Johnson, who photographed Lindsey Adelman’s home on page 132, was drawn to her basement family room, where the muted walls highlight Cherry Bomb light fixtures. “It feels so intimate and inviting,” he says. “I’m a sucker for a dark room.”

WRITE TO US: Mailbox, ELLE DECOR , 300 West 57th Street, 27th loor, New York, NY 10019. E-MAIL: elledecor@hearst.com. FOLLOW US ON TWITTER: @ ELLEDECOR . LIKE US ON FACEBOOK: facebook.com/ELLEDECOR mag. 42 ELLE DECOR

URIST: FARRAH CHAMSEDDINE; ASHE: ZACHARY HEINZERLING; GOODMAN: KATIA TEMKIN; ADELMAN: STEPHEN KENT JOHNSON

contributors


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STUART TYSON/STUDIO D

Not only are these BDDW café tables elegant, they are also extremely versatile—their shape allows for easy repositioning in any room. The tables (in Holly, left, and Dark Oak) are being presented at Salone del Mobile in Milan in April. Holly table: 12 ″ dia. x 30 ″ h., $2,400; Dark Oak table: 12 ″ dia. x 25 ″ h., $2,200. bddw.com. Coffered Wood wallcovering, available to the trade only. phillipjeffries.com 46 ELLE DECOR

PRODUCED BY BENJAMIN REYNAERT


what’s hot

1

1

Former Ralph Lauren Home designer Sean McNanney’s Saved collection combines Mongolian materials with contemporary designs, like this celestial Heptagon cashmere throw, a collaboration with French artist Marin Montagut. 51″ x 71″, $1,700; king and queen sizes by custom order. saved-ny.com

2 Inspired by American Indian tribes, this Pontiac Triangle mirror—Pontiac was an 18th-century Odawa war chief—made of walnut and Paul Smith for Kvadrat fabric, provides a reflection on American craft. 29″ w. x 1.5″ d. x 35″ h., $2,600. notsogeneral.la

3 If your personality is more Princess Margaret than Queen Elizabeth II, try Saint-Louis’s chrome-and-crystal Royal Giant Candelabra, a deconstructed take on the brand’s famous 19th-century chandeliers that is the height of an adult. 73″ h. x 16″ dia., $22,000; also available in Golden finish. saint-louis.com

4

In reinterpreting Jean Cocteau’s figurative Limoges porcelain from the 1950s with pastel backgrounds (the Orphée à la Lyre plate is shown), Raynaud has created tableware that works for dinner as well as display. 8″ dia. plate, $135. raynaud-shop.com 2

5 The patterns on Zak+Fox pillows are 3

more than just motifs: They are historical meditations, like Roto, left, based on 1900s Russian rotary prints, and Orkhon, inspired by Mongolian nomads. 20″ sq., $305 each. zakandfox.com

6

Gary Oldman had some help from Breguet in his Oscar-winning performance as Sir Winston Churchill in Darkest Hour. The horologists made him this replica of the British prime minister’s beloved Breguet 765 pocket watch. More information at breguet.com

1, 5: STUART TYSON/STUDIO D

4

5

48 ELLE DECOR

6


what’s hot

1

1 An aerial view of Hong Kong’s harbor was the impetus behind this ombré couture Oread I steel-and-wool rug, designed by Ed Ng and Terence Ngan for the House of Tai Ping. 8′ x 11′3″, $13,500; customizable. houseoftaiping.com

2 The 60-year-old Murano, Italy–based Carlo Moretti brand has introduced Lungomare, its first collection of three handblown-glass pendant lights (“A” is shown), designed by Diego Chilò and inspired by a Venetian sunset. 14″ h. x 18″ dia., $2,000. 1stdibs.com

3 Escape to Mexico with Pulp Design Studios’ Hidalgo embroidered linen for S. Harris. Shown, from left, in Lush and Royal (and also available in Ebonite), it is a modern presentation of Otomi textiles. Available to the trade only. sharris.com

2

4

Putting things on a pedestal can be a good idea when the base in question is as sculpturally extravagant as the white oak–and–brass ringed one on this Misty dining table from Mr. Brown London. 29.5″ h. x 59″ dia., $11,070; available in Rustic Oak and customizable. mrbrownlondon.com

3, LAMPS, SAMPLES: STUART TYSON/STUDIO D

Netto Nocon lamps from 2017. BELOW RIGHT: Sample designs for the new collection.

4

CLAY GUY 3

“It’s so much work finding lamps with charisma,” says designer David Netto, who combined his need for good lighting with his passion for 1950s ceramics when he collaborated with artist Jennifer Nocon in 2017 on a collection of table lamps whose handmade bases were inspired by Nigerian Kuba cloth. Their sophomore effort takes cues from Picasso’s pottery shapes and features extraterrestrial surface patterns. The resulting creations are sold numbered, edition-style, like the works of art they are. davidnettodesign.com

ELLE DECOR 49


mood board A Paris apartment designed by Frédéric Méchiche.

Artist Cy Twombly in his Rome apartment in 1966.

An 18thcentury Gustavian gilded mirror by Johan Åkerblad. Fifty Days at Iliam, Part V: The Fire That Consumes All Before It, by Cy Twombly.

De La Espada’s marble cofee table.

PAINTING: © CY TWOMBLY FOUNDATION, THE PHILADELPHIA MUSEUM OF ART/ART RESOURCE; MÉCHICHE INTERIORS: JEAN-FRANÇOIS JAUSSAUD/LUXPRODUCTIONS.COM (2); TWOMBLY INTERIOR: HORST P. HORST/CONDÉ NAST VIA GETTY IMAGES; DURAND INTERIOR: ROGER DAVIES; GILLES & BOISSIER INTERIOR: SISTER AGENCY; FASHION: VOGUE.COM; BUST, PEDESTAL, AND MIRROR: 1STDIBS. FOR DETAILS, SEE RESOURCES

Alfonso Marina’s Arnon console.

Rock crystal–anddiamond brooches by S.J. Phillips.

CLASSICS MAJOR A Céline spring 2018 look.

FROM 19TH-CENTURY BUSTS TO CY TWOMBLY PAINTINGS, ED EDITOR AT LARGE SOPHIE PERA’S EYE IS ALWAYS TRAVELING. Antiques dealer Pierre Durand’s 19th-century Paris apartment.

A 19th-century Art Union of London bust of Apollo.

Frédéric Méchiche’s Paris lat.

A fauxpainted malachite pedestal.

The Campana Urn from Jamb. A Paris lat by Gilles & Boissier.

Alfonso Marina’s Kiel bench.

A Cire Trudon candle.

50 ELLE DECOR

Let’s get lyrical. Mixing the old and the new isn’t exactly novel, but to look modern and cool, the balance has to be right. Consider the contrast between old-world grandeur and sculptural, contemporary pieces— it creates an irreverent glamour that is oh so covetable. The pop of a graphic, minimal chaise longue or A look from Givenchy haute couture spring 2018.

Sophie Pera in Paris.

Alexa Hampton’s gilded obelisk for MaitlandSmith.

the punch of an evocative modern art piece loosens up a potentially stuffy (yet majestic) interior. It’s like wearing jeans with your Chanel jacket or a T-shirt with diamonds: The combination of their opposite natures creates a new, highly individual look that provides the perfect blend of then and now. ◾ PRODUCED BY SOPHIE PERA


What’s

NEXT

4

3

2

1

HOME IS WHERE THE HEALTH IS

THE ELEMENTS OF A PERFECT HOME GYM

TRAINER AND FITNESS EXPERT DENNIS REMORCA BELIEVES A BEAUTIFUL ROOM HELPS MAKE THE WORKOUT.

1. BRAZILIAN CHERRYWOOD FLOOR “ The herringbone adds a handsome aspect and creates more lines.” 2. COMMERCIAL ELITE ENDLESS POOL “ Swimming is great and low-impact on the body— and the water is relaxing.” 3. CLEARLIGHT INFRARED SAUNA “ This is diferent from a regular sauna—infrared light has so many beneits for skin care, metabolism, and the immune system.” 4. NOHRD SWING BELLS “Gym equipment doesn’t have to be overly masculine— you can customize the wood inish on these.”

Earlier this year, in an article titled “The Dumb-Bell Economy” about millennials’ investment in their physiques, the Financial Times queried, “Has the gym become the new pub?” If so, there would be no prettier place to pump iron than Remorca Fitness, whose two discreetly chic Upper East Side locations for private training sessions feature decorative details like whitewashed herringbone flooring and marble walls. “The atmosphere you create

52 ELLE DECOR

is your culture—it shouldn’t feel like a gym,” says founder Dennis Remorca. The decor of his two studios has made such an impression on his art gallerist, oligarch, and financial titan clientele that some of them have enlisted him to design the facilities in their luxury condominiums. We offered Remorca the chance to dream up his fantasy home gym, and the result, rendered above, might just make this your favorite room (remorcafitness.com). —VL

PRODUCED BY VANESSA L AWRENCE ILLUSTRATION BY BABETH L AFON

PORTRAIT: GENEVIEVE KIM, COURTESY OF REMORCAFITNESS.COM. FOR DETAILS, SEE RESOURCES

NEW YORK


what’s next

ROOM AND BORDERS Anyone who has stepped into a Tory Burch boutique has experienced the effect of the late, iconic interior designer David Hicks on her brand. Take, for example, the stores’ orange-lacquered decor, which was influenced by a mirrored bathroom Hicks designed in Geneva in 1970. For her spring 2018 collection (toryburch .com), Burch dug deep into Hicks’s archives for inspiration, collaborating with his son, her longtime friend Ashley Hicks, a designer and regular in these pages. Here, Burch and the younger Hicks discuss the impact of Hicks senior, the process of working together, and the one print he would have hated. How has David Hicks affected you both over the course of your creative careers? TORY BURCH: David has been an inspiration from the beginning of the company. I think my parents had all nine of his books, and growing up, I always leafed

54 ELLE DECOR

through them. I was really drawn to his incredible uses of color, interesting mixes, and bold framing of rooms. ASHLEY HICKS: What Tory has done with my father’s inf luence is she has made it just an influence. She hasn’t copied anything, she’s only taken inspiration from it. The Tory Burch logo is really emblematic of that, because although it’s a symmetrical logo that includes her initials in a way like my father, it couldn’t be more different from his. What was the process of digging into David’s work like? TB: I was lucky enough to see some of his original scrapbooks. And I still have one, Ashley, just so you know. It’s extraordinary. To see something that is so meticulous and precise, and the way it gave me insight into the way he looked at design. And I learned a lot of stories from Ashley as well—Ashley came here to talk to our team.

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: David

Hicks’s dining room in London, 1964. Tory Burch in a look from her spring 2018 collection. A shower room designed by Hicks for Lady John Cholmondeley in 1965. Two looks from Tory Burch spring 2018.

INTERIORS: THE ESTATE OF DAVID HICKS; PORTRAIT: NOA GRIFFEL, COURTESY OF TORY BURCH; FASHION: COURTESY OF TORY BURCH

NEW YORK


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what’s next AH: Tory said, “Will you come to New

York and meet with my design team and do a little presentation for them?” I’m used to doing talks with fabric and carpet companies, in a room with just two people. So I expected that, and then I got to Tory HQ , and it’s this enormous lecture room... TB: It was our handbag team, our footwear team, our fabric team. AH: . . . about 200 people sitting in the room. I told some stories about growing up. I ran through pictures of my dad’s rooms and my mother with her enormous helmet hairstyle that he designed for her. It’s a slightly irreverent talk about him that people find funny because he’s such an icon today. What are some specific ways in which David’s inspiration manifested itself in the final looks? TB: There were borders throughout, whether it was a placket or a geometric border, and that was inspired by the rooms, essentially. AH: One of the best things was a dress with a graphic border. It’s something he did a lot in the late 1960s, borders on walls and rooms, which is actually a decorating technique from the 17th century. But he made it look hip and modern. And Tory’s dress was a very distilled ref-

A look from Tory Burch spring 2018.

The entrance hall of Lady John Cholmondeley’s London apartment, 1965.

erence to that without being at all literal. How do you both tread the line of being respectful of his work without being referential? AH: I specialize in doing bits of organicinspired design or colors from the 1930s and ’40s—things he absolutely hated. TB: Ashley, the print I like most from the collection is the one you told me he would have liked the least. It was our best-selling print! Then it’s a good thing David Hicks didn’t actually design your collection. —VL

David and Ashley Hicks in David’s Oxfordshire library, 1966.

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MAJOR DUOMO Despite being the headquarters of some of the world’s most influential design and fashion houses, Milan is really just a village to those in the know. So when a new restaurant opened in the Galleria Vittorio Emanuele II in February—one helmed by star chef Carlo Cracco and decorated by ED A-List designers Roberto Peregalli and Laura Sartori Rimini of Studio Peregalli—it was frontpage news. The interiors of Cracco, which comprise a café, formal dining room, patisserie, chocolatier, and wine cellar on three floors, are an homage to Gio Ponti and the ornate, elaborate architectural vocabulary of the circa1877 galleria itself. Think mosaic flooring and hand-painted stucco walls in the

café, which feature a damask motif reminiscent of Fortuny; the most dreamy multicolored flower-corolla wallpaper in the restaurant; a private area with a 19thcentury fresco, pastel walls, and a terrace with a spectacular view; lacquered red walls and fir shelving in a wine cellar that houses more than 10,000 bottles; three sets of Richard Ginori dinnerware; and an elevator that syncs with its surroundings—faux-bronze with glass inserts at the ground floor, mirrors and gilded metal at the second floor, and a dark patina at the wine-cellar level. In other words, it’s a space so beautiful that you may come for the marinated-yolk caramelized Olivier salad, saffron risotto, and cocoa-crusted turbot, but you will never want to leave (ristorante cracco.it). —Whitney Robinson

HICKS INTERIOR AND PORTRAIT: THE ESTATE OF DAVID HICKS; FASHION: COURTESY OF TORY BURCH; CRACCO: ANDREA PASSUELLO

MILAN The formal dining room at Cracco. BELOW, FROM LEFT: The loral wallpaper was hand-painted. A view of the galleria from a balcony.


what’s next

BOOKSHELF FAR LEFT: The winter garden room of La Bouteriez, Henri Samuel’s country house, 1952.

FRANCE

This spring, three new books follow the legacy of those who have not only mastered French style but also created its je ne sais quoi. Fashion and Versailles, by Laurence Benaïm (Flammarion), looks at the influence of Louis XIV’s grandiose court on contemporary fashion using archival documents, Old Master paintings, and editorial photography. It’s easy

to draw comparisons between Versailles and Henri Samuel, whose historically minded rooms made him one of the most important interior designers of the 20th century, as shown in Henri Samuel: Master of the French Interior by Emily Evans Eerdmans (Rizzoli). And for a taste of la vie en rose, pick up Luke Barr’s Ritz & Escoffier (Clarkson Potter), which follows

the dramatic story of hotelier César Ritz and chef Auguste Escoffier, who minted their careers at London’s Savoy Hotel and later went on to open Hôtel Ritz in Paris in 1898. —Kat Herriman

CALIFORNIA NEW YORK

GOOD BUDS “Every f lower in this book, except for maybe one or two, I grew myself,” says Martha Stewart of the blooms in her new tome Martha’s Flowers: A Practical Guide to Growing, Gathering and Enjoying (Clarkson Potter), which she co-wrote with her longtime colleague Kevin Sharkey. Organized by season and individual floral varietal, the book offers straightforward advice on cultivating and arranging everything from alliums to hydrangeas. —VL

58 ELLE DECOR

TURNER CLASSICS If you’ve ever fantasized about a road trip down the Pacific Coast Highway, Nathan Turner’s new book, I Love California (Abrams), is for you. Out this April from the California native, designer, and entertaining expert, it divides the state by region and city, melding interiors with home-styling tips and, perhaps most delightfully, place-specific meals (a Calistoga-inspired a l fresco zucch i n i pasta lunch, say) that you can re-create at home. —VL

SAMUEL INTERIOR: COURTESY OF RIZZOLI, ROBERT EMMETT BRIGHT; RITZ & ESCOFFIER: COURTESY OF CLARKSON POTTER/ PUBLISHERS; FASHION AND VERSAILLES: COURTESY OF FLAMMARION, PATRICK DEMARCHELIER/ART+COMMERCE; FLOWERS: © 2018 MARTHA STEWART LIVING OMNIMEDIA, INC. PUBLISHED BY CLARKSON POTTER/PUBLISHERS, STEPHEN KENT JOHNSON; TURNER BOOK AND PORTRAIT: COURTESY OF ABRAMS, VICTORIA PEARSON

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what’s next

A necklace designed by Katie Ridder.

NEW YORK

RIDDER ROCKS STOCKHOLM

NEW THREADS Architect and designer Josef Frank’s fabrics have long been an inspiration to the Swedish fashion designer Lars Nilsson, who has worked at Nina Ricci and Bill Blass. Now Nilsson is turning his eye to home decor with a line of interiors textiles, launched in collaboration with Svenskt Tenn, the Swedish interiors brand and keeper of all things Frank. Nilsson’s designs—a variety of vibrant, hand-drawn line patterns—are a result of a summer sketching in Capri as part of a Swedish cultural residency in 2016. “I guess it’s time to redecorate my apartment in Paris now,” he quips (svenskttenn.se). —Gisela Williams

Interior decorator Katie Ridder is known for her bold, colorful portfolio—and for her statement baubles. After working on the 2011 renovation of jeweler David Webb’s Madison Avenue store, she began designing her own pieces, using stones and objects found on her global travels. This necklace was crafted using carnelian intaglios she found at a London antiques shop and set in her favorite metal, rose gold ($8,700; katieridder.com). —Rima Suqi

VENICE, CA

THEY WORE RED VELVET Recognized for creating one-of-a-kind chapeaus for the likes of Pharrell and Madonna out of his Venice, CA, atelier, milliner Nick Fouquet has nothing much in common with Maria von Trapp. But while staying at New York’s Gramercy Park Hotel and brainstorming ideas for the uniforms he recently created for the staff of its Rose Bar, he had a moment worthy of The Sound of Music. “I was in my room looking at the curtains, and I called the general manager and asked for them to be ripped down,” says Fouquet. The resulting Bordeaux velvet trims the bonecolored beaver-felt fedoras he designed, along with black and white cotton bowling shirts and embroidered Argentinean-leather belts (nickfouquet.com). —VL

60 ELLE DECOR

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT:

An Argentineanleather belt; Nick Fouquet; the Gramercy Park Hotel; a beaverfelt fedora; a bowling shirt.


PROMOTION

HAPPENINGS A-LIST ARCHITECTURE AT HUDSON YARDS ELLE DECOR and Hudson Yards honored the magazine’s inaugural A-List Architects with a cocktail party at Hudson Yards to celebrate a roster of renowned talent who have had a hand in changing the New York City skyline over the past 15 years. More than 100 VIPs and honored architects as well as A-List designers celebrated at the Hudson Yards Experience Center, located on the 24th floor of 10 Hudson Yards, overlooking striking evening views. Visit HudsonYardsNewYork.com/live.

Kate Kelly Smith, Hearst Design Group; Whitney Robinson, ELLE DECOR; A. Eugene Kohn, Kohn Pedersen Fox

A-list Designer Celerie Kemble; Julia Noran Johnston, Editor at Large

B&B ITALIA PRESENTS NEW 2018 OUTDOOR DESIGNS Bay, the brand-new outdoor seats by the British duo Doshi Levien, is a collection of sculptural and monolithic yet visually light designs comprising a sofa in two sizes, an armchair, and a high-back armchair. Their enveloping volumes are marked by a double polypropylene fibre interlacing that creates “air pockets,” granting transparency and lightness to the furniture. The frame accommodates padded solid seats and soft cushions for added comfort. The color combinations are extremely refined, with tortora and anthracite for the interlacing, paired with elegant block color and patterned fabrics for the seats and cushions. bebitalia.com

BENJAMIN MOORE Century is the world’s first Soft Touch Matte paint with a never-before-seen depth of color and a soft-touch finish. This innovative paint comes in a curated collection of 75 colors. Century—where color becomes an experience. Visit experiencecentury.com.


1817-2017. 200 YEARS DURAVIT. YOUR FUTUR RE BATHROOM.

DuraSquare. Striking. Precise. Rectangular. The new bathroom series DuraSquare, blends the precise edges of the rectangular outer form with soft, organically flowing inner contours. Basins are made from the innovative DuraCeram® ceramic creating a look that speaks for itself. For more information Boston FW Webb 617-933-0666, Chicago Studio 41 773-395-2900, Denver Ultra Design Center 303-571-5611, Long Island Blackman 631-283-1500, Los Angeles Snyder Diamond 310-450-1000, Miami Decorator‘s Plumbing 305-576-0022, New York Simon‘s Hardware & Bath 212-532-9220, Phoenix Clyde Hardware 602-264-2106, San Francisco Excel Plumbing Supply 415-863-8889, Seattle Keller Supply 206-270-4724, South Norwalk Klaff‘s 203-866-1603, Vancouver Robinson Lighting & Bath Centre 604-879-6847 and www.duravit.us


showcase Charlotte Macaux Perelman and Alexis Fabry.

UNKNOWN PLEASURES THE ARTISTIC DIRECTORS AT HERMÈS MAISON FIND THEIR SWEET SPOT IN PLACES THEY’VE NEVER BEEN. BY VANESSA L AWRENCE · PHOTOGRAPHY BY CYRILL MAT TER

Colorful lacquer-andwood trays for 2018 mixed with a lacquered box, center, from 2017.

If there were a senior-yearbook superlative for Hermès, it would be “most inquisitive.” Even something as seemingly straightforward as the French luxury house’s logo, created in the 1960s, becomes an intellectual exercise: Its depiction of an empty duc carriage flanked by a groom is both a nod to the brand’s roots as a saddlery company and a symbol of anticipated movement. It’s an acknowledgment that one must always be prepared to journey into an unknown future. This preoccupation with temporality is something Charlotte Macaux Perelman and Alexis Fabry, the co–deputy artistic directors of Hermès Maison, entertain every day. As Perelman puts it on a sunny winter day in Paris in the company’s 8th arrondissement showrooms: “We have to be in sync with our times but also have a relationship with a longer view of time.” She and Fabry are selling the promise of pieces that will resonate aesthetically for decades yet look fresh now—and also somehow exist in continuity with more

72 ELLE DECOR

than a century of Hermès products. The scope of their mission is enormous: Everything from tableware and furniture to home textiles and decorative objects falls under their purview. Indeed, though the average citizen probably recognizes Hermès for its patterned silk foulards or Kelly and Birkin handbags, the company, which was founded in 1837, has a storied history with furniture and objects. Between 1910 and 1930, Hermès began creating travelrelated accessories, including blankets and mobile furniture. In 1924, the famed French interior designer Jean-Michel Frank collaborated with the brand on a line of minimalist furniture featuring elegant leather coverings and saddle stitching. Sixty years later, Hermès added a tableware department, and they purchased the glassmakers Saint-Louis and the silver house Puiforcat in 1989 and 1993, respectively. Hermès’s long-established division is still growing; in contrast, many other luxury houses are just making forays into the home category to expand their businesses.


© 2018 Design Within Reach, Inc.


showcase A wool-and-cashmere hand-embroidered Formes Simples Avalon throw for 2018.

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Revolutionize the rules of design one rug at a time. shop at feizy.com


showcase

Another rendition of the Formes Simples Avalon blanket for 2018.

76 ELLE DECOR


showcase

A lacquer-and-wood box from 2017 pictured with a brass-andleather magnifying glass from Perelman and Fabry’s irst collection for Hermès Maison.

78 ELLE DECOR

A selection of leather objets from the Pli’H grouping for 2018.

they created, among other pieces, two cane, oak, and leather chairs, a collaboration with the Spanish architect Rafael Moneo; colorful bowls and centerpieces using a Japanese lacquering technique; and a series of leather accessories—a corded wastebasket, a magazine rack resembling a saddle. Taken together, the items formed a portrait of balance— between color and neutrals, whimsy and rigor, fantasy and utility—and discreet, albeit particularly expensive, luxury. Their latest endeavor makes its debut at Milan’s Salone del Mobile in April.

Among the offerings are bowls and trays sculpted from the same type of leather used in Jean-Michel Frank’s furniture; colorfully embroidered renditions of the Avalon cashmere throw by designer Gianpaolo Pagni; and vivid lacquer– and-wood boxes with sliding, overlapping panels. Ultimately, every statement they make can be defined by more questions. “If we say something new, why are we saying it? What have we not explored yet?” asks Perelman. Their answers may well end up in your living room. ◾

FOR DETAILS, SEE RESOURCES

On the surface, Perelman and Fabry make for a curious pair to oversee this vast universe. Perelman, an architect by training and practice, worked with Philippe Starck and David Rockwell before starting her own interior architecture and design firm, Studio CMP, in 2005. Fabry, meanwhile, is a curator and specialist in Latin American photography and a cofounder of the publishing house Toluca Éditions. The two have been friends since they were teenagers in Paris and met “partying,” according to Perelman, who designed parts of Fabry’s Paris apartment and on whose New York sofa Fabry crashed a decade ago. Hermès artistic director Pierre-Alexis Dumas’s choice to hire them demonstrates, as Fabry says, “something you always find in Hermès: a curiosity to choose profiles that are not necessarily obvious.” Much of the way Perelman and Fabry work, and how they describe their vision for Hermès Maison, boils down to constantly asking questions. What is the place of leather, the oldest Hermès material, in their creations? When should they rely solely on the craftsmen and designers based at the brand’s ateliers in Pantin, a suburb of Paris, and when should they look to outside talents? What does it mean for an object to be an Hermès object? For their first collection in 2016,


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great ideas

INTERNATIONAL INTRIGUE DOES SPRING FEVER HAVE YOU EXPERIENCING WANDERLUST? TRY A TRIP THROUGH THE CITIES AND SPACES FEATURED IN ED ’S INTERNATIONAL EDITIONS. HERE ARE SOME OF OUR FAVORITE MOMENTS FROM THE ARCHIVES.

London

GUILLAUME DE LAUBIER

In March 2016, Elle Decoration Middle East showed us the living room of art dealer David Gill and designer Francis Sultana’s apartment in the famed Albany House, in which artworks by Richard Prince and Paul McCarthy converse with an Emilio Terry chair.

82 ELLE DECOR


great ideas

Pune Kunaal Kyhaan Seolekar designed the 7,000-square-foot parkHaus—including this custom modular seating system—in the western Indian state of Maharashtra, as seen in Elle Decor India in October 2017.

Okavango

Elle Decoration France’s June 2017 issue looked at British designer Andrew Trotter’s irst architectural project, the whitewashed Masseria Moroseta hotel in Italy, which rifs on both Pugliese aesthetics and anciennes fermes while remaining modern.

Charente In December 2017, Elle Decoration France visited the 1830s French house of creative director Bernard Astor, where he indulged his passion for antiquities from the Directoire and Empire periods. These Polish canopy beds, covered in toile de Jouy, are from the 18th century.

84 ELLE DECOR

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: JIGNESH JHAVERI; GIORGIO BARONI; JEAN-MARC PALISSE; YVES DURONSOY

Puglia

The Sandibe Safari Lodge, deep in Botswana’s nature reserve, was designed by architect Nick Plewman, who envisioned it as an animal’s carapace in the middle of the savanna. Elle Decoration France gave us a tour in July 2015, including the curved grand salon.


See the color you expect to, for as long as you expect to. You can tell when the color in the store doesn’t match the color on your wall. When we reinvented our paint, we created our exclusive Gennex® Color Technology which makes our paint simpler on the inside and truer on the outside. So you get exactly what you expect. That’s proudly particular. To find a local retailer, go to benjaminmoore.com


great ideas Lucerne Constructed in 1888 and once frequented by Queen Victoria, the Château Gütsch hotel in the Swiss Alps was redone in a neoromantic style reminiscent of Louis II of Bavaria. In April 2015, Elle Decoration France visited the space, including the portrait-illed bar.

“Dark-brown painted walls, a dark staircase, and stiling pieces” is how designer Sophie Séguéla described her former Parisian apartment to Elle Decoration France in November 2016. She transformed it into an Egypt-inspired oasis, complete with a palmbedecked bathroom.

Berkshire

Pampanga Home to a family of 10, Prado Farms in the Philippines is a collaboration between father and son, who together built a durable stone house that will hopefully last for generations. Extensions over the years include this courtyard that Elle Decoration Philippines highlighted in May 2015.

86 ELLE DECOR

The River Arts Club—a stunning bed-and-breakfast in Maidenhead, England, that was featured in Elle Decoration Middle East in January 2016—has a storied history as the former home of art collector Henry Reitlinger. It also boasts a beautiful boat.

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: NICOLAS MATHÉUS; JEAN-FRANCOIS JAUSSAUD; GUILLAUME DE LAUBIER; SONNY THAKUR

Paris


2017 Dellarobbia, Inc. All rights reserved .

The Felix Collection

To find an authorized dealer visit www.dellarobbia.com Made in USA info@dellarobbia.com


salone preview Giorgetti Adam modular sofa in leather with a bronze inish. giorgetti.eu

Opera Contemporary Brian side tables in marble and brass. operacontemporary.com

Poltrona Frau Byron leather-and–ebonized ash chaise longue. poltronafrau.com

A FAIR TO REMEMBER DESIGN’S YEAR BEGINS NOW AT SALONE DEL MOBILE IN MILAN. HERE, AN EXCLUSIVE LOOK AT THE STANDOUT PIECES SETTING THE AGENDA IN 2018.

Marni Julieta metal-and–PVC cord chair. marni.com

Lee Broom Eclipse stainless steel–and-acrylic chandelier. leebroom.com

La DoubleJ Libellula porcelain dessert plates with gold trim. ladoublej.com

LASVIT: STUART TYSON/STUDIO D

Lasvit Monsters glass objets d’art. lasvit.com

Cattelan Italia Skorpio Keramik ceramic-and-metal table. cattelanitalia.com

B&B Italia Bay steeland-polyurethane outdoor armchair. bebitalia.com

88 ELLE DECOR

Armani/Casa NET walnut-and-resin side table. armanicasa.com

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salone preview

Visionnaire Akira Lampadario steeland-silk chandelier. visionnaire-home.com

Lindsey Adelman Studio Drop brassand-glass chandelier. lindseyadelman.com

Louis Vuitton Diamond leather-and-glass mirror. louisvuitton.com

Luxury Living Group Maryl wood-frame armchair. luxurylivinggroup.com

Gianfranco Ferrè Home Jenga clear and bronze–glass side table. gianfrancoferrehome.it

Roche Bobois Wonder lacquer cabinet with screen-printed interior. roche-bobois.com

Bottega Veneta (with Osanna Visconti di Modrone) Bronze Intrecciato chandelier. 800-845-6790

Etro Babel brass-and– Bukhara jacquard foldable travel chair. etro.com

Fornasetti Celeste paintedand-lacquered obelisk panel. barneys.com 90

Kvadrat September wool-and-silk rug. maharam.com

Natuzzi Furrow leather sofa. natuzzi.com

Versace Home VT1 marble, wood, and brass side table. versace.com


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CLOSET ENCOUNTERS HOW DO YOU SHOWCASE SOME OF THE SEXIEST WARDROBES AROUND? IF YOU ARE MOLTENI&C, YOU ASK ONE OF MILAN’S FAVORITE FASHION DESIGNERS, MARTA FERRI, TO FILL YOUR CLOSETS WITH BESPOKE CLOTHING CREATED OUT OF THE ITALIAN FURNITURE FIRM’S UPHOLSTERY FABRICS.

Milan-based couturier Marta Ferri in front of Molteni&C’s Gliss Master closet system, which was designed by Vincent Van Duysen.

92 ELLE DECOR

DANILO SCARPATI. FOR DETAILS, SEE RESOURCES

BY RIMA SUQI


Shop this room from paint to the table at homedepot.com/homedecor.

Wall (Top): PPG TIMELESS® Shadowbox Beige HDPPGWN24U (Bottom): PPG TIMELESS Grand Canyon Gold HDPPGY11

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Marta Ferri is a rising star in her native Milan for the couture clothing she designs for the city’s fashionable set. But at this year’s Salone del Mobile, Ferri—who also oversees fabric design for the Italian furniture firm Molteni&C—was asked to create styles of a different sort. To enliven a pair of Molteni closets designed by architect Vincent Van Duysen, who is also the company’s creative director, Ferri, the daughter of a fashion photographer and an interior designer, conjured up a capsule collection sewn out of upholstery fabrics from Molteni’s Gea textiles. “Vincent is a fantastic architect—he is very clean and minimalist—but we needed a little more warmth,” says Giulia Molteni, the granddaughter of the firm’s founder, Angelo Molteni, and its current head of marketing. Called the Styling Closet by Marta Ferri for Molteni&C, the clothing collection will appear at this year’s Salone, where it will fill and show off Van Duysen’s fully customizable Gliss Master and Master Dressing closets. It will then make its way into Molteni’s 40 flagships around the world—including the newest, set to debut on New York City’s Madison Avenue later this spring. For Ferri, the idea of crafting clothes out of upholstery fabrics is not so far-fetched: Indeed, she often employs them in her signature high-waisted pants and long, flowing skirts. (Meanwhile, the bodice of the gown she created for her 2012 wedding to Carlo Borromeo was made from 19th-century lace placemats.) In envisioning the wardrobe for the Molteni closets, she says she imagined the client as “a very organized man, or a quite fashionable woman.” And what if people want to buy the clothes right out of the closets? For now, Giulia Molteni remains coy. “Let’s see,” she says. ◾

LEFT: Ferri, who consults on textile development for Molteni&C, creates a template for one of her fashion designs. BELOW: Ferri helped Molteni’s closet systems come to life with clothing and accessories designed using the irm’s Gea fabrics.

The Master Dressing closet system.

ABOVE: Architect and

Molteni creative director Vincent Van Duysen. RIGHT: Giulia Molteni, the irm’s marketing chief. The Gliss Master wardrobe system. 94 ELLE DECOR

FROM TOP: DANILO SCARPATI (2)

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shortlist

9. Dahlias and ranunculus. 4. Cartier Tank Louis watch.

Claiborne Swanson Frank with her sons, Hunter and Wilder.

1 HENRI MATISSE His use of color is genius.

2 CHANEL SYCOMORE This scent is so original— unique and unexpected.

3 MOTHER AND CHILD 2. Chanel Sycomore perfume.

When I became a new mom, I looked to other moms who were inding their way and was inspired to document them.

4 CARTIER TANK WATCH My dad gave me one after the publication of my irst book— he engraved the back with the date and the sweetest note.

5 TOYOTA LAND CRUISER I found a 1980 model for sale on the side of the road in Mendocino, California. It was love at irst sight.

CLAIBORNE SWANSON FRANK 12 THINGS SHE CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT

11. Clé de Peau Beauté La Crème.

7 CALISTOGA POTTERY

As a 22-year-old student at the Academy of Art University in her native San Francisco, Claiborne Swanson Frank took her first and only photography class. For her final exam, she styled and took portraits of 10 of her friends. “It’s funny because that final is what I do now,” says Frank, a portrait photographer who has created advertising images for Michael Kors and Salvatore Ferragamo and published two books with Assouline, American Beauty and Young Hollywood. This April, she releases her third tome, Mother and Child, a series of studies of women and their progeny. The challenges of shooting children proved to be eye-opening: “I realized that the most beautiful moments happen organically and are totally out of your control.” VANESSA L AWRENCE

There is nothing better than making cofee in the morning and pouring it into one of their mugs.

8 SLIM AARONS He was a storyteller who documented a time that will never exist again.

9 RANUNCULUS AND DAHLIAS I love having ranunculus all over my apartment in pink and orange.

10 D. PORTHAULT SHEETS These make me think of my mom and her linen closet.

11 CLÉ DE PEAU BEAUTÉ LA CRÈME I wake up feeling fresh after using it.

12 VERONICA BEARD JEAN JACKET Nothing compares to this classic American look. This one was designed by my sister.

12. Veronica Beard jean jacket.

5. Toyota Land Cruiser in Freeborn Red.

8. Sea Drive by Slim Aarons. 98 ELLE DECOR

As a child I spent summers in Napa. When I’m there now, it feels the same.

6. Napa Valley, California.

10. D. Porthault Demoiselles Pink sham.

6: SIMON LEDDER/GALLERYSTOCK; 8: SLIM AARONS/ GETTY IMAGES; 9: GETTY IMAGES; 11: COURTESY OF BARNEYS. FOR DETAILS, SEE RESOURCES

3. Mother and Child.

6 NAPA VALLEY


ED design hotels

Royal Suite 2209 at the Carlyle.

UPPER EAST PRIDE A NEW DOCUMENTARY FILM CEMENTS ONE OF MANHATTAN’S GREATEST LANDMARKS IN CELLULOID HISTORY. BY WHITNEY ROBINSON

100

COURTESY OF THE CARLYLE, A ROSEWOOD HOTEL. FOR DETAILS, SEE RESOURCES

In New York City, there are hotels, and then there is the Carlyle. That’s not to say that there aren’t other viable options in which to spend time in Manhattan. It’s just that the Carlyle has, since it opened in 1930 with decoration by Dorothy Draper, checked all the boxes: the perfect bar with the perfect wallpaper (a mural by Ludwig Bemelmans of Madeline fame); rooms to love with views of the park; impossible discretion; and, most importantly, the honeysuckle soap in the bathrooms that I love to steal (you know what I’m talking about). This year, in addition to the release of a new documentary about its storied past, Always at the Carlyle, the hotel is set to undergo a renovation by Tony Chi. But don’t fret: The Renzo Mongiardino–designed Gallery, much like the hotel itself, is here to stay.


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CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT: The Gallery

NIGHT MOVES

“THERE’S REALLY NOTHING THAT IS MORE EMBLEMATIC OF ELEGANCE, HISTORY, ROMANCE, AND SCANDAL THAN THE CARLYLE.” —Vera Wang

THE GALLERY AND ENTRANCE: COURTESY OF THE CARLYLE, A ROSEWOOD HOTEL; BEMELMANS BAR: ANDREW MOORE; DOCUMENTARY STILLS: JUSTIN BARE

at the Carlyle. Bemelmans Bar. The entrance on East 76th Street.

The author.

Always at the Carlyle, which features a litany of celebrity guests and notables, “has been a true labor of love these past four years,” says producer Jennifer Cooke. “It is unlike any other hotel.” The film, which premieres in May, “is the perfect way to honor this magical place.”

Vera Wang.

Lenny Kravitz. Jon Hamm.

Anjelica Huston.

Soia Coppola. Wes Anderson.

“STAYING HERE, YOU FEEL LIKE YOU HAVE MADE IT.” OFF CAMERA: “HAVE YOU STAYED HERE?” “I’VE NEVER STAYED HERE.” [SHAKES HEAD WITH A SMILE.] —Jon Hamm

102 ELLE DECOR


WEDGWOOD® VERA DEGRADÉE AND VERA BANDE SHOWN WEDGWOOD.COM


truth in decorating

LOVE IT OR WEAVE IT WICKER IS AMONG THE OLDEST METHODS FOR MAKING FURNITURE. HERE, DESIGNERS FERNANDO WONG AND BUTTER WAKEFIELD EXAMINE CONTEMPORARY OFFERINGS.

There’s at least one thing Egyptian pharaohs and Calvinist exiles had in common: a fondness for wicker. Woven baskets and chests filled the antechambers of ancient tombs, and the Pilgrims brought a wicker cradle aboard the Mayflower. The material may have reached the pinnacle of its popularity—as outdoor furniture—during the reign of Queen Victoria in the 19th century, but the ancients were first to market. Wicker is as prevalent today, especially in tropical climates,

as it was when William Morris first took issue with modernity. “I live in Florida,” says landscape designer Fernando Wong, whose projects include Surf Club, in Surfside, and Bristol Tower, in Miami. “Wicker brings nature inside any room.” Err on the side of caution, though, as Britain-based garden designer Butter Wakefield warns. “It’s blocky and heavy, so you have to place it strategically,” she says. “But there will always be room for wicker in our lives.”

1. Soane Britain console (see next page).

104 ELLE DECOR

TEX T BY CHARLES CURKIN · PHOTOGRAPHY BY THOMAS LOOF · PRODUCED BY LUCY BAMMAN


1

SMALL RATTAN RIPPLE CONSOLE BY SOANE BRITAIN

FW: For resort living, this is a great piece. I could place a simple candle on a palm frond on top and hang a mirror behind it. BW: The undulating curves are genius. I’d put it in a hallway or next to an outdoor ireplace. It doesn’t shout “Look at me!”—it whispers it. Pictured on previous page. 36″ w. × 19″ d. × 31″ h., $5,285. soane.com

RANDALL ACCENT CHAIR BY MARK D. SIKES FOR HENREDON

FW: It reminds me of the chair of a pharaoh. It’s a transitional piece—it could work in any room. BW: It’s my favorite, and a really great price. The lines are clean and crisp. Beautiful detail. 23″ w. × 24.5″ d. × 37.5″ h., $1,650. henredon.com

ANTIBES CHANDELIER BY CURREY & COMPANY

FW: I love it. It would be great with a milky glass cylinder inside, so the light travels down. BW: It recalls the Guggenheim. It’s wonderfully made, and I love a ilament bulb. I’d put it on a dimmer switch to dial down the light. 30″ dia. × 24″ h., $2,310. nandinahome.com

4

OUTDOOR HARBOR CHAISE BY BARBARA BARRY FOR McGUIRE

FW: It doesn’t feel clunky because the back is so narrow. I would use it outside, close to a window, facing a pool. BW: It’s lovely. Lounge chairs are normally hard to place because they can be ugly and clumsy, but this one is really elegant. Two people could snuggle on it. 34″ w. × 64.5″ d. × 28.5″ h., $3,995. mcguirefurniture.com

5

SOMMERWIND DINING TABLE WITH GLASS TOP BY WOODARD

FW: I’d love it in white. It would look amazing with a bit of patina. BW: It’s a little plastic-looking for me, but I like the fact that it’s perfect for outdoor use. 48″ dia. × 29″ h., $1,728*. woodard-furniture.com

106 ELLE DECOR

The opinions featured are those of ELLE DECOR ’s guest experts and do not necessarily represent those of the editors. All measurements and prices are approximate.

*AVAILABLE TO THE TRADE ONLY. HAIR AND MAKEUP BY CASEY GEREN FOR BERNSTEIN AND ANDRIULLI USING LAURA MERCIER. FOR DETAILS, SEE RESOURCES

3

2


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truth in decorating 7

CURVED WOVEN CHAIR BY MECOX

FW: It has such a tiny footprint that you can use it in a small apartment or on a balcony. The high back allows you to slouch down, which I do every chance I get. BW: I could see one standing alone, or a pair of them on a wooden deck. 28″ w. × 31.5″ d. × 37″ h., $595. mecox.com

6

JAMAICA WICKER BARSTOOL BY RALPH LAUREN HOME

FW: Perfect for a private club or a yacht. I’m a sucker for Ralph Lauren. He can do no wrong. BW: Sitting in it, I understand the high price. It really is extremely comfortable. 24″ w. × 25.5″ d. × 46″ h., $6,195. ralphlaurenhome.com

8

RATTAN SWIVEL STOOL BY PALECEK

FW: This is so versatile, and I absolutely adore painted wicker. I am actually going to use it for a covered terrace in Lyford Cay in the Bahamas. BW: It has a certain charm and usability. It would be great in a conservatory among leafy palm trees and ferns. 25.5″ dia. × 23″ h., $899*. palecek.com

10

D.270.1 CHAIR BY GIO PONTI FROM MOLTENI & C

FW: You should have this on your balcony. It’s only missing the straps to take it around like a backpack. BW: It’s really pretty and simple. 21″ w. × 25″ d. × 32.5″ h., $1,780. molteni.it

11

MALIBU CORD SQUARE SIDE TABLE BY MANUTTI

FW: The frame and composite material make for long-lasting furniture. I can see it in Cape Cod or Maine. BW: A charming little piece. Great size, and I adore the curve of the intermediate shelf. 17″ w. × 23.5″ d. × 17″ h., $903*. walterswicker.com

INTERIOR CLOVER COFFEE TABLE BY WALTERS WICKER

FW: If we were to add a cushion, it would make a great ottoman. I’m drawn to it. It’s a good price too. BW: I love the trefoil shape. It’s versatile as both a table and a stool to sit on. I could see a leopard-print cushion on it. 48″ w. × 34″ d. × 15″ h., $1,440*. walterswicker.com

108 ELLE DECOR

The opinions featured are those of ELLE DECOR ’s guest experts and do not necessarily represent those of the editors. All measurements and prices are approximate.

*AVAILABLE TO THE TRADE ONLY

9


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art show

OK CHAOS

WILLIAM ABRANOWICZ. FOR DETAILS, SEE RESOURCES

ARTIST NANCY LORENZ KNOWS JUST HOW UNPREDICTABLE NATURE CAN BE. BY IAN PHILLIPS

Nancy Lorenz in her Long Island City, New York, studio. 112


art show

Nancy Lorenz expects accidents to occur. The New York City–based artist’s first commission, for interior designer William Sofield in 1996, was realized in especially complex conditions. Sofield had enlisted her to decorate the elevator

doors at the Soho Grand Hotel, which she gilded with abstract motifs. The fact that the elevators were in use while she painted, however, was not optimal: “The doors were opening and closing the whole time,” Lorenz recalls. It’s easy to imagine that someone less patient might have considered calling it quits, but Lorenz emerged unfazed. Since the Soho Grand project, she has cultivated a career as a fine artist with projects as diverse as decorative boxes for Bottega Veneta and screens for Chanel’s Paris boutique. This spring marks a milestone for Lorenz with her first solo museum exhibition, “Nancy Lorenz: Moon Gold,” at the San Diego Museum of Art (opening April 27). The show features more than 40 works spanning 15 years, including eight new paintings and the 2004 Rock Garden Room, a monumental installation of bronze tabletop sculptures depicting landscapes. Nature is one with Lorenz, as her work throughout the exhibition shows, with gilded and lacquered compositions of constellations and seascapes on unconventional surfaces like jute and corrugated cardboard. Also on display is her lifelong fascination with reflective

materials, such as mother-of-pearl and metal, which often ooze onto her canvases as if squeezed from a tube of toothpaste deliberately—or perhaps not. Over the years, Lorenz has made uncertainty something to embrace. Whether it’s an errant drip or a smeared elevator door, there’s beauty in the chaos. “It’s important to allow incidental marks to happen,” she says. “If something accidental didn’t happen, the work wouldn’t be so alive.” ◾

Sea and Sky, 2017, pigment and lacquer on wood panel. 114 ELLE DECOR

INTERIOR: COURTESY OF THE ARTIST, KEITH BARRACLOUGH; PAINTINGS: COURTESY OF THE ARTIST AND THE SAN DIEGO MUSEUM OF ART, ADAM REICH (2)

Inside Lorenz’s studio. BELOW LEFT: Gold Flying Apsaras, 2017, gold leaf, mother-of-pearl inlay, lacquer, clay, and resin on wood panel.


AS TOLD TO VANESSA L AWRENCE PHOTOGRAPHY BY STEPHAN JULLIARD


In the sitting room of a London apartment designed by Irakli Zaria, the three armchairs are from the 1960s, the cocktail tables and custom screens are by Galerie Glustin, and the 1970s Pino Signoretto vase is Venetian. The silk rug and gilt mirror are both custom, and the drypoint print on the mantel is by Oleg Kudryashov.

GOLD, GOLDEN, GILDED, GLITTERING Designer Irakli Zaria mixes midcentury furniture with Japanese antiques for a Russian couple’s London pied-à-terre in his ED debut. I GREW UP in Tbilisi, Georgia, in a cozy apartment in a 1960s Soviet-period building with a modest courtyard and a nice view over the city. My favorite part of my home was a huge library with a wide selection of books on architecture, art history, and, of course, Russian classics by Pushkin, Lermontov, and Tolstoy. The first time I saw an interior-design magazine was when I was 17 or 18 years old. I was so impressed that I began searching for more and more books on design history. Eventually, I went to Moscow to study at Details Design School, and three years ago, I started my own interiors firm. I actually got a degree in economics in Georgia before moving to Russia, but these days, I’m mainly very good at spending money! All of my work is residential, and most of my clients are in Moscow. But I have designed several international projects, including an 1880s apartment in Barcelona and a 1950s villa in Cannes, France, that was entirely rebuilt. This London duplex apartment is owned by a Russian couple. He is a businessman, and she is a well-known fashion blogger. (I’m also doing a larger place for them in Moscow.) It is in

117


â&#x20AC;&#x153;IN CLOUDY LONDON, IT MAKES NO SENSE TO HAVE A GRAY INTERIOR.â&#x20AC;?

The Galerie Glustin sofa in the sitting room is covered in a Dominique Kiefer velvet, the brass nesting tables are vintage, and the vintage bronze consoles and mirrors are Italian. The curtains are of an embroidered Dedar silk, the wallpaper is by Holland & Sherry, the 1925 ceramic bowl is by Edouard Cazaux, and the Venetian glass decanters are from the 1960s.

118


ABOVE, FROM LEFT: A 1970s French

faux bamboo–and–gilt bronze bench sits beneath a Marc Cavell artwork in the dining room. In the opposite corner, the 1980s chaise is by Vladimir Kagan, the turquoiseand-brass tables are by Kam Tin, the 1960s loor lamp is Italian, and the pastel on paper is by Alexey Kamensky. OPPOSITE: The dining room’s 1940s oak sideboard and 1960s ceramic lamps are French. The Japanese screen is from the 16th century, and the brass-andglass chandelier is 1980s Italian.

120

Kensington, in a modern building overlooking Hyde Park that is surrounded by neoclassical homes. They have three young kids and travel to London often, usually for just a few days at a time. But they prefer not to stay in a hotel and can afford to maintain a home there, so why not? The wife told me she needed a nice, relaxed place that did not feel too London-ish. I know what she means: In a place where there are such cloudy skies, it makes no sense to have a gray interior. What I love most about this client is her sense of color. She is very keen on it. She shares my love for furnishings from the 1950s to the 1970s. Here, 80 percent of the furniture is vintage and was purchased mainly in Paris and London. The design started with the carpets. I consider a carpet to be the largest painting in a room, and I designed two silk ones for the dining and sitting rooms. The patterns were inspired by a Japanese Art Deco antique. That was the launching point for a palette consisting of shades of turquoise, including the Dominique Kieffer velvet that covers the

Galerie Glustin sofa in the sitting room. I was amazed by the sculptural shape, a tribute to Jean Royère, one of my favorite designers from the ’40s and ’50s. I always incorporate Japanese and Chinese art and antiquities in my designs. Here, there are two golden screens from Japan. One is a 16th-century piece with inserts of 15th-century Chinese love letters. It hangs in the dining room, offsetting the vintage raffia Milo Baughman chairs—he’s one of my favorite designers from the 1970s—and a Karl Springer table that looks like marble but is actually goatskin covered in many layers of lacquer. The other screen, from the 17th century, hangs above the headboard in the master bedroom and gives the room a vibrant, warm feeling. In Russia, my clients love asking about every detail of the design process—even the minor ones. This was the rare project where I can say that, yes, the clients were involved, but they also gave me so much freedom. When you have the trust of your clients, it’s really priceless. ◾


The daughterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s custom bed is covered in a bedspread made from a Pierre Frey silk. The Milo Baughman bench, Italian glass-and-brass cabinet, and Murano lamp are all from the 1970s, the silk carpet and plaster-relief clouds are custom, and the 1950s chandelier is by Carlo Scarpa. OPPOSITE: In the master bedroom, the custom headboard is in a Holland & Sherry velvet, the nightstand is from the 1970s, and the 1935 leather lamp is by Paul DuprĂŠ-Lafon. The screen is 17thcentury Japanese, and the metallic raffia wallcovering is by Phillip Jefries. For details, see Resources.

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“WHEN YOU HAVE THE TRUST OF YOUR CLIENTS, IT’S REALLY PRICELESS.”


In the entrance courtyard of a 1927 Spanish Colonial Revival house in Beverly Hills designed by Steven Johanknecht of Commune Design, the Janus et Cie wicker furniture has cushions in an Opuzen fabric, the root side table is from JF Chen, and the wrought-iron sconce and chandeliers are original to the house. The vintage blanket is Navajo, and the terra-cotta loor tiles are by Malibu Ceramic Works.

TEX T BY INGRID ABRAMOVITCH PHOTOGRAPHY BY DOMINIQUE VORILLON PRODUCED BY ROBERT RUFINO


WEST WORLD On a Beverly Hills street with a star-studded past, Commune Designâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Steven Johanknecht imbues a 1920s Spanish Colonial Revival with Hollywood glamour and Wild West motifs. 125


The family roomâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sofa in an Edelman leather and armchairs in a Kravet stripe are by Ralph Lauren Home. The other armchairs are by A. Rudin, the custom walnut cocktail table is by Commune Design, the sconces are by Paul Ferrante, the custom rug is by Amadi Carpets, and the Roman shades on the original leaded windows are in a Colefax and Fowler fabric. The Thomas C. Molesworthâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;inspired motifs on the ceiling beams and custom cabinetry were painted by artist Nic Valle, the ceiling is sheathed in a Ralph Lauren Home grass cloth, and the cowboy ink drawings are by Edward Borein.


127


In the living room, the sofas, in a Rogers & Goffigon fabric, and armchair, in a Donghia cotton-linen, are all by George Smith; the custom cocktail table is by Commune Design. The red lacquerâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;framed mirror is custom, the 1920s Spanish torchiere is from Revival Antiques in Pasadena, the curtains are of a Brunschwig & Fils velvet, and the rug is by Christopher Farr. The walls are in Navajo White and the ceiling is in Bridgewater Tan, both by Benjamin Moore; the F. Grayson Sayre landscape over the mantel is in a frame by Arts and Crafts ceramics.


A

As a cofounder of Commune Design, the Los Angeles firm known for its savvy mixing of vintage chic with high-end handicraft, Steven Johanknecht might be expected to know his Neutras from his Navajo rugs. But ask him about this renovation of a 1920s Spanish Colonial Revival house in Beverly Hills, and Johanknecht—a former store designer for Barneys New York and design director for Studio Sofield—starts enthusing about his latest obsession: Thomas C. Molesworth. “You’ve got to check him out,” he says. “He did all these interiors and furnishings in the cowboy style in the 1930s and ’40s. He designed lodges in Montana and Wyoming. His furniture was just incredible.” What pushed Johanknecht down the rabbit hole of classic Western design were his cowboy style–aficionado clients, a couple for whom he has designed several homes, most recently one near the ocean in the Pacific Palisades section of L.A. “I have always been enchanted by the West,”

the wife says. “I buy cowboy art and plein air landscapes, old Western blankets, and furniture in that style. And my husband and I adore old Molesworth.” A longtime friend of Johanknecht’s, she became one of his first clients after he founded Commune Design in 2004 with Roman Alonso and Pamela and Ramin Shamshiri (the siblings have since left to found their own firm, Studio Shamshiri). She had been looking for a home that felt more “old Los Angeles” when she discovered this one for sale on Roxbury Drive, a legendarily star-studded street whose former residents include Lucille Ball, who used to hand out Halloween candy from her front door here, and Jimmy Stewart, who grew sweet corn in his backyard. The exterior—carved-plaster facade, woodspindle entry door, clay roof tiles, and leaded-glass windows—was charmingly intact. “Right away, we asked Steven to come in and bring the house back to its Spanish roots,” she says. “He is so good at

ABOVE: The custom dining table is by Cygal Art Deco, the Dessin Fournir chairs are in a Myung Jin mohair, and the 19th-century chandelier is original. The walls are in Benjamin Moore’s Dinner Party. BELOW: The foyer’s antique Spanish-style chest is the client’s own, the David Cressey lamp and ceramic horse are from JF Chen, the antler chandelier is from CBS Showroom, and the rug is by Christopher Farr.


BELOW: The master bed has a headboard in a Clarence House mohair and is topped with pillows in fabrics from Schumacher and Pierre Frey. The Formations bench is in a Fortuny wool lannel, the BDDW side tables support lamps by Hollywood at Home, the curtains are of a C&C Milano fabric, and the wool rug is from Patterson Flynn Martin. The ceiling is in Farrow & Ball’s Pelt.

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mixing. He brings his fashion background and uses color in such an unusual way.” Inside, too, the house retained many of its original features, from hand-carved ceiling beams to wrought-iron chandeliers and arched doors. But previous renovations had altered the flow of the home, with some rooms chopped in two, and the 1920s tile flooring had been replaced with a patchwork of mismatched materials.

“We wanted to make it feel more holistic while still honoring its heritage,” the designer says. A typical Commune project involves a deep dive into history. For this house, Johanknecht did extensive research into the Spanish Colonial Revival tradition in L.A., working with a tile company in Malibu to create authentic-looking octagonal terra-cotta pavers with decorative insets painted in custom motifs of white and blue. The new tilework begins in the entrance courtyard and continues through the kitchen and dining room and out to the patio in the back of the house. “One of the great things about California homes is that indoor/outdoor experience,” he says. “It was really important to me that everything feel connected.” The home’s palette, which ranges from vibrant hues of pink and green to more dramatic shades, such as the dining room’s earthy red, was a balancing act. The wife is “a very happy person who loves color,” Johanknecht says. She chose the raspberry upholstery on the living room’s armchairs and the striking turquoise hue of the floor tiles in the master bath, which were inspired by the color of a piece of Bauer pottery she picked up at a flea market. Johanknecht countered with such choices as the deep plum—Farrow & Ball’s Pelt—on the beamed master bedroom ceiling. “I arched an eyebrow when he proposed that one,” the wife admits. “But I decided to trust him. And he was right: It looks cozy, as opposed to dark, as I’d feared.” It is the very solidity of a Spanish Colonial–style house, the designer says, that makes it such a complex design challenge. “The gestures can be so big that it is easy for things to get lost,” he says. “I really had to pay attention to scale. There is not a lot of midcentury here, but I did incorporate craft, like the Stan Bitters ceramic pots at the entrance.” In the end, Molesworth was the key. His cowboy motifs influenced numerous details throughout the house, from the family room’s hand-stenciled cabinetry and ceiling beams to the whipstitching on the sconce shades and the moccasin-like embroidery on a pair of armchairs. “We got exactly what we wanted and more,” says the client. ◾


The limestone tub in the master bath has unlacquered-brass ittings by Waterworks. The armchair is by George Smith, the custom sconces are by Paul Ferrante, the 1960s Austrian ceiling lights are from Orange Los Angeles, and the sheepskin rug is from Grand Splendid. The custom tiles are by Malibu Ceramic Works, and the photograph is by John Michael Riva, Jr. For details, see Resources.


LET THERE BE LINDSEY Lighting queen Lindsey Adelman and her family live in a 1920s Brooklyn townhouse, where the ceilings and walls are a showcase for her new collection of lighting debuting at this year’s Salone del Mobile fair in Milan.

TEX T BY NANCY HASS · PHOTOGRAPHY BY STEPHEN KENT JOHNSON · PRODUCED BY ROBERT RUFINO

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A detail of the Kingdom chandelier by Karl Zahn for Lindsey Adelman Studio, which hangs in the living room of the Brooklyn townhouse that Adelman shares with her husband, Ian, and their son, Finn. OPPOSITE: The living roomâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sectional is by Living Divani, the side table is by Jean Louis Iratzoki for Retegui, the vintage sconces are Italian, the mirror and mantel are original, and the leather Simon Hasan vase is from the Future Perfect. The walls are in Paper White by Benjamin Moore.


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Artists often choose to live in softly neutral spaces with a soupçon of Zen, the better to swap new works in and out to see how they resonate and glow in a real setting. So perhaps it’s no surprise that such an approach has been embraced by lighting designer Lindsey Adelman, whose fixtures have, in the past decade, moved modern illumination into the territory of sculpture. She has turned the Park Slope, Brooklyn, townhouse she recently moved to with her husband, Ian—chief creative officer at New York magazine—and their 14-year-old son, Finn, into a subtly minimal background for a revolving array of chandeliers and sconces, many of them one of a kind. Some are displayed for weeks or months; others, only a day or two. “Changing out lighting all the time is not like rehanging paintings,” she says. “It’s amazingly complicated. You almost need to have an electrician move in with you. But for me, it’s part of my creative process. I love to see things in context, in real life—to live with them.” That Adelman, whose intensity is balanced by her big, offkilter grin, uses her home partially as a laboratory is only one of the distinctive ways in which she runs her practice, which she opened in Brooklyn in 2006. She is known almost as much for the unconventional work environment in her New York and Los Angeles studios and showrooms as for her poetic fixtures, which mix unconventional metals with handblown glass, including her now-iconic first collection, Branching Bubble. She encourages her 40-plus employees to take breaks for meditation and daydreaming, both of which she considers elemental to true creativity. She even casts them as backup dancers in the impressionistic music videos she shoots to showcase her designs. In recent years, Adelman has experimented with jewelry, mirrors, and porcelain tile, and she constantly coaxes her staff to cross aesthetic boundaries. “I don’t want them to feel stuck,” she says. “Making something really good is a mysterious process. You have to nurture that.”

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: Adelman at

home with her son, Finn. In the living room, the Eames lounge chair and ottoman are by Herman Miller, the malachite table light is by Adelman for Nilufar, and the artwork is by Matt Clark. A vinylrecord collection belonging to Ian, who used to be a DJ, is displayed on Vitsoe shelving.


A BDDW dining table is surrounded by vintage Hans Wegner side chairs and a Saarinen chair in a Jim Thompson fabric. The Drop System chandelier is by Adelman, the candlesticks are by Ted Muehling for E.R. Butler & Co., the parquet looring is original to the house, the walls are painted in Midnight by Benjamin Moore, and the artwork is by Jared Rue.

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“CHANGING OUT LIGHTING ALL THE TIME IS NOT LIKE REHANGING PAINTINGS. YOU ALMOST NEED TO HAVE AN ELECTRICIAN MOVE IN WITH YOU.”

In the movie room, the vintage sectional is by Mario Bellini for B&B Italia, the leather love seat is by Michel Ducaroy for Ligne Roset, the cocktail table is by Dimore Studio for the Future Perfect, and the vintage credenza is Danish. The Cherry Bomb Fringe chandeliers are by Adelman for Nilufar, the curtains are from Ikea, and the rug is from West Elm. The prints are by Sol LeWitt (left) and Robert Ryman (above mantel), and the walls are in Overcoat by Benjamin Moore.


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At home, she has surrounded herself with rich and sober hues—deep blues, grays, and whites that give an unexpected twist to the home’s 1920s detailing. Friends and fellow designers assumed Adelman and her husband would gut the townhouse when they moved in. The former owners had inserted walls that threw off the symmetry, including the balance of the plaster ceiling medallions where Adelman’s chandeliers would, of course, take center stage. But the couple decided a major redo was unnecessary. In the end, the entire renovation “cost about the price of a BDDW sectional,” Adelman says, laughing. They even kept the 1960s pink-tiled bathroom and not only the existing kitchen cabinets, but the hardware as well, which they sent off to their metal plater for a vintage brass patina. “We thought the house had the perfect amount of ‘undone,’ ” she says. “I love a little bit of awkwardness. That’s my thing.” Her newest collection, Drop System, to be introduced in April at the Salone del Mobile in Milan, consists of infinite combinations of perpendicular intersecting rods—in finishes like tarnished silver and hand-dipped mottled brass—studded in seemingly random patterns with 2½-inch handblown-glass globes. Unlike traditional chandeliers, the lights creep all the way up the stem, creating the effect of a floating sculpture; the sconces are infinitely configurable and lend a gentle graphic glow, reminiscent of a backstage makeup mirror. One combination of Drop now hovers over Adelman’s BDDW dining table, which is topped with a black-stained, heavily figured wood slab. A set of vintage Hans Wegner chairs lends a warm edge to the room. One of the couple’s favorite paintings, by Jared Rue, dominates the far wall. Throughout the house, Adelman’s lighting lends an idiosyncratic radiance and a sense of sophisticated coziness. Her custom pieces, especially, reflect her way of working, which is far closer to that of an artist than an industrial designer. What emerges is often impressionistic. “To me,” she says, pointing

to the fixture hanging from the ceiling of her son’s lounge on the third floor, “this somehow seems like Finn, attenuated and lanky and a little out of balance, yet so perfect.” To Adelman, a room’s purpose need not dictate the lighting that belongs there. For example, in the garden-level movie room (the TV screen is behind a curtain), which is moody and purposefully a touch louche, the ceiling is hung with branches of her Cherry Bomb Fringe, perhaps her most rarefied design, available from Milan’s Nilufar gallery. Despite the luminous and ever-changing experimentation overhead, Adelman insists she brings into production only a tiny fraction of her ideas. “I generate them constantly,” she says. “That’s why it’s so important to have the time to dream, uninterrupted by the phone or a rendering on the computer. The ideal is for those pieces that rise to the level of being made to enter the world pure, like a craving.” ◾

ABOVE: An assortment of hand-

blown vases by William Gudenrath are displayed on the master bedroom’s original mantel. Relected in the mirror are drawings by Evan Hecox and Finn. LEFT: The master bed is dressed in Matteo linens, the Burst chandelier and table lamps are by Adelman, and the sconce is by David Weeks. The linen curtains are by RH, Restoration Hardware, and the rug is by ABC Carpet & Home. OPPOSITE: In the kitchen’s breakfast area, the Eames table and chairs are by Herman Miller, the Clamp pendant is by Adelman, and the photograph is by Rachel Sussman. For details, see Resources.

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BLUE-CHIP SPECIAL When a Chicago art collector and philanthropist moves into an apartment overlooking Lake Michigan, she turns to her longtime collaborator Timothy Corrigan to create sensational rooms worthy of her museumcaliber collection.

TEX T BY JACOBA URIST PHOTOGRAPHY BY SIMON UPTON PRODUCED BY CYNTHIA FRANK 140


In the sitting room of a Chicago apartment designed by Timothy Corrigan, the custom armchairs are in a Beacon Hill chenille, the cocktail table is custom, the chandelier is by Paul Ferrante, and the antique Khorassan rug is from Mansour. The artworks are by Frank Stella. OPPOSITE: Custom doors in African mahogany lead into a closet in the main hallway. The custom stool is in a Keleen leather.


The table in the dining room is by Promemoria, the custom chairs are in a Great Plains fabric, and the chandelier is by Panache Designs. The artworks are by Joan Mitchell (left) and Jasper Johns. OPPOSITE, FROM TOP: Diane Heller in the living room with her English cocker spaniel, Daphne; the artworks are linocuts by Pablo Picasso. The pair of custom armchairs are in a Colefax and Fowler fabric, and the custom cocktail table is pyrite, églomisé, and bronze; the side table is by Dessin Fournir, the loor lamps are by Holtkötter, and the curtains are of a Donghia fabric.

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iane Heller has been a serious art collector for more than three decades. From her first Jasper Johns to a Picasso and a Frank Stella phase, her blue-chip collection—a who’s who of modern masters along with some surprising new talent—has always dictated her home’s aesthetic. Born in northern Minnesota, Heller is wary of calling herself a Chicago native, but it’s more than fair for her to claim the title. She grew up in the city’s suburbs and studied art history at the Art Institute of Chicago before raising a family here with her late husband, David, who served for a time as governor of the Midwest Stock Exchange. Longtime philanthropists, the couple helped support the creation of the institute’s Renzo Piano–designed Modern wing, which opened in 2009. Until now, the setting for Heller’s personal collection of artworks—which includes three Helen Frankenthalers, a Robert Motherwell, and a pair of Robert Longos—has always been a house. She has lived in a variety of homes, from a 1930s gardener’s cottage in Lake Forest, Illinois, to a quasi-minimalist residence whose austerity reinforced the gravitas of her collection. But after her husband died in 2012, she was ready to downsize. She found herself drawn to a Beaux Arts–themed high-rise in the city’s leafy Lincoln Park area. Designed by Lucien Lagrange, a French-born, Chicago-based architect, the building—featuring a French garden with intricate


In the sitting room of the master bedroom suite, the custom armchair and ottoman are in a Kravet fabric, the chandelier is by Panache Designs, the tray is by Hermès, the custom mantel is by François & Co., and the ireplace screen is from Reborn Antiques.

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A French Art Deco table in the hallway holds a Roman bust from the second century B.C. and 19th-century Topoke tribal currency, mounted as sculpture. The artwork is Robert Longoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Ellen, and the ceiling is painted in Benjamin Mooreâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Cotton Balls.


linear allées and hedge work—is the neighborhood’s first luxury tower in half a century. She committed herself to the purchase of an apartment on one of the top floors, with 13-foot ceilings and a vast visual expanse—Lake Shore Drive to the south, Lake Michigan to the east, and O’Hare’s jets to the west. It was only then that she began to feel a twinge of trepidation, worrying that she would be engulfed by the unit’s dramatic proportions. “I was a tad skeptical of this apartment at first,” she confesses. But she knew whom to trust: Los Angeles– and Parisbased interior designer Timothy Corrigan, her previous collaborator on three homes and the author of several design books. A self-described “château junkie,” he recently embarked on his fifth French-castle restoration. “I lose money every time,” he says with a laugh, “but the process is like bringing back a sleeping beauty.” Corrigan’s admiration for Heller is evident, but that is not to say that they are entirely simpatico when it comes to design. “Up until the home we did together in Lake Forest, she always lived in stark, clean spaces,” he says. On this project, he persuaded her that her artworks could be displayed to their advantage in a more relaxed setting. “I am way over to the left,” she admits, referring to her modernist proclivities. “Timothy is all the way to the right. Together, we have a lot of fun.” But paring down her collection to fit into a smaller space was not easy. “I had to ask myself, What do I really want to live with? I had to get rid of a lot of pieces I loved,” Heller says. One she absolutely couldn’t imagine selling: Jasper Johns’s The Dutch

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Wives. It was one of the first artworks she and her husband acquired. They had noticed it hanging above their table in a restaurant. “I wonder what it’s called?” asked her husband, before buying it from a local gallery. To highlight the piece, which hangs above the bed, Corrigan created a backdrop of faux-leather paneling. “I’m somewhat fanatical about symmetry,” he says. As they designed the space, Heller generally knew exactly which painting belonged in each room. Still, she was game for experimentation. In the dining room, for example, the original light fixture was sleek and contemporary. Yet the moment they hung Joan Mitchell’s Sunflowers III, the combination felt too expected. The Louis XIV–style chandelier that now hovers over the dining table both illuminates the artwork and adds a surprising, historic counterpoint. Installing the art had to wait until all the furniture and rugs were set; it took a team of master hangers nearly three days. One of the most complex arrangements was in the sitting room, where Heller had envisioned her collection of Frank Stella artworks framing the fireplace. She wasn’t settled, however, on the exact configuration; in her previous homes, the works had never resided on a single wall. She recalls how they raised and lowered each work several times, rearranging and assessing each permutation. At last, they tried Stella’s Double Gray Scramble in the center and the multicolored squares on either side of the mantel—an infusion of color that gives a jolt to the largely neutral apartment. Stepping back, both she and Corrigan immediately knew it was right. “It clicked,” she says. ◾


The custom bed in the master bedroom has a headboard in a Colefax and Fowler fabric and a bed skirt in a Nancy Corzine linen-silk blend. The bench in a Castel velvet with Houlès trim and the shagreen side tables are custom, the sconces are by Marian Jamieson, the curtains are of a Rogers & Goffigon voile, and the wall panels are in a Kravet faux leather. A Jasper Johns silk-screen hangs above the bed; the pen-andink drawing on the side table is by Picasso. OPPOSITE, FROM LEFT: The library’s sectional in a Colefax and Fowler fabric and armchair in a Calvin velvet are both custom, the side table is from Antiquario, and the walls are sheathed in bleached mahogany; the artwork is by Jasper Johns. The powder room’s vanity is custom, the sink and ittings are by THG, and the walls are covered in a Schumacher wool; the artwork is by Joan Miró. For details, see Resources.


The family room in the circa-1790 Georgian country home that interior designer Ariel Ashe renovated with her sister, Alexi Ashe Meyers, and Alexiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s husband, Seth Meyers, in Litchield County, Connecticut. The custom armchair and ottoman are in a Ralph Lauren velvet, and the cabinetry is painted in Green Smoke by Farrow & Ball. OPPOSITE: Alexi, left, in an Erdem dress and Dior coat, with her sister, Ariel, in a dress and coat by Dior, in front of the Maple Leaves quilt at the nearby Weantinoge Heritage Land Trust.


SIBLING REVELRY Decorator Ariel Ashe and her sister, Alexi, decided to go in together on a Connecticut country home. Never mind that Alexi’s husband and young son are part of the package—luckily, she is married to talk-show host and comedian Seth Meyers, whose natural good humor keeps things light. TEX T BY LIZZY GOODMAN · PHOTOGRAPHY BY ALEXEI HAY · ST YLED BY J. ERRICO · PRODUCED BY ROBERT RUFINO AND DAVID M. MURPHY

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WE WERE HIGH-SCHOOL FRESHMEN in Albuquerque, New Mexico, when Ariel Ashe first allowed people a glimpse into one of her singular visual worlds. The designer and co-founder, alongside architect Reinaldo Leandro, of design firm Ashe + Leandro, was a relatively shy, self-contained kid, so it was a surprise to learn she’d written a play, which she planned to direct herself. “Of course I remember The Fashionate Kiss!” exclaims Ashe’s sister, Alexi Ashe Meyers. “It was a completely original idea based off of a book she had read, and also her love of fashion and set design.” Though Alexi can vividly recall the anthropomorphized characters (there were a bee and a cheetah, among others) and the distinct way that each one moved (Ariel collaborated with her classmate Jillian Peña, now an esteemed choreographer), as well as the irreverent sound track (Blue Swede’s cover of “Hooked on a Feeling” featured prominently), she can’t remember a single plot point. In what now seems like a foreshadowing of Ashe + Leandro’s signature aesthetic, the aim of The Fashionate Kiss was mainly experiential: Ariel wanted to curate an entire sensory reality and generate a little jewel box of time that transported us to a prettier, calmer, and more inspiring place.

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The guest room’s Serena & Lily bed is topped with a blanket from Mayapple Hill Farm and tapestry pillows from Kermanshah Oriental Rugs Gallery; the mural is by Ananbô. ABOVE LEFT: In the entry hall, the lamp was a gift from Diane von Furstenberg and the Persian rug is from Double Knot.


ABOVE: In the formal living room, an RH, Restoration Hardware sofa is in a Perennials linen, the custom bench is in a Ralph Lauren fabric, and the walls are in Oval Room Blue by Farrow & Ball. BELOW: A Tom Borgese artwork sits on a vintage chest in Ariel’s bedroom.

To be honest, Ariel hasn’t changed that much since we were 14. (We’ve known each other since middle school.) On a recent picturesque Saturday, she is touring me through her latest curated mini universe, the Litchfield County, Connecticut, home where she, along with Alexi and Alexi’s husband, Seth Meyers, and their two-year-old son, Ashe, spend many of their weekends. (At press time, the Meyerses were also expecting a springtime baby.) The idea of buying a home in the area was sparked during a visit to their friend Diane von Furstenberg’s nearby farm, Cloudwalk. A search led them to this red-brick Colonial in the middle of a land trust. “We wanted a quirky place with an English country home feel,” says Ariel, who painted the house in a historic Victorian palette and embellished it with floral wallpaper and murals. As we enter the cozier of the two living rooms, we encounter Seth, who is writing jokes on his laptop, and the couple’s de facto first child, Frisbee Ashe Meyers, an Italian greyhound who is sleeping by the fire in a custom dog bed designed by Ariel. “These

things are mostly from eBay, flea markets, and antiques stores around here,” she says. She points out a painting in the hallway. “I literally just searched online for ‘antique oil portrait,’ ” she says. Alexi completely trusts her sister’s design eye. “Her gut is so good,” she says, “that I don’t buy anything without first texting her a picture.” Seth concurs. He’s known his sister-in-law since 2001, when he was still on Saturday Night Live, where she was an intern. Later, she helped him with the design of his apartments. “Babe, how much did I even show you of what we had planned for this house?” Alexi asks her husband. “Nothing,” he replies, laughing. “I fully bought in.” The hanging copper pots in the kitchen were a special request from Alexi; by the sink, the lavender lotion and soap from Los Poblanos Historic Inn & Organic Farm are among several nods to the family’s New Mexico roots; and a chest in the entryway was purchased from the original owner. The tour winds up the staircase, through the bedrooms and into the attic, where we find—


very deliberately, Alexi notes—the one TV in the house. Ariel points out an array of sometimes elegant (alabaster lamps), sometimes quirky (a Mexican saint portrait), and always exquisite objects. The house is impeccably appointed, but not fancy: Real people live here, the rooms seem to say. “It’s never just about, ‘Oh, this is beautiful, you’ll never use it, but get it,’ ” Ariel explains. “I want things to be useful and to feel meaningful.” When we were kids, Ariel wouldn’t sleep over at anyone else’s house. Other people’s rooms were “scary,” she always said. And so we would all trek up to her family’s adobe hideaway in Placitas, New Mexico, and spend the night in her world. “Do you remember the hat-box phase, when she had all the wicker furniture?” Alexi asks. “And then she got rid of the hat boxes and just lined the top rim of her room with black-and-white photos? And then one day, you’d come home and those would be gone, and she’d have stencilpainted all around her room.” When Ariel arrived in New York City at 18 to study set design at New York University, she brought

her room with her, remaking her studio apartment in its image, down to the “camel floral Ralph Lauren bedding.” Staying close to her roots helps Ariel to visualize what will inspire others. She still maintains a West Village apartment that is an iteration of her childhood bedroom: “It’s a lot of things from New Mexico, like Navajo rugs, Indian pots, and red chile jars, and from other places, too, like a big African tribal rug. It’s all stuff I have an attachment to.” She pauses, takes a sip of her hot toddy, then brings up a friend’s apartment where the bookshelves are cluttered with campy knickknacks. I assumed she hated it, but I could not have been more wrong. “He had all those little vignettes set up, all these odd little scenes that make him happy,” she says. “I’m like that, too. My room is like my museum. It’s weird, but I love it.” Ariel has built a career applying that intuitive, deeply personal sense of how a space should feel to rooms that are not her own. The Connecticut house “didn’t need fixing up, really,” she says. But she knew it could become “this magical cottage.” ◾

ABOVE: Alexi (left), in a Chanel dress and Barrie sweater, and Ariel, holding her nephew, Ashe, in a Barrie sweater and Chanel pants, tour a local farm. BELOW, FROM LEFT: An antique dining table is set with heirloom china from the sisters’ mother; the antique chandelier is Flemish, the curtains are of a Designers Guild fabric, and the walls are in Rectory Red by Farrow & Ball. Alexi’s husband, Seth Meyers, and Ashe in the family room.

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The tub in Arielâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s bathroom is original, and the curtain is of a Holland & Sherry linen with a velvet trim. OPPOSITE: In Arielâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s bedroom, the headboard and wallpaper are in a Pierre Frey pattern, the pillow is in a Bennison fabric, and the side table is from the Antique and Artisan Gallery. For details, see Resources.


ALEXI COMPLETELY TRUSTS HER SISTER’S DESIGN EYE. “HER GUT IS SO GOOD THAT I DON’T BUY ANYTHING WITHOUT FIRST TEXTING HER A PICTURE.”

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resources Items pictured but not listed are from private collections. MOOD BOARD PAGE 50: Console and bench: Alfonso Marina, alfonsomarina.com. Fashion: Céline, celine.com; Givenchy, givenchy.com. Obelisk: Alexa Hampton for Maitland-Smith, www.maitland-smith.com. Candle: Cire Trudon, trudon.com. Urn: Jamb, jamb.co.uk. Cofee table: De La Espada, thefutureperfect.com. Brooches: S.J. Phillips, sjphillips.com. WHAT’S NEXT PAGE 52: Pool: Endless Pools, endlesspools.com. Sauna: Jacuzzi Saunas, infraredsauna.com. Swing bells: Nohrd, nohrd.com. SHOWCASE PAGES 72–78: Hermès, hermes.com. SALONE PREVIEW PAGES 92–94: Marta Ferri, martaferri.com. Molteni&C, molteni.it. SHORTLIST PAGE 98: Claiborne Swanson Frank, claiborne swansonfrank.com. Perfume: Chanel, chanel.com. Book: Assouline, assouline.com. Pottery: Calistoga Pottery, calistogapottery.com. Sheets: D. Porthault, dporthaultparis.com. Cream: Clé de Peau, clede peaubeaute.com. Jacket: Veronica Beard, veronica beard.com. ED DESIGN HOTELS PAGES 100–102: The Carlyle, rosewoodhotels.com. TRUTH IN DECORATING PAGES 104–108: Butter Wakeield, butterwakeield .co.uk. Fernando Wong, fernandowongold.com. Wallpaper: Osborne & Little, osborneandlittle.com. Fashion: Oscar de la Renta, oscardelarenta.com. ART SHOW PAGES 112–114: Nancy Lorenz, nancy-lorenz.com. GOLD, GOLDEN, GILDED, GLITTERING Interior design: Irakli Zaria, iraklizariainteriors.com. PAGES 116–117: Cocktail tables and screens: Galerie Glustin, glustin.net. Drypoint print: Oleg Kudryashov, oleg-kudryashov.com. PAGES 118–119: Sofa: Galerie Glustin. Sofa fabric: Dominique Kiefer, rubelli.com. Curtains fabric: Dedar, dedar.com. Wallpaper: Holland & Sherry, hollandandsherry.com. PAGE 122: Bedspread fabric: Pierre Frey, www.pierrefrey.com. PAGE 123: Headboard fabric: Holland & Sherry. Wallcovering: Phillip Jefries, phillipjeffries.com. WEST WORLD Interior design: Steven Johanknecht, Commune Design, communedesign.com. Decorative painting: Nic Valle, nicvalle.com. PAGES 124–125: Wicker furniture: Janus et Cie, janus etcie.com. Cushions fabric: Opuzen, opuzen.com. Root side table: JF Chen, jfchen.com. Floor tiles: Malibu Ceramic Works, malibuceramicworks.com. PAGES 126–127: Sofa and striped armchairs: Ralph Lauren Home, ralphlaurenhome.com. Sofa upholstery: Edelman Leather, edelmanleather.com. Striped armchairs fabric: Kravet, kravet.com. Beige armchairs: A. Rudin, arudin.com. Sconces: Paul Ferrante, paulferrante.com. Rug: Amadi Carpets, amadi carpets.com. Roman shades fabric: Colefax and Fowler, cowtan.com. Ceiling beams and cabinetry painting: Nic Valle. Ceiling grass cloth: Ralph Lauren Home. PAGE 128: Sofas and armchair: George Smith, georgesmith.com. Sofas fabric: Rogers & Goffigon, rogersandgoffigon.com. Armchair fabric: Donghia, donghia.com. Torchiere: Revival Antiques, revival antiques.com. Curtains fabric: Brunschwig & Fils, brunschwig.com. Rug: Christopher Farr, christopher farr.com. Wall and ceiling paint: Benjamin Moore,

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benjaminmoore.com. PAGE 129, TOP: Dining table: Cygal Art Deco, cygal.com. Chairs: Dessin Fournir, dessinfournir.com. Chairs fabric: Myung Jin, mimi london.com. Wall paint: Benjamin Moore. PAGE 129, BOTTOM: Lamp and ceramic horse: JF Chen. Antler chandelier: CBS Showroom, pacificdesigncenter.com. Rug: Christopher Farr. PAGE 130: Headboard fabric: Clarence House, clarencehouse.com. Pillows fabrics: Schumacher, fschumacher.com; Pierre Frey, www .pierrefrey.com. Bench: Formations, formationsusa .com. Bench fabric: Fortuny, fortuny.com. Side tables: BDDW, bddw.com. Lamps: Hollywood at Home, hollywoodathome.com. Curtains fabric: C&C Milano, cec-milano.com. Rug: Patterson Flynn Martin, pattersonflynnmartin.com. Ceiling paint: Farrow & Ball, farrow-ball.com. PAGE 131: Tub ittings: Waterworks, waterworks.com. Armchair: George Smith. Sconce: Paul Ferrante. Ceiling lights: Orange Los Angeles, orangefurniture.com. Sheepskin rug: Grand Splendid, grandsplendid.com. Wall and floor tiles: Malibu Ceramic Works. Photograph: John Michael Riva, Jr., mikeyriva.com. LET THERE BE LINDSEY Interior design and lighting: Lindsey Adelman, Lindsey Adelman Studio, lindseyadelman.com. PAGE 132: Sectional: Living Divani, livingdivani.it. Side table: Retegui, retegui-marble.fr. Vase: The Future Perfect, thefutureperfect.com. Wall paint: Benjamin Moore, benjaminmoore.com. PAGE 134, BOTTOM LEFT: Shelving: Vitsoe, vitsoe.com. PAGE 134, BOTTOM RIGHT: Eames lounge chair and ottoman: Herman Miller, hermanmiller.com. Table lamp: Nilufar, nilufar .com. Artwork: Matt Clark, mattclarkstudio.com. PAGE 135: Table: BDDW, bddw.com. Saarinen chair fabric: Jim Thompson Fabrics, jimthompsonfabrics .com. Candlesticks: E.R. Butler & Co., erbutler.com. Wall paint: Benjamin Moore. Artwork: Jared Rue, jaredrue.com. PAGES 136–137: Sectional: B&B Italia, bebitalia.com. Loveseat: Ligne Roset, ligne-roset .com. Cocktail table: The Future Perfect. Curtains: Ikea, ikea.com. Rug: West Elm, westelm.com. Prints: Sol LeWitt and Robert Ryman, both pacegallery.com. Wall paint: Benjamin Moore. PAGE 138: Table and chairs: Herman Miller. Photograph: Rachel Sussman, rachelsussman.com. PAGE 139, BOTTOM: Linens: Matteo, matteola.com. Sconce: David Weeks, david weeksstudio.com. Curtains: RH, Restoration Hardware, rh.com. Rug: ABC Carpet & Home, abchome.com. BLUE-CHIP SPECIAL Interior design: Timothy Corrigan, Timothy Corrigan Inc., timothy-corrigan.com. PAGE 140: Stool upholstery: Keleen Leathers, keleenleathers.com. PAGE 141: Armchairs fabric: Beacon Hill, beaconhilldesign.com. Chandelier: Paul Ferrante, paulferrante.com. Rug: Mansour, mansour.com. PAGE 142: Dining table: Promemoria, promemoria .com. Chairs fabric: Great Plains, hollyhunt.com. Chandelier: Panache Designs, panachedesigns.com. Artworks: Joan Mitchell, cheimread.com, and Jasper Johns, matthewmarks.com. PAGE 143, BOTTOM: Armchairs fabric: Colefax and Fowler, cowtan.com. Side table: Dessin Fournir, dessinfournir.com. Floor lamps: Holtkötter, holtkoetter.com. Curtains fabric: Donghia, donghia.com. PAGE 144: Armchair and ottoman fabric: Kravet, kravet.com. Chandelier: Panache Designs. Tray: Hermès, hermes.com. Mantel: François & Co., francoisandco.com. Fireplace screen: Reborn Antiques, rebornantiques.net. PAGE 145: Artwork: Robert Longo, robertlongo.com. Ceiling paint: Benjamin Moore, benjaminmoore.com. PAGE 146, LEFT: Sectional fabric: Colefax and Fowler. Armchair fabric: Calvin Fabrics, calvinfabrics.com. Side table: Antiquario, antiquariosf.com. Artwork: Jasper Johns. PAGE 146, RIGHT: Sink and ittings: THG, thg-paris .com. Wall fabric: Schumacher, fschumacher.com. PAGE 147: Headboard fabric: Colefax and Fowler. Bed skirt fabric: Nancy Corzine, nancycorzine.com. Bench fabric: Castel, castelmaison.com. Trim fabric: Houlès, houles.com. Sconces: Marian Jamieson,

marianjamieson.com. Curtains fabric: Rogers & Goffigon, rogersandgoffigon.com. Wall panels fabric: Kravet. Artwork: Jasper Johns. SIBLING REVELRY Interior design: Ariel Ashe, Ashe + Leandro, asheleandro.com. PAGE 148: Armchair and ottoman fabric: Ralph Lauren Home, ralphlaurenhome.com. Cabinetry paint: Farrow & Ball, farrow-ball.com. PAGE 149: Dress: Erdem, erdem.com. Dress and coats: Dior, dior.com. PAGE 150, LEFT: Rug: Double Knot, double-knot.com. PAGES 150–151: Bed: Serena & Lily, serenaandlily.com. Blanket: Mayapple Hill Farm, mayapplehillfarm.com. Tapestry pillows: Kermanshah Oriental Rugs Gallery, kermanshahrugs.com. Mural: Ananbô, ananbo.com. PAGE 152, TOP: Sofa: RH, Restoration Hardware, rh.com. Sofa fabric: Perennials, perennialsfabrics .com. Bench fabric: Ralph Lauren Home. Wall paint: Farrow & Ball. Chicken footstool: The City Girl Farm, thecitygirlfarm.com. PAGE 152, BOTTOM: Artwork: Tom Borgese, tomborgese.com. PAGE 153, TOP: Dress and pants: Chanel, chanel.com. Sweaters: Barrie, barrie.com. PAGE 153, BOTTOM LEFT: Curtains fabric: Designers Guild, designersguild.com. Wall paint: Farrow & Ball. PAGE 154: Curtains fabric: Holland & Sherry, hollandandsherry.com. PAGE 155: Headboard fabric and wallpaper: Pierre Frey, www .pierrefrey.com. Pillow fabric: Bennison Fabrics, bennisonfabrics.com. Side table: Antique and Artisan Gallery, theantiqueandartisangallery.com.

NO PURCHASE NECESSARY TO ENTER OR WIN. ELLE DECOR Lee Industries Sweepstakes. Sponsored by Hearst Communications, Inc. Beginning April 3, 2018, at 12:01 A.M. (ET) through May 14, 2018, at 11:59 P.M. (ET), go to leeindustries.elledecor .com on a computer or wireless device and complete the entry form pursuant to the on-screen instructions. One (1) winner will receive a Lee Industries L1549-21 chaise longue in a signature angora interior with ivory leather on the exterior and a polished stainless-steel frame. Total ARV: $4,500. Important Notice: You may be charged for visiting the mobile website in accordance with the terms of your service agreement with your carrier. Odds of winning will depend upon the total number of eligible entries received. Sweepstakes open to legal residents of the 48 contiguous United States or the District of Columbia who are 18 years or older at time of entry. Void in Puerto Rico, Alaska, Hawaii, and where prohibited by law. Sweepstakes subject to complete official rules available at leeindustries.elledecor.com.

ELLE DECOR (ISSN 1046-1957) Volume 29, Number 4, May 2018, is published monthly except bimonthly in January/February and July/August, 10 times a year, by Hearst Communications, Inc., 300 West 57th Street, New York, NY 10019 U.S.A. Steven R. Swartz, President & Chief Executive Officer; William R. Hearst III, Chairman; Frank A. Bennack, Jr., Executive Vice Chairman; Catherine A. Bostron, Secretary. Hearst Magazines Division: David Carey, President; John A. Rohan, Jr., Senior Vice President, Finance. © 2018 by Hearst Communications, Inc. All rights reserved. ELLE DECOR is a registered trademark of Hearst Communications, Inc. Periodicals postage paid at N.Y., N.Y., and additional mailing offices. Canada Post International Publications mail product (Canadian distribution) sales agreement No. 40012499. Editorial and Advertising Offices: 300 West 57th Street, New York, NY 10019. Subscription prices: United States and possessions: $15 for one year. Canada: $41 for one year. All other countries: $60 for one year. Subscription Services: ELLE DECOR will, upon receipt of a complete subscription order, undertake fulillment of that order so as to provide the irst copy for delivery by the Postal Service or alternate carrier within 4–6 weeks. For customer service, changes of address, and subscription orders, log on to service.elledecor .com or write to Customer Service Department, ELLE DECOR, P.O. Box 37870, Boone, IA 50037. From time to time, we make our subscriber list available to companies who sell goods and services by mail that we believe would interest our readers. If you would rather not receive such ofers via postal mail, please send your current mailing label or exact copy to Mail Preference Service, P.O. Box 37870, Boone, IA 50037. You can also visit preferences.hearstmags.com to manage your preferences and opt out of receiving marketing ofers by e-mail. ELLE DECOR is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts or art. None will be returned unless accompanied by a self-addressed stamped envelope. Canadian registration number 126018209RT0001. POSTMASTER: Please send address changes to ELLE DECOR, P.O. Box 37870, Boone, IA 50037. Printed in the U.S.A.


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Each month, ELLE DECOR asks an artisan to create a unique item for us that literally has no price tag. At the end of the year, these pieces will be auctioned off to benefit the charity of each maker’s choice. The Heath Clay Studio clock by Heath Ceramics seems to slow down when life is at its peachiest. Conceived by studio director Tung Chiang and made with a multilayered glaze overlapping in different sequences, it captures both space and time—like an ancient navy blue discus that’s been hurled from Mount Olympus to the Milky Way. It gives new meaning to the aphorism “Time flies.” heathceramics.com

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