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WIN A $10,000 LAUNDRY *

70

years of AUSTRALIAN HOMES

BE OUR GUEST CHEFS’ TIPS, INVITING SPACES, ITALIAN FARE

Hot ^ spicy

Palettes to savour

MARVELS FROM MILAN LOOKS WE LOVE

Fresh sheets! MAKE A BED THAT BECKONS

JULY $8.50 *NZ$9.50 (*incl. GST)

* T&CS APPLY P161 AUSTRALIA ONLY

Winter WONDERLAND

SET UP AN INVITING HOME FOR GOOD TIMES YEAR ROUND


Winter entertaining

JULY On the cover

Insider

20

55 N Welcome to photographer Michelle Stanic’s artfully curated sanctuary in Melbourne. 56 Design news and reviews. 63 Spend a day with industrial designer Coco Reynolds as she combines work, home and play. 76 The cutting edge in 1829, Laguiole cutlery is now a mainstay of kitchens worldwide.

Set up an inviting home for good times year round 29 H Palettes to sample 42 Chefs’ tips, inviting spaces, Italian fare 67 Looks we love 161 W 190 Make a bed that beckons

Decorating & design 19 I Our July palette taps the dramatic depths of winter. 20 At A seasoned renovator and a football star bring a coastal vibe to their outer-Sydney property. 29 Sp Savour these warm room settings filled with gracious furniture and homewares. 38 Create unique table settings for entertaining.

People 41

The complex sensory process of tasting food. 42 Top foodies dish out their entertaining secrets.

Bright and beautiful in all seasons, this NSW build combines the best features of a relaxed Australian lifestyle, with a coastal aesthetic translated to a semi-rural setting. To see more, turn to page 20...


Milan Furniture Fair 2018

Living

Shopping

67 The designs we loved at the world’s premier design event.

141 B Favourite Italian dishes from Australian chefs – ideal for feasting with family and friends. 148 Versatile vermouth. 150 S Learning to consume less sugar for better health. 151 P Word of mouth about the best new lipsticks.

181

Houses 82 90

Advice

187 188 190 195

155 I New ideas for dining zones with a flair for fun. 163 K What designers and manufacturers cooked up for Italy’s EuroCucina showcase. 178 I Draught-proofing saves energy and cold, hard cash. 179 W Help for lonely dogs suffering from separation anxiety.

196

Gardens

My Ideal House

Offers & promotions

125 Li Lovingly tended by seven generations, the grounds of Tasmania’s Brickendon Estate are a historic and horticultural gem. 134 H A happy mix of garden, swimming and entertaining areas in one backyard. 138 W From privacy to edible fruits and aromatics, the right hedging plant has many attractions.

171 T As Mirvac completes our My Ideal House build, we look at its innovative features and fittings. 176 C Keep calm and put your house on the market in winter.

152 S to H&G to save 26 per cent and receive a Laguiole Louis Thiers cheese-knife set valued at $89. 161 W a Miele laundry package worth more than $10,000!

98 106 114

Photograph by Maree Homer.

A boldly modern house takes shape in the renovation of this inner Melbourne property. Si Born in the 1940s, this Sydney residence is now free-flowing and fabulous. L After a savvy reinvention, this Perth home is a great all-round entertainer. L An eco-conscious build on the site of an old tennis court becomes a grand-slam winner. C A stylish seaside weekender in South Australia makes the perfect retreat for a busy family.

Desirable objects with handcrafted appeal in deep, moody winter colours, including 50 fab buys under $150. The cover story. S Tableware essentials to spice up the daily grind. Bed linen. Splash out on these beautiful bathroom accessories. Stockists’ details.

Community 16 Readers’ letters. 197 198 Info and insights. 202 H We’re looking up to Loose Leaf Design Studio’s uplifting botanical sculptures.


EDITOR’S LETTER H G

GOOD TIMES ustralians love a social gathering and entertaining is increasingly a year-round affair, enabled by a fire of some description and ever-more sophisticated outdoor cooking equipment, furniture and accessories. With space at a premium in our cities, activating outdoor spaces is a smart move, whether it’s a small nook to sit in and enjoy breakfast in the sun, or a place to share a family meal on weeknights. A friend told me recently that she’d finally bought new outdoor dining chairs and, with that one act, had changed the whole dynamic in her house. With a comfortable seating option, her household is now gravitating outdoors more often, taking pressure off the internal living spaces. Plants can quickly transform spaces small and large, and installing outdoor lights is always a winner – whether spotlighting a hero tree or simply strung over a pergola with twinkling results. Meanwhile, outdoor heating options are increasingly sophisticated standing and roof-mounted solutions. Gathering around a fire pit or fireplace, meanwhile, holds appeal for every generation: give me a flickering flame over a flickering screen any day! Perusing the range of barbecues on offer in a shopping centre one recent weekend, it was interesting to observe the migration from giant grills to sophisticated smokers and designs for gourmet cooking, as well as compact models for balconies and patios and transporting for picnics further afield. Fully integrated outdoor kitchens are one of the leading garden-design trends, and new offerings spied at Milan’s EuroCucina trade fair will excite. This issue has winter entertaining as a key theme, in tandem with an exploration of taste, the third in H&G’s series on the senses. Each

A

Love that look…

Market editor Sarah Maloney’s fave finds.

Photograph by Maree Homer (Lisa).

Trans-seasonal indoor-outdoor pieces to make entertaining a breeze. FROM TOP Wooden serving dish, $30, H&M; hm.com/au. Sika Design ‘James’ rattan and Loom drinks trolley, $1375, Domo; (03) 9277 8888 or domo.com.au. Deb Taylor ceramic plant pot, from $65, Garden Life; gardenlife.com.au.

Follow the H&G team on Instagram @houseandgarden

Cover match REPLICATE OUR COVER COLOUR WITH DULUX VENGEFUL RED

of the featured homes has easy entertaining at heart, and their impressive kitchens and outdoor areas come packed with great ideas. Hats off to Bonnie and Nathan Hindmarsh, whose landmark home in Sydney’s north-west is unveiled upfront this month (page 20). Rugby league fans will recognise Nathan, the former Parramatta Eels second-rower and Fox Sports presenter, and Bonnie is the creative director of Three Birds Renovations. The latest Three Birds project is a spectacular whitewashed home for Bonnie and Nathan and their four young boys... Having walked through the home myself, I can confirm it’s nothing short of breathtaking and, considering the generous spaces, a relaxed and comfortable familyfriendly home. “White-on-white with four boys?” I hear you exclaim. Let’s just say that Bonnie wasn’t going to let her team of boys get in the way of her long-held ‘coastal barn’ house dream. Hence, her approach to materials and finishes provides a useful guide to durable, good-looking living spaces, indoors and out.

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EDITORIAL Editor in chief Lisa Green Creative director Melissa Heath Deputy editor & travel John McDonald Interiors & houses Kate Nixon

ART

STYLE

Art director Katrina Breen Deputy art director Shayne Burton Junior designer Sophie Wilson

Senior stylist Kayla Gex Market editor Sarah Maloney Assistant stylist Sara Åkesson

FEATURES

SUB-EDITORS & WRITERS

Senior features editor Elizabeth Wilson Features Sarah Pickette Gardening Helen Young Western Australia editor Anna Flanders 0410 551 048

Chief sub-editor/writer Deborah Grant Deputy chief sub-editor/production Tamarah Pienaar Sub-editor/writer Rosa Senese Junior writer/editorial assistant Laura Barry

CONTRIBUTORS Domenic Bahmann, Mark Best, Alaana Cobon, Stephen Crafti, Roger Crosthwaite, Nicole England, Anna Flanders, Paula Goodyer, Nic Gossage, Harvey Grennan, Sandy Guy, Armelle Habib, Rose-Marie Hillier, Maree Homer, Natalie Hunfalvay, Elisabeth King, Caitlin Mills, Maz Mis, Toni Paterson, Chris Pearson, Dion Robeson, Beck Simon, Kristina Soljo, Derek Swalwell, Claire Takacs, Jacqui Way

ADVERTISING & PRODUCTION Group brand manager Analise Gattellaro (02) 9282 8935 Advertising production manager Kate Orsborn (02) 9282 8364 Brand manager Kimberly Anderson (02) 9338 6103 Brand executive Jennifer Burke (02) 9288 9145 Victoria, SA & WA sales director Jaclyn Clements NSW head of agency sales Karen Holmes +61 2 9282 8733 Victoria head of direct sales Will Jamison (03) 9823 6301 Queensland head of sales Judy Taylor (07) 3101 6636 New Zealand enquiries +61 2 9282 8505 General manager – production services Ian McHutchison Production controller Sally Jefferys Advertising production controller Dominic Roy (02) 9282 8691 Senior Event Manager Cate Gazal (02) 8226 9342

MARKETING & CIRCULATION Marketing director Zenna Katsikaris Circulation manager Nicole Pearson Subscriptions campaign manager Lauren Flinn

SUBSCRIPTION SALES & ENQUIRIES Magshop, GPO Box 5252, Sydney NSW 2000, Australia Phone 136 116 (Mon-Fri, 8am-6pm AEST) Web magshop.com.au Marketing enquiries: homes@bauer-media.com.au All other Australian House & Garden enquiries: (02) 9282 8456

BAUER MEDIA CORPORATE Chief Executive Officer Paul Dykzeul Chief Financial Officer Andrew Stedwell General manager – publishing Fiorella Di Santo Commercial director Paul Gardiner Group brand & partnerships director Brigitte Guerin National sales manager – retail sales Julie Green Senior category circulation manager Andrew Cohn General manager – subscriptions & e-commerce Sean McLintock Commercial analyst Marisa Spasich Syndications syndication@bauer-media.com.au Published by Bauer Media Group (ABN 053 273 546), 54 Park Street, Sydney, NSW 2000. The trademark AUSTRALIAN HOUSE & GARDEN is the property of Bauer Media Pty Ltd and is used under licence. © 2018. All rights reserved. Printed by PMP Moorebank, 31-37 Heathcote Road, Moorebank, NSW 2170. National distribution by Gordon and Gotch Australia Pty Ltd. 1300 650 666. ISSN 0004-931X. No material may be reproduced in part or in whole without written consent from the copyright holders. Bauer Media Pty Ltd does not accept responsibility for damage to or loss of freelance material submitted for publication. Allow several weeks for acceptance or return. For enquiries regarding subscriptions, call 136 116 Monday-Friday 8am-6pm AEST, email magshop@magshop.com.au or mail letters to: Australian House & Garden, Reply Paid 3508, Sydney, NSW 2001 or subscribe online at magshop.com.au/hg. Subscription rate*: Australia $79.99 (one year, 12 issues); NZ A$120 (one year, 12 issues); other countries A$180 (one year, 12 issues). All overseas subscriptions sent air speed. *Recommended price, Australian House & Garden.


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H G LETTERS

H&G social

The posts that made your month.

Facebook

YOUR H&G I have been an avid H&G reader for many years, putting the advice to good use in making our old Queenslander into the home that I love. I was eager to read the April issue, charting the changes in style over 70 years, and was delighted to find the content was as lush as its cover. May, too, had an outstanding cover, and was likewise a great read. This is what I love about H&G: the consistency and quality. I’m sure my cup of tea always tastes much better while I pore over the pages! Feast for the eyes

Instagram

Pinterest

Our story on kitchen designs was a hit on Facebook, Instagrammers doubletapped this pic of Winston the pug and Pinners pined for a private courtyard like this one in Sydney’s Bondi. Facebook facebook.com/ australianhouseandgarden Highlights from each issue + links to our favourite home tours. Instagram @houseandgarden View the most inspirational images from the month at H&G’s HQ and out and about. Pinterest pinterest.com/ housengarden Picture-perfect images from our pages and sensational products to covet. For weekly news and inspiration, subscribe to our e-newsletter at newsletter. houseandgardenmag.com.au.

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The May issue of H&G really held centrestage on the supermarket shelf. I just had to have it – I think I reached over a family to nab my copy! I was already eager to get into every page, but after reading the editorial, ‘Visual Feast’, I was starving for more. The exhilaration began with the great cover and unfolded through the colours, flowers, homes, furniture, artworks, decorating tips and gardens, sending me into sensory overload. Thank you for the feast – it was an absolute delight. Neil Robson, Fitzgibbon, Queensland

Colourful read Your 70th anniversary issue (April) was my first toe in the H&G water and I just wanted to say how much I enjoyed it. And to wish you all a happy 70th birthday with this card! ‘Decades Of Style’ was a terrific way to showcase wonderful style eras. I think my favourite was the 1970s – a special time for

me, since I was a teenager then. I remember well the use of colours – green, orang and brown – that felt so uplifting and vibrant. I am now hooked on your magazine and will certain buy it again in the future Audrey Shepherd, Lower Vogeltown, New Zealand

Best buds I was pleasantly surprised to find a most delightful and perfect combination of flowers, foliage and fruit on the very last page of May’s H&G. It was full of interest, with such glorious form and colourful, fabulous blooms – simply spectacular and a real credit to Kate Sice of Botanical in Hobart. The arrangement is a work of art and very inspirational for us readers. Susan MacLean, Toolern Vale, Victoria

WRITE IN TO WIN The author of every letter published receives $50. Our favourite also wins a fabulous prize. This month, Catherine Youngberry of Mackay wins three cast-iron combo cookers from Lodge Cookware (total prize value of $404.85; lodgecookware.com.au). Email your letter to H&G@bauer-media.com with your full name and address or post to Your H&G, PO Box 4088 Sydney, NSW 1028.

Letters may be edited for length and clarity.

Catherine Youngberry, Mackay, Queensland


Discover the

Luxaflex Difference

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INSPIRED BY H G

Styling by Sara Åkesson. Photograph by Kristina Soljo.

July ‘The possibilities of food and how we serve and enjoy our favourite dishes is endlessly fascinating to me. Encountering new flavours and tastes is as exciting as discovering a new country.’ Maeve O’Meara, foodie, author and presenter of SBS TV’s Food Safari series

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP ‘Punk’ crystal whisky tumbler, $35, Nachtmann. Stoneware platter, $15, H&M. ‘Artefact’ ceramic footed dip bowl, $10, Salt&Pepper. Linen napkin, $40/set of four, In Bed. ‘Sand Fade’ ceramic tapas plate, $8, Made in Japan. Acacia side plate, $14, Muji. Australian House & Garden by Robert Gordon ‘Monument’ limited-edition stoneware platter, $70, Myer. ‘Oricalcum’ cutlery, from $75/five-piece place setting, Kinnow Cutlery. Australian House & Garden ‘Sandy Cape’ linen quilt cover (used as tablecloth), $250/queen-size quilt cover set, Myer. For Where to Buy, see page 196.

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THAT HOLIDAY FEELING Seasoned renovator Bonnie Hindmarsh mixed her two favourite looks to create her family’s forever home – a modern-coastal barn. STO RY Elizabeth Wilson | ST Y L IN G Kayla Gex & Bonnie Hindmarsh | P HOTOG R A P HY Maree Homer


AT HOME WITH H G This Sydney home is a dream come true for owner Bonnie, seen here in the airy white kitchen with her youngest son, Dodge, and British bulldog Miss Coco. The kitchen is the focal point of the central pavilion and has a 7m-high raked ceiling. “I wanted the kitchen cabinetry to look like furniture in the room because it is part of a beautiful, big open-plan space,” says Bonnie. Polyurethane cabinetry with V-groove detail by Carrera By Design, painted Dulux White on White. ‘Muriel Cloud’ chandelier, Coco Republic. Island benchtop, Caesarstone Statuario Maximus. Dorf ‘Madi’ mixer tap. Stools, Space to Create. Bowl and vase, Water Tiger. >

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onnie Hindmarsh’s obsession with white weatherboards began as a young, beach-loving girl growing up in Sydney’s bushy north-western suburbs. “I remember driving to the coast and seeing white beach houses and thinking that they were the most beautiful things I had ever seen,” she says. “Whenever I envisioned my future home it always involved white cladding.” Fast-forward a couple of decades and Bonnie, who is co-founder and creative director of Three Birds Renovations, and her husband, former NSW Rugby League star Nathan Hindmarsh, have just completed their dream home for their four boys: Archie, 12, Buster, 10, Rowdie, nine, and Dodge, two. Set on acreage in semi-rural Sydney, near where Bonnie grew up, it’s a sprawling one-level home that combines a vast central pavilion with a soaring 7m ceiling, a breezeway, walls of glass and lashings of light, all wrapped up in a white-clad exterior. It’s the type of dwelling you might expect to see perched on a coastal clifftop, but it looks perfectly at home here, settled into an ocean of green lawn. “I wanted a relaxed, beachy feel even though we’re 30km from the beach,” she says. “I love the rural setting, too, so I’ve mixed the coastal vibe with a barn-like space. I’m calling it our modern-coastal barn.” Bonnie and Nathan bought the 2ha property five years ago and spent four years living in a 1970s-era home on the site. They had planned to renovate and extend, but when the house was declared dangerously termite-ridden, they had to demolish most of it, except for a fireplace and a couple of walls. “We basically rebuilt the footprint of the old house and then added to it,” says Bonnie. After the squeezy dimensions of their old residence, in which there was only one living area, Nathan wanted large, open spaces with multiple living zones and the option to close off some rooms. “We were lucky to have enough land so we could allow the house to sprawl,” he says. The result is a four-bedroom home of super-generous proportions. There are formal and casual options for living and dining, and every space feels luxurious because of its size and detailing. Bonnie devised the entire scheme and engaged > an architect to help nut out the structural technicalities.

B


AT HOME WITH H G

This casual dining zone adjacent to the kitchen showcases Bonnie’s aesthetic: a white-on-white palette with touches of timber and raw materials. The built-in window seat features family-friendly, wipeable fabric. A 2.5m-diameter ‘Orbit’ dining table from The Wood Room is teamed with ‘Malawi’ chairs from Coastal Drift. ‘Paris’ pendant light, Les Interieurs. ‘Indra’ jute and leather rug, Zanui. European oak flooring (throughout), Woodcut. Artwork by Libby Watkins.

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H G AT HOME WITH

‘I’ve used rattan, washed timbers, cream rugs and greenery to create warmth. These large spaces could have looked cold and formal, but they don’t at all because of the textures and layers.’ Bonnie Hindmarsh FORMAL DINING This room is connected to the formal living room via glass panelled doors. “I wanted the flexibility to create intimate spaces, so it’s lovely to be able to close off this area,” says Bonnie. The fireplace is from the original house. Pendant light, Deer Willow. Dining table, Oz Design Furniture. ‘Lennox’ dining chairs, La Maison. ‘Jardine’ cane chairs, B Seated Global. ‘Pia Ivory’ rug, Tribe Home. ‘Lollipops’ print, Nathan+Jac. FRONT BAR Located in the formal dining space, this drinks station is a real treat. Caesarstone White Attica benchtop and splashback. FORMAL LIVING Bonnie’s eclectic aesthetic is on display here. ‘6015 HO GS2’ gas fireplace, Lopi Fireplaces. ‘Bronte’ coffee table and slipcovered chairs, Lounge Lovers. Rug, Freedom. >

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Living with white WASHABLE CHAIR COVERS Simply throw cotton or linen covers into the washing machine and add a little bleach if they need a refresh. WASH&WEAR PAINT Bonnie used a Dulux product with barrier technology to make her walls stain-, scratch- and scrape-resistant. TEXTURED FLOORING Choose a light but grainy timber floor to conceal dirt and dust. POLYSATIN SHUTTERS The Luxaflex ones in this house are a breeze to clean, unlike many regular plantation shutters that can’t be wet-wiped. STAIN-RESISTANT CARPET In the bedrooms, solution-dyed nylon carpet from Stainmaster not only resists spills, it repels them.


Integral to the new design was the inclusion of a swimming pool, positioned centrally at the rear, its reflections bouncing into the living areas. The result is ‘water views’ from almost every room. “It gives the house a resort feel,” says Bonnie. “Our life is pretty chaotic with four boys, so I wanted to evoke the feeling of always being on holiday.” It also means the couple always have sightlines to the pool when the kids are swimming. Reinforcing the coastal feel is a white-on-white palette, and the use of cladding inside and out. Instead of using traditional timber weatherboards – not permitted in this bushfire-prone area – Bonnie opted for Scyon ‘Linea’ cladding. Made from a cement composite, the boards have a Bushfire Attack Level (BAL) rating of 40, which makes them a perfect choice. Inside, Scyon ‘Axon’ has been used to line the raked ceiling in the central pavilion, the feature walls in the children’s rooms, and to highlight the fireplace in the dining room. “What I love about using the cladding inside is that it adds texture,” says Bonnie. “It brings a different dimension to the spaces.” Bonnie and Nathan are forever hosting family and friends at the property, so the home is set up for entertaining a crowd.

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The kitchen, with its mammoth 5x2m island bench, is the heart of the home, flowing through to the adjacent living and dining zones and family room. Located behind the kitchen is a wellequipped butler’s pantry to keep a lid on prep mess – a boon when hosting. A servery with sliding windows connects the kitchen to the vast rear deck, where a high bar and stools, outdoor sink and fridges are located poolside. Outside, there are multiple relaxation zones, ranging from an outdoor room with sumptuous sofas and a suspended day bed to a sunken lounge beside the pool, and bench seating in the outdoor kitchen/bar area. “I’ve designed it so that people can easily connect with each other in lots of different areas of the house,” says Bonnie. “I want people to feel relaxed here.” While it’s a very social home, it’s also very family focused, designed to cater for the four boys as they grow. The kids have plenty of spaces indoors and out to call their own, too. Bonnie knows her white walls will see their share of scuff marks, but that’s life. “I don’t like things to be too precious because they can’t be in my life,” she says. “They have to be robust and able # to handle some rough and tumble.”


AT HOME WITH H G OUTDOOR ROOM With its high raked ceiling, huge fireplace, Bahamas-style pergola, fan and ample comfy seating, this is a luxurious spot to hang out in. Rowdie (left) and Buster take advantage of the play space at their disposal. Classic Triple cane lounges, Coastal Drift. Cushions, Koskela and Considered. Australian House & Garden throw, Myer. Lanterns, Country Road. Rug, Koskela. BUTLER’S PANTRY Perfect for keeping prep mess contained and hidden from view. Scyon ‘Axon’ cladding. Caesarstone Statuario Maximus benchtop. ‘Titan’ kitchen mixer, Caroma. French doors from Wideline Windows & Doors. OUTDOOR KITCHEN/BAR Nathan and Bonnie, pictured with British bulldog Peanut Butter at their feet, enjoy the fruits of their labours. Scyon ‘Linea’ cladding painted Dulux Snowy Mountain Quarter. The decking is fire-resistant HardieDeck boards. For Where to Buy, see page 196.

Take a tour of the house on Three Birds TV with Bonnie and her colleagues Lana Taylor and Erin Cayless. Go to threebirdsrenovations.com.


Subtle. Sophisticated. Concrete domesticated by Caesarstone® New Cloudburst Concrete™ www.caesarstone.com.au


Styling by Kayla Gex. Photography by Kristina Soljo.

Toasty hues... Hot and spicy palettes to warm your home.


SOFT KHAKIS Dulux Oyster Linen

Dulux Teahouse

Spice route

Dulux Army Greens

Seek colour inspiration from the spice rack and tread a path to beautiful interiors. Here, four delicious room recipes.

PA L E T T E I N S P I R AT I O N Lemon myrtle, wasabi, dried bay leaves, oregano, cloves and nutmeg

Styling by Kayla Gex. Photograph by Kristina Soljo.

PRODUCED BY Kayla Gex & Katrina Breen


DECORATING H G

MID-CENTURY MOOD Elegant forms in mid-toned timbers, warm greys and dirty greens are flavours of the month and easy to live with to boot. Look to textured paint

d ‘Marmorino’ wallpaper, $190/10m roll, Wallpaper Trader. Haresfur stone ge’ bamboo tray, $100/set of two, Myer. ‘Tana’ Tasmanian oak shelf unit, from $ blanket, $179, Domayne. ‘Pemba’ viscose-blend rug (2x2.8m), from $690, Nick , $372, King Living. ‘Kelly’ floor lamp with fabric shade, $299, Provincial Home for Molmic. One Duck Two ‘Alectra Alabaster’ cotton cushion, $50, Temple & Warm Hands. ‘Eastwood’ polyester fabric, $40/m, Warwick Fabrics. For similar bowl, try Salt&Pepper. For similar ceramic spoon, try Sarah Schembri Ceramics. Elitis ‘Transcoso Anambas’ recycled-teak wall tile, POA, Seneca Textiles. ‘Rafiki’ acrylic-polyester-rayon fabric in Camel, $51/m, Warwick Fabrics. For similar teal bowl, try KeepResin. Folded-ceramic bowl, stylist’s own. >

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H G DECORATING

APTAINS OF INDUSTRY bust equipment and aterials are heroes in kitchen. Add bamboo wood notes to bring ther dimension to the monochrome story. cessories in linen and resin round out a ough-luxe offering.

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT Scyon ‘Axon Smooth 133mm cladding, P A, James Hardie. Limited-edition Caesarstone wall clock, $275, Caesarstone. ‘Z1’ bamboo and cotton pendant light, $695, Spence & Lyda. Laminate surface in Carrara Marble, $110/m², Laminex. ‘Beetle’ resin bowl in Sandy Pearl, $280, Dinosaur Designs. VIPP powdercoated-metal kitchen module with Corian benchtop, integrated sink and tap, POA, Cult. ‘Dani’ metal stool with ash seat, $129, Life Interiors. ‘Mink Grey Herringbone’ European oak flooring, $110/m², Royal Oak Floors. ‘Bengterik’ wood and steel height-adjustable bar stool, $65, Ikea. ‘Life Coupe’ porcelain dinner set, $35/12-piece set, Target. ‘Stripe’ linen cloths, $36/set of three, Cultiver. OPPOSITE clockwise from top left Large resin round spoon in Snow Swirl, $90, Dinosaur Designs. ‘Kalahari’ polyester-viscose-linen fabric in Carbon, $62/m, and ‘Clover’ viscose-polyestercotton fabric in Pepper, $62/m, both Warwick Fabrics. Elitis ‘Trancoso Ishtar’ recycled-teak wall tiles, POA, Seneca Textiles. ‘Japanese Black’ stoneware salt dish, $25, MH Ceramics. For similar net fabric, try The Remnant Warehouse. ‘Rowsaan’ blackened stainless-steel spoon, $60, Wingnut & Co. >

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SALT & PEPPER Haymes Paint Iris White

Haymes Paint Chimney Ash

Styling by Kayla Gex. Photograph by Kristina Soljo.

Haymes Paint Blackberry 2875

PA L E T T E I N S P I R AT I O N White rock salt, black sea salt, black peppercorns, guajillo chilli


CHILLI FACTOR Taubmans Earth Works

Taubmans Carnegie Tan

PA L E T T E I N S P I R AT I O N Saffron, dried red chilli, cardamom seeds, paprika 34 |

AUSTRALIAN HOUSE & GARDEN

Styling by Kayla Gex. Photograph by Kristina Soljo. Currency conversion correct at time of printing.

Taubmans Delhi Delight


DECORATING H G

MILANESE MUSE Rosy pinks, rust-reds and rich terracotta drive this stylish bathroom look, notable for its contrasting materials. Rough timber and tiles alongside smooth porcelain and a sleek bath spout set up a glamorous bathing space.

heet, Di Lorenzo Tiles. ‘Eikon Circus’ wood and steel pendant ott. ‘Devonshire Marsala’ ceramic tiles, from $129/m², Beaumont nto’ terracotta cup, $22, Lightly. ‘Solid Block’ pine side table, $450, Mark Tuckey. For similar decking, try Boral ‘KD’ blackbutt, $7/m, Bunnings. ‘Milli Glance’ floor-mounted bath filler, $956, Reece. ‘Senso’ Stonetec freestanding bath, $7590, Parisi. OPPOSITE clockwise from top For similar vintage copper dish, try Storie. ‘Monarch’ viscose-cotton fabric in Paprika, $99/m, ‘Verona’ acrylic-polyester-cotton fabric in Spice, $73/m, and ‘Haven’ linen fabric in Paprika, $143/m, all Warwick Fabrics. For similar flat dish, try MH Ceramics. For similar tapas dish, try Living Clay Australia. ‘Antique Bella’ ceramic tile, $11, Di Lorenzo Tiles. For similar platter, try Salt&Pepper. >


H G DECORATING

NUANCED NURSERY Dip into golden shades and creamy pinks to outfit a child’s room that everyone enjoys spending time in. The interplay of charming graphics and tactile soft furnishings is spot on for babies and leaves room to grow.

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT ‘Pink Abstract #1’ giclée print by Sylvia McEwan, $360, Tigmi Trading. ‘H Scandinavian Wallpaper & Décor. ‘Flying Major Mitchells’ ceramic wall ornaments, $160/set of three, Studio Australia. Oeuf ‘Sparrow’ birch cot, $1299, Kido Store. ‘Fringe’ linen throw, $200, Lilly & Lolly. ‘Austin’ polyester-linen-cotton cushion in Tangerine, $50, Weave. Cotton velvet floor cushion in Turmeric, $145, Lightly. ‘Lahaina’ hemp rug in Blush (225x155cm), $244, Miss Amara. ‘Bloke’ armchair with velvet upholstery, $2899, Blu Dot. ‘Paloma’ polyester cushion in Blush, $70, Weave. OPPOSITE clockwise from top left Silver foil baking cups, $5/pack of 24, Shindigs. For similar hessian, try Spotlight. For similar salt dish, try Twelve Trees Ceramics. ‘Verona’ acrylic-polyester-cotton fabric in Willow, $73/m, Warwick Fabrics. For similar beech coffee measure, try Paper Plane Store. Elitis ‘Costa Verde Estancia’ wallcovering, $578/m, Seneca Textiles. Mangowood plate, $14, Tara Dennis Store. For similar vintage brass dish, try Storie. Elitis ‘Pur Mohair’ mohair-velvet fabric, $894/m, Seneca Textiles. For similar beech spoon, try Weylandts. For Where to Buy, see page 196. #

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DIFFERENT STROKES Wattyl The Rockies

Wattyl Ochre Mine

Styling by Kayla Gex. Photograph by Kristina Soljo.

Wattyl Chocolate Cherry

PA L E T T E I N S P I R AT I O N Pink peppercorns, turmeric, pink rock salt and bee pollen


H G DECORATING

Ask an expert

TABLESCAPES Use your table as a canvas to create a picture of hospitality, writes interiors editor Kate Nixon.

✚ A swathe of unhemmed fabric or a canvas dropsheet make ingenious alternatives to a formal tablecloth. ✚ Use lengths of ribbon or even kitchen string to tie sprigs of foliage around napkins or bread. ✚ An oversized breadboard can do double duty as a centrepiece tray and as a trivet for hot serving plates. ✚ Cut flowers or foliage from the garden and arrange in a mix of vases. The height will give your table impact, while keeping sightlines clear for interaction between guests.

Your tabletop should always set the mood, from a romantic dinner to a family celebration.

Fab four

etting the table for an occasion doesn’t require a certain shape of table or your best china any more. These days, it’s easy to incorporate everyday objects into a beautiful table arrangement. Pick the mood (fresh, playful or serene) and palette (dark, earthy, bright or white), then layer plates, napery, cutlery and glassware to suit. Don’t be afraid to mix and match, or think outside the box. Water jugs, jam jars and canisters make quirky impromptu vases. Try using palm leaves or wallpaper offcuts for unique placemats and a bowl of sculptural, seasonal fruits, herbs or vegetables (think quinces, artichokes, potted rosemary or thyme). For a fresh and personal touch, add a little sprig of greenery to each plate in lieu of formal place cards. #

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Send decor questions (with name and address) to H&G Advice, GPO Box 4088, Sydney, NSW 1028, or email H&G@bauer-media.com.au.

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AUST AUSTRALIAN ALIA HOU HOUSE E & GARDEN

FROM LEFT Aqua Door Designs ‘Christmas Beetle’ printed-linen napkins in Gold, $52/set of four, Hardtofind; hardtofind.com.au. Addition Studio ‘Interlock’ steel candleholder, $35, Top3 by Design; top3.com.au. Vintage brass tray (53cm diameter), $160, Storie; storie.com.au. Australian House & Garden ‘Peninsula’ whitewashed mangowood coasters, $15/set of four, Myer; myer.com.au.

OR TRY THESE… Zakkia Clean-lined wares in bold finishes such as terrazzo and brass; zakkia.com.au. Water Tiger Vintage and statement pieces; watertiger.com.au. Country Road Crisp, cool everyday essentials; countryroad.com. Zara Home Chic napery in linen, cotton or paper; zarahome.com.au. Horgans Handpainted ceramics, servingware and embossed glassware; horgans.com.au.

Photography by Julie Adams (long table), Lisa Cohen/courtesy Wattyl (pendant light), John Paul Urizar (salad). Styling by Kate Nixon (pendant light, salad).

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PEOPLE H G

TASTE TEST The way in which you experience food is the result of a fascinating sensory process, writes Sarah Pickette. very interesting thing has happened to foodie and broadcaster Maeve O’Meara: “I’ve built up quite an extensive library of tastes in my brain,” she says. Her Food Safari cooking shows for SBS have taken O’Meara into the kitchens of people from countless cultures, and seen her try a broader range of dishes and flavours than most of us are likely to encounter in a lifetime. As a result, her sense of taste is extremely well honed. “Friends always remark on how I seem to taste things differently to them, and I suspect that I really do.” Experience and exposure can certainly change a person’s palate, as O’Meara’s case illustrates, but our impressions of how things taste are, in fact, specific to each of us. “Taste is a very complex sense,” says Ingrid Appelqvist, a senior research scientist and group leader for food structure at CSIRO’s Food and Nutrition Flagship. “Taste receptors and nerve endings enable the perception of chemical signals on the tongue, and those work in tandem with your sense of smell to create what we understand as flavour.” Genes and culture also inform our sense of taste, says Appelqvist. Research has shown that certain genes are involved in determining our preference for or avoidance of bitter flavours – and this explains why some of us (the group sometimes termed ‘supertasters’) describe green vegetables such as broccoli as bitter and coriander as ‘soapy’. “We know there is also a strong

Photograph by Chris Court/bauersyndication.com.au.

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cultural basis to taste and this can influence things such as your tolerances of spices and hot food, which are normalised and built up from a very early age in some cultures.” The CSIRO is currently involved in researching how our other senses can enhance the overall flavour perception of a food, says Appelqvist. Taste has a major role to play in Australia’s obesity crisis because – like the idea or not – the more sugar, salt and fat in the food, the more appealing it is to eat. “We’re looking at how to lower the salt and sugar in certain foods while having our other senses come into playtomakethosefoodsjustassatisfying to eat.” Also underway is research into using a person’s genetic taste predispositions and physiological make-up (gathered via wearables) to personalise the ideal diet for their wellbeing. Having tasted most of the world’s cuisines over the years, O’Meara says one thing she has noted is that every nation has their own version of “the Vegemite factor”. That Australians, on the whole, love Vegemite is perplexing to many international visitors, she says, “but you might argue it’s the same situation with Koreans and kim chi. “We are so fortunate tohavesuchawonderfullydiverseculinary scene in Australia today,” O’Meara points out. “We have some truly innovative chefs and cooks here, but what makes our food so good is the produce we grow locally. Good-quality fresh fruit, vegetables and meats are undoubtedly the foundation of > all great-tasting dishes.” AUSTRALIAN HOUSE & GARDEN |

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Chef’s

CHOICE We asked three of Australia’s top chefs and foodies for their tips on entertaining and to share what’s cooking in their kitchens.

MATT PRESTON

Dapper dresser Matt is known for his array of cravats as well as his warm, avuncular on-screen role as a judge on MasterChef Australia. He’s also an acclaimed food journalist and author with five cookbooks under his belt and a sixth out in November. I’m always exploring new flavours. My next book is all about easy, quick recipes from around the globe, so I’ve been spending a lot of time playing with signature flavours from the world’s great cuisines. Korean and Indian are a current obsession – and so simple, when you master them, to get monster tasty flavours. Italian and Muslim Mediterranean are long-term obsessions. Thai, Vietnamese and Japanese are other go-tos for inspiration. The most influential cookbook I’ve ever read is Harold McGee’s On Food and Cooking. It’s a brilliant and very accessible work on the science of cooking. The River Café books are great for tasty, no-fail recipes. And Margaret Fulton’s Encyclopedia of Food and Cookery is another regular read. For an easy, mid-week family dinner I cook teriyaki ocean trout or salmon with crispy skin on brown rice. Or my mother-inlaw’s lamb, walnut and pineapple braise – a country classic. Or anything from my last book! [Yummy Easy Quick, Pan Macmillan] For Sunday lunch I love a slow-roasted lamb shoulder with a roast beetroot and feta salad. Or slow-roasted, crispy five-spice pork shoulder with killer Asian slaw and roasted Brussels sprouts. Must-have kitchen utensils include a heat-resistant silicone spatula: it’s cleaner than a wooden spoon and encourages

gentle folding – cheap and valuable. Also, a good, fine-toothed microplane for fine grating: expect to pay about $40 for a decent one. And two good vegetable peelers: a straight-edged one and the other a multi-toothed julienne peeler for shredding veg for slaws and pickles (the best $12 you’ll spend in the kitchen). I always play music when I cook, everything from trash disco to old soul. Favourite artists are The Sonics, The Black Keys, Sunnyboys and whatever is on my children’s playlists – Little Uzi Vert, Childish Gambino, Sticky Fingers, DMA’s, Tay Tay. In the kitchen I wear my beautiful brown leather apron made for me by CollectingPrettyBoys – it’s ageing to a burnished suppleness and is easy to keep clean. Oh, and tough Aussie-made work boots. The cravat is my Sunday best and has no place in the kitchen! My pet hate is all that tedious chopping required to make stir-fries. I love to cook for people. It helps that I always have new recipes to try out on unsuspecting friends who will give me honest feedback – though not as brutally honest as my children! I’d rather have ‘people over for dinner’ than a dinner party. It’s about the people rather than the food, always. For background music when entertaining, I play something laidback like Angus & Julia Stone, cruisy dub or something from the Blue Note jazz collection for the

first part of the night, then pass round the controls and let my guests DJ. If you’re preparing a dinner party, do as much as you can in advance. Go for share platters to make life easier – one meat or seafood side and two interesting sides that are good enough to eat on their own. My favourite tipple is Tanqueray and tonic. I like it with unusual garnishes, such as rosemary and pear, or grapefruit and thyme. I love making cocktails, too. I think a signature cocktail for the night makes guests feel more valued when they arrive. MasterChef Australia airs Sunday to Thursday at 7.30pm on Network Ten.


PEOPLE H G

KYLIE MILLAR

Interviews by Elizabeth Wilson.

Named 2018 Josephine Pignolet Young Chef of the Year*, Kylie first came to our attention as a contestant on MasterChef in 2012. She has worked at Mugaritz in Spain and with top Australian chefs, including Ben Shewry at Attica in Melbourne. Next, she’s off to Blue Hill restaurant in New York. At the moment I’m experimenting with Spanish cuisine. I lived in Spain for two years and fell in love with the food culture there, so I’m trying to learn some of the more traditional dishes. For a mid-week meal a stir-fry is always a good healthy option. I like to incorporate a lot of vegies and fresh leaves from the market or my little balcony garden. On Sundays I love a slow-cooked meal, anything from a slow braise to a roast. Picking a favourite cookbook is like a parent picking a favourite child! I always use On Food and Cooking by Harold McGee as a point of reference. Bouchon Bakery by Thomas Keller is great for baking and bread, The Art of Fermentation by Sandor Ellix Katz is great for making ferments at home and I’m loving Anna Jones’ The Modern Cook’s Year – full of delicious, healthy recipes. Kitchen utensils I can’t live without include my Shun Classic chef’s knife –

I have a 20cm one and it’s a great all-rounder. My Lodge cast-iron skillet pan, because it works on induction, gas, the barbecue, hot coals or even straight into the oven. And my silicone spatula; a good-quality spatula ensures nothing gets left in the bowl (to the disappointment of some). When it comes to appliances my absolute favourite is my KitchenAid. With all the attachments you can get these days, it makes cooking at home easy. My pet hate is a messy kitchen bench

I don’t get the chance to entertain at home as often as I’d like, but I manage to do so about once a month. When I do entertain at home I usually have casual nibbles that are easy to prepare before everyone arrives, then spend more time and effort on the main course and dessert. Having people over gives me a perfect excuse to try a new ingredient or experiment in the kitchen. My favourite background music for dining with friends is a playlist ranging from Fleetwood Mac to Lorde. My key piece of advice for anyone preparing a dinner party is don’t go crazy. As nice as it is to wow people with a perfectly risen soufflé, remember that everyone – including you – is there to enjoy the night. There is nothing worse than the host being stressed out. Have most of your prep done before everyone gets there. That way, you can enjoy the night more. My favourite tipple is vermouth. It’s an understatement to say winning the award is an honour. To be recognised by hospitality heavyweights and Damien Pignolet in receiving this award was, for me, a form of acceptance into the industry and a huge encouragement. As part of the award I am lined up to embark on an internship [chefs often refer to these stints as ‘stages’] at Blue Hill at Stone Barns in upstate New York. My grand plan is to have my own small restaurant with ties to the garden and

‘As nice as it is to wow people with a perfectly risen soufflé, remember that everyone – including you – is there to enjoy the night.’ wherever I am, at home or work. I love to have everything clean and organised. Favourite music to cook to? Sydney band The Middle Kids.

produce that is all made in-house, including cheese, vinegar and charcuterie products. > * Awarded to an Australian chef under 30 at the annual Good Food Guide Awards. AUSTRALIAN HOUSE & GARDEN |

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H G PEOPLE

JOSH NILAND

There are lots of flavours to explore with fish. We are currently infatuated with what I’m calling fish intercostal: that’s the meat in between the rib bones on a fish. Absolutely amazing on the grill. I’m experimenting all the time. For the past 18 months I’ve been trying to achieve a delicious recipe for every single part of the fish, from fish black pudding

(utilising the blood) right through to chips made from fish eyes. This is the most exciting part of my work, which I love. My favourite easy meal for a mid-week dinner is avocado on toast. Sunday lunches at home are few and far between, but if we ever got the time as a family it would be a barbecue at home with lots of grilled food: beautiful vegies, some nice meat and maybe a fish or two from Fish Butchery. My favourite kitchen appliance is my target top stove. My dream kitchen would include a big, open, wood-fired hearth, marble counter tops that can be heated or chilled, and a fish cool room with a glass-encased wall. My pet hates are working in a mess and cooks not tasting their own food when preparing a meal. My favourite music to cook to would have to be something by Sam Cooke. The most influential cookbooks I’ve read are The Big Fat Duck Cookbook by Heston Blumenthal and The French Laundry Cookbook by Thomas Keller, Michael Ruhlman and Susie Heller. At the moment I’m too busy at the restaurant to entertain at home.

But when I do entertain at home I opt for very casual approach rather than anything formal. I think it brings me and my friends far more pleasure if we are all relaxed and eating and drinking well. My favourite background music for dining at home with friends is anything from the 1950s or ’60s. I love that old-school music. Key piece of advice for anyone preparing a dinner party? Don’t bite off too much, keep it simple, play to your strengths and remember that, ultimately, your friends are just happy to be in your company and not have to do the dishes that night. I’ve always been fond of a good chardy as a favourite tipple with a meal. For people who aren’t confident serving seafood to guests, I always advise keeping it really simple; do a little reading on what you are attempting or, if all else fails, come and see me at Fish Butchery and I’ll tell you what I would do! # Saint Peter, 362 Oxford Street, Paddington, NSW: (02) 8937 2530 or saintpeter.com.au. Fish Butchery, 388 Oxford Street (a few doors from Saint Peter), Paddington, NSW; (02) 8068 0312 or fishbutchery.com.au.

‘My dream kitchen would include a big, open, wood-fired hearth, marble countertops that can be heated or chilled, and a fish cool room with a glass-encased wall.’

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AUSTRALIAN HOUSE & GARDEN

Interview by Elizabeth Wilson. Photograph by Mark Best.

Sydney chef, restaurateur and boundary pusher Josh Niland has attracted rave reviews for his exciting and experimental seafood cookery. His Saint Peter restaurant is devoted entirely to sustainably sourced, Australian-only fish and has a fanatical following. His latest venture is Fish Butchery, a reimagining of the humble fish shop, selling sustainably caught fish in a glamorous marble-and-tile boutique among the fashion stores of Sydney’s Paddington.


COOKING WITH

STEAM The healthy and ef ficient way to cook all your favourites, with the ability to lock in vital nutrients w h i l e a d d i n g b o t h m o i s t u r e a n d f l a v o u r. S t e a m c o o k i n g d e l i v e r s a f u s s -f r e e , healthy way to cook , roast or bake.

CRISPY SKIN TIPS FOR A WORTHY ROAST Roast chicken with cranberry, almond stufing and crisp hasselback potatoes

FOR RECIPE VISIT hn.com.au/steam-ovens

VISIT HN.COM.AU/STEAM-OVENS FOR MORE INFORMATION ELECTROLUX 60CM 16-FUNCTION STEAM-ASSIST PYROLYTIC OVEN ( EVEP618SC) $1999


COOKING WITH

COMBINATION STEAM #01 Roasting perfection

Roasting is made easy, more succulent and healthier using steam. You will also find your roast will hold most of its weight compared to electric-only cooking, where up to 20% can be lost during the cooking process.

BENEFITS OF COOKING WITH A STEAM OVEN Food cooked in steam not only tastes wonderfully tender and juicy, it’s also healthier, with more flavours, nutrients and minerals retained. Plus, you can cook multiple dishes at the same time without the flavour transfer. Cleaning up is a breeze–the moist air on the oven cavity wall heavily reduces food splatter and spills sticking on the bottom of the oven.


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60CM COMBINATION STEAM PYROLYTIC ( HRG6767S2A ) $2799

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The oven that automatically prepares your dishes, with a PerfectBake sensor and PerfectRoast thermometer, 15 cooking functions, pyrolytic self-cleaning function, telescopic rails, TFT touchscreen control and large 71L capacity.

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TECH SPECS • Made in Germany • Touchscreen TFT colour display • Child safety lock • 15 heating methods • Baking sensor

EASY CLEAN Create a honey, ginger and rosemary glazed ham with a fennel and pear salad, topped with apple cider vinegar and Dijon dressing.

FOR RECIPE VISIT hn.com.au/steam-ovens

During the pyrolytic cleaning function, the oven heats up to 480°C to burn off grease and food residue. What’s left is a little ash that can be easily wiped clean. Choose from three cleaning programs, depending on the degree of residue that has accumulated, and with pyrolytic-proof enameled trays, shelf racking and telescopic rails (available on certain models), you can leave them in the oven during the cleaning program, too.

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PERFECTLY CRISP SKIN When it comes to roasting, the crispier the skin, the better. Create a tender and juicy ham by simply patting the meat dry with a paper towel and rubbing salt all over the skin. With a steam oven, put your ham onto a universal pan and cook at level one. The space around the dish also needs good air circulation, which is essential for an even, consistent cook.

VISIT HN.COM.AU/STEAM-OVENS FOR MORE INFORMATION


COOKING WITH

COMPACT STEAM #02 STEAMING SEAFOOD

SUCCULENT SEAFOOD Keep your seafood moist and tasty with the Smeg compact steam oven that locks in flavour and nutrients so your seafood is always as fresh as the day it was caught.

B E S T F E AT U R E S O F A C O M PAC T S T E A M C O M B I N AT I O N OV E N The smaller capacity of a compact steam combination oven delivers quicker heat-up with less energy consumption. Use steam and convection cooking at the same time, or use the electric oven or even the grill independently.


S M E G C L A S S I C C O M PAC T BUILT-IN COMPACT STEAM COMBINATION OVEN ( SFA4395VCX1 ) $3,475 SMEG WARMING DRAWER ( CTPA3015X ) $1590

COMPACT SIZE, BIG IMPACT With the Smeg 60cm Classic compact steam oven and warming drawer, you can treat your kitchen to the class, style and functionality that it deserves. Without having to change your kitchen, simply update your oven and start cooking with steam.

KEY FEATURES Smeg steam ovens utilis distributed steam that ri the base in order to brin to the perfect level of tas retaining a healthier vitam Smeg’s SmartSense auto menus set cooking times, with the Ever Clean Enamel interior and the Vapour Clean function, it’s an absolute ease to clean. Soft Close Door technology keeps the door from slamming closed, and stops it dropping open.

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• Fingerprint-proof stainless steel • High visibility black glass • 5 cooking functions • 20 SmartSense auto menus • Large LCD display • 50L cooking capacity • 3 cooking levels • 1.2L water tank capacity • Thermostat control 30 - 100ºC • Fully programmable • Child safety lock

Steamed lobster tails with verjuice and tarragon, spaghetti with roasted truss tomatoes and chervil.

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Cooking lobster can be overwhelming, but with a steam oven it’s super easy. Because steam creates moisture instead of dry heat there’s no risk of dry, flaky, unpalatable flesh. Instead, the steam traps the flavour and the goodness, so not only do you get a juicy and succulent lobster, you get the most nutritious version of it. So, instead of heading out to a fancy restaurant, get that master chef feeling from your very own kitchen.

VISIT HN.COM.AU/STEAM-OVENS FOR MORE INFORMATION


COOKING WITH

COMBI STEAM #03 baking perfection

BEST IN BAKING Bread is one of the most popular things to cook using steam. Still crusty on the outside but with more moisture and texture on the inside, it’s easy to bake and you can even create your own flavour profiles.

N E W WAY I N C O O K I N G W I T H O U T U P DAT I N G YO U R K I TC H E N As dimensions of cooking appliances haven’t really changed for the last 50 years, updating to the latest technology in most cases is as easy as out with the old and in with the new; no need to replace the entire kitchen just to get the best that innovation has to offer. No matter what level of cook you are, most of these ovens will almost do the cooking for you and deliver better results.


M I E L E S T E A M C O M B I N AT I O N OV E N 60CM CLEANSTEEL STEAM COMBINATION OVEN ( DGC6800XL ) $7599

KEY FEATURES The Miele 570mm Combi Steam and Electric Oven will take pride of place in your kitchen. With a spacious 48L capacity, you’ll be provided with ample room for cooking poultry, whole fish or any other delicious dish that you dream of. Ten cooking functions, 150+ automatic programs, a steam-only mode, humidity sensor, a wireless food probe and a range of additional features will help expand your culinary repertoire.

CAPACITY 48L oven capacity, combination mode with FanPlus, Grill or Conventional heat, steam-only mode, 150+ automatic programs, humidity sensor, wireless food probe.

TECH SPECS • Steam combination oven • Full colour touch sensitive TFT display • Wireless food probe • 3 shelf levels • 100% steam • Humidity sensor • Perfect clean

No knead seeded spelt bread.

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BAKE YOUR OWN BREAD Steam transforms home-baked bread by enabling a great rise and a beautiful crust. Plus, scoring the loaf provides a strategic vent to release fermentation gases during baking. With proper scoring and steaming your efforts will result in a fully open loaf with great shape and texture.

SIT HN.COM.AU/STEAM-OVENS FOR MORE INFORMATION


COOKING WITH

SOUS VIDE #04 LOCK IN THE FLAVOUR

STELLAR SALMON The Steampro Steam Oven with SousVide function does everything an oven can do, to perfection, every time. Nail that salmon dish by cooking at a low and slow heat. Choose the right oven setting and the ultra-smart AEG Steampro will switch itself of when it’s done.

P E R F E C T R E S U LT S . E V E RY T I M E . Every meal should be an experience. AEG created the SteamPro oven with full steam. It has three cooking modes — heat, steam and a combination of both. In combination mode it will automatically calculate exactly the right level of heat and steam. Whether you’re roasting or grilling meats, baking bread, creating delicate desserts or using the Sous Vide feature as seen in many professional restaurants around the world, you can be confident your cooking will be elevated to another level.


AEG STEAMPRO 60CM STEAMPRO, PURE STEAM, SOUS VIDE HUMIDITY SENSOR OVEN COMBINED WITH CONVECTION OVEN & GRILL (BSK892330M) $4999 AEG PRECISIONVAC VACUUM SEALER DRAWER (KDK911423M) $3999 EA

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With three cooking modes – heat, steam and a combination of both – plus a sous vide feature that automatically calculates the optimum level of steam and heat, with the SteamPro your meals are limited only by your imagination.

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• Anti-fingerprint stainless steel • Five shelf options • Removable door and inner glass panes for ease of cleaning • Steam cleaning • 75 cooking recipes • 10 sous vide cooking recipes • 24 months warranty

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SOUS VIDE IN FOUR STEPS Get ultimate control over your dishes with the genius sous vide feature. Prepare, seal and cook even the most delicate food to perfection using low temperate steam cooking from 95°C to as low as 50°C with 1°C adjustability. You’ll be amazed at your own cooking.

Whole salmon fillet with pickled red onion and capers, served with a quinoa, kale and coriander salad.

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FOR RECIPE VISIT hn.com.au/steam-ovens

THE SECRET TO LOCKED IN FLAVOUR Delivering the perfect amount of steam for every dish — the advanced humidity sensor continuously adjusts temperature and moisture levels in the oven to suit the type of food you are cooking. This not only leads to more efficient water usage, but ensures that every dish is cooked to perfection. Sous vide is the most efficient way to marinate protein; if you vacuum seal protein with the flavours or marinade, 30 minutes in a sealed bag is equivalent to overnight in the fridge in a covered bowl.

SHOP AT YOUR LOCAL STORE, ONLINE AT HN.COM.AU OR CALL 1300 464 278 Harvey Norman® stores are operated by independent franchisees. Offers end 04/07/2018

VISIT HN.COM.AU/STEAM-OVENS FOR MORE INFORMATION


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MICHELLE STANIC Fine art photographer

Text by Laura Barry. Styling by Julia Green & Michelle Stanic. Photograph by Armelle Habib.

Michelle shares her inner-city Melbourne home with husband Adrian and their three children. FAVOURITE THINGS Artworks Beach by Catherine Nelson [left] and an image I captured in Hoi An, Vietnam. Sideboard One of the first vintage Danish pieces my husband and I bought together. Ceramic pots From The Nomad Society in Prahran. Black glass vase Georg Jensen. Sofa This deep ‘Frankie’ sofa from Fanuli is our favourite place to wind down. Coffee table Adrian and I designed this in Carrara marble, powdercoated steel and spotted gum. Books Gifts collected over a lifetime. My eldest daughter gave me Jardin des Modes, a 1956 French publication, when she returned from her first trip alone to Paris. Wool rug Made to measure by Cavalier Bremworth.

What does ‘home’ mean to you? It’s our sanctuary, full of memories of destinations we have travelled to and experiences we’ve shared. Where are your favourite places to eat and shop? Serotonin Eatery in Burnley never disappoints. And Husk boutiques for apparel, homewares and jewellery. Where do you find inspiration? The National Gallery of Victoria and walking through the Royal Botanic Gardens Melbourne. > See more of Michelle’s work at Gallerysmith Project Space, June 23 to July 21, or at altpause.com.


H G INSIDER

H E AT H E R LY D E S I G N B E D H E A D S ’ ‘ S T E L L A’ D E S I G N , S H O W N I N K AT E S PA D E ‘ P O S I E D OT ’ FA B R I C , I S J U S T T H E T H I N G F O R A N I M AG I N AT I V E CHILD’S ROOM. FROM $1350. H E AT H E R LY D E S I G N . C O M . AU

DESIGNER PROFILE Judith Love, Love And West

ove And West is an independent Australian company producing cushions and shopping totes made from vintage tea towels. The venture was started by three friends, graphic designers who shared a passion for the imagination and time that once went into creating these domestic artworks. Co-founder Judith Love (pictured above with her rescue labrador Stan) designs many of the products. “Colour, humour and a love of repurposing old linens are what inspire my work,” she says. “It’s great when people recognise the vintage tea towels from their own mother’s or grandmother’s stash. It prompts the loveliest conversations about their childhoods.” Judith has been building her collection for many years. From ransacking her grandmother’s cupboards to searching every op shop up and down the coast of NSW, she has an eye for nostalgic designs. But while she loves the products that result,

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‘ELEVATING A HUMBLE OBJECT LIKE THE DOMESTIC TEA TOWEL INTO AN ITEM READY TO TAKE A PLACE OF PROMINENCE IS INCREDIBLE.’ Judith Love

Judith is all too aware that the original vintage materials are finite. “I am currently in discussions with a print house to develop new designs myself,” she says. “I enjoy hand-making individual items and selling them to customers who get as much joy from them as I do.” Check out the extensive range of cushions, from $50 each, and shopping totes, $30, online at loveandwest.com, or in living colour at Object Shop in Sydney’s Australian Design Centre and The Happenstore in Annandale, Sydney.

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RETAIL NEWS HATCHES, MATCHES… Designed by Aino-Maija Metsola, charming ‘Mynsteri’ printed homewares (below) from Marimekko are inspired by lace and flowers. Priced from $30. marimekko.com.au

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Idle Hands’ multifunctional and interchangeable ‘Platform’ designs (right), from $270 each, serve as plant stands, coffee or side tables, and can be used inside and out. From Sydney’s Catapult, Shop Furniture in Melbourne or online at idlehands.design.

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New to Matt Blatt is furniture and homewares brand United Strangers. We like this fab ‘Knowledge’ magazine rack in leather, $195. mattblatt.com.au

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Smeg’s latest collaboration with fashion house Dolce & Gabbana has given appliances from stoves to toasters the couture touch, with saturated colours and decorative motifs inspired by Sicily. smeg.com.au


Australian retailer Eco Outdoor has opened its first international showroom (shown at right) in Los Angeles. Designed by stellar LA firm Standard Architecture, it’s a sophisticated showcase for the company’s premium range of natural stone and outdoor furniture. It joins the brand’s four locations in Victoria, Queensland and NSW. ecooutdoor.com.au

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THE STYLISH ITALIAN

Text by Laura Barry. Styling by Greenhouse Interiors (GlobeWest). Photograph by Armelle Habib (GlobeWest).

Quality, high-end pieces that look a million bucks but are surprisingly affordable characterise Domo’s Elements collection of furniture and homewares. Pictured at left are the glamorous ‘Deco’ side table, $575, and exotic ‘Studio 54’ table lamp, $650. domo.com.au

REFINED SHAPES, TEXTURES AND FINISHES DEFINE THE LATEST PRODUCT RELEASES FROM GLOBEWEST, INCLUDING THREE NEW COLLECTIONS: THE CONTEMPORARY SAVANNAH LINE, THE SOPHISTICATED HARRINGTON RANGE AND THE SLEEK PIER COLLECTION OF OUTDOOR FURNITURE. FEAST YOUR EYES ON THIS ‘BELMOND’ DINING TABLE, $2760, ‘FREYA’ CHAIRS, $520 EACH, ‘LUKAS’ PENDANT LIGHT, $160, AND ‘AURA’ RUG, $1260. GLOBEWEST.COM.AU >

The Zeta range,a stylish bathroom selection of exquisite pieces perfect for your home.

QUALITY | GREEN | DESIGN

FOR STOCKISTS VISIT WWW.BATHE.NET.AU OR PHONE 13000BATHE


H G INSIDER An Apple Isle experience What Foraging for oysters. Where Saffire Freycinet, Freycinet Peninsula, Tasmania. Why Eating delectable Tasmanian oysters is all the more enjoyable when you’ve gathered them yourself. At the luxe Saffire Freycinet resort at Coles Bay, you can don waders and join an expedition that will have you strolling into the sea, where you’ll be shown how to pick oysters where they grow. Then, at a table set up over the water (left), you’ll learn how to shuck your catch and slurp them down happily with a well-earned glass of bubbles. When Most comfortable in the warmer months, obviously. saffire-freycinet.com.au

The world is your oyster.

NEW COLLECTABLES

“The ‘Can’ sofa by French brothers Ronan and Erwan Bouroullec for Hay is not only comfortable, it’s a timeless design with simple lines. It has an almost outdoor feel, thanks to the powdercoated steel frame and cotton canvas with piped details (also available in a beautiful, thick leather, see below). Reflecting a laidback and relaxed lifestyle, this design fits easily into Australian homes. What makes it unique is the flat-pack approach for a designer piece. The Bouroullec brothers have seen the practical side of flat-pack design, usually associated with cheaper furniture. They explain that ‘less transportation, less volume, less stock [is] better for all resources’. The ‘Can’ sofa marries elegance, comfort, modernity and affordability, while allowing clients to customise their materials.”

A taste for travel

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ustralians are spoilt for choice at home when it comes to local tucker, but we also look forward to dining well when we go overseas. Pat Nourse from Australian Gourmet Traveller magazine has noted the growth of the ‘destination diner’ market. “Not only do Australians place an emphasis on food and drink when they’re planning travel, there are plenty who plan at least some of that travel around eating and drinking,” he says. “That might mean getting the reservation at Noma or Blue Hill at Stone Barns before you book the flights to Copenhagen or New York, or timing a visit to Milan or Shanghai to coincide with the season for white truffles or hairy crab. Visit a hot restaurant in Europe or the US in the northern summer and chances are good that at least one of the other tables will be Australian.” Travel consultant Kellie Woodward agrees. “Some clients’ holidays are based solely on being able to obtain reservations at specific restaurants,” she says. Cruising and touring are also popular foodie experiences. “The cruise and tour world is putting more emphasis on food,” says Pat, “whether that’s big-name chefs or wines they have on board, or the places and themes they explore.” Case in point: Luke Nguyen will be hosting a series of gourmet trips through Vietnam, Myanmar and Cambodia with APT in 2018/19. noma.dk; bluehillfarm.com; aptouring.com

3 OF A KIND

‘Can’ sofa, from $3295, Hay; hayshop.com.au.

FROM LEFT Alessi ‘Tea Rex’ 9093 2L stainless-steel and polyamide stovetop kettle in Light Blue, $262, Peter’s of Kensington; petersofkensington.com.au. KLF01BLAU 1.7L stainless-steel and chrome electric kettle in Black, $199, Smeg; smeg.com.au. Morphy Richards ‘White Accents’ 1.5L electric kettle in Rose Gold with stainless-steel lid, handle and spout, $139, Harvey Norman; harveynorman.com.au. #

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Text by John McDonald (travel) & Natasha Dragun (oysters).

French interior designer Veronique Terreaux (above) has more than 20 years’ experience working in design, with a client list that includes fashion giants Chanel, Karl Lagerfeld and Isabel Marant, as well as five-star hotels. Now based in Australia, she is the founder of homewares company Courrier (courrier.com.au). This month, she identifies a product destined to become a true collectable, an object to buy now and keep forever.


naturally ageless

for the first signs of ageing Ageless is rich in deeply nourishing Rosehip Oil, a natural source of Vitamin A and C, antioxidants and natural nutrients to moisturise, revitalise and protect skin of all ages and types. Use the ‘try me’ free testers on all Natio display stands to experience Natio’s exceptional quality and value. www.natio.com.au Available at Myer, David Jones and selected Pharmacies.


MULTISTORE 1. 2 shelf & 4 jumbo basket insert, $511; 2. Hanging rail insert, $274; 3. Corner shelving insert, $511; 4. 4 adjustable shelves insert, $265; 5. 2 adjustable shelves & 4 jumbo drawers insert, $399.

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DRESSED FOR SUCCESS A great wardrobe never goes out of style. Get those bags and shoes in order with some clever planning and forward thinking.


BRAND PROMOTION

FLEXI STORAGE 1. 3-door sliding wardrobe frame, $430; 2. Sliding wardrobe door in White, $67.50 each; 3. Sliding wardrobe door in White Gloss, $128 each; 4. Sliding wardrobe door in Oak, $67.50 each; 5. 2 sliding shelves, $24; 6. Medium 3-drawer insert, $129; 7. Large 3-drawer insert, $149.

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aving an organised wardrobe doesn't just mean you can find your clothes in a hurry – it's also the perfect way to bring a little zen into your bedroom. The biggest advantage of designing your own wardrobe is that you can guarantee the space suits your style of clothes. But don't start planning before identifying and prioritising your storage needs. Shoe addict? Include plenty of low open space or wide, open-front shallow drawers. Prefer folding over hanging clothes? Include more shelves than hanging space. As a general rule of thumb, wardrobes are best designed

with drawers on the bottom half and the space above waist height reserved for open shelves and hanging space. If you're tight on space, look to have bigger drawers rather than multiple small drawers. Don't forget a full-length mirror – plan it upfront rather than as an afterthought.

PERFECT MATCH

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WALK IN If you've got the space and lots of clothes, a walk-in is the ultimate storage option. FREESTANDING If you're renting or planning to swap things around between rooms at home, a freestanding wardrobe is easy to install and can give you more long-term flexibility.

3 Some products are not available in some stores, but may be ordered.

BUILT IN Keep it streamlined with a built-in wardrobe. Not only will it maximise your storage space but it can also add additional value to your home.


45 Years of French Style Michel Ducaroy’s TOGO LVDWUXHFODVVLF2ÜHULQJ WKHXOWLPDWHLQFRPIRUW DQGVW\OH72*2LV DYDLODEOHDVDVRIDZLWKRU ZLWKRXWDUPVDORYHVHDWD FRUQHUVHDWDFKDLUDQGDV DQRWWRPDQ

TOGO sectional sofa and ottoman by Michel Ducaroy for Ligne Roset.

Explore the DOMO collection at one of our seven showrooms across New South Wales, Queensland, South Australia and Victoria or online at

www.domo.com.au


INSIDER H G

Women in design

COCO REYNOLDS The quest to create objects that are beautiful to look at and pleasurable to use is what drives this young designer. STO RY Elizabeth Wilson | P HOTOG R A P HY Kristina Soljo

Coco in her home studio with prototypes in various states of completion. A trio of Bright Beads pendants hangs in the background.

rowing up on a vineyard in the Upper Hunter Valley of NSW was an idyllic childhood for lighting and furniture designer Coco Reynolds. It also sparked her creative life. “We were pretty isolated and had to entertain ourselves,” she says. “I did lots of craft. That’s where it all started for me.” Beading was her thing. She spent hours threading glass beads onto string, making jewellery and other creations. It was a “lovely coincidence”, she says, that her first commercial success decades later – the acclaimed Bright Beads pendant light – consisted of timber beads threaded onto cord, teamed with a globe. After completing a Bachelor of Industrial Design at the University of

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Canberra, Coco worked for wayfinding agencies and a furniture manufacturer. Her (ahem) lightbulb moment came in 2007 when, as part of a Sydney Indesign event, she was asked to demonstrate how to use a lathe. She devised the simple yet genius idea of producing turned-timber beads to form a sculptural pendant light – and the Bright Beads range was born. Design-savvy consumers loved it and Coco’s solo career took off. Coco launched Marz Designs in 2010 and has since expanded her range of products to include furniture and small objects. “I see my pieces as functional art,” she says. “My aim is to create things that are useable and enhance a person’s life in some way.” > AUSTRALIAN HOUSE & GARDEN |

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H G INSIDER

8am BRONTE TO BONDI COASTAL WALK A self-confessed night owl, Coco often works into the early hours. “But if I go to bed at a reasonable hour, I get up early and go for a walk.” The coastal walk is a favourite. Sometimes, she’ll take her journal in order to jot down design notes and thoughts. “I seek inspiration from the outdoors; it gives me an opportunity to clear my head.”

9.30-11am HOME STUDIO Downstairs from her apartment, in a converted garage, Coco conjures beautiful products from natural materials in simple silhouettes. Her Brights Beads range includes (below left, from left) ‘Aztec’, ‘Art’ and ‘Alice’. Below right are samples of her wall lights: the ‘Bermuda’ in triangular marble and ‘Furl’ lights in particoat aluminium and brass.

4pm CATAPULT DESIGN, ULTIMO “Catapult was one of my first retailers. It’s a great company because it sells solely Australian products and supports up-and-coming designers,” says Coco, reviewing the ‘Furl’ display with showroom consultant Luc O’Brien.

6pm BRONTE SUNSET A favourite end-of-day routine is to soak up the sunset on the balcony with her partner Matt, a school teacher. “We do this regularly – sit here with beers and a platter of cheese,” says Coco. After dinner, Coco will often head back to the drawing board until midnight or 1am. “There are no distractions,” she says. Above right, the ‘Delano’ bottle opener in bronze, inspired by Art Deco buildings, typifies Coco’s design philosophy: “I just love functional objects that are aesthetically pleasing.” Marz Designs; marzdesigns.com.

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MEETING, HOME OFFICE “Mostly, I’m in a studio on my own, so it’s nice to work with someone on a project and bounce ideas off each other,” says Coco. Recently, she collaborated with fellow designer Christel Hadiwibawa of ChristelH studio (left) on the ‘Furl’ collection of wall lights, made from gentle folds of sheet metal in three shapes (circle design shown). Below left are Coco’s drawings for her ‘Attalos’ light, inspired by ancient Greek architecture, and (below right) the finished product with fluted-brass base and frosted-glass bulb.

‘I enjoy designing lighting, creating something that looks beautiful whether it’s switched on or off.’ Coco

2-3pm KFC METAL MANUFACTURER, BALMAIN

“The hardest thing as a designer is finding a manufacturer who understands what you’re trying to achieve,” says Coco, who found just that in this family-run operation. Here, Coco checks the progress of a prototype, a new lighting product being made from sheet aluminium, and reviews her drawings as machinist James Crowe adjusts the CNC machine and press. “At prototyping stage I visit often, to nut out what needs tweaking until we get a product we’re both happy with.”


MILAN 2018

MILAN TREND REPORT Swinging from high luxury to sustainable with many stations in between, this year’s Milan Furniture Fair was full of creative tension. Here, the pieces and themes that left us marvelling at the power and the possibilities in design. PR O D U C ED BY Lisa Green

PROUDLY SUPPORTED BY

London-based Kiwi industrial designer Tim Rundle worked his magic at Milan 2018. These pieces are from his collection for Australian company SP01. See timrundle.net; sp01design. com; spacefurniture.com.au. >

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ORIENTALISM Desi Natural materials such as sedge and rattan were put to beautiful use, furniture was inspired by futons, fans and fortune cookies, and Missoni launched a fabric range depicting the Chinese horoscope.

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1 Nassa natu for Moroso; m pleated-fabri accessories b Materia; beck rug by Nanim 10 Kartell ‘Sh g y y pouf with back by Lyndon Neri and Rossana Hu (Neri&Hu) for GAN; gan-rugs.com or hubfurniture.com.au.

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MILAN 2018

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Glamor ba underpinn from ro Fifties inf

6 E g lamp ilufar; federicoperi.com or nilufar.com. 2 ‘Mila7’ pendants in Copper by Vancouver’s Matthew McCormick; ck.ca. 3 Ini Archibong for Sé ‘Below The Heavens’ pendant; se-collections.com. 4 Sweden’s Hem Design Studio ‘Alphabeta’ floor lamp can be iple ways; hem.com or hgfs.com.au. 5 ‘Drop System’ lighting: hand-blown globes on brass tubes by America’s Lindsey Adelman (pictured); om. 6 London’s Raw Edges presented Israeli-inspired ‘Horah’ lights, cast in leaves of glass that spin; raw-edges.com. 7 Denmark’s Warm Nordic ‘Bloom’ n Rusty Red, is a re-released 1950s design by Svend Aage Holm-Sørensen; warmnordic.com. | A Patricia Urquiola’s ‘Overlay Bowl’ for Louis Vuitton is eather; au.louisvuitton.com. B Terrazzo Alhambra ‘Bowl 2.1’ is one of a range of forms that reinterpret the age-old material; catalandeocon.com. e’s glass ‘Toy Boy’ object nods to da Vinci’s Vitruvian Man; novembre.it or kezu.com.au. D Hermès Home ‘A Walk In The Garden’ porcelain tableware has designs by UK artist Nigel Peake; australia.hermes.com. E La Double J ‘Maximal’ dessert plates have vintage patterns and handpainted gold trims; ladoublej.com. >


WITH THE GRAIN

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Timbers of all kinds were employed masterfully, taking on many extraordinary forms and functions. Marquetry was a big story, placing wood as a decorative material at the fore.

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5 W 2 ‘Torsion’ table by Mario Bellini for Natuzzi Italia has a polished olive wood base and ground glass top; natu g Hansen is constructed from 23 pieces of timber and veneer; cultdesign.com.au. 4 Lebanese designer Nada Debs debuted this year. Her ‘Funquetry Shift’ cabinet displays a modern take on traditional timber-veneer marquetry; nadadebs.com. 5 ‘Newood’ stackable timber chairs by BrogliatoTraverso for Cappellini; cultdesign.com.au. 6 Marcel Wanders ‘Silo’ leather coffee table/pouf for Natuzzi Italia. Part of the Agronomist Collection, it comes with a tray table or padded seat and can be used for storage; natuzzi.com.au. 7 Giacomo Moor ‘Centina’ dining table celebrates the bridge arch as an architectural form; giustinistagetti.com. 8 Italian timber furniture firm Porada celebrated 70 years at the Fair. At front, ‘Trittico’ ash side tables; porada.it. 9 ‘Perseidi’ wall-hung timber-veneer containers by Elena Pancaldi (some with brass detailing); emmemobili.it. 10 Giovanna Azzarello’s ‘Iron High’ sideboard for Riva 1920; riva1920.it.


MILAN MILAN2018 2018

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PE S H A H IF S T

Cues from nature, architecture, food and a child’s toy led to an eye-catching array of furniture and furnishin that demanded a share the limelight.

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1 Patricia Urquiola ‘Triple Slinkie’ cotton weave and Himalayan wool rug, CC-Tapis; cc-tapis.com or poliformaustralia.com.au. 2 Wiener GTV Design ‘Caryllon’ timber coffee table with inlaid top by Cristina Celestinom nods to Art Deco forms and colours; spacefurniture.com.au. 3 ‘Mellow’ armchair by Federica Capitani for Moroso has a soft, shell-like embrace; hubfurniture.com.au. 4 Michele De Lucchi’s ‘Filla 11’ ash chair for Very Wood has a leaf-like backrest; verywood.it or schiavello.com. 5 ‘Hawa Beirut’ collection by Richard Yasmine references the curvaceous forms of Lebanese architectural motifs; richardyasmine.com. 6 Piero Lissoni’s ‘Eda-Mame’ sofa for B&B Italia is inspired by the shape of that delicious soy bean; bebitalia.com or spacefurniture. com.au. 7 ‘Font’ indoor/outdoor small table is a collaboration between Italy’s Kristalia and Swedish design studio Claesson Koivisto Rune, available in various materials; kristalia.it or fanuli.com.au. 8 Kartell ‘Bio’ chair by Antonio Citterio is made from a biodegradable, plant-based material; spacefurniture. com.au. 9 Emmanuel Babled ‘Babled’ easy chair for Offecct has a swivel option; offecct.com. 10 Pedrali ‘Fox’ chair by Patrick Norguet; pedrali.it. > AUSTRALIAN HOUSE & GARDEN |

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WEAVING MAGIC Furniture and accessories in woven form were firm favourites for their handcrafted quality, which allows them to settle naturally into homes of all eras.

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g y a.hermes.com. 2 PET Lamp is a collaboration between designer Alvaro ps from recycled PET bottles and natural fibres; petlamp.org. 3 ‘AMI’ ba avie’ woven leather basket by GamFratesi for Poltrona Frau; poltron q ; astianherkner.com. 6 Gert Wingårdh’s ‘Soundwave Wicker’ concrete acoustic panel; offecct.com. 7 ‘Sloop’ baby cradle by Studio Irvine has storage and a rocking base; yamakawa-rattan.com. 8 Wiener GTV Design ‘LOÏE’ lounge chair by Chiara Andreatti; spacefurniture.com.au. 9 In Shaker style, an ‘Alpha’ armchair by Matteo Cibic for L’abbate; labbateitalia.it. 10 ‘Tatami’ table by a Lebanese designer who grew up in Japan; nadadebs.com. 11 DePadova’s ‘T54’ chair time-travels to us from 1954; depadova.com. 12 Carl Hansen & Søn ‘PK1’ chair by Poul Kjærholm in a new design; carlhansen.com.

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Photography by Craig Wall (4 & C, opposite).

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MATERIAL MIX

From decorative marble and metals to the rare and recycled, materials were explored for both dazzling and sustainable outcomes.

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D Rota’s & rug Taliesin 1’ g o Nienke Hoogvliet is a new take on leather; n n.com.au. | A Extinct Animals Collection ‘Menagerie’ wallcovering; moooi.com. B ‘Giardino delle Delizie’ tiles by Cristina Celestino for Fornace Brioni; fornacebrioni.it. C London’s Bethan Laura Wood’s Mex-inspired textiles for Moroso; hubfurniture.com.au. D From Milan’s Studiopepe, ‘Kaze’ wallpaper; studiopepe.info. >


MILAN 2018

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om.au. 2 This sofa is Patricia Urquiola’s ‘Vimini’ design for Kettal; kettal.com. 3 From Paolo Lenti, ‘Diade’ moulded-plastic rug; dedece.com.au. 4 ‘Touffu’ collapsible pet house by Violeta Alcaide Weishaupt & Manel Jiménez Ibáñez for Diabla; diablaoutdoor.com. 5 Bodil Kjær for Carl Hansen & Søn ‘BK10’ teak dining chair; carlhansen.com or cultdesign. com.au. 6 ‘Recamier’ lounger by Piero Lissoni for Janus et Cie; janusetcie.com. 7 ‘Fila’ lamps by Michel Charlot for Kettal; kettal.com. 8 Jamie Durie’s stainless steel/teak ‘Hugo’ sofa with acrylic cover for Italy’s Unipiù; jamiedurie.com. 9 ‘Shake’ light by Italy’s Ethimo; cafecultureinsitu.com.au. 10 Dedon ‘Aiir’ chair by Milano’s GamFratesi Studio has teak legs and optional cushions; dedonliving.com.au. 11 LucidiPevere’s ‘Brioni’ lounger for Kristalia; fanuli.com.au. #

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H G INSIDER

LAGUIOL A teenager’s cutting-edge idea began an artisanal and culinary French tradition that’s still on point after nearly two centuries, writes Chris Pearson.

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rowing up at his parents’ inn in Laguiole, southern France, young Pierre-Jean Calmels admired the sharp-looking knives belonging to the inn’s patrons. Especially the Spanish navaja, a folding knife with a slim, sinuous blade and handle, brought back from Catalonia by seasonal workers. Calmels was keen to produce these stunners locally. In 1829, aged just 16, he approached his uncle, a blacksmith, with a plan to make knives inspired by the navaja and the local capuchadou farmer’s knife. His designs featured steel blades tempered in the natural springs of Laguiole (pronounced lah-yole), with a spring to close the blade and a handle fashioned from locally sourced ox horn. Thus was born an enduring tradition that took its name from the village. An awl was added to some models for the convenience of farmers and, from 1880, due to demand from cafe owners and waiters, some also sported corkscrews. Domestic cutlery joined the line-up in the 1930s, placing Laguiole firmly on the culinary map. 76 |

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Surprisingly, Laguiole is not a trademark, just the name of a town and the style of knives and cutlery associated with it, so anyone can stamp the name on their products. Adding to the confusion, most contemporary examples hail from the town of Thiers, some 190km to the north, and from two respected makers there: Jean Dubost, established in 1920, and André Verdier, founded in 1859. Early last century, the iconic bee landed on the shanks of Laguiole knives. This may have been be a reference to the dynastic symbol of Napoleon Bonaparte; according to legend, he allowed Laguiole to add a bee to its coat of arms in tribute to the bravery of the town. Another theory says the insect was originally a fly, and a play on words. The ‘bee’ forms the mouche, a piece of metal over the rotating part of a pocket knife. Mouche also happens to be French for ‘fly’. “They now call the insect a bee, as it is charming, but in the beginning it was technically a fly,” claims Laurence Arthaud of Jean Dubost. Be that as it may, the range bearing the critter – from spoons to cigar cutters – is

WHAT IT MEANS TO US The bee or not the bee? That’s still the question. Jean Dubost sells to 40 countries, says Arthaud, with key markets including Australia, the US, Japan, Europe and Chile. So popular has it become that bogus makers have sprung up, wanting a slice of the action. The real thing should have ‘Made in France’ on the blade (not just ‘France’). Price is another telltale factor; if it’s cheap, it’s probably too good to be true. Look closely at the bee, too; on lookalikes they may be laser-etched, while the real deal will boast a moulded mouche. And finally, true Laguiole possesses a certain je ne sais quoi that cuts through any doubt – it rests, perfectly poised, in the hand. # FROM TOP A Laguiole craftsman at work in Aveyron. Jean Dubost table cutlery with coloured handles. A luxurious 1995 Forge de Laguiole design by Hermès.

Photography from Alamy (workshop).

Design moment

now vast. The list of materials used for the handles has expanded to include exotic timbers, leather and coloured resin. And with people seeking more colour and decoration in their lives, Laguiole cutlery is enjoying a resurgence, explains Peter Hall of RM Hall, local distributor for Jean Dubost. “It offers a point of difference to the stainlesssteel or silver sets of previous generations. It can be dressed up or down. Handles in light horn, black or mixed colours add another dimension to dining.” As well as the table cutlery and cheese and pâté knives, bread knives and salad servers are top sellers. Other makers have lent the knives design kudos while honing them for the present. The knife Philippe Starck created for the Forge de Laguiole brand in 1988 sported an elegant profile with steel blade and aluminium handle. Hermès’ 1995 take featured a leather handle, while Andrée Putman’s 2010 knife neatly harked back to Calmels’ 1820s original.


BRAND PROMOTION

Home Design Honey Pendant, $129 Home Design Gessoo Pendant, $179 Home Design LED Doppio Pendant, $129 D Home Design Deco Pendant 3 Light, $129;

Home Design Mondo Pendant, $129

Home Design Crudo Pendant, $69 Home Design Verde Pendant, $89

shining EXAMPLES

Pendants look fantastic when they’re positioned over a dining table but keep in mind that they should be hung about 1.7m above the floor, so they not too bright or in the way.

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Brighten up your home without breaking the bank by adding one of these stylish and on-trend pendant lights.

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STYLE NOTES

Your lights are like any other fixture or accessory: they need to work in with the overall look and aesthetic of your home.

1. Home Design Timber Grove Pendant, $119; 2. Home Design Timber Mesen Pendant, $149

he lighting you choose for your home not only influences the mood of a room through its illumination but also via its own shape and style. Pendant lights are a wonderfully versatile and chic option for most spaces, from home office to hallway and bedside to kitchen bench. The latest styles are appealingly slimline and geometric in form and come in a variety of sizes and good-looking finishes. No matter what style your home, you’re sure to find a pendant to suit. Look for textural concrete and striking metallic pendants for a contemporary dining area, conversation-starter styles for over the kitchen bench or in an entryway, or there’s always the classic shapes that work in any space. Whether you’re building, renovating or simply updating your lighting, pendant lights are an affordable, effective way to refresh your home’s look.

Clustering pendant lights is among the latest trends for interiors. Grouping two or more lights and hanging them together or at varying heights makes for an eye-catching visual feature. And you needn’t spend a fortune either; some of the most affordable styles come into their own when they’re hung in formation. Pendants look fantastic when they’re spaced evenly above a kitchen island or hung extra-low to become bedside lighting. They might just be the answer if you like a clutter-free bedside table.

Some products are not available in some stores, but may be ordered. Indoor Lighting only available at Armadale & Bunbury in WA.


on your DOORSTEP You don’t need to travel far for an indulgent experience when there are a range of luxury hotels and resorts within a short drive or ight of our major cities. Three Travel Associates advisers give you insight into their first-hand experiences at three luxury properties, perfect for your next winter escape.

Emirates One&Only, Wolgan Valley - NSW


Emirates One&Only Wolgan Valley Located only 2.5 hours drive from Sydney in the Greater Blue Mountains region, this resort features 40 elegantly appointed villas, each with its own double-sided fireplace and verandah with stunning views.

Emirates One&Only, Wolgan Valley - NSW

“The resort’s restaurant and bars boast epicurean delights, made from locally sourced produce and matched with an incredible wine list, making for a truly memorable culinary experience. ” Megan Storey O’Sullivan & Turner Travel Associates, NSW

Spicers Peak Lodge, Maryvale Set among some of Australia’s most breathtaking natural landscapes, this stunning lodge offers an intimate and relaxing experience. Discover bespoke interior design with 10 luxury suites and two private lodges commanding stunning mountain views and an all-inclusive gastronomic menu that showcases the best local produce.

Spicers Peak Lodge, Maryvale - QLD

Southern Ocean Lodge, Kangaroo Island

“The food is amazing. A luxurious getaway only an hour out of Brisbane makes it great for special occasions and the service is amazing.” Lolo Trendell Trendell & Turner Travel Associates, QLD

Southern Ocean Lodge, Kangaroo Island Perched on a rise above Hanson Bay, this lodge takes full advantage of the surrounding nature. The 21 contemporary suits offer unbroken views of the Southern Ocean. The Great Room, a breathtaking designer space of restaurant, cocktail bar and lounge frames the remarkable rugged coastline views. “A bucket-list experience offering breathtaking views of the beautiful Kangaroo Island coastline, premium dining, and personalised service.” Southern Ocean Lodge, Kangaroo Island

Michael Lewis Lewis & Turner Travel Associates, SA

Speak to an experienced travel adviser to book your next winter escape.

1800 017 159 travel-associates.com.au/houseandgarden


Set up for easy entertaining, these homes bring year-round delight.

Styling by Beck Simon. Photograph by Derek Swalwell.

A sweet collection of wooden houses is just one of the featured displays in this Melbourne home, full of fabulous storage, beautiful timbers and natural light. Turn the page for more‌


H G HOUSES

BRIGHT ANGLES Old and new, inside and out come together in a bold new shape for this Melbourne heritage home. STO RY Stephen Crafti | ST Y L IN G Beck Simon P H OTOGRA PHY Derek Swalwell


KITCHEN/DINING Unexpected angles, a signature of architect Fiona Dunin, animate the contemporary extension of this Victorian-era home. Mirror-backed glass wraps around the island bench and rangehood canopy, balanced by the warm tones of Tasmanian oak veneer. Dining table made by Naco Design. ‘Urban’ chairs, Feelgood Designs. Customised sideboard by Zuster. Table lamp, Mark Douglass Design. Splashback tiles, Academy Tiles. Mixer tap, Abey. At bottom right, a turntable attests to owner Arthur’s love of vintage vinyl recordings. The painting and sculpture, both by Robby Wirramanda, are just two of the artworks the homeowners have acquired through The Torch, a not-for-profit program providing artistic, cultural and vocational support to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander prisoners and ex-prisoners in Victoria (thetorch.org.au). Designer buy: Design House Stockholm ‘Cord’ floor lamp, from $245, Vincent Design Supply. >

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he residents of this home in Melbourne’s inner north-east were well acquainted with their architect long before their renovation was discussed.FionaDunin,director of FMD Architects, initially devised a scheme for owner Arthur, who shared the singlefronted Victorian-era terrace with his son Lindsay. Fiona had previously transformed an Edwardian home nearby for Arthur’s partner, Pam Mitchell. “Then Pam and I decided to get married and live under one roof,” says Arthur. That meant choosing between two abodes. While Pam’s home (known as the Cross Stitch House and featured in the April 2015 issue of H&G) ticked numerous boxes, this property offered greater outdoor space and potential for all the amenities three adults and two generations would require in a shared home. “Lindsay is 24, so he needs his own space, as do we,” says Pam. When council approved the original plans for Arthur’s renovation and extension, the house was designed for a father and son. The new living arrangements, however, required some fine-tuning. In addition, Pam and Arthur were keen to translate favourite features of the Cross Stitch House to this home. Among the most distinctive elements of both projects are the dramatic use of angles, raked ceilings and joinery featuring mirrored surfaces. The first can be seen to great effect in the window frames, cabinetry and bathroom vanities. Some angled features take on the abstracted shape of a pitched-roof house, in various orientations. “We call this one the His & Her House,” the proud architect says of the 158m2 project. “It’s a merging of design references

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from the original design for Arthur and the best elements of the Cross Stitch House.” The two front rooms have been left in their original form, with minor changes. The first now functions as a study/ guestroom. Next is Lindsay’s bedroom with french doors opening to a side courtyard and adjacent bathroom, which has a door to the living area so it cleverly doubles as a powder room when required. Central to Fiona’s design is the new open-plan kitchen, dining and living area. The kitchen is pivotal to the design, with its 3.2m-long island bench forming an arresting focal point. Mirrored on three sides, the unit appears to ‘float’ off the floor. Its geometric quality is complemented by triangular splashback tiles. Soaring above are skylights, and LED lighting set into the walls and concealed in skylight shafts. “The LEDs accentuate the angles of the walls and the ceiling,” says Fiona. At night, they create a glow against the moonlight.” A garden courtyard behind the kitchen and passageway along the side separate the open-plan area from the main bedroom. The side corridor is lined with cabinets and shelving and its generous windows strengthen the outdoor connection. That same bright, welcoming quality is evident in the landscaped courtyard featuring an integrated barbecue and dining setting (designed by Fiona and built by joiner Spence Construction). “We’re very happy,” says Pam. “Fiona has created a wonderful > place for us to live. This house feels like a real home.” FMD Architects, Melbourne, Victoria; (03) 9670 9671 or fmdarchitects.com.au. Basis Builders, Prahran, Victoria; 0412 821 720 or basisbuilders.com.au.

HALLWAY A ramp from the kitchen leads to Pam and Arthur’s bedroom, which has a slightly lower floor height. The built-in storage and display space along the corridor includes much of Arthur’s vinyl record collection. Green glass vessels, Mark Douglass Design. Tasmanian oak flooring with Bona ‘Traffic’ finish. KITCHEN/LIVING Pam at ease in this airy space, where angled skylight shafts cast intriguing patterns of light. She brought the ottoman, sofa and armchair (all by Jardan) from the Cross Stitch House. Kitchen stools, Great Dane. Copper planter, The Greenery Garden Centre. Artwork by Wendy Ford.

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Be my guest

The new extension was taken out to the side and rear boundaries with a small but charming outdoor dining and party zone built into the middle. “The courtyard is a great year-round entertainment area,” says Pam. Fitted with an Electrolux barbecue and custom dining table, it’s well suited to long winter lunches. Overhead, blown-glass pendant lights in translucent colours lend the space a sense of enchantment.

Mirrored surfaces create the sense of a larger, light-rich space.


MAIN BEDROOM A windowsill and shelves extended from the angled window make a handy desk surface and display corner. Eames storage cabinet, Living Edge. Hay ‘Mega Dot’ bedcover, Cult. Bentzon Carpets ‘Savanna’ carpet, RC+D. Linen curtains and feature cushion custom-made by Lyn Hunter Design. Pendant light, Mark Douglass Design. Bedside table, Freedom. Designer buy: Herman Miller ‘Capelli’ stool, $940, Living Edge. ENSUITE Five-sided ‘house’ shapes, constructed from Maxi Ply Edge ‘Rustic’ by Maxi Plywood, reprise the geometric theme. ‘Quinn’ basin and ‘Cube’ toilet suite, Caroma. ‘Icon’ shower and basin tapware, Astra Walker. Tommy Hilfiger towels. Planter, Bunnings. Floor tiles and ‘Triangle’ vitrified ceramic wall tiles, Academy Tiles.

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Paint colours are reproduced as accurately as printing processes allow.

H G HOUSES


THE PALETTE

This is the life

Although modest in size, this house allows a family of three to socialise happily or enjoy their own spaces. One of the key decisions was to create a separate rear bedroom wing for Pam and Arthur, accessed by a gentle ramp. This not only provides privacy and a clear separation of domains but also future-proofs the house. “We don’t want to have to negotiate stairs or move from this home when we’re older,” says Pam. >

Vitrified ceramic tiles (ensuite)

6mm mirrorbacked glass (kitchen)

Dulux Grey Pebble (courtyard)

‘ L I G H T WA S V E RY I M P O RTA N T I N T H I S H O U S E . I WA N T E D TO B R I N G I N A S M U C H N O RT H E R N L I G H T A S P O S S I B L E , W H I C H WA S S L I G H T LY P R O B L E M AT I C G I V E N I T ’ S O N T H E S I D E E L E VAT I O N .’

Fiona Dunin, architect


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Living greenery helps blend the line between indoors and out.

COURTYARD this page, all images except bottom left, and opposite “Each room has a great outlook to the greenery in the garden and courtyard,” says Pam. Sedum ‘Gold Mound’ grows up training wires, while dwarf nandina thrives in the tabletop planter. Scyon wall cladding, James Hardie. Custom outdoor table by Spence Construction. ‘C607’ chairs, Feelgood Designs. Maxwell & Williams ‘Cashmere’ dinnerware. Glasses, Ikea. Pendant lights, Mark Douglass Design. Planters, Northcote Nursery. Smart buy: ‘New Deck’ 80mm timber decking in Silvertop Ash, $6/m, Radial Timber. FRONT DOOR Wisteria frames the home’s heritage facade. Landscape design by Eckersley Garden Architecture; construction by Vivid Landscapes. For Where to Buy, see page 196. #

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THE PLAN

FEATURE TREES & PLANTS FRONT YARD

Wisteria Bath

INDOORS

Main bed

Fruit salad plant (Monstera deliciosa) Dragon tree (Dracaena marginata)

Courtyard Storage Barbecue

COURTYARD

Silk floss tree (Ceiba speciosa) Sedum ‘Gold Mound’

Dining Room name Kitchen

Living

Bath/ laundry

Bed Courtyard

Study/guest Entry Verandah


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SIGN OF THE TIMES This free-flowing Sydney home was nudged out of the 1940s with a new look that embraces the owners’ laidback lifestyle. STO RY Deborah Grant | ST Y L IN G Kayla Gex | PH OTO GR A P HY Maree Homer

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FEATURE TREES & PLANTS

ENCLOSED VERANDAH Just off the formal living room, this space is used all year round. Coffee table, sofa and side table, Restoration Hardware (US). Round shelf with timber backing from LA’s Big Daddy’s Antiques. The white hearth is a sandstone slab. For similar lantern, try ‘Lagrad’ lantern, Ikea. FRONT GARDEN Designed by landscape architect Michael Bligh, this serene pocket features a large pond and various sculptures. This north-eastern corner near the driveway enjoys morning sun. The fine grey foliage of Santolina contrasts with the green plants and snow-pear tree nearby. >

Malus floribunda Pyrus salicifolia ‘Pendula’ Cistus ‘Silver Pink’ Shrubby germander (Teucrium fruticans) Helleborus orientalis


THE PALETTE

Dulux Beige Royal (kitchen, family room)

Dulux Malay Grey (enclosed verandah)

hen interior designer Lisa Burdus was approached to decorate this 1940s house on Sydney’s north shore, she was excited. The owners had seen her business sign outside a project nearby and called with a somewhat familiar brief: to create a home that was warm and cosy yet practical enough for a family with multiple children and pets – much like Lisa’s own domestic set-up with five children across a spread of ages. “There are so many blended families and other households with kids in their twenties still living at home, so it’s more important than ever for everyone to have their own space,” she says. The house sits on a huge block and had already been extended by architect David White. Lisa began the full refurbishment in 2014, and spent two years filling in the details. “Everything needed to be hardy, not too glitzy or precious, and able to withstand the rough and tumble of a large family,” say the owners. “Lisa got to know us, listened to what we needed and encouraged us to try new things.” Lisa designed every room of the house, including the kitchen joinery and bathroom fittings, fabrics and furniture. She personally sourced all of the new pieces, and incorporated existing items the family wanted to keep. “I wouldn’t say we had a decorating style in mind,” say the owners. “We were just sympathetic to the style of the house and the people in it. Lisa helped it all come together by combining >

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Paint colours are reproduced as accurately as printing processes allow.

Schumacher ‘Sinhala’ linen in Sky (living)


HOUSES H G

This is the life

There’s always plenty to do in this house, which caters to all ages and life stages, from kids’ birthday parties to extended stays for interstate family members. The owners are used to cooking for a crowd in their spacious new kitchen and encourage the children to pitch in. Barbecues are held year-round and they host one massive party at home in the summer, when guests spill out onto the shady verandahs.

Aged timber elements lend patina and character.

KITCHEN Lisa designed all the cabinetry, choosing Carrara marble for the island benchtop and honed Indian jet-black granite for the others. Shaker cabinetry in Dulux White on White. Subway tiles, Beaumont Tiles. Pendant light and stools, Big Daddy’s Antiques. Liebherr BioFresh fridge. The timber floor is recycled grey ironbark from the old Kingaroy railway line in Queensland. “It’s very hard-wearing and I love the depth of the colour,” says the owner.

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THE LAYOUT GROUND FLOOR

Gym Bed

Bed

Laundry

FORMAL LIVING The sofas and ottoman are custom made in Schumacher fabrics, as are the curtains (‘Sinhala’ linen in Sky) and wallpaper (‘Haruki’ sisal in Cornflower). Lamp, Bloomingdales Lighting. Pressed-flower artwork, Parterre. ‘Eclipse’ rug, Cadrys. Smart buy: ‘Plantation’ rattan tray, $85, Coastal Furnishings. MAIN ENSUITE A Dulux paint colour called Tranquil Retreat sets the tone here. The tiles are Carrara marble. Table, Big Daddy’s Antiques. Rug, Cadrys. DINING This space is cocooned in a grey ‘Weston Raffia Weave’ wallpaper by Schumacher. Lamp from Emac & Lawton. ‘Wabi-Sabi’ rug, Jenny Jones Rugs. Artwork by Patricia Heaslip.

Bath Bed Bath Study

Playroom Bath Family

Formal dining Kitchen

Bath WIR Main bed Entry Formal living

Pantry Enclosed verandah Study Outdoor living/dining

Pool

Dining

Lawn

Bath Bed Games LOWER GROUND

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Movies

MEZZANINE


HOUSES H G

Be my guest

The formal dining room is favoured in the cooler months because it’s close to the living room’s open fire. A mixture of lamps and candlelight make it an inviting place to entertain. Lisa Burdus imported the pendant light, mirrors and cabinets from the US (Restoration Hardware), along with many other pieces she sourced there. She designed the oak table and customised the chairs with Schumacher ‘Kenya Texture’ fabric. >


H G HOUSES MEZZANINE The library in the atrium was inspired by an online post showing ideas for rooms with very high ceilings. It’s accessed via a compact spiral staircase. Wall light, Visual Comfort & Co. Vintage books, sourced from a number of thrift shops. PLAYROOM Popular with all members of the family. ‘Sheldon’ sofa by Boyd Blue. Coffee table, Restoration Hardware. Roman blind fabric, Schumacher ‘Sunara Ikat’. Rug, Cadrys. Designer buy: Schumacher ‘Toscana Stripe’ fabric in Tuscan Red (on sofa), $165/m, Orient House. GUESTROOM The bedhead’s Schumacher ‘Cambay’ print in Oyster was the starting point here. Molmic ‘Flockhart’ ottoman in Schumacher ‘Rosegate’ fabric. Artworks from Parterre. For Where to Buy, see page 196.


the colours, fabrics, furniture and homewares we needed and loved.” Interestingly, paint colours were the last thing Lisa chose. “They sit in the background of all the fabrics, artworks and rugs I’ve selected,” she explains. “I select the paint colours based on the aspect of the room, and to enhance the furnishings I’ve chosen.” Everyone is happy with the result. “I love the wide timber floorboards because it reminds me of living in the country, where I’m from,” says the lady of the house. “Opening up the whole back of the house and being close to the garden is great, too. I also appreciate the small details, such as the architraves and joinery; they give the home character and warmth.” Interestingly, both the owners and designer nominate the playroom as their favourite. “We love the bright blend of colours, textures and materials, and there’s nothing better than watching the kids make great use of the space,” say the owners. Lisa agrees, adding: “We put as much value into it as everywhere else.” Outside, the existing garden was already established, however the owners enlisted the help of landscape designer Michael Bligh to ensure the extensions to the house worked with it. Since the new plan was implemented, the family has spent many weekends working in the garden, which is now divided into different zones, including a substantial vegetable patch. It’s fair to say the refreshed home is adored by Lisa’s clients, who have no regrets about enlisting expert help. “Renovating and decorating is tricky. Bringing in a # team of people who know what they’re doing avoids costly mistakes.” Lisa Burdus, Crows Nest, NSW; lisaburdus.com.au. David White Architects, Beecroft, NSW; (02) 9241 4033. Michael Bligh, Goulburn, NSW; michaelbligh.com. AUSTRALIAN HOUSE & GARDEN |

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LASTING RESORT A passion for entertaining and Mid-century design drove the transformation of this tired Perth home into a hub for family and friends. STORY & STYLI NG Anna Flanders | PH OTO G R APH Y Dion Robeson

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HOUSES H G BACKYARD Entertaining and a smooth indoor-outdoor connection were the focus of this rear extension. The change from black fibre-cement cladding to concrete and cedar marks the transition between the home’s old and new sections. Table setting, deck chairs, side tables, blue chair and footstool, all Ultimo Interiors. Vintage deckchair, Editeur. Pool wall in bWall system from Bacic Group, which was also responsible for the landscaping. >

FEATURE TREES & PLANTS Magnolia grandiflora Lilly pilly Hibiscus Lemon trees Philodendron Palms


This is the life

It’s all about the living area for the owners of this home. “When I’m not in the kitchen, I’ll be lying on the sofa looking out over the credenza to the sky and treetops,” says Lorena. “Chantel likes to look out over the pavilion and at the church windows behind our house.” As a result, they feel deeply connected to the suburb they love and to the elements. “I’m amazed by how much sky we can see from inside,” says Chantel.

LIVING An Italian Flexform sofa from Innerspace offers deep comfort. Original Marc Newson ‘Embryo’ chair and Tom Dixon vase (on floor), Editeur. Side table (next to sofa), Living Edge. Artworks are by Murray Gill (over chair) and Chantal’s mother (the portrait of Sadie, one of the owners’ dogs). Cushions and throw, Asbury Park Agency. Design classic: Eames ‘Walnut Stool Shape A’, $1625, Living Edge.

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leafy northern suburb of Perth was the area Lorena and Chantel targeted when house-hunting five years ago. When they walked into this 1947 property, they knew they’d hit the bullseye and fell for its classic features and quirks: each room had a different cornice and ceiling rose. Filled with the sort of Mid-century pieces they adored, it seemed meant to be. That love of Mid-century design – combined with a fondness for concrete and the use of timber as seen in iconic 1960s and ’70s Perth homes by architect Iwan Iwanoff – drove their renovation plans and the choices of architect and builder: Klopper & Davis Architects and Bacic Group. “We saw Sam Klopper’s home and knew he understood what we wanted, and Bacic is renowned for its concrete work and love of honest materials,” says Lorena. “We’d collected images of things we liked over many years,” adds Chantel. “It’s amazing to look back and see how the home is exactly that.” Four original rooms at the front of the house remain intact, yet some functions have changed. The old living space on the left and dining room behind now serve as the study/library and a guestroom. On the right, the main bedroom is still situated at the front, but Lorena and Chantel have brought the ensuite up to date by renovating > it themselves. Behind this lie a bathroom and second spare bedroom.

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H G HOUSES

To create the lifestyle-enhancing addition at the rear, the old kitchen and a lean-to were knocked down and a wall removed to open up the home from front to back. Cedar-framed windows and sliding doors now flood the kitchen, dining and living areas with light and help define the modernist vibe of the extension. Filled with Mid-century furniture, ceramics and artworks collected over many years, these new spaces overlook the backyard and bask in northern sunshine. Contributing to that warmth is the thermal mass of honed concrete flooring and Bacic Group’s innovative bWall insulated concrete, a costeffective and time-saving solution used to construct the entire rear addition. “I love our home in winter,” says Lorena. “The whole rear addition was designed to take advantage of passive heating, thanks to its orientation and the use of the bWall system.” Beyond the social areas, the home opens up to a large, covered entertaining space and deck, which look out to the pool and landscaped grounds. “It’s a true indoor-outdoor home, which is what we always wanted,” says Chantel. “Now we have friends inviting themselves over for dinner, the dogs are > loving it – and we just don’t want to leave the house!” Klopper & Davis Architects, Subiaco, WA; (08) 9381 4731 or kada.com.au. Bacic Group; 0434 066 747 or bacicgroup.com.au.

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KITCHEN Teak veneer references the Mid-century vibe the owners love. Mixer tap, Phoenix. Vintage TH Brown stool. Les Basic bowl, Living Edge. Saucepan, Table Culture. Emile Henry tagine, David Jones. Vintage pendant lights, Many 2.0. LIVING Chantel (left) and Lorena with French bulldog Sadie and British bulldog Jackson. Minotti ‘Sullivan’ coffee table, Dedece. Vintage credenza. Eames recliner, Innerspace. Rug, Temple Fine Rugs. Artworks by Vladimir Tretchikoff (left) and Linda Syddick Napaltjarri. Pendant light, About Space. DINING The travertine-topped table was a vintage score from Editeur. Muuto ‘Fiber’ side chairs, Living Edge. Artwork by Stormie Mills.

‘ This house is uplifting and open yet also very private.’ Chantel

Be my guest

“Our friends now call this place ‘The Resort’,” says Chantel with a laugh. From the start, the house was planned with entertaining in mind: it can easily accommodate a table for 50 in the rear pavilion or 100 guests at a party sprawling from inside to out. “It was designed for parties, but we’ve been a bit lazy,” admits Lorena. “That doesn’t matter because we’ve had lots of friends inviting themselves over!”


THE PALETTE THE PLAN Venetian plaster feature wall (living) Deck Living

Teak veneer (kitchen) Dining Alfresco entertaining

Bath

Pool

Caesarstone Calacatta Nuvo (benchtop) Garden

Laundry Kitchen

Bed

Bed

Bath Study/library

Main bed

WIR Bath

Entry Verandah

MAIN BEDROOM this page and opposite top At the front of the house, this room proudly displays its postwar feature windows. Bedding, Pure Linen. Gubi floor lamp, Ultimo Interiors. Artwork by Kathleen Petyarre. STUDY The original fireplace and cabinetry retain their period charm. Pink Rabbit figurine by Stormie Mills. Artwork (on wall) by Chantel’s mother. Designer buy: Paola C ‘Base’ vase in Brass, $345, Ultimo Interiors. ENSUITE Lorena and Chantel designed and renovated this elegant wet zone themselves. For similar floor tiles, try the Milan range at Amber Tiles. Taps, Phoenix Tapware. Mirror, Scurr’s. Side table, Ultimo Interiors. Cool Galah towels, Asbury Park Agency. For Where to Buy, see page 196. #

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HOUSES H G


E V O L

H C T A M

MAIN BEDROOM At the top of the three-level home, this light-filled space enjoys cooling cross-breezes in summer. Motorised timber louvres by JWI Louvres offer style and privacy; they’re operated using a Clipsal C-Bus system. The bed was crafted by joinery firm Élan to sit on a turntable: the owners can spin it towards the windows when they want a view, or have it facing the TV at night. Eames ‘Soft Pad’ chair, Vitra. >

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HOUSES H G

O bo nce of ast a its s a ten ST O ne w nis RY Jo hn igh elc co M cD bo om ur on urh in t, a al d oo g fa blo |S TY d a mi ck LI NG ly h in Sa nd ra om Syd h M sp o e t ne al on rts ey su hat y’s i |P p ho nn HO T O er n e G R la tiv our r we AP HY e e s t st Ni co he no co le cre cha w En gl de ra an d nti cte als r .


This is the life

Spreading the layout over three levels was a great way for the Gabriels to optimise floor space on their compact inner-city plot. Taryn says that she and Tyrone prefer a clean, minimal aesthetic, so they requested plenty of built-in storage to ensure the home stays that way as their daughter grows. “We really hate clutter and mess, so we needed lots of storage to hide Mila’s toys away – and contain all my clothes and shoes.”

ENSUITE This private space occupies the front half of the top floor, behind the bedroom. Agape ‘Vieques’ steel bathtub (with shelf and backrest) and basin by Patricia Urquiola, ‘Sen’ tapware by Gwenael Nicolas, and ‘Spin’ mirror by Benedini Associati, all Artedomus. Akari ‘120A’ shoji paper lantern by Isamu Noguchi, Vitra. Smart buy: Nero Marquina honed tiles (50x50mm), about $182/m², Bisanna Tiles. MAIN BEDROOM Tyrone asked for handles to be kept to a minimum in the home; simple cutouts in the black-stained oak cabinetry do the trick. Storage cupboards line both sides of the room. Ceiling fan, Boffi Studio.


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family stroll led to what is perhaps one of the more unusual house-finding stories you’ll hear. In 2013, Taryn and Tyrone Gabriel were walking through a leafy suburb in Sydney’s inner west with their baby daughter Mila (now four) and Staffordshire bull terrier Zara when they spied a ‘For Sale’ sign on a vacant lot fronted by a graffiti-covered brick wall. The Gabriels lost no time in calling the estate agent. Turns out that the sale was twin 237m2 lots – a rarity for the area. Two families jointly owned the blocks and had been seeking council approval to develop townhouses on the land, but those plans had fallen through. Taryn and Tyrone put in an offer and secured one of the lots for their dream home. The couple engaged multidisciplinary design firm Hassell Studio to help plan a new build on the site, which was formerly a recreational tennis facility dating back to 1929. Tyrone, a regional sales manager for designer furniture company UniforVitra, had worked with Hassell on many commercial projects and trusted that the team would do justice to their vision – a compact family home with a European warehouse feel. The process began in 2014 with an assessment by urbanplanning firm Urbis to determine if the site had any heritage significance. While strictly it didn’t, the wall was deemed a lovely heritage feature and council supported preserving it. “Retaining the wall was a key part of the design,” says the Hassell teams’s senior designer, Ciaran Acton. Today, the brick wall – once part of a grandstand – forms the entrance to the property; behind it, the home’s gabled roof peeps over the top at street level. As the site drops 3m immediately behind the grandstand wall, it was essentially ready for the Gabriels to build their three-storey, three-bedroom home. Steel-framed ‘portals’ allowed builder Richard Jones of Lancaster Building Group to erect the main structure quickly. (One not-so-tiny hitch was the 4.8m concrete kitchen island, which had to be brought in first; construction took place around

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it.) Lightweight burnt-ash infill cladding, dark metal roofing (Lysaght ‘Longline’ in Dulux Monument Grey) and glazing completed the structure. The north and south elevations were draped in a ‘veil’ of automated timber louvres that filter light and allow Tyrone and Taryn to control the ventilation and privacy levels. “The louvres mean the natural light is layered, which gives each room a unique ambience,” says Ciaran. Hydronic underfloor heating was also installed under the polishedconcrete floors. It operates from the hot-water system and requires no additional electricity. Stepping through the front door gains entry to the perfectly formed ground floor, containing a little office nook, two bedrooms that mirror each other (one is Mila’s, the other a guestroom) and a family bathroom with built-in Agape ‘In Out’ tub. A central stairwell leads up to Tyrone and Taryn’s luxurious first-floor retreat and down to the lower-ground floor. This last floor is the main living zone, containing a dark and moody movie room fitted with a magnificent Vitra ‘Alcove’ sofa; a combined laundry/ bathroom; and an open-plan kitchen/dining/living area that opens to a courtyard and pool. The house has a warm and deliberately limited materials palette: lye-treated larch and polished concrete on the floors, birch ply and burnt ash lining the walls, and lashings of glass throughout. Timber is the real hero, says Ciaran. “It’s either oiled or gently whitewashed, allowing the grain to be honestly expressed with filtered, reflected light that honours the material used,” he explains. “The simplicity of the materials allows family life to unfold around them.” This restraint carries through to the decor. Visual clutter is kept to a minimum and there are no artworks. The courtyard is simple and functional, too. “You don’t really need a backyard in the inner suburbs as there are so many parks nearby,” says > Tyrone. Game, set and match. Hassell Studio, Sydney, NSW; hassellstudio.com. Lancaster Building Group, Melrose Park, NSW; 0419 496 396. AUSTRALIAN HOUSE & GARDEN |

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THE PALETTE

Be my guest

Taryn is a keen cook and the kitchen was designed with her passion in mind. “It’s so open,” she says. “I can be cooking dinner and still feel like I’m part of the group when we have guests over.” The indoor-outdoor flow is perfect for large gatherings, and there are many throughout the year. “I love the size of the kitchen bench and that it’s also our dining table,” she says. “We use it for every meal and love sitting around it, eating and talking.”

Porter’s Paints Wood Wash in Plain White (walls, trims)

Exposed brick (boundary walls)

Black oak cabinetry (bedroom)


HOUSES H G

Paint colours are reproduced as accurately as printing processes allow.

LIVING/KITCHEN above and opposite Taryn, Mila and Zara love their indoor-outdoor space. ‘Soft’ modular sofa by Jasper Morrison, assorted cushions, ‘Metal’ side tables and Eames ‘DSW’ children’s setting, all Vitra. ‘Boho’ wool rug, West Elm. The impressive concrete island bench is 4.8m long. Joinery by Impala Kitchens. Gaggenau and Miele appliances. Artek ‘901’ tea trolley, ‘High Chair K65’ (stools), and ‘A330S’ pendant lights in Black, all Anibou. Design classic: Artek ‘A400’ pendant lights in White by Alvar Aalto, $955 each, Anibou. COURTYARD A simple, low-maintenance zone with a Corten-steel wall housing planter boxes. The raised edge of the heated pool prevents leaves blowing in. Tyrone says the self-cleaning design is “zero maintenance – I’ve never even picked up a leaf scoop”. Fynn ‘PT3’ armchairs and ‘Tandem Alu’ outdoor table, all Wintons Teak. The decking is burnt ash with an oiled finish. >

FEATURE TREES & PLANTS Potted fig trees (Ficus) Devil’s ivy (Epipremnum aureum) Silver fern (Cyathea dealbata)

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ENTRY above left and opposite Two steel-framed ‘pocket’ windows or ‘cheeks’ flood the entry with light. The steel handrail seen at right runs the length of the stairwell with a single join. ‘Butterfly’ stool by Sori Yanagi, Vitra. GROUND-FLOOR BATHROOM Continuity and the repetition of tightly edited material selections are key in the home. Here, another Agape ‘Vieques’ basin, ‘Sen’ mixer and ‘Spin’ swivel mirror, all from Artedomus, and Artek ‘A330S’ pendant light from Anibou. On the glass door at right is a ‘Big O’ handle from In-Teria. MILA’S ROOM Sweet, simple and timeless. All the beds are low to the floor, their designs inspired by Japanese Zen philosophy. The desk area is sectioned with panels of burnt Portugal cork. Akari ‘3AD’ lantern, Eames ‘DAW’ armchair and Eames ‘Elephant’ stool, all Vitra. ‘Flapjack’ timber handles on cupboard doors, In-Teria. For Where to Buy, see page 196. #


THE LAYOUT LOWER GROUND Courtyard Kitchen

Pool

Bath/ laundry Movies

Living

GROUND FLOOR

Bed

Office nook

Entry

Bed Bath FIRST FLOOR

WIR Main bed

Bath

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COMFORT ZONE Built around a huge alfresco area, this weekender in South Australia’s Port Willunga has all the ingredients for a relaxing break. STORY Laura Barry | ST Y L IN G Maz Mis | PH OTO G R A P HY Jacqui Way

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LIVING this page and opposite Rustic textures imbue the home with warmth and comfort. Bricks around fire, Littlehampton Clay Bricks and Pavers. Eames lounger and footstool and ‘Muffin’ lamp, Aptos Cruz Galleries. Cushions and throw, Living by Design. Wall light, Espo Lighting. ‘George’ floor lamp, Stylecraft. Curtain in James Dunlop Textiles ‘Antipodes’ fabric. Rug, Abbode Interior Products. Local hero: Fire surround and external wall in ‘Crackenback Free Form’ sandstone cladding, $133/m², Eco Outdoor. >


H G HOUSES

unctionality, comfort and contemporary style were top of the wish list for the owners of this holiday home, located in the scenic seaside haven of Port Willunga in South Australia. They were keen to build a relaxed and understated yet unique beach house that could cater to their family of four young children and two beloved canine companions. Engaging architectural firm Outset Design and multidisciplinary design outfit Enoki, the couple set their plans in motion. “Our clients wanted a retreat from their hectic work lives, a holiday home with everything they needed for outdoor living in summer and a warm retreat in winter,” says Enoki director Susanna Bilardo. She and her colleague, senior designer Meaghan Williams, worked on all the

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material selections, as well as designing the interior spaces and outdoor entertaining area. The four-bedroom property is built on a 1112m2 parcel of land on the fringe of the Fleurieu Peninsula wine region. Taking its cues from both classic and current design styles, the open-plan layout, flat roof and stone walling references are Mid-century, while the Corten-steel cladding, concrete and composite stone are entirely 21st century. Rustic natural materials – timber, rope, leather and sandstone – are used throughout for texture and cohesion. “The natural palette and traditional elements such as the open fireplaces achieve the country feel the clients desired,” says Susanna. “The materials we chose are also > robust enough for the young children.”


THE PALETTE

KITCHEN/DINING/LIVING/ OUTDOOR ENTERTAINING Lengths of rope make a unique ceiling/wall treatment, a nod to the seaside setting. ‘Baker’ dining table, Agostino & Brown. For similar dining chairs, try ‘Tuscan II’ chairs from King Living. Rug (under dining table), Armadillo & Co. Ligne Roset ‘Togo’ sofas, Domo. ‘April’ coffee table, Zuster. Joinery throughout by RM2 Shopfitters. Local hero: Smoked-oak flooring, from $85/m², Royal Oak Floors.

Sandstone cladding, Eco Outdoor (living)

Skheme ‘Trellis’ tiles (hall nook)

Kelly Wearstler ‘Katana’ fabric (family room)

This is the life Port Willunga is just 46km from Adelaide – far enough for weekend sojourns but close enough that no one complains about the drive. To ensure it really felt like an escape, the owners briefed Susanna and Meaghan to design interiors that contrasted with their city residence but paid homage to their childhood homes in the country. “It’s beach-meets-country in look and feel,” says Susanna. “And very much about comfort.”


H G HOUSES

Be my guest “The kitchen is a super-functional space that always looks amazing,” says the owner. “If a meal is being prepared, the children can join in with the cooking or sit nearby and sample some of the dishes in progress.” When friends come to visit, the doors to the adjacent courtyard are usually opened, which seamlessly extends the mingling space. “Then the outdoor barbecue and wood-fired pizza oven get a real workout.”

‘ T H E FA M I LY T R U S T E D U S TO E X P E R I M E N T W I T H UNIQUE DESIGN ELEMENTS AND T E X T U R A L F I N I S H E S .’ S U SA N N A BI LA R DO, DE S I G N E R

KITCHEN Clean lines and high ceilings enhance the feeling of space. A butler’s pantry is located behind the door at right. Custom Corten-steel rangehood. Splashback tiles, Eco Tile Factory. ‘Eva’ pendant lights, Espo Lighting. Benchtops in American oak (island) and Caesarstone Raven. White vase, black fruit bowl and coffee set, all Transforma. Kitchen and pantry by Farquhar Kitchens and RM2 Shopfitters. Local hero: ‘Olive’ stools, $688 each, Agostino & Brown.


At 311m2, the single-storey weekender is relatively modest in size, but Susanna insists the home delivers way beyond its physical parameters. The front door opens to a mud room/hallway, with the laundry immediately to the right of the entrance for easy disposal of wet post-swim towels. “Locating the laundry near the front door contains sand and mess to the perimeter of the house,” says Meaghan. An outdoor shower just outside the entrance helps on this front, too. Turning right at the end of the hall leads to three bedrooms and the family room; turning left takes you to the light-filled open-plan kitchen/dining/living area, connected to an alfresco entertaining zone.

The open-plan area is a textural triumph. American-oak joinery is teamed with sage-green splashback tiles, waxedterracotta pendant lights, a black Caesarstone benchtop and a Corten-steel rangehood. Lengths of rope adorn the ceiling and walls – a dramatic final flourish. “The clients trusted us to experiment with unique design elements and textural finishes,” says Susanna. The owners love the laidback vibe and easy liveability Enoki has brought to the home. Susanna sums it up perfectly. “There are areas every family member can > retreat to, each one as inviting as the next.” Enoki, Adelaide, SA; (08) 8271 5500 or enoki.com.au. Outset Design, Stepney, SA; outset.com.au.

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HALLWAY NOOK Storage is tucked into every available space. Skheme ‘Trellis’ tiles, Italia Ceramics. FAMILY ROOM Moveable furniture gives this room maximum versatility. Pinboard in Kelly Wearstler ‘Katana’ fabric. Hay ‘About A Chair’ chairs, Cult. ‘Quadrant’ modular sofa, Koskela. Coffee table, Mark Tuckey. Ceiling fan, Big Ass Fans. Painting by Neil Thwaite. CHILDREN’S ROOM A framed tea towel by Rachel Castle makes a fun and affordable artwork. Single bed, Plyroom. Designer buy: ‘Castello’ bunk bed, $2195-$2495, Plyroom. MAIN BEDROOM With a sitting area, desk and views to nearby sand dunes, the parents’ domain is blissfully self-contained. Custom-made bed. Two-seater sofa and side table, Jardan. Curtain in Romo Black Edition ‘Fresco’ from Marco Fabrics. OUTDOOR ENTERTAINING A retractable shade will soon be installed over the entertaining area, which should enhance its useability. ‘Bronte’ dining table and matching benches, ‘Ord’ outdoor sofa and ‘Byron’ beanbag chair, both Eco Outdoor. For Where to Buy, see page 196. #

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THE LAYOUT Kitchen

Store Dining

Deck

Bed

WIR

Bath Hallway Outdoor entertaining

Powder

Main bed Store Study

Bath Living Laundry Entry

‘ T H E F O OT P R I N T I S R E L AT I V E LY M O D E S T B U T THERE’S PLENTY OF ROOM TO M OV E . ZO N I N G M E A N S THE HOUSE NEVER FEELS TO O B I G O R TO O S M A L L .’ S U SA N N A BI LA R DO

Bed Bed

Family


In partnership with Australian House & Garden

Child’s play Thrill the kids with a colour-led room refresh. And while you’ve got the brushes out, transform a nook for everyone’s enjoyment.

HELP AT YOUR FINGERTIPS Head to the Dulux website for painting tips, techniques and advice, and the helpful Dulux chat service. Dulux also offers a Colour Design Service, with qualified interior designers to help you choose colour palettes and make carrying out your projects plain sailing.


Earthen Pot echoes the rocks and cliffs of this seaside location.

T BEFORE YOU GET STARTED It pays to check how a colour looks at different times of the day. Paint your colour options on large sheets of cardboard and note how they look in situ throughout the day and into the evening. Matt paint is great for bedrooms and out-of-the-way zones. Low-sheen paint is ideal for living areas and hallways.

he transformative powers of paint are well known and winter is a great time to get started on some fun projects. Why not cosy things up with a fresh paint job? Whether it’s a chest of drawers, a chair or a whole wall, each time you look at the finished paint job you’ll feel a sense of pride and achievement. Talk to the staff at your local paint or hardware store. They will be able to help you choose the right paints and equipment for your project quickly and easily – everything from colours to gloss levels to paintbrushes, rollers and painter’s tape. Need to know Wall temperatures must be above 10˚C and below 35˚C throughout the painting process.

‘The colour palette complements the rustic textural materials, including timbers, rope and stone, and enhances the country feel we wanted.’ HOMEOW N E R

Project palette Dulux Wash & Wear Low Sheen in Natural White Desk drawers customised in Duck Egg Blue are cheery and fun.

(bunk-room wall & ceiling) Dulux Wash & Wear Low Sheen in Pale Green Tea (bunk-room wall)

COOL FOR KIDS

ADDED WARMTH

Project 1: hero wall

Project 3: cosy nook

Children’s rooms needn’t be white on white. Put together a palette of colours that will age well with the kids, especially if it’s a shared room. The soothing green shown on the hero wall in the bunk room (opposite) is playful but not too young. “To give the kids ownership of their space, we included them in the decision-making process of the project,” says interior designer Meaghan Williams. Painting the other walls and ceiling the same warm white – Dulux Natural White – creates an enveloping, band-like effect that’s not glary or cold.

A great example of what you could easily do in a weekend is the reading/seating nook shown above left. It was given a warm and inviting treatment with a rich and relaxing natural tone: Dulux Wash & Wear Low Sheen in Earthen Pot. Picking up on the highlights in the fireplace surround and timber floor, it’s also super practical: marks and smudges are easily wiped off in this relaxation space (and children’s rumbling zone).

Project 2: customised desk

Dulux Aquanamel in Duck Egg Blue (desk)

Dulux Wash & Wear Low Sheen in Earthen Pot (reading nook)

A complementary colour – Duck Egg Blue – was chosen for the desk. It’s a warm, soft-toned blue, yet is still vibrant enough to create a fun feature.

GRAND FINAL Satisfaction guaranteed

These projects were part of a larger one – a holiday getaway for a busy city-based family. The owners wanted a home inspired by its coastal setting – ocean, scrub, cliffs and sky. They couldn’t be happier. Good luck with your own projects.

Pleasing palette (left) This home features a clever combination of soothing tones that work beautifully with the timber accents in the oak joinery, furniture and flooring.

F O R I N S P I R AT I O N , H E L P A N D A DV I C E , V I S I T D U LU X .C O M . AU


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A strawberry tree (Arbutus unedo), laurels and a bird cherry (Prunus padus) create a natural arch over the English box-lined driveway at Brickendon, an historic estate in northern Tasmania. Turn the page for more‌


H G GARDENS

Living

HISTORY Seven generations of the Archer family have lovingly tended the gardens of Tasmania’s Brickendon Estate, a world-heritage property featuring some of the state’s oldest trees. STORY Sandy Guy | PH OTO G R APH Y Claire Takacs

Located on the outskirts of Longford, near Launceston, the grand 1829 home at Brickendon is beautifully preserved. ‘Sea Foam’ roses spill over the ha-ha wall, originally built to prevent sheep munching the grass in the ‘pleasure’ garden. Wild grass outside creates a soft purple haze. The sculptural branches of a bunya pine can be seen at right. >


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H G GARDENS riving along the narrow avenue towards Brickendon, and now farms the property with his wife Louise and their you could be forgiven for thinking you’re somewhere children: Maddie, 22, Eliza, 27, and Will, 29. in the English countryside. The property, near the William designed his garden with sweeping lawns, woodlands, historic town of Longford in Tasmania’s north, is meandering paths and sunny glades, a quintessentially English bordered by kilometres of hawthorn hedgerows country garden along the lines of those made famous by planted by the original owner, William Archer, in the 1830s. 18th-century landscape architect Capability Brown. Established in 1824, Brickendon is one of Tasmania’s oldest The Archer family’s ownership over nearly two centuries farms. The 465-hectare estate, complete with Georgian manor has provided a remarkable continuity in the development of house, has been continuously owned by William Archer’s the garden and the estate as a whole, which have barely changed descendants for seven generations. It’s one of 11 Australian in appearance since the 1830s. sites on the UNESCO World Heritage List. “All the Archers have been keen gardeners,” says Richard. “It’s The garden at Brickendon extends over 5ha and is studded believed that William’s son, William Henry Davies Archer, planted with exotic trees, mostly planted during the 1830s. William the orchard in the 1860s.” The cherry plum, mulberry, apple, Archer sourced many specimens from around the world, including chestnut, hazelnut and pear trees William the younger planted a deodar cedar from India, an Algerian oak from north Africa still bear fruit today. and a cork oak from Portugal. The sole Australian contribution Of course, each generation since then has added to the is a majestic bunya pine (Araucaria bidwillii) in the front garden, plantings, which now include perennials, flowering shrubs its branches casting dramatic shadows over the manicured lawns. and trees that combine to make what Louise describes as “a William Archer’s original timber cottage (dating from 1824) giant cottage garden”. The expansive beds created over time is located about a kilometre from the manor house, in a ‘village’ feature about 100 varieties of heritage roses as well as camellia, of convict-built barns, stables and sheds. Prior to his marriage aquilegia, wisteria, clematis, hostas, hydrangeas and various in 1829, the increasingly prosperous William built and moved ornamental fruit trees. into the house the Archer family live in today. “He wanted a big Richard’s father Kerry was born at Brickendon and lived on house and pleasure gardens to match,” says sixth-generation the property for 85 years until he and his wife Angela, also an descendant Richard Archer, who has lived here all his life avid gardener, retired to nearby Launceston in 2016. >

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Abundant pink Alstroemeria and ‘Radox Bouquet’ roses, purple wallflowers (Erysimum), lavender, Lepichinia salviae, catmint, clematis and white lupins contribute to the cottage-garden feel. OPPOSITE, CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT Alchemilla mollis, shasta daisy (Leucanthemum x superbum) and a potted Echeveria in front of the Coachman’s Cottage. The Archer family (from left): Maddie, Richard, Eliza, Louise and Will. Blush-toned Rosa ‘Sea Foam’. Shetland pony Silver in the Farm Village. Elegant white lupins. The impressive main house and carriageway. Brickendon’s resident ducks and turkeys, including Indian runner duck Brian, roam freely in the garden. “Brian is getting on in years so he tends to stay close to home,” says Louise.


FEATURE TREES & PLANTS TREES

Strawberry tree (Arbutus unedo) Cork oak (Quercus suber) Algerian oak (Quercus canariensis) Bunya pine (Araucaria bidwillii) Monterey pine (Pinus radiata) Redbud (Cercis canadensis ‘Forest Pansy’) FLOWERS

Heritage roses Lupins Shasta daisy Alstroemeria

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Masses of candy-pink ‘Apple Blossom’ roses bloom along the fence of the Gardener’s Cottage. Honeysuckle, viburnum and Pittosporum add fragrant blooms in turn. BELOW The vivid purple leaves of a redbud tree (Cercis canadensis ‘Forest Pansy’) are a highlight of the Southern Garden, complemented by a mix of ‘Bonica’ roses, catmint, strawberries, Hydrangea grandiflora, Achillea and pink penstemons. OPPOSITE Variegated Euonymus and climbing hydrangea (Hydrangea petiolaris) adorn an arch near the main house. Other plantings include camellias, yellow tree peony, Agastache, salvia and catmint. >


‘Each morning I wake up, look out the window and appreciate where I am. It’s a beautiful place to live and work.’ Richard Archer

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Angela introduced a number of hardy, low-maintenance grasses, forms in the rural landscape. Spring is when flowering shrubs including miscanthus and pennisetum, in areas where periwinkle burst forth and the euphorbias and magnolias are at their best, (used as a groundcover) had previously dominated. “Grasses as blossoms appear on fruit trees and kilometres of hedgerows. are a good alternative in drier areas, such as beneath pine trees Down at the Farm Village, ancient trees tower above what was and in shrubberies,” says Louise. once the convicts’ quarters. There’s a cookhouse, a blacksmith’s Adding to the garden’s rich tapestry all the time, Louise and (untouched for almost 100 years), various farm structures and Richard recently planted a huon pine and a monkey puzzle tree. an exquisite little chapel now used for weddings. Resident ducks “We’ve had the Green Army [a federal government youth-training and turkeys promenade amid these and the other heritage program] helping us for a couple of months and they’ve been buildings – 20 in total – that make up this living museum of removing blackberries from the outer shrubberies, which has early European settlement. “Everything is pretty much as it was allowed us to plant new trees.” 180 years ago,” says Louise. The seasons make their presence felt in this beautiful garden. Brickendon is a working farm with sheep and cattle, vegetables Summer sees spectacular displays of fragrant roses and colourful and a number of specialist-seed crops. It also remains very much cottage perennials such as lupins, penstemons, daisies, anemones, the Archer family’s home. “Every day I wake up, look out the lilies and foxglove. The autumn garden is resplendent with a window and appreciate where I am,” says Richard. “This is a # blaze of multi-hued leaves on pin and scarlet oaks and lindens. beautiful place to live and work.” In winter, the bare branches of deciduous trees cast striking Brickendon; brickendon.com.au.

‘Everything is pretty much as it was 180 years ago.’ Louise Archer

Brickendon Farm Village and Estate Gardens are open year-round (closed Mondays and Christmas Day). Self-contained accommodation is available.

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The quaint Coachman’s Cottage, now used as holiday accommodation, is nestled into its own English-style garden, complete with ‘Cornelia’, ‘Rosendorf Sparrieshoop’ and ‘Angela’ roses peeping over the picket fence. Towering white gums in the background are the only clue to its antipodean location. OPPOSITE Spikes of betony (Stachys officinalis), a vigorous perennial loved by bees.


H G GARDENING

How to create

A HAPPY MIX

A sunny vegie patch is a favourite destination point in this Sydney garden, where a swimming pool and entertaining area also gently coexist. STORY Elizabeth Wilson | PH OTO G R APH Y Natalie Hunfalvay


Going native The pool fence is fringed with native grass lomandra and kangaroo paw. The white-trunked tree in the foreground is a water gum (Tristaniopsis laurina ‘Luscious’).

NICOLA CAMERON Director, Pepo Botanic Design

Screen queen

Raised expectations

A dense screen of passionfruit vine helps hide the garden shed. Nicola has used two layers of reinforcing mesh as the climbing frame. “The double thickness of mesh means the passionfruit grows very thick.”

“By raising these beds, we could fill them with growing media perfect for vegies,” says Nicola. “It also makes them a strong feature of the garden and prevents vegetables from spilling out into other beds.”

Stacks of style

Patch to plate

The 4x3m garden bed is made from stacked, recycled ironbark railway sleepers, their rustic appearance perfectly suited to the garden’s relaxed style. The vegie patch is surrounded by a gravel path for ease of access.

“We always have herbs growing and try different vegies throughout the year, including a whole lot of tomato varieties,” says Isabella. “The children love to eat the tiny tomatoes right off the vines.”

The brief When Isabella and Matthew returned to Australia from the UK with their two young children, they set their sights on finding a home with ample outdoor space “so we could spend more time in the sunshine”, says Isabella. They found their answer: a Federation house with a 12x22m backyard and pool in Sydney’s inner west. But a few things needed tweaking: there was boggy lawn around the pool and the back patio was more a thoroughfare than a sitting area. As keen but time-poor gardeners, the couple were seeking a low-maintenance garden with a vegie patch so they could teach their children about growing food. The solution To redirect foot traffic, Nicola relocated the pool gate and installed a central set of limestone steps, reinforcing the status of the pergola as a sitting area. By using a mix of Australian natives and exotics in simple, repeat plantings, she has ensured the garden is both structured and low maintenance. The boggy lawn around the pool has been replaced with pavers and beds of hardy plants, and a generous, raised vegetable garden has pride of place in a sunny rear pocket. Designer statement “I love that this garden flows in such a functional and visual way. It’s a happy family garden.” > AUSTRALIAN HOUSE & GARDEN |

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NEW DIRECTION Previously, access to the pool was via the pergola, which meant a constant stampede of little feet through the outdoor dining area. Nicola’s team installed a new pool fence, moved the pool entry and repaved the whole area. “It works so well now,” says Isabella. “It’s like having another room in the house.” Growing on the outside of the pool fence (left) are Lomandra ‘Katie Belles’ and kangaroo paw (Anigozanthos flavidus ‘Landscape Lilac’); on the inside are Babingtonia virgata ‘Dwarf’ and mounds of Westringia ‘Aussie Box’.

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Strong climber

Border protection

Scaling the pergola post is fragrant, white-flowering Stephanotis floribunda. “We wanted something scented, with a strong form that would not be messy,” says Nicola. “This ticks all the boxes.”

Pre-existing hedges of star jasmine (Trachelospermum jasminoides) grow along the side fences, a soft backdrop to the new garden. The lawn is Sir Walter buffalo, described by Nicola as “tough and bouncy”.

Sweeping beauty

Garden of contrasts

Pave the way

“Isabella and Matthew are gentle people, and we wanted to reflect that with a garden of soft colours and sweeping layers of plants,” says Nicola. “It’s lovely when all the grasses sway in the breeze.”

“I love that the garden is robust in its materials and plantings but also has gentle surprises, like when the purple-tinged kangaroo paw flowers at the same time as the neighbour’s jacaranda,” says Nicola.

The 600x400mm pavers are sandblasted Anamur limestone from Marble Matters. “With the paving in light grey, we wanted to keep the plant palette to mauve, greys, green-yellow and white,” Nicola explains.

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GARDENING H G Craving a productive garden? Nicola offers some food for thought:

✚ Salad vegies, herbs and fruit vines are generally easy to grow. They can be grown in pots of any size. ✚ A true vegetable garden is more of a commitment as crops need to be seasonally rotated and the soil prepared for each. ✚ A vegie garden with rotating crops requires a minimum plot of 2m². ✚ Most vegies need at least four hours of sun per day. ✚ Take the time to research the soil-nutrient, light and watering requirements of everything you grow. #

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Illustration by Sheryl Cole. For Where to Buy, see page 196.

A Rosemary and thyme thrive in their raised planter. B The prolific passionfruit vine. C Star jasmine (Trachelospermum jasminoides) grows like a thick cloak over the side fences. D Daisies and salvias have been planted in order to attract and sustain bees and butterflies.

Pepo Botanic Design, Paddington, NSW; (02) 9349 1220 or pepo.com.au.

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1 Paved pergola 2 Steps to garden 3 Lomandra ‘Katie Belles’ and kangaroo paw 4 Swimming pool 5 Outdoor seating 6 Garden shed 7 Vegetable bed 8 Water gums 9 Retaining wall of recycled railway sleepers 10 Westringia fruticosa

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WINNING HEDGE FRUITING HEDGES Many delicious fruits come from bushy plants that form dense hedges: Feijoa (Acca sellowiana), or pineapple guava, has egg-shaped fruit with a fruitsalad flavour. Its pretty crimson flowers are also edible. Silvery leaves make this a very attractive hedge. It grows in most climates, surviving mild frosts and salty coastal winds. The heaviest crops of fruit develop when flowers are cross-pollinated, so having a whole hedge of feijoas is ideal. Cumquats and calamondins are the bushiest, most compact citrus for hedging. The white flowers are beautifully fragrant and the small, bright orange fruit is held on the tree for months. Although sour, it’s delicious made into marmalade or steeped in brandy. Oval ‘Nagami’ cumquats have sweet skin and can be eaten whole. Lilly pilly is a native rainforest plant with glossy leaves and colourful new foliage in bronze, pink, red or gold. The fluffy flowers turn into edible berries, ranging from mauve to crimson in colour, which can be used to make jams, jellies and sauces. The bushtucker name of one of the prettiest, Syzygium luehmannii, is riberry. Chilean guava (Ugni molinae) is a smallleafed, frost-tolerant shrub that bears masses of pea-sized crimson berries in autumn. Now being marketed under the Tazziberries trademark, they have a spicy, strawberry/pineapple taste. The leaves and fruit are aromatic and pretty flowers in white to pale pink cover the bush in summer. 138 |

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Pomegranates (Punica granatum) are tough, deciduous shrubs that grow best in Mediterranean climates. They have lovely flowers (usually bright orange-red) followed by large, apple-size fruit in late summer and autumn. Traditional symbols of fertility, they contain numerous edible seeds in a juicy, crimson pulp. Eat them fresh, blend them for juice or use them in sauces and jellies.

Rosemary makes a robust, aromatic low hedge. You can choose regular rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis) or an upright variety such as ‘Tuscan Blue’. After stripping off the leaves for use in cooking, or drying them for pot pourri, the stalks can serve as barbecue skewers. Rosemary loves a hot, well-drained spot and slightly alkaline soil. It tolerates coastal conditions, drought and mild frosts.

Blueberries are delicious and good for you, so having your own hedge has lots of appeal. They require rich, acidic soil and you’ll need to protect the ripening crop from birds. They may be evergreen or deciduous, depending on the variety and climate. Select the right variety for your conditions; low-chill selections are available for warmer areas. Hedge heights range from 1m to 2m and the fruit ripens over a long period.

Lemon myrtle (Backhousia citriodora) is a native rainforest tree that can be pruned to a tall hedge. It likes a frost-free climate and water in summer. Use the leaves to flavour biscuits, teas, ice-cream or fish dishes.

AROMATIC LEAVES Bay trees (Laurus nobilis) will make a handsome hedge of rich green, aromatic foliage in full sun to part shade. Although native to the Mediterranean, bay trees grow in most areas of Australia and tolerate coastal conditions. Bay leaves, fresh or dried, are used in casseroles and stews, and can also help ward off pantry moths.

HEDGES FOR BEVERAGES In tropical or subtropical areas, you can grow your own coffee as a hedge. Coffea arabica and C. robusta have lustrous, deep-green foliage and lightly scented white flowers. The berries ripen from green through yellow to red; the seeds within are roasted and ground to make coffee. Plant your coffee hedge in rich, moist soil, preferably in a sheltered, shaded position. If you’re a tea-drinker in a cooler climate, try growing Camellia sinensis as a hedge. It has white flowers with yellow stamens; the leafy tips are picked and dried for tea. #

BEARING FRUIT Good soil preparation always pays off, so add plenty of organic matter before planting. Be sure to choose plants that are suited to your climate, and buy named fruiting varieties to ensure you’re getting quality fruit. Some fruits, such as feijoa and blueberries, will crop best when you have two or more varieties together for cross-pollination. Regular pruning of the hedge tips – lightly and often – is the key to a bushy form. Start pruning when the plants are young, avoiding the temptation to see your hedge grow tall as quickly as possible.

Photograph from Alamy (background).

Garden hedges provide more than just structure and privacy – they can also reward you with edible fruits and leaves. Consider some of these tasty options, writes Helen Young.


GET PAID TO DO WHAT YOU LOVE .

Feijoa

Cumquat

Lilly pilly

Chilean guava

Pomegranate

Blueberry

Growing a stately hedge that will act as a privacy screen or windbreak, and produce edible fruit or aromatic leaves, is a win-win scenario in any garden.

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FR E E D O M Learn practical skills to help start your business and be your own boss.

Lemon myrtle

Coffee


BRAND PROMOTION

Shared table

Gather friends and family for a relaxed dining experience with the Australian House & Garden tableware range, only at Myer. Make your guests feel welcome with an antipasto spread served on an appealingly organic wooden cheeseboard. Team it with ceramics in soft shades of green, blue and grey.

Clockwise from bottom left ‘Berrilee’ three-piece serving set, $69.95 (includes acacia cheeseboard and two porcelain bowls). ‘Cattai’ stoneware bowl, $10.95 (11.5cm). ‘Pitwater’ hi-ball glasses, $39.95/four. ‘Bowen’ frosted glass two-piece tumbler and jug set, $52.95 (glasses not pictured). Oil bottles with oak lid, $19.95 each. ‘Hartley’ noodle bowl, $19.95 (17.5cm). ‘Cattai’ stoneware side plate, $14.95 (21cm), and dinner plate, $18.95 (24cm). ‘Pitwater’ glass tumbler, $39.95/four. Blown glass vase $69.95 (37.5cm). ‘Esk’ wooden tray, $99.95. ‘Peninsula’ mangowood salad servers, $24.95. Dip-dye cotton napkin in Indigo, $9.95 each.

See more of the new and exclusive Australian House & Garden collection instore and online at myer.com.au


Styling by Kayla Gex. Photograph by Pablo Martin/bauersyndication.com.au.

Bring everyone to the table for a winter meal they’ll remember.


BUON APPETITO!

Gnocco fritto with prosciutto di San Daniele

Styling by Geraldine MuĂąoz. Photography by John Paul Urizar (this page), Vanessa Levis (opposite).

Round up la famiglia for an Italianstyle lunch or dinner. These six recipes from well-known Australian chefs are guaranteed to impress.


ENTERTAINING H G

Rigatoni with braised pork, tomato & olives

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S E RV E T H E S O U P O R PA S TA A S A F L AVO U R S O M E P R E LU D E TO T H E MAIN COURSE. IF T H AT ’ S D E L I C I O U S S L O W- C O O K E D M E AT, P L AT E W I T H H E A RT Y W I N T E R V E G E TA B L E S .

Minestra Braised beef cheeks, baby carrots & cavolo nero

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Fennel cooked in milk


Styling by Emma Knowles (minestra), Claire Delmar & Alice Storey (beef cheeks), Lucy Weight & Alice Storey (fennel), Lisa Featherby (tiramisu). Photography by Sharyn Cairns (minestra), Prue Ruscoe (beef cheeks), Ben Dearnley (fennel and tiramisu), Sharyn Cairns/bauersyndication.com.au (napkin).

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Tiramisu


Prep: 45 mins. Cooking: 25 mins + proving + resting. Serves 10-12.

155ml milk 5g dried yeast 2¼ cups (340g) plain flour, plus extra for dusting 30g softened butter, coarsely chopped Vegetable oil, for deep-frying 200g thinly sliced San Daniele prosciutto 1 Heat milk in a small saucepan until just lukewarm, add yeast and stir until dissolved; set aside. 2 Place flour, butter and a large pinch of salt in a food processor and pulse until just combined, about 30 secs. Add milk mixture and pulse until a soft dough forms, a further 30 secs. Turn dough onto a lightly floured bench and knead lightly until smooth, about 5 mins. Transfer to a lightly oiled bowl, cover with a tea towel and set aside until doubled in size, 45 mins-1 hr. 3 Turn dough out onto a very lightly floured surface, divide in half and, working with a piece at a time, roll to 5mm thick with a rolling pin. Roll through a pasta machine on widest setting, then fold over and feed through again. Continue to feed dough through rollers, reducing settings 1 notch at a time, until dough is about 2mm thick. Using a crinkle cutter or knife, cut dough into 8cm squares and set aside on baking paper-lined trays that have been lightly dusted with flour. Cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate 1 hr. 4 Place vegetable oil in a frypan and heat to 180˚C. Gently add gnocco fritto to oil in batches (take care as hot oil will spit) and cook, turning a few times, until just beginning to colour, about 3 mins. Drain well on absorbent paper and repeat with remaining dough. Serve warm with prosciutto or other Italian cured meat.

MINESTRA Prep: 20 mins. Cooking: 1 hr 25 mins. Serves 6.

¼ cup (60ml) olive oil 1 onion, finely chopped 2 cloves garlic, finely chopped 2 desiree potatoes, cut into 5mm dice 300g canned crushed tomatoes 420g podded fresh borlotti beans (about 1kg unpodded; see notes) 1 small sprig rosemary 120g dried ditalini (see notes) 1 curly endive, trimmed Finely grated parmesan, to serve Crusty bread, to serve 1 Heat 40ml olive oil in a large saucepan over medium heat, add onion and garlic and sauté until beginning to soften, about 6 mins. Add potato and sauté until starting to soften, a further 5-7 mins. Add tomato, simmer to reduce slightly, then add beans, rosemary and 2L water. Bring to a simmer and cook, covered, until potato and beans are very tender, about 55 mins. Remove lid, add ditalini and cook, stirring occasionally, until al dente, a further 6-8 mins. Add endive, stirring until wilted; season to taste. Scatter with parmesan and serve hot with crusty bread on the side. Notes

+ If fresh borlotti beans aren’t available, dried ones are good alternative. Before using, soak dried beans overnight in cold water, then drain, combine in a large saucepan with cold water and cook until tender, 25-30 mins. + Ditalini is a small tubular pasta available from select delicatessens. If unavailable, substitute another small pasta.

RIGATONI WITH BRAISED PORK, TOMATO & OLIVES Prep: 25 mins. Cooking: 3 hrs 30 mins. Serves 8.

1½ tbsp olive oil 1 onion, 1 leek and 1 stalk celery, all finely chopped 350g mild pancetta, finely chopped 150ml madeira 800g canned crushed tomatoes 1kg boneless pork shoulder, cut in half 200g black Ligurian olives, pitted 30g butter, coarsely chopped 1½ tbsp firmly packed marjoram leaves, plus extra to serve 750g dried rigatoni Finely grated parmesan, to serve 1 Preheat oven to 120˚C (100˚C fan). On the stovetop, heat olive oil in a large casserole over medium heat. Add onion, leek and celery and stir occasionally until tender, about 8 mins. Add pancetta and cook, stirring occasionally, until golden, a further 6-7 mins. Add madeira, simmer until reduced by half (about 2 mins), then add crushed tomatoes, bring to a simmer and season to taste. Add pork shoulder, cover and place in oven to braise, turning pork once, for 3 hrs or until very tender. Remove pork to a plate and, when cool enough to handle, coarsely shred and set aside. Retain cooking liquid. 2 Puree cooking liquid in a food processor or mouli, then transfer to a saucepan over medium heat. Bring to a simmer and cook until reduced to a thick sauce, about 10 mins. Stir in shredded pork, olives, butter and marjoram, season and keep warm. 3 Cook rigatoni in a large saucepan of boiling salted water until al dente (6-8 mins), then drain, toss through pork mixture and serve hot, scattered with parmesan. Garnish with extra marjoram leaves.

Recipes by O Tama Carey (gnocco fritto), James Kidman (rigatoni), Café di Stasio (fennel), Rita Macali (minestra), Il Bàcaro (beef cheeks), Daniel Pepperell (tiramisu).

GNOCCO FRITTO WITH PROSCIUTTO DI SAN DANIELE


ENTERTAINING H G

FENNEL COOKED IN MILK Prep: 20 mins. Cooking 1 hr + standing. Serves 4.

¼ cup (60ml) olive oil 4 fennel bulbs (about 350g each), cut into 5mm slices 600ml pouring cream 2 cloves garlic, crushed 4 sprigs sage 50g parmesan, finely grated 60g fresh sourdough breadcrumbs 1 tbsp finely chopped flat-leaf parsley 1 tsp lemon juice 1 Heat 20ml oil in a large frypan over medium-high heat. Add fennel in batches, season to taste and cook, turning occasionally, until golden, about 7 mins. 2 Preheat oven to 180˚C (160˚C fan). Place cream, garlic and sage in a saucepan over medium heat and bring to a simmer. Add fennel, return to the simmer, then use a slotted spoon to transfer to a 2.5L baking dish. Pour cream mixture over until dish is ¾ full. Scatter with ⅔ of the parmesan and bake until fennel is tender, 30-35 mins. 3 Preheat grill to high heat. Combine remaining oil and parmesan with breadcrumbs, parsley and lemon juice in a small bowl. Scatter breadcrumbs over fennel and grill until golden, about 7 mins. Stand for 5 mins, then serve hot.

BRAISED BEEF CHEEKS, BABY CARROTS & CAVOLO NERO Prep: 40 mins. Cooking: 5 hrs 15 mins. Serves 6.

⅓ cup (80ml) olive oil 6 beef cheeks (280g each), trimmed 2 golden shallots, finely chopped 2 celery stalks, coarsely chopped 1 carrot, coarsely chopped 1 clove garlic, crushed 5 sprigs thyme 1 cinnamon quill 1 fresh bay leaf 3 juniper berries 1 clove 200ml dry white wine 200ml port 6 cups (1.5L) chicken stock 2 bunches baby carrots, trimmed 120g butter, coarsely chopped 2 bunches cavolo nero (kale), trimmed 1 Preheat oven to 160˚C (140˚C fan). Heat 40ml olive oil in a frypan over high heat. Add beef cheeks and cook, turning once, until browned. Set aside. 2 Heat remaining oil in a large casserole over high heat. Add vegetables and garlic and stir occasionally until tender, 10 mins. Add herbs and spices, deglaze with wine and port; reduce until almost evaporated, 6 mins. Add stock, bring to a simmer, add cheeks, cover, and roast in oven until very tender, 3-4 hrs. Remove cheeks and keep warm. Return casserole to stove at medium-high heat and reduce braising liquid to a sauce consistency, 25-35 mins; set aside and keep warm. 3 Place carrots, 80g butter and 1L water in a saucepan over medium heat and cook until tender, 10-15 mins; remove with a slotted spoon and keep warm. Reduce cooking liquid until a light caramel colour, 15-20 mins. Toss sauce through carrots to serve. 4 Combine cavolo nero and 50ml water in a saucepan over low heat, season, cover, cook until wilted; toss remaining butter through. Serve beef cheeks, carrots and cavolo nero with reserved sauce and polenta, if you like.

TIRAMISU Prep: 15 mins. Cooking: 10 mins + refrigeration. Serves 6-8.

200ml freshly brewed espresso 125g caster sugar 3 egg yolks 40ml good-quality marsala 1 cup (250ml) pouring cream 350ml mascarpone 18 savoiardi (ladyfinger) biscuits Dutch-process cocoa, sieved, to serve 1 Pour hot coffee into a shallow bowl with 50g caster sugar, stirring to dissolve. Set aside to cool. 2 Place egg yolks, marsala and 25g sugar in a heatproof bowl over low heat and whisk until thick and mixture holds a thick ribbon, about 6 mins. Set aside. Place cream and remaining sugar in a bowl and use an electric mixer to whisk to soft-medium peaks; set aside. Place mascarpone in a separate bowl and whisk until smooth. Add egg yolk mixture to mascarpone, gently whisk to combine, then add whipped cream and whisk to soft peaks. 3 Soak 9 savoiardi biscuits in cooled coffee mixture, arranging them in a single layer in the base of a 24cm baking dish as you go. Cover with half the cream mixture. Soak remaining savoiardi in coffee and layer on top of cream mixture. Spread remaining cream over. Refrigerate for 2 hrs or until firm. Serve chilled, dusted with cocoa. #

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Botanical bliss

Drinks

TWIST AGAIN Vermouth is back on the menu. Sipped straight, with a twist or in a cocktail, it’s a delightfully versatile drop, writes Toni Paterson.

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Darker-coloured vermouths are made using red-grape varieties or through the addition of caramel. Of the botanicals, citrus is important for freshness, with the peels, leaves and flesh used. Spices add aroma, bitterness and warmth to the mix via seeds, roots and barks such as anise and cardamom. Flowers impart perfume, especially chamomile and elderflower. Herbs add complexity and depth; thyme and mint are popular, and many Australian vermouths also include native ingredients, such as finger lime and lemon myrtle. The exact blend of botanicals used to make a vermouth beverage is usually a closely guarded secret, as the ultimate aim of the producers is to create a ‘signature’ taste. As with white wine, always store an open bottle of vermouth in the fridge. And for maximum freshness, consume the contents within one month. #

Try these REGAL ROGUE LIVELY WHITE, $36/500ML Strong citrus overtones and delicate sweetness. Semillon base; botanicals include lemon myrtle, desert lime, native thyme, elderflower and grapefruit. 16.5% abv. DOLIN BLANC VERMOUTH DE CHAMBÉRY, $30/750ML Slightly sweet and refreshing, with blossom and gentle herb notes. Ugni blanc base; 30+ botanicals. 16% abv. MAIDENII DRY VERMOUTH, $50/750ML Wood, spice and herb accents. Viognier base; 30+ botanicals, including Australian natives. 19% abv. NOILLY PRAT ORIGINAL FRENCH DRY VERMOUTH, $32/750ML Wood-ageing is central to this dry, balanced, amber-toned drop. Great depth and complexity. 18% abv.

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Master the mixology Good-quality vermouth can be served very simply: straight up in a chilled glass, or over ice with a twist of citrus peel and splash of soda (ideal for aperitifs). Vermouth is also commonly used as a mixer in cocktails. With so many unique vermouths on the market, don’t be afraid to experiment. Using different vermouths in classic cocktails can have a big impact on their character. Garnishes can bring out the flavours of the botanicals – try rosemary, fresh mint, citrus peels or olives. Negroni For this classic Italian cocktail, pour equal parts sweet vermouth, Campari and gin over ice. Stir and garnish with a slice of orange. Dry martini Three parts dry gin with one part dry vermouth. Stir and garnish with a green olive. Manhattan Pour equal parts bourbon whiskey and Italian vermouth over ice. Add a dash or two of orange bitters. Stir to chill, then strain into a chilled cocktail glass. ABOVE Longdrink tumbler, $70/four, cocktail glass, $60/two, and decanter, $250 (part of a set with tumblers), from the ‘Punk’ range at Nachtmann.com.au.

Styling by Sophie Wilson. Photograph by Kristina Soljo.

ermouth is experiencing a revival alongside craft spirits and classic cocktails. But what exactly is it? You may be surprised to learn that wine is the base, to which a fortifying grape spirit is added. Botanicals – wormwood (always), among others – impart character. So vermouth is essentially a flavoured fortified wine. Traditionally, herbs, spices and roots were added to wine for their medicinal benefits; sweetening the wine made the botanicals more palatable. And as wine oxidises rapidly when exposed to air, the addition of yeast-busting spirit extended its shelf life. Vermouth can be sweet or dry, and has an alcohol content of between 15% and 22%, which is higher than wine but much lower than most spirits. Sweetness is part of the style, balancing any bitterness extracted from the botanicals; even those labelled ‘dry’ have a perceivable sweetness.


H G LIVING PA R T O F T H E P R O C E S S ✚ Sweet treats have been part of our food culture for a long time, but now we don’t have to make them ourselves and can access them instantly, it’s easy to eat too many. ✚ Sugar turns up in unexpected places, such as salad dressings and tomato-based pasta sauces, so it’s best to make your own. ✚ Eat more wholefoods and fewer processed foods. This will help your tastebuds appreciate the natural flavours of fresh food.

Health

SWEET SWITCH e humans are hardwired to like the sweet stuff. Two million years ago, it steered us towards high-kilojoule or nutrient-rich foods that helped us survive. All well and good when wild honey and fruit were the only dessert options, but not in a 21st-century supermarket where entire aisles are devoted to soft drink, sweets and biscuits. A recent study from Sydney’s George Institute for Global Health found that about 70 per cent of packaged foods contain added sugar. No surprise, then, that the average sugar intake in Australia is about 14 teaspoons a day, according to the Australian Health Survey, not counting the sugars found naturally in foods such as milk, fruit and vegies. Meanwhile, the World Health Organization suggests that added sugar should be no more than 10 per cent of our total kilojoule intake – about 12 teaspoons a day. “Sugar isn’t a problem if it’s consumed at recommended levels, but too much can lead to dental decay and a higher body weight, and being overweight increases the risk of type 2 diabetes, heart disease and some

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‘Sugar isn’t a problem if consumed at recommended levels, but too much can lead to dental decay and a higher body weight.’ Dr Sze Yen Tan, dietitian

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cancers,” says Dr Sze Yen Tan, a dietitian and lecturer at Deakin University’s School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences. Reducing the amount of sugar in your baking is one small change you can make, says Dr Tan, as long as you’re not fooled into thinking you can eat more. If you use alternative sweeteners, there are some small advantages. For example, honey and maple syrup are sweeter than white sugar so you need to use less, while agave syrup has a very low GI so is better for blood-sugar control. But on balance, the difference is very small, he adds. “Artificial sweeteners have their place if they help overweight people transition to a healthier diet, but the crucial point is that we need to be less dependent on sweet food,” says Dr Tan. It is possible to adjust to reduce sugar in your diet, says Professor Russell Keast of the Centre for Advanced Sensory Science at Deakin University. “But once you’ve reset your palate to prefer less sweet foods, you have to keep it up. If you go back to eating more sweet foods again, your palate will readjust to how it was before.” #

Illustration by Domenic Bahmann.

Refined sugar is almost impossible to avoid, but we should all learn to love it less, writes Paula Goodyer.


Beauty

PECKING ORDER We love to kiss and tell when it comes to the best new lipsticks and their high-tech formulas, writes Elisabeth King.

B Styling by Sophie Wilson. Photograph by Kristina Soljo. For Where to Buy, see page 196.

eauty brands are constantly revamping their products to give women what they want. That’s no easy feat when it comes to lipstick, lip gloss, lip pencils and lip balm, since the most sought-after attributes are more or less in conflict with each other. Happily, these new-release lip colours tick all the most-wanted boxes: lightweight feel yet intense colour; shine with coverage; and moisture with staying power.

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Mavala ‘Boutique Collection’ lipsticks ($28 each)

A leader in natural ingredient-based nail care for 50 years, this Swiss brand has also built up a formidable reputation for easy-glide, moisturising lipsticks. Featuring Prolip, a trademarked anti-ageing complex that includes candelilla wax, shea butter, aloe vera, vitamin E and UVB filters, the creamy formula protects, hydrates and repairs lips. The latest winter collection is a glamorous line-up of six bold shades from Golden Rose to Dark Velvet (pictured below, far right).

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Chanel ‘Rouge Coco Lip Blush’ hydrating lip and cheek colours ($50)

The name says it all. This two-in-one lip and cheek enhancer comes in six shades that run the gamut from soft rose to rich berry. Light, moisturising and easily buildable, you begin with one dot on each

cheek and three dots on the lips for a fresh, healthy glow, then add more as required. No bleeding, feathering or settling into fine lines.

3

Max Factor ‘Velvet Mattes’ lipstick collection ($21 each)

Many beauty brands are chasing the Millennial dollar, but Max Factor has recently relaunched as the go-to choice for women aged 35-plus. Matt lipsticks once used powders to achieve the longed-for opaque effect, which tended to dry the lips. Not this product, an assortment of seven satin-finished lippies packed with hydrating ingredients. It keeps lips feeling moisturised and comfortable for hours.

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Natio ‘Intense Colour’ lip crayons ($10 each)

Lip crayons are a fun alternative to gloss and lipstick – they’re easy to use and a great tool for creating a defined outline. This five-shade range includes colours that can take you from day to night (pictured are Spring Flower, left, and Dusty Rose). The long-wearing formula does double-duty as a lip liner and fill-in colour. Sharpen with a regular sharpener.

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100-per-cent natural lipstick had limited choices. Kiwi entrepreneur Karen Murrell has enjoyed explosive global success with her “better for you” lipsticks made from nourishing natural ingredients such as avocado oil, evening primrose oil and carnauba wax. The pigment and colour payoff is as good as their mainstream competitors. Sustainably sourced paper and vegetable-based inks used in the packaging is also a major selling point for natural-beauty fans.

6

Yves Saint Laurent ‘Volupté Liquid Colour Balm’ lip colours ($57 each)

Whether it’s a slick of sheer for shine or a splash of strong colour, lip gloss is one product that is flattering at any age. Intense colour and moisturisation were once mutually exclusive, but this gloss-balm hybrid delivers vibrancy as well as lip care, thanks to coconut water, antioxidant-rich vitamin E, jojoba oil and shea butter. Available in 12 shades ranging from balletslipper pink to deep raspberry and orange blossom. #

Karen Murrell lipsticks ($30 each)

Ten years ago, anyone who wanted to buy a

Lip gloss flatters at any age. 4

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Sofie reveals all here!

solution!

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Compared with previous Samsung WW6500K. Saves up to 50% time on Cotton (40ËšC, half load), based on testing conducted to IEC 60456:2010. Cycle duration may vary depending on the water supply and weight/type of laundry. 2 Add Door can be opened at anytime if drum is below 50Ëšc and has stopped spinning. 3 Compatible device and Internet required. 4 Based on Super Speed at default settings with a 5kg load.


Photograph by Thomas Dalhoff. Artworks by Brett Mickan.

All the ingredients for fun, familyfriendly dining zones.

Whether you’re a serious chef or prefer to eat food cooked by someone else, your dining room should be a place you love to spend time in. For more ideas on funky meals areas like this one by interior designer Brett Mickan, turn the page...


In focus

DYNAMIC DINING ZONES

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pen-plan kitchen/dining/living areas are de rigueur in contemporary Australian homes, but combining the various functions they perform isn’t always easy. The answer is a thoughtful layout, which begins with working out exactly how you want to use the space, says Perth interior designer Judith Barrett-Lennard. Decide how much room is needed for your furniture, appliances and workability, then integrate any special design features, statement pieces and bold colours into the scheme.

KNOCK-ON EFFECT This 1950s holiday cottage on the NSW central coast is now more user-friendly, thanks to a revamp by interior designer Brett Mickan. The cramped kitchen and living room were knocked into one larger, more relaxed open-plan space and beachy accessories, such as the blue stools, were combined with the rug and other traditional elements. bmid.com.au


Text by Laura Barry. Artwork by Greg Wood (this page, bottom). Photography by John Paul Urizar (this page, top), Justin Alexander (this page, bottom), Maree Homer (opposite).

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FORM FOLLOWS FUNCTION Cook, writer and television presenter Adam Liaw needed his Sydney kitchen to be beautiful, child-friendly and multifunctional because, as well as family dinners, Adam uses it for recipe testing, photo shoots and business meetings. When designing a kitchen, he says it’s important to think about the work triangle between fridge, sink and oven, and include a compact ‘cleaning triangle’ – formed by your sink, dishwasher and plate-storage area – to make cleaning easier. Here, the stepped-down custom oak table keeps the family close to the action, while Caesarstone benchtops in Raw Concrete (adjacent island) and Calacatta Nuvo (wall-side bench) add a polished, contemporary finish.

ONE FOR ALL THE OWNERS OF THIS SY D N E Y H O M E A S K E D LU I G I R O S S E L L I A R C H I T E C T S TO C R E AT E A C A S UA L D I N I N G ZO N E T H AT C O U L D C AT E R TO A C R O W D. “ T H E D I N E R - S T Y L E B A N Q U E T T E , W H I C H AC C O M M O DAT E S U P TO 1 0 , S U B T LY R E F E R E N C E S T H E H O M E ’ S 1 9 5 0 S A R C H I T E C T U R E ,” S AYS LU I G I . R O U N D E D P E N DA N T L I G H T S A N D A C U RV E D - E D G E D I N I N G TA B L E ECHO THE EYE-CATCHING FORM OF THE S E AT. LU I G I R O S S E L L I .C O M >

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STAGE CRAFT The owners of this 1960s apartment in Melbourne wanted a space that was suitable for entertaining and referenced the building’s architectural history. “I proposed the large-scale macramé screen by local artist Sarah Parkes, to demarcate the zones within the openplan layout and provide a visual focal point,” says Andrew Mitchell of Mr Mitchell Interior Design. The stylish three-panel screen (right) defines the dining area yet doesn’t obstruct the flow of the greater space. It also gives a subtle nod to the decorative crafts of the 1960s and ’70s, when macramé was popular. mrmitchell.com.au

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Photography by Robert Frith (this page, top), Andrew Wuttke (this page, bottom), Sean Fennessy (opposite).

C O L O U R T H E O RY I N T E R I O R D E S I G N E R J U D I T H B A R R E T T- L E N N A R D WA S A S K E D TO “ B R I G H T E N A N D E N E R G I S E ” T H E P E RT H D I N I N G A R E A AT L E F T, O W N E D BY A YO U N G FA M I LY. “ P L AY F U L C O L O U R S A N D S H A P E S W E R E K E Y TO R E A L I S I N G T H E B R I E F,” S AYS J U D I T H . T H E F E AT U R E PA I N T I N G BY A RT I S T B U G A I W H YO U LT E R I N F O R M S T H E C O L O U R PA L E T T E A N D I N J E C T S F U N I N TO T H E F U N C T I O N A L S PAC E . JBLDESIGN.COM.AU


MIXED MEDIA Designed with flexibility in mind, the highlight of this Melbourne kitchen/dining space is its movable joinery, which can be configured to suit multiple purposes. The brainchild of interior designer Fiona Lynch, it features a rich mix of colours and materials. A wall of mirror mixed with stone, brass and painted-oak surfaces make for a striking yet considered concept. “Materials and lighting are important for creating layers and feeling within a room,” says Fiona. “The mirror creates the illusion of more space.” And the glamorous Areti ‘Mimosa’ pendant light is an eye-catching flourish. fionalynch.com.au #


BRAND PROMOTION

Laundry

LOVE

In this three-part series, a trio of style setters share the details of their dream laundry.

F

ew people look forward to tackling the mountains of laundry that pile up daily, but there’s no denying the task is infinitely more enjoyable when carried out in a beautiful laundry, using intuitive appliances loaded with technology and design smarts. Working mum Kate Nixon, Australian House & Garden’s interiors editor, says her ideal laundry is designed to deal with high foot-traffic and lots of washing. “My ultimate laundry would be a functional extension of the kitchen – beautifully designed and carefully considered with an enviable materials palette. “These beautiful Italian reclaimedterracotta tiles are a great choice for the flooring – I’m passionate about natural materials and patina and they bring such soul to a space. The smart, super-white dolomite marble bench and splashback is sophisticated and practical. Accents of black steel, aged bronze, leather, linen and oak ground the scheme. “The need for beauty in our homes, especially in high-traffic work areas such as laundries, is so often overlooked. My dream laundry is a modern, multipurpose room – a space for washing, drying and folding and ironing, as well as a mud room, potting shed and impromptu study nook.”

Miele TMV840 9kg heat-pump dryer (left) and WMV960 WPS 9kg washing machine.


Think function first, with a place for everything and everything in its place. KATE NIXON

The power of technology Kate’s ideal laundry would feature a Miele 9kg front-loading washing machine – its generous capacity, plus 26 wash programmes including QuickPowerWash, means the job’s done perfectly in just 59 minutes. For drying, there’s a 9kg-capacity Miele heat-pump tumble dryer with Steam Smoothing – a quick alternative to ironing – and an outstanding 8-star energy rating. A perfect pairing for her busy family.

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v a l u e d at u p to $1 0, 8 0 0 * How would you turn your laundry from lacklustre to lovely? Tell us in 25 words or less and you could win a Miele washing machine valued at up to $4499, a Miele tumble dryer valued at up to $4499 and return flights and one night’s accommodation for the winner to attend a one-hour design consultation with Kate Nixon in Sydney. Enter now at homestolove.com.au/miele

Step into interior designer Juliette Arent’s dream laundry.

*Conditions apply, see homestolove.com.au/miele. Commences 28.05.2018. Ends 11.59pm AEST on 02.07.2018. AU residents 18+. This is a game of skill, not a game of chance. The Promoter is Bauer Media Pty Limited (ABN 18 053 273 546) of 54 Park Street, Sydney, NSW 2000.


ADVICE H G

KITCHEN DIRECTIONS The biennial EuroCucina trade fair in Milan attracts kitchen designers and manufacturers from all over the world. Lisa Green joined the throng to uncover the technology and trends bound for our shores. P R OU DLY S P ON S OR E D BY BLU M

Taking its place in an open-plan living zone, this sculptural island solution from Italian brand L’Ottocento is backed by a wall of integrated appliances secreted behind panelled doors. Handle-free designs featured at many stands. >

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IN WITH THE NOIR The trend towards darker neutrals and rich-toned cabinetry is supported by sultry hardware choices. “To designers, and increasingly consumers, the inside of the cabinetry and drawers matters as much as the outside,” says Blum national marketing manager Kylie Peterson. This places Blum Clip top Blumotion hinges in onyx black firmly in the frame.

DARK ART With seamlessly integrated appliances receding into walls and work zones, dark and mid-toned timbers, black steel and smoky glass finishes and the seductive glow of warm LED lighting pinpointing shelves and underscoring thin-profile benchtops, much of the EuroCucina exhibition had a nightclub vibe, an energy assisted by record crowds – more than 434,500 people passed through the halls in six days. “Beautiful, rich warmer and darker colours are creating a nice mood in the kitchen,” says Rob Sinclair, joint managing director of appliance retailer E&S. “There is a lovely use of natural stone and more industrial finishes, like brasses and bronzes, in combination with stone.” “Kitchens are increasingly going to ‘the dark side’, and also extending into grey, blue and green,” agrees Jon Carlehed, design manager at Swedish brand Asko. “Matt finishes in glass are big for us and we see more and more people matching this with matt cabinetry. Matt black will always attract kitchen designers and architects. Asko has now added a more ‘alive’ and reflective element that’s less absorbent than matt black. It’s much more adaptable and will fit most kitchens.” Combined with rich timbers, the effect is such that the appliances recede, says Sinclair. “It’s a much better colour match, an alternative to integration.”

OPPOSITE from top A sensor-triggered panel lifts to reveal

a Valcucine kitchen. Mirrored steel from Abimis. Smeg’s sleek ‘Dolce Stil Novo’ range of appliances launches in Australia this spring. A Scavolini design nails two big trends: metal frames and fluted glass.


ADVICE H G

SMOOTH OPERATORS In contemporary homes and apartments, hiding the kitchen is becoming something of an art form. Appliances retreat behind sleek joinery or sit flush within work islands to make more room for living. The key to success is handle-free designs, push-to-open cabinetry that reveals ovens or fridges, and pocket doors that open and slide into recesses to reveal small appliances. Minimalist looks put the spotlight on functionality, and storage solutions driven by clever engineering come into play. Think motion-sensing technologies for lift systems that expose workspaces, push-open doors and drawers, and pull-out pantries. “There are infinite possibilities for handlefree kitchen furniture,” says Peterson. Sinclair notes the expansive use of drawers. “Europeans are always ahead of us on drawer use; their drawers are ergonomic and weightbearing, thanks to strong runners. There’s push-to-open technology on fridges now... everything is handle-free.” INDUSTRIAL STRENGTH Balancing the disappearing kitchen is the showcase statement piece… handcrafted, sculptural, monolithic even. High-end Florentine kitchen company Officine Gullo’s modern kitchen bears all the artisanal details the brand is known for, housing the latest in cooking technologies within a detailed metalwork case that screams upscale yet traditional. Another Italian company, Barazza, took hardwearing to the next level with its pretreated scratchproof stainless-steel benchtops. Made to measure, it’s subjected to pre-scratching, so it appears weathered on delivery. It’s available in Australia through Abey. Channelling a 1950s diner, Abimis presented stainless t li i ff t ith t i lt hil Il ’

Compact and freestanding Stylish and portable all-in-one units with sink, hob, bins and storage were presented by several brands, including Japanese company Sanwa and Italian maker Fantin. The latter’s ‘Frame’ unit (pictured) designed by Salvatore Indriolo comes in several chic colours.

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WHAT GOES UP MUST GO DOWN Pioneered by Bora a few years ago and now seen across many brands, downdraft extractors housed adjacent to cooking hubs are on the rise. They reduce visual clutter in the kitchen by eliminating heavy hoods but, according to James Vogdanos, marketing director at Asko Australia, the technology has its shortcomings: “Steam rises. This is the law of physics. A downdraft will work, but not as effectively as traditional methods. For example, a wok is elevated and away from the source of air extraction, which will limit its ability to move fumes.” BURNING DESIRE Precision engineering in the form of gas hobs by Dutch company Pitt Cooking erupted from work surfaces in more than 50 kitchens throughout Milan this year, in three- or four-burner, linear or square formats, a striking product piercing natural stone or composite stones, without the surrounding plate. “Flush-mounted induction hotplates, where the appliance surface is on the same plane as the benchtop material, delivers a smooth, featureless surface. “I hope we see the fabrication industry in Australia step up its game to make that a reality here,” says Sinclair. “It’s a matter of educating fabricators in stone to get this done well.” Induction as a global trend is definitely growing and matt finishes in glass are popular. Yet consumers love the look and feel of a naked flame, says Asko designer Jon Carlehed, especially where there is an abundance of natural gas. “The future for gas, and Asko has already launched this with ‘Volcano’, is to control gas electronically. Select the program for what you wish to cook and the level of gas i j t t m ti ll ”

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ADVICE H G

MATERIAL FUSION Deft material mixes drew plenty of attention, particularly at the high-end stands. Masterful merging of stone and wood was seen at Boffi, Dada, Lago and exemplified by ‘Ratio’ by Molteni & C (below). Taking things a step further was the blurring of function with induction hobs secreted in islands and even on a dining table (opposite). Thin-face material applications have given designers great freedom, says Kylie Peterson, opening up endless material opportunities for door and drawer fronts. “Some designers have a desire to work with veneer types laid up to 9mm or 12mm, or Dekton surfaces, which come in 8mm and 12mm thicknesses,” she says. “A lot of suppliers were putting 4mm or 6mm panels of glass on joinery,” concurs Sinclair. “Think chocolate or charcoal glass on door fronts to get a smokedglass effect, and etched glass on door and drawer fronts.” Peterson says the thin-front trend is supported by hardware now available in Europe but yet to reach Australia.

‘Ratio’, the dramatic design by Vincent Van Duysen for Dada, epitomises the material fusion seen at EuroCucina, where stone cloaking rich timbers – sometimes dipping beneath sink level – was a strong feature. OPPOSITE from top ‘Levante’ overhead hood by Falmec; downdraft extraction slot by Bora. Asko’s Fusion ‘Volcano’ wok is a great example of a dual-fuel hob: induction and gas side by side. The ‘H-20’ design for Kartell by Piero Lissoni blurs kitchen/living zones by embedding an induction hob in the dining table. Dutch company Pitt Cooking’s gas burners are cut into the work surface.

FULL STEAM AHEAD Steam is really powering as a cooking method and is set to gain in popularity as other selling points are highlighted to consumers. Currently, most suppliers are only emphasising the technology functionality, says Vogdanos. “What we are yet to see is deeper messaging about how steam cooking is better for you in health terms.” Steam is absolutely about healthy cooking – fish, white meats, vegetables and so on, says Sinclair. “But it’s also about results: adding steam to the end of your bread-baking results in a crispier crust. Miele and V-Zug, Gaggenau and Siemens, to name four, are global leaders in steam cooking. “The next evolution for steam is larger-format ovens – 60x60cm. (One such example is the AEG 60cm SteamPro Steam Oven with sous vide function, stocked locally by Harvey Norman). Add a vacuum drawer with a combi steam oven and you have marinating and food-storage solutions, too.” >


H G ADVICE

BREAKTHROUGH TECHNOLOGY Miele’s ‘Dialog’ oven, launched in the Italian market at EuroCucina and arriving in Australia in July, is being hailed as a major breakthrough. Harnessing electromagnetic waves for precision results, ‘Dialog’ reads how much energy is being absorbed by the food and adjusts the cooking rate accordingly, reducing cooking time and energy. (Think 2.5 hours for a slow-cooked roast that usually takes 6-8 hours.) “Unlike microwaves, which cook from the outside in, electromagnetic waves move right through the food very efficiently,” says Rob Sinclair. “Miele has taken a medical technology – invented to keep donor organs at a precise temperature during transplant procedures – and transferred it to the kitchen. It won’t be a cheap product, but it’s great to see innovation like this.” CONNECTED & SOCIAL Appliances that recognise your voice, talk you through a recipe and reorder groceries… Front and centre of big-brand thinking is the connected kitchen, an intuitive social hub. Elica previewed a virtual assistant, the ‘NikolaTesla Chef’. Select a recipe from the practical display on the hob and the Sensor Chef feature guides you through the process step by step, including setting and monitoring your cooking temperature, to ensure the recipe turns out perfectly. The system also notifies users when to actively intervene during cooking, leaving them free to do other tasks in the meantime. Similarly, Asko ‘Connect Life’ has a digital cooking assistant to guide you through a recipe with pictures and videos, while voice recognition allows you to control the appliances by speaking to them. Whirlpool’s ‘6th Sense’ kitchen system sees products interact – for example, a rangehood light flashing to denote the end of a dishwasher cycle – for a better user experience. In its first EuroCucina outing, Fisher & Paykel launched the ninth-generation DishDrawer, which features a handy knock-to-pause function. On the refrigeration front, Liebherr’s SmartDevice technology allows you to control your fridge from anywhere, plus see the contents by means of modular cameras. THINK GREEN Factories are chasing carbon-neutral production processes and kitchen design is heading towards ever more precise temperature control. Think multiple gas hob settings and the ability to set the desired temperature for induction cooktops, saving electricity. “You’ll set 100˚C to boil water and only use the required amount of energy,” says Asko’s Jon Carlehed. Companies are also moving to all-recyclable components. “The Swiss, Germans and Swedes are all very conscious of their environmental footprint,” says Sinclair. # 168 |

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ABOVE clockwise from top Whirlpool’s new collections are internetenabled. Miele’s groundbreaking ‘Dialog’ oven uses electromagnetic waves to reduce cooking time. Samsung’s ‘Family Hub’ app allows you to reorder Nespresso capsules. BELOW Aran Cucine’s experimental ‘Oasi’ island houses nature and all kitchen functions in one clever hub.


BRAND PROMOTION

Milan 2018: The Blum Report

Kitchen STORIES With sophisticated chocolatey timbers and smoky glass, the news from EuroCucina was sweet.

Moody hues Dark moody looks are dominating kitchen palettes, from rich-toned cabinetry to appliances in blackened steel and smoky glass finishes. Completing the picture for many kitchen companies was Blum’s CLIP top BLUMOTION – onyx black hinges that disappear into the dark cabinet interior while playing a major supporting role, ensuring silent, effortless, soft-close function. CLIP top BLUMOTION

Glass doors were used as a feature to highlight homewares, not hide them behind solid doors.

Blum’s undersink drawer ensured the function met the beauty of design. Drawer card The designer and consumer preference for large drawers in kitchens is as strong as ever, and ably supported by Blum hardware. Capable of bearing a 70kg load, the elegant LEGRABOX drawer box system is adored by architects for its thin profile and smooth motion. And what’s not to love about the AMBIA-LINE accessories range that keeps everything in order?

Impressive design deserves quality hardware.

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THE BIG FINISH All the tradies are packing away their tools and the style team is moving in to decorate. We can’t wait to show you around this lovely family home in Sydney. triking, eco-conscious and standing tall among its pitch-roofed neighbours, My Ideal House is every inch the innovative home that Australian House & Garden and Mirvac hoped it would be. The newly built home, borne of a design competition, resides at Crest by Mirvac, a master-planned community in Sydney’s Gledswood Hills. At the time of going to print, teams of tradies were on site and finishing off the final tasks – installing lights and power points, fitting appliances, completing the landscaping and turfing the driveway. The home brings to life H&G’s desire to rethink the Australian family home. The design is flexible enough to orient advantageously on any block, and its living spaces cleverly allow for future change. Most exciting of all, this >

S

Photograph by Nic Gossage.

The crowning glory of My Ideal House is its Bradford 5.4kW Solar ChargePack, which includes a Tesla Powerwall 2 storage battery and the 5.4kW solar panels that are affixed to the Colorbond roof.

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A Smeg gas cooktop in white keeps the kitchen looking cohesive.

white appliances are a great option,” says Madeleine. There’s also a dishwasher with a six-star WELS rating tucked into the kitchen island, and a roomy french-door fridge/freezer from Winning Appliances concealed in cabinetry. One of the final elements to be installed inthekitchenwasitsSmartstonebenches. The Carrara finish has been chosen to top the island and flow down to the floor. While the island is intentionally a focal point of the home, the rear benchtop, in Smartstone’s Absolute Blanc, blends beautifully into the joinery along the allimportant southern wall.

In the bathrooms, tilers have completed a final seal and the fixtures, which are all from Reece, are now in place. Both the main bathroom and ensuite have a Rifco ‘Acqua’ timber-topped vanity, and the main bathroom now has a timeless, solidsurface Kado ‘Lussi’ freestanding bath as its star feature. Plumbers have fitted all the tapware – designs from Reece’s cleanlined ‘Mizu Soothe’ range. A final visit from Dallimont Electrical has seen Brightgreen LED lights installed throughout, along with feature pendant lights, power points and ceiling fan. This home is so thermally efficient and so >

Photography by Nic Gossage.

single dwelling has the potential to change the shape of our suburbs. In any home build, the materialisation of the kitchen generates great anticipation and excitement. Joiners from Top Knot Carpentry & Joinery have been busy here, excelling at the exacting task of delivering a kitchen that reflects the vision architect Madeleine Blanchfield laid out in her competition-winning design. “I like the kitchens I design to be almost indistinguishable from their architecture, particularly when they are open-plan,” says Madeleine. “They might be partially concealed in walls or have the same finishes as the bones of the building.” To achieve this look at My Ideal House, Top Knot Carpentry & Joinery installed Polytec doors with neat V-groove detailing. The cabinetry neatly complements the Glosswood-lined ceiling and houses sleek Smegappliancesthathavebeenintegrated into the design. Flanking a state-of-the-art Smeg ‘Linear’ cooktop and underbench oven, the understated bank of cupboards containsan appliance tower with compact speed oven and coffee machine. “Inkeepingwiththeideaofdownplaying the kitchen in a white-walled space,


LIGHTING: IN THE CAN Most of the lighting in My Ideal House is provided via Brightgreen LED lights, an energy-efficient choice. D900 SH ‘Curve’ can lights (left) have a 70,000-hour lifespan. The beauty of these lights is that they’re surface-mounted, which increases the home’s thermal efficiency by eliminating the need for ceiling cutouts. They offer great, dimmable task lighting when in use and look neat in their white casings when turned off. Madeleine has specified the D900 SH ‘Curve’ lights for above the kitchen’s island bench, while Brightgreen’s minimalist D900+ downlights appear in the entry, hallways and multipurpose room. The bedrooms are illuminated by D700+ downlights.

THIS PAGE clockwise from top left The built-in appliance

My Ideal House is white throughout but punctuated with warming timber accents in its lined ceiling and window seat. Deep charcoal walls create a focal point in the living areas.

tower features a Smeg ‘Linear’ compact speed oven. D900 SH ‘Curve’ lights by Brightgreen are surface-mounted onto the Glosswood-lined ceiling. A round Alape basin sits atop a Rifco ‘Acqua’ vanity; both are from Reece. A DCW Editions ‘213’ articulated wall light from Spence & Lyda illuminates the Innowood-clad window seat. This wall, in Taubmans Knight Grey, surrounds the spot where a Real Flame ‘Simplicity’ 1500 gas fireplace will go. A Kado ‘Lussi’ bath from Reece is set by the main bathroom’s cedar-framed windows. OPPOSITE from left Joiners from Top Knot Carpentry & Joinery have worked hard to realise architect Madeleine Blanchfield’s vision for a well-integrated kitchen. Specifying a Smeg ‘Linear’ gas cooktop in white was one of Madeleine’s masterstrokes.


comfortable that the only space featuring mechanical cooling is the multipurpose room at the front of the house. Here, an ‘I Series’ fan by Haiku has been installed. It features sensors that automatically adjust the operating mode whenever the room’s occupancy, temperature or humidity level changes. Outside, landscapers have now laid the lawn and put in garden plants, which sit against a timber fence painted Taubmans Knight Grey – the same colour used as an accent in the living areas. Designed to border the lawn and provide a perch for people to chat on, a low wall in ‘Bowral Blue’ bricks from Austral Bricks extends the width of the garden’s rear. “The ‘Bowral Blues’ add a nice bit of definition,” explains landscape designer Richard Unsworth from Garden Life. “I wanted to bring an architectural element to the garden. The wall creates an area where the owners can either sit quietly or socialise with friends and family.” Behind the brick wall, a row of five mature weeping lilly pillies (Waterhousea floribunda) helps to block the afternoon’s western sun. A generous 4x11m expanse of buffalo-grass lawn, hedged with another variety of lilly pilly, has been allowed for, which ensures the garden, like the house, is flexible and adaptable. “This is a seasonal garden, with the trees, lawn, flowers, foliage and herbs all interacting,” says Richard. “I wanted to give the edible elements prominence by positioning them at the front of the house. Clipped Buxus [box] will bring structure to the at-times unruly herbs and vegies.”

doubling as a privacy screen for the main bathroom, it makes a striking feature against the home’s white facade. The B&D ‘Panelift’ garage door has been colourmatched to the Taubmans Crisp White exterior paint. Innowood makes an appearance inside, too, wrapping around an inviting window seat in the front, multipurpose room.

‘I like the use of bricks in the garden. Whether they’re recycled or new, bricks look smart.’ Richard Unsworth On the facade, Innowood cladding has been applied to My Ideal House’s signature windowboxes. Innowood is a highly durable, sustainable-timber composite made predominantly from wood waste. The finishing touch to the facade is now in place, a decorative Innowood grille installed above the front entrance. Cleverly

With the sales campaign about to begin, My Ideal House will soon be lived in and loved. Mirvac will auction the home on June 30. You can follow the final stages of our build journey online, and don’t miss August H&G, where we’ll reveal our home in all its finished, furnished glory. # See more at myidealhouse.com.au.


HOW GREEN IS YOUR DRIVEWAY?

Painters apply the finishing touches to the home’s facade. The porch over the front door is clad in Innowood, as are the windowboxes and decorative grille. To the left, you can see the finished Grass-Cel turf driveway being watered in. OPPOSITE from top Painters get to work finishing the garden’s northern fence in Taubmans Knight Grey. The Glosswood lining that covers the ceilings in the living areas extends out to under the eaves. Features in the rear garden include a low wall in ‘Bowral Blue’ bricks for additional seating and a row of weeping lilly pillies. The Grass-Cel driveway pavers going in.

Photography by Nic Gossage.

Among the many innovative inclusions in My Ideal House is its Grass-Cel turf driveway. “Grass-Cel pavers are constructed from recycled council wheelie bins and take the form of hexagonal cells that can be locked together to create a mat of just about any size,” says company director Vicki Weeks. The pavers (shown opposite, bottom) are strong enough to hold the weight of a car or truck. They allow air, water and nutrients to move from the lawn surface to the subsoil. Grass roots grow down through the holes into the subsoil to bind and hold the pavers in place. “You do have to water your driveway, as you would any patch of grass, but it recovers well after a period of neglect or having a vehicle parked there too long.”

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Property

CHILLING OUT The notion that spring is the best time to sell requires some seasonal adjustment, writes Harvey Grennan. hen the weather’s cold, it’s easy to assume that spring is a better time to sell your home. The sun will be shining, the grass green and birds singing, tra-la-la. But is it really the best time to sell? Yes and no, according to statistics compiled for H&G by property-research company CoreLogic. While spring is indeed the peak time for total property listings, more homes are actually sold in autumn, albeit by a small margin. And listings in autumn are only fractionally behind spring anyway. In terms of individual months, this pattern is maintained. November is the peak time for total listings in all capital cities except Darwin, and March the peak month for sales (except in Adelaide and Darwin) followed by May. Adelaide has its peak selling period in June and Darwin in December. Not surprisingly, January is the slowest month nationally for sales and listings – with December second slowest – when the nation’s at the beach. “Over the 10 years to February 2018, the number of properties listed for sale in November was 1.5 per cent greater than the second-highest month for listings, October,” says CoreLogic research analyst Cameron Kusher. “Sales volumes do not match the volume of listings,” he says. “The month of March has the highest number of sales over that period, but only the fourth-highest number of listings. May has the second-highest number of properties sold and the third-highest number of listings. November and October had the highest and secondhighest number of property listings respectively, but only recorded the

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fourth- and fifth-highest number of sales,” says Kusher. But what time of year achieves the highest price? A team from Swinburne, Monash and Griffith Universities found quite a variation between capital cities when they compared home prices between 2008 and 2015 – the first study to examine the impact of the seasons on selling prices. “Our main finding is that substantial seasonal effects exist for both the smallest (Darwin and Hobart) and largest (Melbourne and Sydney) capital cities, and these are mostly predictable,” said Professor Abbas Valadkhani from Swinburne’s Department of Accounting, Economics and Finance. In Sydney, July was found to be the best month for achieving the highest prices for houses, and June the best month for units. In Melbourne it was May for both, in Brisbane January/ November, Adelaide April/September, Perth December/March, Canberra March/February, Hobart January/ February, and Darwin March/August. So it seems only Brisbane and Adelaide units fetch the best prices in spring. Still convinced this is the best time to sell? Perhaps the best time is when you’re ready. #

The picture over 10 years (2008-18) TOTAL LISTINGS

SALES

Summer

5,255,006

1,058,106

Autumn

5,541,272

1,267,311

Winter

5,386,833

1,197,417

Spring

5,670,901

1,259,260

Source: CoreLogic

Follow the journey at myidealhouse. com.au.

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H G ADVICE

Green house

INTO THIN AIR Take draught-proofing your home seriously and it might just save you big dollars in the long run, writes Sarah Pickette. isitors from European countries sometimes get a shock when they step inside Australian homes in winter. “They can’t believe how cold they are!” says Simone Schenkel, the German-born director of Melbourne firm Gruen Eco Design. “The temperatures outside are much milder than a European winter, yet the homes are freezing. This is because many Australian homes are riddled with draughts.” You might not think the tiny gaps around doors or windows are of much concern, but sealing them could save you up to 25 per cent on your heating and cooling bills. “Draughts aren’t always taken seriously, but they should be,” says Schenkel. “I always advise clients to make draught issues a priority. If they can’t afford to address them all, they should fix the ones they can.” Sealing windows is a good first step, she advises. Consider pelmets if you have curtains; they stop air circulating between the curtain and window. “Doors are sometimes overlooked,” says Schenkel, “but sealing them properly will prevent a significant amount of heat escaping.” Thoroughly draught-proofing means that the sides and top of external doors have perimeter seals, says Lyn Beinat, CEO of Melbourne retrofitting company EcoMaster. “These seals are in addition to the draught excluders on the bottom of a door. No amount of ceiling insulation will keep a home warm if you can see daylight around the edges of a closed door.” And don’t be concerned that addressing draughts might restrict airflow – the

V

‘ WHEN YOU FIND A PROBLEM AREA, SEAL IT AS SOON AS P OSSIBLE. HAVING DRAUGHTS IN YOUR HOME IS CAUSING YOU TO USE, AND PAY FOR , MORE ENERGY THAN YOU NEED TO.’ ANDREW REDDAWAY, ALTERNATIVE TECHNOLOGY ASSOCIATION

ordinary comings and goings of occupants provide ample air. Check for draughts in your floorboards, architraves, skirting boards, vents, downlights, skylights and even cornices. Exhaust fans are another overlooked culprit, says Schenkel. Look for models that feature backdraught shutters to stop unwanted air entering via the exhaust fan when it’s not in use. As well as looking for obvious gaps, rattling or whistling doors and movement in curtains may also suggest a problem. “To find draughts, hold a lit incense stick near the areas in question and see if the smoke moves,” says Andrew Reddaway, energy analyst for the Alternative Technology Association. “When you find a problem area, seal it ASAP. Having draughts in your home is causing you to use, and pay for, # more energy that you need to – and no one wants to do that.”

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3 OF A KIND: INSPIRING WINTER READS

Written by Australian eco-blogger Erin Rhoads, Waste Not is your guide to living a modern life with less household waste. $29.99, Hardie Grant.

1 Million Women founder Natalie Isaacs encourages women to address climate change via lifestyle adjustments. $32.99, Harper Collins.

The Year of Less by Cait Flanders is about simplifying and redefining what it means to have – and be – enough. $19.99, Penguin.


WE’VE FOUND YOUR FUTURE COLOUR

Pets

WHINE O’CLOCK Being alone can be distressing for dogs, but help is at hand, writes Roger Crosthwaite.

Photograph from Alamy.

D

isruptive, infuriating and downright depressing… that’s what it can be like to hear a neighbour’s dog howling and barking through the day, stopping briefly only to start up again. Of course, it usually ceases as soon as the neighbours return, oblivious to the fact that their dog has been driving you – and everyone within earshot – crazy all day. You can try to explain to them what’s been happening in their absence, but often owners find it inexplicable that their pet, seemingly content and happy when they’re home, could be causing such ructions. But separation anxiety in dogs is a real problem, especially in a home that is deserted for much of the day, with the kids in school and both parents at work. Jenny Harlow is a Sydney-based dog trainer and certified separation-anxiety specialist (jhdogtraining.com.au). She recommends that if you get such a tip-off, don’t ignore it. “If you receive a note saying your dog’s been howling and barking all day, thank them for letting you know, because it means your dog is very distressed. “There are several indicators that your dog is uncomfortable being left alone,” Jenny says. “These range from whining, howling and barking, destructive chewing and digging to toileting in inappropriate places and even chewing their paws.” A useful start, she says, is to video your dog’s behaviour after you leave. This can help to distinguish a separation issue from other problems, such as boredom. “People can be reluctant to believe there’s a problem,” she adds. “Everyone wants to

believe that their dog is the calm, happy, ideal pet. And of course, as soon as their car pulls into the driveway, the dog stops whatever the behaviour was. But it’s a very real problem. And listening to a dog in distress is distressing in itself.” Some dogs can be more susceptible to separation anxiety than others. Active working breeds and rescue dogs that have been in and out of foster homes, as well as older dogs that are losing some of their cognitive functions, are more likely to suffer. And if you’ve recently moved house, the upheaval and change from familiar surroundings can also trigger this response. The good news is that separation anxiety can be conquered. A trainer will assess the dog’s behaviour online, so as not to disrupt the home situation, and begin a program of incremental steps to increase the dog’s threshold for being left alone. Then there’s the all-important question: how long does it take? “Some dogs are just happy to have a warm body in the house, but if it’s a specific person they need to have around, that is trickier,” says Jenny. “It all depends on the dog – it’s a matter of a lot of tiny steps that don’t push it over its stress threshold – but I would hope to see some improvement within four weeks.” In the end, she says, it all comes down to you and how you interact with your canine. “Dogs love routine, so if you get up early and take them for a walk, or play ball with them in the evening, at the same time every day, they’ll feel more secure. The onus is really on us to teach our dogs to behave appropriately.” #

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Dark good looks start the party while flashes of matt gold and teal spice things up.

PLACE SETTING from top ‘Fringe’ cotton napkin, $4.50, Bed Bath N’ Table. For similar cotton ribbon, try Spotlight. ‘De Nimes’ stoneware bowl, from $25, MH Ceramics. Scallop-edge stoneware side plate, $45, Nicola Hart Studios. Ceramic serving bowl in Rust, $145 (including matching servers), Kim Wallace Ceramics. ‘Mazara’ porcelain 27cm plate, $10, and ‘Daintree’ stoneware platter in Jade, $30, both Maxwell & Williams. ‘Occulus’ cutlery in Matt Gold, from $99/five-piece place setting and $18 (butter knife), Kinnow Cutlery. ACCESSORIES from top left Metal servers with leaf handles, $76, Zara Home. ‘Wayfarer’ stoneware shallow bowl, $20, Maxwell & Williams. ‘Botanical’ porcelain bowl, $42, Nicola Hart Studios. ‘Cloud’ resin dish, $44, KeepResin. ‘Athens’ wine glass, $12/four, Target. ‘Bond’ glass tumbler, $40/four, Salt&Pepper. Jeans Decor cotton panel in Autumn Leaves (1.2x1.6m), $528, Casa e Cucina. >


FEEL THE WARMTH With artisan qualities and moody hues, these stylish buys signal cosy nights in. ST Y LI N G Sarah Maloney P HOTOG R A P HY Nic Gossage

50+ FAB finds under $150

‘Eaton’ American oak-veneer dining table, $699, James Lane. ‘No.18’ European beech chairs, $220 each, Thonet. ON MANTEL from left ‘Angkor’ terracotta vessel, $25, Ecology. ‘Kastehelmi’ glass votive, $25, Iittala. ‘Rustic’ candle, $20, Bed Bath N’ Table. Glass vase, $2, Kmart. ON TABLE from left Stoneware deep serving bowl, $70, Nicola Hart Studios. ‘Ottawa Lichen’ stoneware 27.5cm plates, $17 each, Ecology. ‘Globe’ red-wine glass, $100/pair, Wedgwood. Maison Balzac blown-glass tumbler (also far right), $59/four, Monsoon Living. Resin kitchen board, $69, KeepResin. ‘Camden’ glass tumbler, $30/four, Salt&Pepper. ‘Wonderlust Camellia’ fine bone china bowl, $50, Wedgwood. ‘Yoko’ cotton tablecloth (150x280cm), $150, Walter G. ‘Athens’ red-wine glass, $12/four, Target. ‘Misura’ glass carafe, $3, Freedom. ‘Milano’ linen napkins, $40, Bed Bath N’ Table. For similar cutlery, try Kinnow Cutlery. Tea Bar ‘Orb’ stoneware jug, $90, The Decadent Pantry. ‘Watercolour’ porcelain bowl, $55, Nicola Hart Studios. ON WALL from left Jeans Decor cotton panel in Autumn Leaves (1.2x1.6m), $528, Casa e Cucina. Endure Interior paint in Coniston, $64/2L, Taubmans. ‘Luna’ polyester curtain, $50, Spotlight. ON FLOOR ‘Abrash’ jute rug in Slate (160x230cm), $399, James Lane. Da Vinci ‘Woodplank Collection’ vinyl flooring, from $76/m² (supply only), Choices Flooring.


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‘Byzantine’ cotton napkin in Lapis, $50/four, Walter G. Maka Leathergoods suede cutlery roll, from $45, and ‘Oricalcum’ cutlery, from $75/ five-piece place setting, all Kinnow Cutlery.

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Stone Paint Coarse paint in Black Sea, $50/L, Porter’s Paints. ics.

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‘Caviar’ porcelain plate with handle, $7, Maxwell & Williams.

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Bosign ‘Air S’ stainless-steel spreader, $45, Top3 by Design.


SHOPPING H G

‘Flinders’ iron coffee table with mangowood top, $865, GlobeWest. ‘Boyd’ three-seater sofa with velvetlook upholstery, $1299, Freedom. ON MANTEL ‘Breena’ glass bubble vase, $150, Sheridan. ‘Aalto’ glass bowl, $30, Iittala. ON COFFEE TABLE from left ‘Theia’ stoneware jug, $50, Ecology. Resin vessel, $34, KeepResin. Tapered candles, $2/pack of six, Target. ‘Loop Maison’ chromed-steel candelabra, $60, Until. ‘De Nimes’ stoneware bowl, from $35, MH Ceramics. Stoneware side plate, $19, Rhiannon Gill Ceramics. ‘Daintree’ stoneware 18.5cm plates, $10 each, Maxwell & Williams. ‘Kastehelmi’ glass votive, $25, Iittala. Soda-lime glass cake stand, $7, Kmart. ‘Madeira’ mangowood paddle, $50, and ‘Fromage’ pronged knife, $10, and slotted knife, $10, all Salt&Pepper. ‘Kink’ glass oil/vinegar bottles, $99 each, Top3 by Design. Zafferano ‘Balloton’ glass tumblers, $127/six, Casa e Cucina. Cotton table runner with double border (50x160cm), $38, Zara Home. ON SOFA ‘Tallet’ cotton throw, $150, Sheridan. ‘Luca’ linen cushion, $95, Eadie Lifestyle. ON WALL Endure Interior paint in Coniston, $64/2L, Taubmans. ‘Luna’ polyester curtain, $50, Spotlight. ON FLOOR ‘Barnet’ wool and bamboo-silk floor cushion, $150, GlobeWest. ‘Kisii’ wool rug (2x3m), $699, Freedom. For Where to Buy, see page 196. #


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Where inspiration lives…


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Styling by Kayla Gex. Stylist’s assistant Sara Åkesson. Photograph by Kristina Soljo.

WARM LAYERS 1 ‘The Bibbulman’ wool blanket (180x125cm), $189, Ghost Outdoors; ghostoutdoors.com. 2 ‘Maxi Grid’ alpaca throw in Wine/Orange/Red on Natural (240x135cm), $489, Waverley Mills; waverleymills.com.au. 3 Alpaca throw in Ivory Stripe (125x185cm), $270, In Bed; inbedstore.com. 4 Australian House & Garden merino wool queen/king blanket in Grey Check (265x255cm), $400, Myer; myer.com.au. 5 ‘Anneliese’ wool double blanket in Multi Check (230x240cm), $229, Pillow Talk; pillowtalk.com.au. 6 Brita Sweden ‘Arctic’ wool blanket in Brick (130x180cm), Habitat Home Collection; habitathome collection.com.au. 7 Mohair double blanket in Celadon (225x245cm), $649, St Albans; stalbans.com.au. 8 ‘Chunky Cable’ angora and wool throw in Dove (130x230cm), $539, Bemboka; bemboka.com. 9 ‘Quilt’ lambswool blanket in Tibetan (130x200cm), $165, Nordic Fusion; nordicfusion. com.au. ‘Raffles’ oak, veneer and rattan wardrobe, $1199, Freedom; freedom.com.au. For similar terracotta urn, try Clever Patch; cleverpatch. com.au. Vintage elm tray, $550, Few & Far; www. fewandfar.com.au. #

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1 Muuto ‘Plus’ beech salt and pepper mills, $100 each, Surrounding; surrounding.com.au. 2 ‘Boulder’ resin salt and pepper grinders in Moody Blue Swirl, $330 each, Dinosaur Designs; dinosaurdesigns.com.au. 3 ‘Stockholm’ rubberwood salt and pepper grinders, $12/set of two, Kmart; kmart.com.au. 4 Australian House & Garden ceramic salt and pepper shakers, $5/set of two, Myer; myer.com.au. 5 Alessi ‘Grind’ aluminium salt/pepper/spice grinder in Black, $165, and Aluminium, $136, Amara; au.amara.com. 6 Salt&Pepper ‘Spice’ salt and pepper mills, $40 each, Domayne; domayneonline.com.au. 7 Eva Solo oak salt and pepper grinders, $80 each, Until; until.com.au. 8 Menu ‘Bottle’ plastic and wood salt and pepper grinders, $139/set of two, Designstuff; designstuff.com.au. 9 Normann Copenhagen ‘Craft’ wood and marble salt and pepper mills, $195 each, Living by Design; livingbydesign.net.au. #

AUSTRALIAN HOUSE & GARDEN

Produced by Sophie Wilson.

SALT & PEPPER MILLS


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Buyer’s guide

BED LINEN

Rug and wall art from Adairs.

Winter brings with it a cosy assemblage of layers and textures. Put your favourites together in the bedroom and prepare for happy hibernation, writes Alaana Cobon.


SHOPPING H G

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ust as in the realm of fashion, the world of interiors revels in the onset of winter as a chance to add plush texture and cosseting colours. This rings especially true in the bedroom, which is easy to update with changing seasons. But before you splurge on all-new bedding, find out what’s trending and see if you can incorporate some key pieces into your existing scheme. “The layers we add in winter should always look and feel luxurious,” says interior stylist Lynda Gardener. “There’s nothing lovelier than a bed you want to jump straight into, and layering definitely makes you want to do that.” However, that doesn’t mean just adding throw after throw. It’s about starting with the base – the sheets – and creating a combination that works for you. Texture is important, too, because it brings warmth and variation. Bear this in mind as you add layers one at a time (a sensible way to allow for fluctuations in temperature). When it comes to sheet fabric, there are quite a few options to consider. Flannelette, a brushed cotton material that has the snuggle factor in winter, now comes in on-trend colours and subtle patterns so look out for those. Linen, however, offers year-round appeal. It has a luxurious feel and is a natural temperature regulator (the fibres trap warmth in winter yet still allow the fabric to ‘breathe’). Lyocell (often marketed under the Tencel trademark) is made from cellulose spun into a strong, silky fabric that wicks away moisture and resists wrinkles, which means it always looks smooth. Cotton-jersey sheets are another popular option; they feel like slipping into a favourite T-shirt that stretches and moves with your body. Also in the mix are fabric blends that combine the familiar comfort of cotton with sustainably grown bamboo; these usually have a sateen finish. For the next layer – the quilt-cover – go for something sumptuous and tactile

this season. Velvet is especially popular right now. “It comes in many weights and constructions,” says Tracie Ellis, creative director at Aura Home. “I recommend pure cotton velvet, without joins on the front, for a better drape on your bed.” Quilted covers are also very much in evidence, and lend a padded decadence to any bedroom. Tufting and tassels remain in vogue, and retro waffle weave is enjoying a renaissance. In terms of colour, the winter 2018 palette is full of soft pink and plum shades played off against sun-bleached eucalypt greens and smoky blues. “The colour direction this winter is stunning – we are seeing so much colour coming back into design, with the minimalism of the past years shifting to a much warmer space,” says Ellis. Aura Home’s latest releases, she adds, have been inspired by “the natural colours of the outback and our connection to the earth”. And because the hues all hail from nature, they can be styled together almost effortlessly. “My go-to base palette is navy and steel grey,” says Melbourne interior designer Christopher Elliott, who’s renowned for his elegant bedroom designs. “This year I’m introducing warm tones such as amber and burgundy.” A rich and moody palette with such tones will make your bed seem like the perfect cocoon. “Add interest and depth in unexpected contrasting textures,” Elliott suggests. “I like the look of a coarse matt linen paired with the lustre of velvet.” Blankets and throws are a wonderful way to tie a look together or reference other colours in the room, as well as providing instant warmth. Embroidered or patterned throws come in a spectrum of styles and colours, while faux-fur designs cater to bolder tastes. But if you’ve opted for an eye-catching quilt cover, dial it down with a more subtle top layer, such as a fine cashmere knit or rumpled linen throw. >

MAKING A DIFFERENCE Beautiful beds are built upon great bed linen, says Allira Bell, stylist for online retailer Temple & Webster. “Start with a breathable mattress topper, then add sheets, blankets, quilts and quilt covers in natural fibres, plus a throw if the weather is cool,” she says. “And for a luxurious hotel feel, choose a quilt one size larger than your bed, so you have a generous overhang.” Loose and unstructured bedding is very on trend, says Bell. “You don’t want your bed to look overly coordinated. To achieve a relaxed look, loosely drape a throw over the end of the bed, mix and match complementary colours in your sheets and quilt covers, and plump for a blend of European and standard pillows, plus cushions. The different heights will work a treat visually.” When choosing a palette for linen, the main thing to consider is whether you (and anyone you share a bed with) prefer warm or cool colours. “If you love warm hues, team terracotta or tobacco quilt covers with blush-coloured sheets,” Bell suggests. “If you prefer a cooler palette, look to white, soft grey and pastel linen, accented with indigo, olive or charcoal.”

OPPOSITE Home Republic ‘Lavaniya’ quilted polyester-velvet queen quilt cover in Silver, $200, matching standard pillowcases, $60/pair, and European pillowcases, $40 each, ‘Mongolian Sheepskin’ wool cushion in Rose, $100, and ‘Malmo’ linen throw in Blush, $120, all Adairs; 1300 783 005 or adairs.com.au.

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Quilt covers/sets Morgan & Finch ‘Takara’ queen quilt cover in Indigo Floral, $150 Delicate, Japan-inspired florals bloom across the surface of this 360-threadcount cotton quilt with sleek sateen finish. The reverse print is equally attractive, making it a great two-for-one deal. Complete the look with matching pillowcases.

‘Crinkle Velvet’ queen quilt cover in Dusty Blush, $199 A contemporary interpretation of retro crushed velvet in a rayon/ nylon blend, this design has a pleated effect. If pink’s not your thing, check out the Slate, Regal Blue, Wasabi and Platinum colourways, then mix and match pillowcases from across the range.

Bed Bath N’ Table; (03) 8888 8100 or bedbathntable.com.au

West Elm; 1800 239 516 or westelm.com.au

Bambi ‘Flynn’ queen quilt-cover set in White, $168 This pristine quilt cover and pair of matching standard pillowcases are distinguished by a simple, textural white-on-white stripe that will never go out of style. The silky softness and absorbency of Tencel fibres make for a comfy night’s sleep in any season or climate.

‘Cahil’ queen quilt-cover set in Natural, $250 If you’re after a textured beauty that’s also soft and cuddly, look no further. This tufted geometric design is also the perfect neutral foundation for all-white or bolder palettes. The pure-cotton set includes two standard pillowcases.

Domayne; domayneonline.com.au

Kas Australia; (02) 8035 2248 or kasaustralia.com.au

‘Cross Pleat’ queen quilt cover in Blush, $169 Pleated, pintucked detailing adds visual interest to this cotton cover, with tie closures for an elegant finishing touch. The pale pink shade is sure to please, and you can add pillowcases from the range in matching or contrasting shades.

‘Luxury Velvet’ queen quilt cover in Fig, $299 Plush fabric in an intense shade will make this quilt cover the centre of attention in your boudoir. Its cotton-velvet construction drapes beautifully; when you want a more subtle effect, turn over to the cotton-percale reverse.

Freedom; 1300 135 588 or freedom.com.au

Aura Home; 1300 304 269 or aurahome.com.au

‘Dumond’ queen quilt cover in Pewter, $300 Thanks to its subtly textured cotton jacquard weave, this quilt cover has a sensous feel (the reverse is a plain-dye percale). The cleanly modern geometric print makes an ideal base for piling on opulent winter layers and accessories.

Australian House & Garden ‘Hazelbrook’ queen quilt cover set in Natural, $300 The natural beauty of Australia’s Jervis Bay inspired the relaxed look and earthy, neutral tones of this set, consisting of a quilt cover and two standard pillowcases. A prewashed linen-cotton jacquard weave gives it touchable texture.

Sheridan; 1800 625 516 or sheridan.com.au

Myer; 1800 811 611 or myer.com.au


SHOPPING H G Sheets

Throws

‘Mila’ flannelette queen sheet set in Rust, $125 Embrace the trending rust palette with these cotton-flannelette sheets, sporting a warm, brushed finish on both sides. The woodblock-print pattern lends an exotic edge to the set, which has fitted and flat sheets plus a pair of standard pillowcases.

Bianca ‘Declan’ throw in Charcoal, $50 A wavy take on waffle weave, this lightweight 130x170cm cotton throw with a luxuriously deep fringe is perfect for chilly days. Even better, the neutral grey allows it to move easily from sofa to bed top.

Bed Bath N’ Table; (03) 8888 8100 or bedbathntable.com.au

Mercer & Reid ‘Stripe Flannelette’ queen sheet set in Coal, $140 A classic stripe in cotton flannelette – a favourite winter fabric – this set features a fitted and a flat sheet plus two standard pillowcases. Pair these premium sheets with charcoal and white textiles for a timeless look that should see you through many winters.

Temple & Webster; templeandwebster.com.au

‘Otis’ throw in Blue, $150 Tufted cotton embroidery and hand-knotted tassels define this eye-catching, super-soft cotton throw. Handmade by artisans in India, it’s 127x152cm in size and available in Peach to complement warmer bedroom palettes. Linen House; 1300 350 886 or linenhouse.com.au

Adairs; 1300 783 005 or adairs.com.au

‘Polly’s Garden’ cotton double sheet set, $269 Made from 300-threadcount organic cotton sateen, this gorgeous set features a whimsical floral print designed by Brisbane illustrator Jess Miles. Included are flat and fitted sheets plus two standard pillowcases.

‘Vintage Linen’ throw in Clay, $189 Richly textured, this relaxed throw in linen yarn with a fringed edging brings midwinter colour in muted terracotta. Also available in a range of other colours, from pale Marshmallow through to inky Indigo. Dimensions are 130x170cm.

Oh Mabel; ohmabel.com.au

Aura Home; 1300 304 269 or aurahome.com.au

Tencel queen sheet set in Breeze, $300 Breathable, temperatureregulating and silky to touch, this 500-threadcount set blends Tencel lyocell fibres with cotton for strength and durability. Has fitted and flat sheets with two standard pillowcases.

‘Kazzi’ throw in Multi, $190 Tribal-inspired motifs and multihued tassels offer a vibrant counterpoint to grey winter days. This generous 130x180cm throw brings colour and energy to a bed and is a great finishing touch for a contemporary scheme.

Sheridan; 1800 625 516 or sheridan.com.au

Kas Australia; (02) 8035 2248 or kasaustralia.com.au #

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Fast find

BATHROOM EXTRAS Attention to detail is what gives a bathing space star quality. Rose-Marie Hillier floats the latest accessories for wet areas. 1 ‘Striped’ bathroom accessories 1

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We love this ceramic collection for its powder-pink hue and simple, fluted forms. Soap dispenser, $33, with tumbler and soap dish, $18 each. zarahome.com.au

2 ‘Balungen’ magnifying mirror This chrome-plated mirror on a non-scratch base offers traditional styling, 2.5x magnification on one side and a handy glass tray, $23. ikea.com.au

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3 Lexon ‘Zen’ bathroom organiser in White Pop whatever you need close to hand on the vanity into a clever hold-all constructed from bamboo and bamboo-fibre composite, $40. top3.com.au 7

4 Square tissue-box cover The whitewashed finish of this woven rattan cover will complement many styles of decor, from classic to country, $25. frenchknot.com.au

5 Pip Studio ‘Royal’ cosmetic bag Store your make-up and brushes inside this stylish satin bag with charming print, $40. au.amara.com

6 Morgan & Finch ‘Regency’ accessories Glass and chrome set up a chic theme, ideal for an elegant ensuite. Soap dish, $15, soap dispenser, $50, lidded jar, $40, and tumbler, $25. bedbathntable.com.au

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7 Australian House & Garden ‘Apollo’ rack This streamlined bamboo bath rack will keep your bath-time essentials above water while you enjoy an indulgent soak, $60. myer.com.au

8 ‘Speckle’ oversized tumbler in Pink

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Speckles produced in the firing process give this ceramic piece a unique pattern. Perfect for make-up essentials or fresh flowers, $29. zakkia.com.au

9 Linen House ‘Marble’ soap dish in White

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Small but sublime, this marble dish is pure luxury. Add complementary pieces from the same range for effortless coordination, $30. domayneonline.com.au

10 ‘Handi Vanity Valet’ organiser 5

A space-saving grooming station in stainless steel, featuring two compartments and a dispenser for make-up remover, $89. templeandwebster.com.au #

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WHERE TO BUY Locate your nearest stockist by contacting the following suppliers. A Aalto Colour 1800 009 600; aaltocolour.com Abbode Interior Products (08) 8362 9909; abbode.com.au Abey 1800 809 143; abey.com.au About Space (03) 9417 4635; aboutspace.net.au Academy Tiles (02) 9436 3566; academytiles.com.au Agostino & Brown agostinoandbrown.com Amber Tiles 1300 362 241; ambertiles.com.au Anibou (02) 9319 0655; anibou.com.au Aptos Cruz Galleries (08) 8370 9011; aptoscruz.com.au Armadillo & Co (02) 9698 4043; armadillo-co.com Artedomus (02) 9557 5060; artedomus.com Asbury Park Agency asburyparkagency.com.au Astra Walker (02) 8838 5100; astrawalker.com.au Aura Home 1300 304 269; aurahome.com.au B B Seated Global (02) 9557 0226; bseatedglobal.com.au Bauwerk Colour (08) 9433 3860; bauwerk.com.au Beaumont Tiles beaumont-tiles.com.au Bed Bath N’ Table (03) 8888 8100; bedbathntable.com.au Big Ass Fans 1300 244 277; bigassfans.com.au Big Daddy’s Antiques bdantiques.com Bisanna Tiles (02) 9310 2500; bisanna.com.au Bloomingdales Lighting (02) 8345 6888; bloomingdales.com.au Blu Dot (02) 9313 5400; bludot.com.au Bobby Clark, available from Boffi Studio boffi.com Bona bona.net.au

Boyd Blue (07) 5527 0899; boydblue.com Bristol 131 686; bristol.com.au British Paints 132 525; britishpaints.com.au Bunnings (03) 8831 9777; bunnings.com.au C Cabot’s 1800 011 006; cabots.com.au Cadrys (02) 9328 6144; cadrys.com.au Caesarstone 1300 119 119; caesarstone.com.au Caroma 131 416; caroma.com.au Casa e Cucina (02) 9958 3271; casaecucina.com.au Castle 0410 705 253; castleandthings.com.au Chanel 1300 242 635; chanel.com.au Choices Flooring choicesflooring.com.au Clipsal 1300 202 525; clipsal.com.au Coastal Drift coastaldrift.net Coastal Furnishings (07) 4191 4946; coastalfurnishings.com.au Coco Republic 1300 000 220; cocorepublic.com.au Considered consideredbyreal.com Country Road 1800 801 911; countryroad.com.au Covered in Paint (02) 9519 0204; coveredinpaint.com.au Cult 1300 768 626; cultdesign.com.au Cultiver cultiver.com D David Jones 133 357; shop.davidjones.com.au Dedece (02) 9360 2722; dedece.com.au Deer Willow (02) 9651 2003 Di Lorenzo Tiles (02) 8818 2950; dilorenzo.com.au Dinosaur Designs (02) 9698 3500; dinosaurdesigns.com.au Domayne domayneonline.com.au Domo (03) 9277 8888; domo.com.au Dulux 132 525; dulux.com.au E Eadie Lifestyle (02) 4969 8998; eadielifestyle.com.au

Eckersley Garden Architecture (03) 9421 5537; e-ga.com.au Eco Outdoor 1300 131 413; ecooutdoor.com.au Eco Tile Factory (08) 8363 4666; ecotilefactory.com.au Ecology ecologyhomewares.com.au Ecolour ecolour.com.au Editeur (08) 9385 1964; editeur.com.au Élan (02) 8217 0700; elanc.com Electrolux electrolux.com.au Emac & Lawton (02) 9517 4455; emac-lawton.com.au Espo Lighting (03) 9037 0893; espo.com.au F Farquhar Kitchens (08) 8132 8000; farqhuar.kitchen Feast Watson 1800 252 502; feastwatson.com.au Feelgood Designs (03) 9745 2077; feelgooddesigns.com Freedom 1300 135 588; freedom.com.au G Gaggenau 1300 170 552; gaggenau.com.au GlobeWest 1800 722 366; globewest.com.au Great Dane (03) 9699 7677; greatdanefurniture.com H H&M 1800 828 002; hm.com/au Haiku haikuhome.com HardieDeck jameshardie.com.au Haymes Paint 1800 033 431; haymespaint.com.au HK Living (03) 9500 9991; hkliving.com.au House of Orange (03) 9500 9991; houseoforange.com.au I Iittala iittala.com.au Ikea (02) 8020 6641; ikea.com.au Impala Kitchens (02) 9483 2222; impalakitchens.com.au In Bed inbedstore.com Innerspace innerspacewa.com.au Inspirations Paint 1300 368 325; inspirationspaint.com.au In-Teria interia.com.au Italia Ceramics (08) 8336 2366; italiaceramics.com.au

J James Dunlop Textiles jamesdunloptextiles.com James Hardie jameshardie.com.au James Lane jameslane.com.au Jardan (03) 8581 4988; jardan.com.au Jenny Jones Rugs (08) 9286 1200; jennyjonesrugs.com JWI Louvres (02) 9757 7600; jwilouvres.com.au K Karen Murrell karenmurrell.com KeepResin keepresin.com.au Kelly Wearstler, available from Becker Minty (02) 8356 9999; beckerminty.com Kido Store 1300 115 436; kidostore.com Kim Wallace Ceramics 0404 187 248; kwceramics.com.au King Living 1300 546 438; kingliving.com.au Kinnow Cutlery kinnowcutlery.com Kmart 1800 634 251; kmart.com.au Koskela (02) 9280 0999; koskela.com.au L La Maison (02) 9698 8860; lamaison.net.au Laminex 132 136; laminex.com.au Les Interieurs (02) 9380 4975; lesinterieurs.com.au Libby Watkins libbywatkins.com Life Interiors (03) 9005 8303; lifeinteriors.com.au Lightly (03) 9417 2440; lightly.com.au Lilly & Lolly (02) 9699 7474; lillyandlolly.com.au Littlehampton Clay Bricks and Pavers (08) 8391 1855; littlehamptonbrick.com.au Living Clay Australia 1300 397 339; livingclayaustralia.com.au Living Edge 1300 132 154; livingedge.com.au Lounge Lovers 1300 738 088; loungelovers.com.au Lyn Hunter Design (03) 9898 4278 M Made in Japan mij.com.au Many 2.0 (08) 9336 6444 Marble Matters (02) 9648 6222; marblematters.com.au


STOCKISTS H G

Mark Douglass Design 0414 540 110; markdouglassdesign.com Mark Tuckey (02) 9997 4222; marktuckey.com.au Mavala mavala.com.au Max Factor 1800 181 040; maxfactor.com.au Maxi Plywood 1300 761741; maxiplywood.com.au Maxwell & Williams (03) 9318 0466; maxwellandwilliams.com.au MH Ceramics mhceramics.net Miele 1300 464 353; miele.com.au Miss Amara missamara.com.au Molmic (03) 9335 2413; molmic.com.au Mona Lisa Pottery monalisapottery.etsy.com Monsoon Living 0418 888 008; monsoonliving.com.au Muji (02) 8036 4556; muji.com/au Murobond Paint 1800 199 299; murobond.com.au Myer 1800 811 611; myer.com.au N Nachtmann (02) 9966 0033; nachtmann.com.au Naco Design (03) 9421 3883; nacodesign.com Nathan+Jac nathanjac.com.au Natio natio.com.au Nick Scali (02) 9748 4000; nickscali.com.au Nicola Hart Studios hartstudios.com.au Northcote Nursery northcotenursery.com.au O Orient House (02) 9660 3895; orienthouse.com.au Oz Design Furniture 1300 721 942; ozdesignfurniture.com.au P Paint Place 1800 008 007; paintplace.com.au Paper Plane Store paperplanestore.com Parisi (02) 9648 1111; parisi.com.au

Parterre (02) 9363 5874; parterre.com.au Phoenix Tapware (03) 9780 4200; phoenixtapware.com.au Plyroom 1300 709 399; plyroom.com.au Pop & Scott popandscott.com Porter’s Paints 1800 656 664; porterspaints.com Provincial Home Living 1300 732 258; provincialhomeliving.com.au Pure Linen linenthings.com.au R Radial Timber (03) 9768 2100; radialtimbers.com.au RC+D (03) 9428 6223; rc-d.com.au Reece 1800 032 566; reece.com.au Resene 1800 738 383; resene.com.au Restoration Hardware (US) restorationhardware.com Rhiannon Gill Ceramics rhiannongillceramics.etsy.com RM2 Shopfitters rm2.net.au Royal Doulton 1300 852 022; royaldoulton.com.au Royal Oak Floors (03) 9826 3611; royaloakfloors.com.au S Saardé Home saarde.com Salt&Pepper 1800 246 987; saltandpepper.com.au Sarah Schembri Ceramics sarahschembri.com Sayaka Ogawa Ceramics sayakaogawaceramics.etsy.com Scandinavian Wallpaper & Décor (08) 9444 2717; wallpaperdecor.com.au Schneid schneid.org Scyon 1300 599 542; scyon.com.au Seneca Textiles (03) 9509 4999; senecatextiles.com Shaynna Blaze for Molmic (03) 9335 2413; molmic.com.au Sheridan 1800 625 516; sheridan.com.au Shindigs (02) 4950 9561; shindigs.com.au

Sikkens 1300 745 536; tenaru.com.au Solver Paints (08) 8368 1200; solverpaints.com.au Space to Create spacetocreate.co Spence & Lyda (02) 9212 6747; spenceandlyda.com.au Spence Construction (03) 5232 2822; spenceconstruction.com.au Spotlight 1300 305 405; spotlight.com.au Storie storie.com.au Stormie Mills stormiemills.com Studio Australia (02) 6926 5459; studioaustralia.net Stylecraft (02) 9355 0000; stylecraft.com.au T Table Culture (08) 9380 6233; tableculture.com.au Tara Dennis Store taradennisstore.com Target 1300 753 567; target.com.au Taubmans 131 686; taubmans.com.au Temple & Webster templeandwebster.com.au Temple Fine Rugs 0417 957 643; templerugs.com.au The Decadent Pantry thedecadentpantry.com The Greenery Garden Centre (03) 9459 8433; thegreenery.com.au The Remnant Warehouse theremnantwarehouse.com.au The Tailored Store @thetailoredstore The Wood Room (02) 9970 8480; thewoodroom.com.au Thonet 1800 800 777; thonet.com.au Tide Design (03) 8555 3405; tidedesign.com.au Tigmi Trading 0418 602 231; tigmitrading.com Tommy Hilfiger, available from Myer 1800 811 611; myer.com.au Top3 by Design 1300 867 333; top3.com.au Tribe Home tribehome.com.au

Twelve Trees Ceramics twelvetreesceramics.etsy.com Two Warm Hands twowarmhands.com U Ultimo Interiors (08) 9201 2479; ultimointeriors.com.au Until (02) 9119 8700; until.com.au V Vincent Design Supply (03) 9686 7702; vincentdesign.com.au Visual Comfort+Co visualcomfortlightinglights.com Vitra, available from Space (02) 8339 7588; spacefurniture.com.au W Wallpaper Trader 0408 503 210; wallpapertrader.com Walter G walter-g.com.au Warwick Fabrics 1300 787 888; warwick.com.au Water Tiger 0420 855 886; watertiger.com.au Wattyl 132 101; wattyl.com.au Weave weavehome.com.au Wedgwood 1300 852 022; wwrd.com.au West Elm 1800 239 516; westelm.com.au Weylandts 1300 880 149; weylandts.com.au Wideline Windows & Doors 1300 935 741; wideline.com.au Wingnut&Co wingnutand.co Wintons Teak (02) 9439 1600; wintonsteak.com Woodcut woodcut.com.au Woodfolk woodfolk.com.au Y Yves Saint Laurent (02) 9931 8888 Z Zanui 1300 668 317; zanui.com.au Zara Home 1800 121 095; zarahome.com/au Zuster (03) 9427 7188; zuster.com.au

PRIVACY NOTICE This issue of Australian House & Garden magazine is published by Bauer Media Pty Ltd (Bauer). Bauer may use and disclose your information in accordance with our Privacy Policy, including to provide you with your requested products or services and to keep you informed of other Bauer publications, products, services and events. Our Privacy Policy is located at www.bauer-media.com.au/privacy. It also sets out on how you can access or correct your personal information and lodge a complaint. Bauer may disclose your personal information offshore to its owners, joint venture partners, service providers and agents located throughout the world, including in New Zealand, USA, the Philippines and the European Union. In addition, this issue may contain Reader Offers, being offers, competitions or surveys. Reader Offers may require you to provide personal information to enter or to take part. Personal information collected for Reader Offers may be disclosed by us to service providers assisting Bauer in the conduct of the Reader Offer and to other organisations providing special prizes or offers that are part of the Reader Offer. An opt-out choice is provided with a Reader Offer. Unless you exercise that opt-out choice, personal information collected for Reader Offers may also be disclosed by us to other organisations for use by them to inform you about other products, services or events or to give to other organisations that may use this information for this purpose. If you require further information, please contact Bauer’s Privacy Officer either by email at privacyofficer@bauer-media.com.au or mail at Privacy Officer Bauer Media Pty Ltd, 54 Park Street, Sydney NSW 2000.

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WHAT’S ON THINGS TO DO, SEE, ENJOY

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Brisbane’s Good Food Month returns in full force in July. This year’s celebration will be bursting at the seams with foodie events, including the crowd-pleasing Night Noodles Markets at Southbank. goodfoodmonth.com

2

Adelaide’s Beer & BBQ Festival kicks off on July 6 for a three-day weekend of good beer, cheer, eats and beats at the historic Brick Dairy Pavilion at Adelaide Showground. beerbbqfest.com.au/Adelaide Feasting, roaring fires, cider and folklore are on the agenda for the Huon Valley Mid-Winter Fest in Tasmania’s south. From July 13 to 15 at Willie Smith’s Apple Shed. huonvalleymidwinterfest.com.au

SH AR I NG

N EWS

IDEAS

WORLDLY WISE Kate Arends is a creative and multichannel marketing consultant with a strong eye for design possibilities. She’s based in Minnesota, but her decorating aesthetic (above and right) holds universal appeal. Kate’s Instagram feed will inspire you with her novel concepts for styling living spaces, open shelving, tabletop settings and other aspects of your home. For more ideas from this style maven, check out @witanddelight or her website witanddelight.com. 198 |

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In Melbourne, the Australian Centre for the Moving Image looks at Lewis Carroll’s classic tale in its Wonderland exhibition, examining filmgoers’ enduring fascination with Alice’s adventures down the rabbit hole. Until October 7. acmi.net.au

5

Some of Australia’s best winemakers will get together in Sydney on July 13 for Cellarmasters’ annual Meet the Makers wine-tasting in Pyrmont. Perfect for enthusiasts who want to know more about the process and the people behind the labels, or anyone who appreciates a good drop. cellarmasters.com.au

6

Visit an Enchanted Forest, walk through the Winter Wonderland, go ice-skating and enjoy street food and performances at the Bathurst Winter Festival, from July 7 to 22. bathurstwinterfestival.com.au

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The National Gallery of Victoria will reassemble works from its landmark 1968 exhibition of avante-garde Australian artworks in The Field Revisited (above). Until August 26. ngv.vic.gov.au

Text by Laura Barry.

Show & tell

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BOOK NOOK

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Take your palate on a tour of Spain’s Catalonia region with authentic dishes from Barcelona: Cult Recipes, compiled by tourist guide and foodie Stephan Mitsch. Spanning patatas bravas to paella, it offers plates suited to all levels of cooking ability. $49.99 , Murdoch Books.

EMBARK ON AN UNFORGETTABLE ITALIAN GASTRONOMIC ADVENTURE WITH RENOWNED AUSTRALIAN CHEF MARTIN TEPLITZKY. YOU’LL BE STAYING IN A 17TH-CENTURY PALAZZOTURNED-LUXURY HOTEL IN THE PIEDMONT REGION AS MARTIN GUIDES YOU THROUGH HANDS-ON COOKING CLASSES AND DEMONSTRATIONS, TASTINGS AND EXCURSIONS. OCTOBER 29 TO NOVEMBER 4, FROM $5500. PIEMONTE2018.COM

Now & then: the ’70s The 1970s were a time of bold statements and even bolder colours. And H&G was at the forefront, showcasing swish interiors, funky wallpapers and the latest appliances and household essentials, including this ad for Royal Doulton’s on-trend avocado fittings from a 1974 issue. What can we say? That decade has a lot to answer for. These days, we’re of the opinion that avocado works better on toast than on bathroom fittings.

From classic Japanese dishes loved by locals to the latest foodie trends, Caryn and Brendan Liew break down delicious Japanese recipes into easy-to-follow steps for home cooks in Tokyo Local. Snapshots of urban Tokyo are dotted throughout as an added visual bonus. $39.99, Smith Street Books.

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Acclaimed food writer Nancy Singleton Hachisu covers the cuisine of her adopted country in Japan: The Cookbook. There are more than 400 traditional recipes within its beautifully bound, bamboo-look covers, annotated with insightful thoughts from the author. $59.95, Phaidon.

Sta y in t ouch

We love hearing from readers, so please share your news and views with us. Call (02) 9282 8456, email h&g@bauer-media. com.au or post a letter to Australian House & Garden, GPO Box 4088, Sydney, NSW 1028. Subscribe to the digital edition of H&G at magshop.com. au/hgn. For weekly news and inspiration, subscribe to our e-newsletter at newsletter.houseandgardenmag.com.au. And head to homestolove.com.au/ahg for fab home tours, gardens and galleries.

Share in our home and garden finds: Facebook facebook.com/australianhouseandgarden Instagram @houseandgarden Pinterest pinterest.com/HOUSEnGARDEN


Colorbond® steel matt for Bluescope is a contemporary roof and wall material durable enough to withstand even the harshest Australian weather. Call 1800 702 764 or visit colorbond.com/matt

The latest design update from Choices Flooring is packed with personality and colour. The trenddriven palette and graphic pattern adds visual energy to any space. choicesflooring.com.au

Seamlessly combining practicality with style, the new ILVE Versa is perfect for the at-home chef, offering both induction and gas cooking, and a spacious 90cm cooktop, $3,999. ilve.com.au

H&G ESSENTIALS Linea weatherboards from James Hardie create a beautiful and relaxed look, and will complement coastal, country or Hamptons-style homes with ease. Download the look book at scyon.com.au

Create a beautiful lifestyle and home with these must-have products.

Trend’s new Botanica Timber range of windows and doors from Jeld Wen includes 13 different products, each available in cedar and meranti so you can find your perfect match. trendwindows.com.au.

Update your dining room with the Aspen Dining Collection by King Living, and strike the perfect balance between natural, timeless style and enduring quality. kingliving.com.au

Enjoy unobstructed views in the kitchen with Miele's TwoInOne induction cooktop with integrated extractor, a chic and sleek addition to any kitchen. miele.com.au.

Reduce your wash time by up to 50 per cent with the new Samsung QuickDrive™ Washer from Narta. Better yet, you can even add missed items mid-wash without a worry thanks to the AddWash™ Door. npr.reviews/QuickDrive.

Synchronise the Sonos One with other speakers to create a multi-room home sound system. Now featuring Amazon Alexa voice control, it's the smart speaker for music-lovers, $299. sonos.com

Stylish, gorgeous and affordable, these decorative cushions from Spotlight are on-trend and the perfect way to update your home this season, $15 each. spotlightstores.com

Designed for people who care about good music as much as they care about style, the Sonos Play:5 speaker is available in black or white for easy integration into your home décor, $749. sonos.com


ON SALE JUNE 4

Next month

Texture is tops... We zero in on the sense of touch.

Styling by Kayla Gex. Photograph by Nic Gossage.

MY IDEAL HOUSE The big, beautiful reveal! ✚ Laundry and bathroom updates ✚ A tropical garden in Melbourne

Inspiration lives here…

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To mark H&G’s 70th anniversary year, we’ve asked leading florists to create special pieces for every issue in 2018. Check out the floral artistry each month.

Heavens above ave you ever looked to the ceiling when preparing your table for guests? It’s a natural place to begin for Melbourne couple Wona Bae and Charlie Lawler, creators of experimental botanical installations and co-founders of Loose Leaf Design Studio. Here, they’ve formed a sculptural ‘pendant’ using fresh and dried plant materials hung with steel cable. “This kind of arrangement focuses attention on the table without needing to style the tabletop,” says Charlie. The use of fresh and dried plants reflects Loose Leaf’s philosophy of “celebrating nature’s beauty in

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all its phases and forms”. For this display, they’ve combined large pleated leaves of robusta palm with magnolia branches, hoya, banana flowers, aloe, agave, lotus leaves and dried stems of Strelitzia reginae (bird of paradise). “The dried Strelitzia brings intrigue to the piece,” says Wona. The dynamic duo encourages everyone to experiment and create with nature. “Next time you buy flowers or prune your plants, ask yourself if they have beauty or function beyond their current life,” says Charlie. # looseleafstore.com.au or @looseleaf_

Text by Elizabeth Wilson. Photograph by Caitlin Mills. Artworks by Susie Wright (top) & Sydenham Edwards.

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STATEMENT STYLE FEATURING: HASTINGS 3.5 SEATER SOFA - MADE IN AUSTRALIA $2495 | REPLICA JORGEN HOVELSKOV HARP CHAIR $1795 | MARIO MAZZER FRAME SIDE TABLE $395 | HANDMADE OVERDYED TURKISH RUG 300 X 200 $3050 | REPLICA WARREN PLATNER COFFEE TABLE $695 TEAM MEMBER: GEORGIA STRAZZERI, DESIGNER

ADELAIDE | ALEXANDRIA | BALGOWLAH | BALMAIN | BLACKBURN | BUNDALL | CANBERRA | FITZROY | FORTITUDE VALLEY | OAKLEIGH | PADDINGTON | REGENTS PARK | RICHMOND

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Discover the subtle art of standing out. Introducing COLORBOND steel Matt. Understated yet contemporary, this roofing and walling material is unequalled in its ability to draw attention. In fact, the only thing that does match its looks is its durability in our harsh Australian environment. Visit COLORBOND.COM/MATT or call 1800 702 764

COLORBOND and the BlueScope brand mark are registered trade marks of BlueScope Steel Limited. 2018 BlueScope Steel Limited ABN 16 000 011 058. All rights reserved.

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