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THE INTERNATIONAL DESIGN AUTHORITY JANUARY 2018

THE DESIGNERS OF THE YEAR A PARADISE IN HAWAII A MINIMALIST MASTERPIECE IN BELGIUM plus NATE BERKUS SHARES HIS CALIFORNIA DREAM HOUSE


CONTENTS january

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NATE BERKUS, JEREMIAH BRENT, AND DAUGHTER POPPY AT HOME IN LOS ANGELES.

Features 140 DOUBLE VISION

Same architect, same designer, same contractor, same clients—two extraordinary houses. By Shax Riegler

156 SWEET SPOT

Life is good for designers Nate Berkus and Jeremiah Brent as they move into a new home. By Mayer Rus 166 FUN HOUSE

Kelly Wearstler dreams up a color-soaked L.A. pad for a free-spirited young family. By Hannah Martin

176 SACRED GROVE

Garden guru Fernando Caruncho cultivates an ancient attitude at an estate on the Aegean Sea. By Mitchell Owens

180 RULE, BRITANNIA!

Rose Uniacke channels— and refreshes—the Aesthetic Movement in Oscar Wilde’s onetime London digs. By Mitchell Owens

184 PERFECT HARMONY

Under the deft direction of Pierre Yovanovitch, a dowdy Belgian house gets a new lease on life. By Ian Phillips

ON THE COVER PALMS ARC OVER A POOL IN KONA, HAWAII. THE CUSTOM CHAISE LONGUES WEAR CUSHIONS OF A PERENNIALS FABRIC. “DOUBLE VISION,” PAGE 140. PHOTOGRAPHY BY DOMINIQUE VORILLON. STYLED BY STEPHEN PAPPAS.

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When a young San Francisco couple asks for old-fashioned, deep-dish decorating, Miles Redd pulls out all the stops. By Mitchell Owens (CONTINUED ON PAGE 22)

TOP: DOUGLAS FRIEDMAN

192 FANCY THAT


CONTENTS january

140

THE MASTER BEDROOM OF A HOME ON LONG ISLAND’S NORTH FORK.

47 SHOPPING: QUIET RIOT

Macaron-box pastels— revved up with a touch of metallics—are this season’s unexpected stars. Produced by Kathryn Given

62 TRAVELS: TALK OF THE TOWN

Amid political upheaval, Barcelona revels in the reinvigorated legacy of Catalan master Antoni Gaudí. By Hannah Martin

50 AT HOME WITH: ED TANG

A set of historic modernist houses in Connecticut are thoughtfully reunited by a design-minded couple. By David Foxley

56 DEBUT: THE ART OF COMMERCE

Roman and Williams—the go-to firm for Gwyneth Paltrow, the Ace Hotel, and others—opens a bounteous home-goods emporium. By Jane Keltner de Valle

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66 COLLECTING: ALL TOGETHER NOW

At a Manhattan townhouse decorated by Russell Groves, a family of art aficionados finds that more is more. By Stephen Wallis (CONTINUED ON PAGE 26)

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LOSANGE VASES BY RONAN AND ERWAN BOUROULLEC FROM GALERIE KREO; GALERIEKREO.COM

FROM TOP: DOMINIQUE VORILLON; COURTESY OF GALERIE KREO

Discoveries


CONTENTS january

74

Whether rule-breakers or defenders of tradition, the top architects and designers in the world—the AD100— all have one thing in common: uncommon vision.

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In Every Issue 34 EDITOR’S LETTER By Amy Astley

38 OBJECT LESSON: CLOUD COVERAGE

TWO NEW PRODUCTS BY A PAIR OF AD100 DESIGNERS: ALEX PAPACHRISTIDIS WALLPAPER FOR GRACIE; GRACIESTUDIO.COM. 5914 SERPENT DOORKNOB BY ALEXA HAMPTON FOR SA BAXTER. 212-203-4382. FOR MORE, TURN TO PAGE 74.

Tracking down the origins of Guy de Rougemont’s wildly rare Nuage table. By Hannah Martin

200 RESOURCES

The designers, architects, and products featured this month. 202 LAST WORD: SEA CHANGE

Peter Marino brings high design to Manhattan’s hottest new restaurant. By Sam Cochran

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FOLLOW

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SUBSCRIPTIONS For subscription information go to archdigest.com, call 800-365-8032, or email subscriptions@archdigest.com. Download AD’s digital edition at archdigest.com/app. To sign up for AD’s daily newsletter, go to archdigest.com/newsletter. COMMENTS Contact us via social media or email us at letters@archdigest.com.

FROM TOP: FRANÇOIS DISCHINGER; COURTESY OF RESPECTIVE COMPANIES (2)

INSIDE COMEDIAN SEBASTIAN MANISCALCO AND ARTIST LANA GOMEZ’S LOS ANGELES HOME.


THE INTERNATIONAL DESIGN AUTHORITY VOLUME 75 NUMBER 1

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editor’s letter

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1. NATE BERKUS’S DAUGHTER POPPY KIDS AROUND IN THE MASTER BEDROOM. 2. A KATIE STOUT CABINET IN A KELLY WEARSTLER PROJECT. 3. A SERENE LANDING IN A PIERRE YOVANOVITCH– DESIGNED HOME. 4. DESIGNER RODMAN PRIMACK AND I ON LOCATION IN LONG ISLAND. 5. A CHAISE LONGUE IN A HAWAII HOUSE DECORATED BY PRIMACK.

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AMY ASTLEY Editor in Chief @amytastley

1. DOUGLAS FRIEDMAN; 2. FRANÇOIS DISCHINGER; 3. JOSÉ MANUEL ALORDA; 4. @AMYTASTLEY; 5. DOMINIQUE VORILLON

This is the second AD100 issue I have produced with the editorial team, and we are excited to welcome 19 new names to the illustrious lineup. Eighty-one individuals (or firms) are back, and six superstars join the Hall of Fame. With major projects from Kelly Wearstler, Miles Redd, Rose Uniacke, Pierre Yovanovitch, Fernando Caruncho, Roman and Williams, and more, the entire issue celebrates these top talents from around the world. Making his AD100 debut, Nate Berkus shares his idyllic L.A. home and family life with us this month—confirming that the man really does have it all. And our cover story, which documents two extraordinary homes for the same discerning family—one in Hawaii, one on the North Fork of Long Island—marks designer Rodman Primack’s first time on the list. (Architect Tom Kundig, his partner on both projects, has appeared previously.) Primack, the chief creative officer of Design Miami, the twice-a-year showcase for contemporary furniture, lighting, and objets, is a true insider, having also served as chairman of Phillips and worked with tastemakers like Peter Marino, Simon de Pury, and Larry Gagosian before launching his own interiors career in earnest. Primack’s layered, colorful spaces artfully combine the sophisticated (blue-chip design treasures) and the humble (Guatemalan fabrics and vintage quilts). This is the first time his handiwork has been featured in AD, and it is a real joy to both show Primack’s most important decorating work to date (thereby introducing him to a wider audience) and welcome him to the club. Congratulations to all the AD100!


object lesson

THE STORY BEHIND AN ICONIC DESIGN

Cloud Coverage Tracking down the origins of Guy de Rougemont’s wildly rare Nuage table

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FRANÇOIS HALARD/TRUNK ARCHIVE

GUY DE ROUGEMONT’S NUAGE COCKTAIL TABLE ACCENTS COSMETICS QUEEN TERRY DE GUNZBURG’S LONDON LIVING ROOM, WHICH WAS DECORATED BY JACQUES GRANGE.


object lesson

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t the end of the 1960s, traditionalist French decorator Henri Samuel did something radical: He asked a handful of edgy artists—César, François Arnal, Philippe Hiquily, and Guy de Rougemont—to create furnishings. Many of the stunning results (the stars of which filled Samuel’s louche Pompeian-red salon) have gained cult followings, though one piece in particular put the design world on cloud nine and still does: aristocrat Rougemont’s luminous Nuage table. The painter and sculptor had shown cloud-shaped volumes at Galerie Suzy Langlois in 1969,

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urging Samuel to pose an obvious question: Why not make the shape into a cocktail table? Rougemont presented two sketches to Samuel, who ordered a five-puff cloud, marked 2/6, in 1970. Nuage, ultimately realized in colored or clear Plexiglas accented with brass, steel, or wood, had a silver lining: Concealed lightbulbs gave it a heavenly glow. A lucky few—Reed Krakoff, Jacques Grange, Diane de Polignac, and the like—have gone to great lengths to snap up the originals. (One brought $200,500 at Christie’s in 2011.) “Why?” enthuses Grange, who tapped Rougemont, now in his 80s, to make a Nuage bar and tables for New York City’s Mark hotel. “More like why not?” The originals may be out of reach, but you might pick up one of Nuage’s sisters on the secondary market, where they sell for closer to $100,000. A decade ago, dealer Pierre Passebon, Grange’s partner, resurrected Rougemont’s unused second sketch for Samuel as an edition of 32 six-puff clouds in four dreamy colors. —HANNAH MARTIN

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1. A NUAGE IN DESIGNER RICHARD MISHAAN’S MANHATTAN APARTMENT. 2. A CIRCA-1971 NUAGE OF PURPLE PLEXIGLAS. 3. A 2006 EDITION PRODUCED BY PIERRE PASSEBON.

FROM TOP: WILLIAM WALDRON; CHRISTIE’S IMAGES LTD. 2017; COURTESY OF DEMISCH DANANT

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DISCOVERIES

THE BEST IN SHOPPING, DESIGN, AND STYLE

EDITED BY JANE KELTNER DE VALLE AND SAM COCHRAN

Quiet Riot Macaron-box pastels— revved up with a touch of metallics—are this season’s unexpected stars

Buzzy Italian design firm Dimore Studio looked to the Art Deco movement for inspiration in creating its first-ever collection of decorative objects, ranging from candlesticks to poufs. LOST-WAX-CAST METAL-AND-BRONZE CANDLESTICKS; OXIDIZED-BRASS VASSOIO TRAY WITH BAMBOO HANDLES; AND BRASS, FOAM, AND WOOD POUF. PRICES UPON REQUEST; DIMOREGALLERY.COM.

PH OTO G R A PH BY B E PPE BRANCATO

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DISCOVERIES shopping 2

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1. NENDO FOR CHRISTOFLE MOUTH-BLOWN GLASS VASES, EACH WITH A SILVER-PLATED ORNAMENT. 9" H. TO 14.25" H.; FROM $455. CHRISTOFLE.COM 2. ALDO BAKKER FOR KARAKTER TABLE. 12.75" W. X 10.5" D. X 16.5" H.; $1,997. KARAKTERCOPENHAGEN.COM

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3. JAIME HAYON FOR FRITZ HANSEN TEA LIGHT CANDLEHOLDER. 4" W. X 5" D. X 4.5" H.; $150. DWR.COM 4. MATTIA BONETTI ELLE & LUI ARMCHAIR. 38.5" W. X 44" D. X 38.5" H.; PRICE UPON REQUEST. DAVIDGILL GALLERY.COM

6. STEPHEN BURKS FOR DEDON THE OTHERS LANTERN IN 128 CLOUD WITH MARBLE BASE. 17.75" W. X 23.25" H.; $1,300. DEDON.DE

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7. MARTINO GAMPER FOR NILUFAR FAKE FRANK CUPBOARD. 48.5" W. X 15.75" D. X 55" H.; $39,956. NILUFAR.COM

P ROD U C ED BY K AT HRY N G I V E N

COURTESY OF RESPECTIVE COMPANIES

5. CRISTINA CELESTINO FOR SERGIO ROSSI CHARLOTTE POUF IN MINT GREEN, NUDE, AND IVORY WITH COPPER FINISHING. 165.25" H. X 185" DIA.; PRICE UPON REQUEST. CRISTINA CELESTINO.COM

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DISCOVERIES at home with ED TANG (NEAR LEFT) AND HIS PARTNER PLAY PING-PONG ON A TABLE BY ARTIST RIRKRIT TIRAVANIJA AT THEIR MARCEL BREUER HOUSE.

Double Impact A set of historic modernist houses in Connecticut are thoughtfully reunited by a design-minded couple

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’m a maximalist, and I hate empty white walls,” says Ed Tang, a Manhattan-based art adviser, of his aesthetic sensibility. Tang, son of the late fashion mogul and Shanghai Tang founder Sir David Tang, is discussing his design decisions for the pair of 1950s modernist houses that he and his partner share in Litchfield, Connecticut. The couple were introduced to the laid-back, leafy corner of the state two years ago by a friend who thought the art collectors would appreciate the famous 1950 Stillman house, designed by Marcel Breuer, which had recently come on the market. “We just fell in love with it,” Tang recalls, noting that the scale was ideal, as was the opportunity to unpack some of their art and furniture collection from storage. “Immediately we wanted it.” Which is why when the adjacent property, a pristine 1953 house designed by Breuer’s fellow Harvard Five architect and onetime student John M. Johansen, came up for sale, Tang acted quickly to join the sister buildings, creating a low-slung modernist compound. (The homes had previously been renovated by Joseph Mazzaferro and Ken Sena, who won a Docomomo award for their meticulous and faithful restoration.) Tang and his partner keep both houses open, but the second home, built for the Huvelle family, friends of the Stillmans, now essentially functions as a winter residence, while the four-bedroom Stillman house—the more playful of the two—is where the couple often stay and entertain

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WORKS BY RICHARD PRINCE, MICHELE ABELES, AND WADE GUYTON AND KELLEY WALKER OCCUPY A STAIRWELL.

P HOTOGRAP HY BY BROOK E HOLM

S T YLI NG BY CO L I N K I N G


DISCOVERIES at home with 1

on summer weekends. A short walk from town, the conjoined properties feel remote, a tucked-away idyll with sun-drenched interiors looking out on the rolling hills and nearby nature preserve. One’s sense of arrival is heightened by the contrast to Litchfield’s broad thoroughfare, lined with imposing white mansions from the mid–19th century, “which look to me, a foreigner, like a complete movie set,” says Tang, who was born in Hong Kong and educated in the U.K. Once they installed forced air, radiant heat, and delicate outdoor lighting, as well as a new stone wall, the houses were a blank canvas for personalization. And personalize they did, though thoughtfully, making sure to keep comfort always the primary consideration. “We don’t want to be those precious people where you have to use a coaster or wear a towel to sit down somewhere,” Tang says. The Stillman house—marked by its sliding glass walls, pool, pops of primary colors (the blue paint was sourced from Switzerland), and an iconic ten-by-18-foot Alexander Calder mural—is full of swimsuit-friendly, airy setups, cheerful artwork by the likes of Darren Bader and Richard Prince, and a light marquee by Philippe Parreno. The Huvelle house, meanwhile, retains a more meditative air. So it makes sense that it’s where the occupants are drawn

1. A PAINTING BY LEO GABIN HANGS ABOVE A DONALD JUDD SIDE TABLE AND AN ALVAR AALTO CHAIR IN A LIVING ROOM. 2. THE HOUSE BY JOHN M. JOHANSEN. 3. PIECES BY KARL HOLMQVIST, PHILIPPE PARRENO, AND WADE GUYTON LINE A WALL OF THE STUDIO.

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during the colder months. Here one finds a cozy, book-lined library, as well as photographs by Brassaï and DO NOT EVER WORK, by Rirkrit Tiravanija, a piece that amplifies the serene atmosphere. Deferential to its views of the sloping landscape, the house is the organic yin to Stillman’s carefully composed yang. “I love nature, art, and architecture,” Tang explains, “and all of that is, in a very humble way, distilled in this house.” Asked if he’s content to make do with the current setup, splitting time between their homes in New York City and Litchfield, Tang takes a moment. “Actually, I would love to have a third home with chintz and wallpaper and pattern-onpattern—a place where not a single surface is blank,” he says with a laugh. —DAVID FOXLEY 3

“We don’t want to be those precious people where you have to use a coaster or wear a towel to sit down.” —Ed Tang 52

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DISCOVERIES debut

The Art of Commerce

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Roman and Williams—the go-to firm for Gwyneth Paltrow, the Ace Hotel, and others—opens a bounteous home-goods emporium

I 1. FURNITURE AND OBJECTS FROM ROMAN AND WILLIAMS GUILD NY. 2. CASEY ZABLOCKI CERAMIC URNS, $650 EACH, AND CUPS, $175 EACH. 3. COFOUNDERS ROBIN STANDEFER AND STEPHEN ALESCH.

f you visited our house, we might sit on the sofa and have a glass of wine—it’s normal,” says Robin Standefer, cofounder of Roman and Williams with husband Stephen Alesch. “But it’s not normal as a shopping experience.” Or, shall we say, it wasn’t pre–Roman and Williams Guild NY. The pair’s new 7,000-square-foot Manhattan emporium encompasses their furniture, lighting, and kitchen-and-bath line for Waterworks; artisanal objects from around the world; books; prints; an Emily Thompson flower shop; and Le Mercerie, a brasserie helmed by chef Marie-Aude Rose (wife of Daniel Rose, the chef and coproprietor of the Roman and Williams–designed Le Coucou). The Guild is located in an 1860s building that originally housed the oldest department store in America, though most recently it served as a bank. So Standefer and Alesch—whose clients range from Gwyneth Paltrow to the Metropolitan Museum of Art—stripped away drop ceilings and teller windows to reveal the treasured bones. Much of the marble

P HOTOGRAP HY BY AD R I A N G AU T

HAIR AND MAKEUP BY EVA SCRIVO FOR EVA SCRIVO SALONS NYC

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DISCOVERIES debut façade is currently being cleaned, unveiling what Alesch describes as a “Venice-like” exterior. The entrance on Howard Street is painted a custom shade that Standefer describes as between “French blue and indigo.” That arresting color is carried over in the open kitchen, which features an Athanor stove from France. Like everything else at the Guild, the stove is for sale (special order in this case). “Our clients, like Gwyneth, are cooks,” Standefer says. Visitors wander beneath the majestic ceilings and through gracious arches with a sense of discovery, moving from the flower shop through the restaurant and café and into living and dining spaces filled with cabinets that are stocked with fabric and hardware samples. “It’s not precious,” Standefer says. “You can go in and play.” 3 The mix of antiques and contemporary objects is more than an aesthetic choice: It plays into Roman and Williams’s core philosophy. “Stephen and I have

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“A lot of modern furniture challenges itself to have no memory. We are of the mind-set that you can do both.” always had an interest in the history of techniques in artisanal objects,” Standefer observes. “It really influences our designs.” Adds Alesch, “We’re extremely stubborn about not having historical things be put on pedestals behind velvet ropes and treated as if they’re so much more extraordinary than anything in the present. A cabinet today isn’t going to have the same details as a Colonial one—we’ve moved on from that kind of molding—but we want it to have the same heft, weight, durability, and trustworthiness.” He continues, “While a lot of modern furniture challenges itself to have no memory at all, we are of the mind-set that you can absolutely do both.” Standefer and Alesch actually sketched the initial designs for the store some 10 years ago, and “it’s been simmering like a broth ever since,” he explains. “Robin and I love to entertain. We love to cook. To us, the house is a place that’s always alive. Stores never inspired us the way being in people’s homes did. In a funny way,” he adds with a smile, “the shop is becoming like our third house.” rwguild.com —JANE KELTNER DE VALLE

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1. SLING CHAIR, PRICE UPON REQUEST. 2. VEDRAN JASKIC WOODEN TOWER, $4,000. 3. EMILY THOMPSON FLOWERS IN A VASE BY CASEY ZABLOCKI. 4. SLAB BED MADE FROM CLARO WALNUT, $42,000. 5. DYLAN BOWEN CERAMIC PLATE, $195. 6. DAVENPORT SOFA UPHOLSTERED IN CASHMERE MOHAIR, PRICE UPON REQUEST.


DISCOVERIES travels 1. ANTONI GAUDÍ’S NEWLY RESTORED CASA VICENS. 2. INSIDE THE MUSEUM, GRAPHIC TILES MINGLE WITH PAPIER-MÂCHÉ RELIEF.

Until then, Gaudí fans can delight in some more happy news: the restoration of Casa Vicens, the architect’s very first residential project (a UNESCO World Heritage Site). Tucked in the quiet neighborhood of Gràcia, just below the Park Güell, the singlefamily home was commissioned in 1883 by stockbroker Manel Vicens i Montaner and later converted into apartments, remaining under private ownership for more than a century. Three years ago, a Spanish bank bought the property, intent on transforming it into a museum. Meticulously rehabilitated thanks to the local design studio DAW, which worked in collaboration with Martínez Lapeña-Torres Arquitectos, Casa Vicens opened to the public this past November. “Vicens is very important for understanding Gaudí’s career,” explains DAW founder David García Martínez. “Here you start to see the beginnings of his relationship to the natural world.” Unlike Casa Milà and Casa Batlló, with their catenary arches and rippling façades, Vicens is intensely linear, more Moorish in spirit than Gaudí’s signature modernisme. (In fact, the architect based the house on the standard square tiles produced by local artisans.) Nonetheless, fanciful ornamentation abounds, from the front gate’s cast-iron palmetto leaves to the French marigolds and dianthus that adorn the exterior’s ceramic tiles. All throughout the interiors, painted ceilings reveal trompe l’oeil visions of flora and fauna, and textural papier-mâché tiles create faux foliage on the ceilings and walls. 1 2

Talk of the Town Amid political upheaval, Barcelona revels in the reinvigorated legacy of Catalan master Antoni Gaudí

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t’s doubtful Antoni Gaudí ever contemplated the perfect selfie. But the Catalan architect’s dizzying oeuvre, a phantasmagoria of shapes and colors, makes taking one almost irresistible. On a recent sunny day in Barcelona, crowds clamored toward the mosaic walls of Park Güell, smiling for the camera. And all around town, arms stretched up to snap Gaudí’s unfinished Sagrada Família, an omnipresent masterpiece with melting façades and spires topped by hulking cranes. More than 135 years in the making, the basilica is now a decade away from completion—a milestone some thought might never come.

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P HOTO G R A P HY BY CO KE B A RTR I N A


DISCOVERIES travels 1

1. SALA BECKETT THEATER, DESIGNED BY FLORES & PRATS. 2. A ROOM AT CASA VICENS IS CLAD IN WOODEN BLINDS. 3. SOHO HOUSE BARCELONA. 4. THE VIEW FROM PARK GÜELL.

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Modernisme—Catalonia’s hallucinatory answer to France’s Art Nouveau—still defines the city, electrifying the senses and luring aesthetes like Anna Karlin, Reinaldo Leandro, and Zak Profera. “Barcelona has fully embraced this very courageous, exciting aesthetic from its past,” says design dealer David Alhadeff of the Future Perfect, who visited last summer. “Locals continue to create a place that’s completely inspiring and unique.” As Catalonian pride surges (at press time, the region was in the midst of a struggle to secede from Spain), Barcelona’s latest design destinations all remain steeped in history. Four years ago, another UNESCO World Heritage Site, the Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, reopened as a cultural and research center. Built between 1902 and 1930 by architect Lluís Domènech i Montaner, it dazzles with stained-glass windows and mosaic ceilings in glistening golden hues. Just a short stroll toward the sea, a former social club has been reborn as Sala Beckett, a contemporary theater designed by local firm Flores & Prats, which uses traditional ceramic tile (reclaimed from other parts of the building) and a ribbed ceiling that nods to the Catalan vault. Even the new outpost of Soho House embraces its roots. Set on the former site of a convent, the hotel and members’ club boasts vaulted ceilings, tiled floors and walls, and exuberant textiles. “Thanks to Gaudí, Barcelona is a celebration of curves, color, and detail, inside and out,” says interior designer Amy Lau, another recent visitor. “His manmade structures echo the randomness and organic essence of nature herself.” Gaudí, who famously mused, “Nothing is art if it does not come from nature,” couldn’t have agreed more. —HANNAH MARTIN

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MORE TO DO IN BARCELONA SIGHTS Check out as many Gaudí buildings as you can stand—and try to schedule appointments in advance to avoid the lines. The shimmering Casa Batlló (casa batllo.es), undulating Casa Milà (lapedrera.com), and newly opened Casa Vicens (casavicens.org) are a great buildup to the architect’s magnum opus: the Sagrada Família (sagradafamilia.org). Then take in the view from the top at the fantastical Park Güell (parkguell.cat). Experiencing sensory overload? Cleanse the visual palate with a trip to the Mies van der Rohe–designed Barcelona Pavilion (miesbcn.com).

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RESTAURANTS If you’re hungry for a fresh catch, try the family-run mainstay La Taberna Gallega (lataberna gallega.com), which Alhadeff calls “as authentic as authentic gets.” For tapas, Bar Mut (barmut.com) delivers faithful classics, while Bar But, just down the street, offers contemporary twists like waffle-shaped patatas bravas (barbut.es). And should you tire of finger food, head to Céleri, the open, airy kitchen of Michelinstarred chef Xavier Pellicer, where fruits and vegetables sourced from local farms are carted in daily for rotating seasonal dishes (tribuwoki.com).

HOTELS Sleep beneath a Catalan vaulted ceiling and hang poolside on a candy-striped lounge at Soho House, tucked inside an 18thcentury building (once the site of a 13th-century convent) in the Gothic Quarter (sohohouse barcelona.com). Textile designer Zak Profera recommends the low-key cool of Casa Bonay (casabonay.com), steps from several Gaudí sights. Or keep it classic at Barcelona mainstays like the Cotton House (hotel cottonhouse.com) and Majestic Hotel (hotelmajestic.es).


DISCOVERIES collecting 1. MELISSA NEUMANN’S MANHATTAN LIVING ROOM DOUBLES AS AN INTRODUCTION TO THE HISTORY OF ART, WITH MAJOR PAINTINGS BY JEAN DUBUFFET, JOAN MIRÓ, AND FERNAND LÉGER, PLUS SCULPTURES BY JEFF KOONS AND HENRI MATISSE. 2. THE ENTRY DISPLAYS A CHARLIE ROBERTS TOTEM AND A MICHAEL BEVILACQUA PAINTING. FOR DETAILS SEE RESOURCES.

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All Together Now At a Manhattan townhouse decorated by Russell Groves, a family of art aficionados finds that more is more

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itting in Melissa Neumann’s Manhattan living room, you can feel almost overcome—your eyes flitting from one artwork to the next, trying to take it all in. Over here a Jeff Koons sheepdog and a Futurist composition by Gino Severini. Over there classic abstractions by Joan Miró and Fernand Léger. Yet, for all the visual ping-pong, the room is actually one of the tamer spaces in the house, which is packed with a collection spanning three generations. Four, if you count the children. And this family does. “We just brought in a Kenny Scharf doughnut painting,” says Melissa, “and all three of my young kids were lobbying to put it in their room.” Art has been embroidered into the fabric of the Neumanns’ lives ever since Melissa’s father, Hubert, and his father began buying, around 1950. Melissa and her sisters grew up surrounded with paintings and sculptures, and when she and her husband bought their latest home, there was no question it would be a showcase for art—the more the better. “This house is a cacophony,” says Hubert. “But so is the world. Why wouldn’t art, and showing art, reflect that?” The 1899 residence, designed by architect Clarence True, might not have been an obvious fit for such dynamic treasures, but Melissa says she and her husband just felt it “had a great energy.” They hired Zivkovic Connolly Architects to renovate and expand the property, lightening its Victorian feel with a skylit central staircase whose walls and landings serve as

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S T YLED BY HOWARD CH R I S TI A N


DISCOVERIES collecting galleries that reveal themselves as you ascend. “You see these fragmented views, which is similar to the visual vocabulary of many of the artists,” says Melissa, “but there’s also a sense of openness.” For the furnishings the couple turned to Russell Groves, a designer known for rooms that exude a subtle glamour, combining warm palettes with a sophisticated mix of vintage and custom pieces. “The furniture couldn’t compete with the art,” says Groves. “We had to find a way to make the rooms feel softer and relaxed because there was already so much going on visually.” The Neumanns have always favored art, Hubert says, that is “creative enough to make a significant step forward.” Translation: work that is joyously idiosyncratic and often obsessively intricate—if not outright chaotic. Take the entrance hall, where you are greeted by a vibrant 11-foot-tall totem by Charlie Roberts and a riotous 20-foot-wide Michael Bevilacqua painting with fragments of imagery and letters spelling out exclamations of joy. Climbing the

“This house is a cacophony. But so is the world. Why wouldn’t art, and showıng art, reflect that?” —Hubert Neumann 1 2

1. A LANDING OF THE RENOVATED TOWNHOUSE REVEALS AN EARLY BASQUIAT PAINTING. 2. ARNE JACOBSEN EGG CHAIRS PUNCTUATE ANOTHER LANDING, ECHOING THE JUSTIN SAMSON PAINTING OVER THE STAIRCASE.

stairs to the second floor, you encounter a pristine photo-realist portrait by Chuck Close beside a kaleidoscopic painting by Ashley Bickerton. Nearby is a magisterial Jean-Michel Basquiat work, one of two the Neumanns bought from the artist in 1982. When it comes to the subject of curators and museums, Hubert, in particular, proudly wears his reputation for being opinionated and at times irascible. (Remarks like “Most museum installations are boring” are not uncommon.) But the family does regularly lend to exhibitions, like the recent Matthew Ronay show at the Blaffer Art Museum in Houston and the Francis Picabia survey at New York’s Museum of Modern Art. These days, they are making hundreds of their works accessible on social media under the handle Aftermodernism. Melissa says she and her husband plan to rotate what’s on display in their home and keep adding new acquisitions. Asked what unifies the mix, Hubert notes “it’s about antagonisms.” Melissa, pausing for a moment, remarks that while a lot of thought went into the way the house is laid out, there was also spontaneity. “Great art,” she adds, “just works.” —STEPHEN WALLIS


AD100 2018

A FAMILY ROOM BY ISABEL LÓPEZQUESADA ON THE GREEK ISLAND OF SPETSES.

Adjaye Associates Aero Studios AL_A Alex Papachristidis Interiors Amy Lau Design The Archers Ashe + Leandro Atelier AM Ben Pentreath Ltd. Bestor Architecture BIG–Bjarke Ingels Group Bilhuber and Associates Billy Cotton Brian J. McCarthy Inc. Carrier and Company Interiors Caruncho Garden & Architecture Charles Zana Architecture d’Intérieur Commune Design Cullman & Kravis Associates Inc. Dan Fink Studio Daniel Romualdez Architects Deborah Berke Partners Décoration Jacques Garcia 74

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Diller Scofidio + Renfro Dimore Studio Drake/Anderson Faye Toogood Fernando Santangelo Inc. Fox-Nahem Associates Francis Sultana Frank de Biasi Interiors G. P. Schafer Architect Gachot Studios Georgis & Mirgorodsky Architects Groves & Co. Hollander Design Landscape Architects Ike Kligerman Barkley India Mahdavi Ingrao Inc. Isabel López-Quesada Jan Showers & Associates Inc. Jean-Louis Deniot John Pawson Ltd. John Stefanidis Brands Ltd. Johnston Marklee Joseph Dirand Architecture

Kelly Wearstler Laplace Leroy Street Studio Lorenzo Castillo Madison Cox Associates Mark Hampton LLC Markham Roberts Inc. Martyn Lawrence Bullard Design McAlpine Michael S. Smith Inc. Miles Redd Monique Gibson Interior Design Muriel Brandolini Nate Berkus Associates NH Design Olson Kundig Paul Fortune Design Studio Perry Guillot Inc. Peter Pennoyer Architects Pierre Yovanovitch Architecture d’Intérieur Piet Oudolf Rafael de Cárdenas Ltd./ Architecture at Large Robert Couturier Inc.

Tom Scheerer Inc. Robert Stilin Toshiko Mori Architect Rockwell Group Veere Grenney Roman and Williams Associates Buildings and Interiors Rose Uniacke Studio Ltd. Victoria Hagan Interiors Vincent Van Duysen RP Miller Design Architects Ryan Korban Waldo’s Designs S. R. Gambrel Inc. Sawyer | Berson E Selldorf Architects LL M SheltonMindel HA OF FA Snøhetta Mario Buatta Stephen Shadley François Catroux Designs Stephen Sills Associates Thierry Despont Steven Harris Architects Mica Ertegun Norman Foster Steven Holl Architects Jacques Grange Steven Volpe Design Hugh Newell Jacobsen Studio Gang Robert Kime Studio KO Peter Marino Studio Peregalli Richard Meier Studio Shamshiri Juan Pablo Molyneux Studio Sofield Inc. Jean Nouvel Studioilse Suzanne Kasler Interiors Robert A.M. Stern Rose Tarlow Thad Hayes Inc. Axel Vervoordt Tino Zervudachi & Associés Bunny Williams

HAND LET T ERI NG BY LEANNE S H A P TO N

RICHARD POWERS

Whether rule-breakers or defenders of tradition, the men and women of the 2018 AD100 all have one thing in common: uncommon vision.


100 T A D EBU D AMY LAU DESIGN Interior Design NEW YORK

Long before groundbreaking design began tiptoeing across the borders of high art, Amy Lau was busy conjuring bravura interiors that rejected antiquated distinctions between the two disciplines. “I conceive an interior as a total work of art, so that every piece in an environment has a supporting role to play within that space,” she says, underscoring the importance of serious connoisseurship as the foundation for any decorative scheme. A familiar presence at elite art and design fairs across the globe— she was a cofounder of Design Miami in 2005—Lau has an all-encompassing vision of inspired, artful living that raises mere finesse into the realm of pure magic. ► amylaudesign.com 1. A NEW YORK APARTMENT BY AMY LAU. 2. PRISMA RUG BY AMY LAU FOR KYLE BUNTING. 8' DIA.; $5,931. KYLEBUNTING.COM. 3. MEMBERS OF THE ARCHERS’ TEAM, FROM LEFT: DAN BAKLIK, STEPHEN HUNT, MARY CASPER, RICHARD PETIT, AND ANDREW ELMENDORF.

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100 T A D EBU D THE ARCHERS Interior Design LOS ANGELES

It’s official. The avant-garde Los Angeles design collective known as The Archers is no longer an inside secret among the city’s young creative elite. For the past decade and a half, the firm, founded by Richard Petit and Stephen Hunt in 2002, has been quietly building a portfolio of some of the freshest, chicest homes in town, including residences for some of the boldest boldface names in entertainment. The Archers’ design of the Mare hair salon in West Hollywood also made quite a splash, particularly in a city that takes hair as seriously as L.A. does. Vanity Fair dubbed Mare “The New It Hair Salon.” Petit, an avowed cineaste who knows how to set a scene, described it as “a time-travel journey to the Franco-Japanese 1980s.” Just dreamy.

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ALEX PAPACHRISTIDIS INTERIORS Interior Design NEW YORK Signature: Close attention

to details and finishes, to create truly bespoke interiors with comfortable, cozy, inviting atmospheres. What’s next: Wall coverings with Gracie; a new line for Langhorne Carpet Co.; the launch of everydayelegance.com, a website devoted to the art of table-setting. ► alexpapachristidis.com

ASHE + LEANDRO

ATELIER AM

Interior Design NEW YORK Known for: Relaxed—but

Interior Design LOS ANGELES Signature: Husband and

deliberate—contemporary luxury. What’s next: On the occasion of their tenth anniversary, the duo is launching a furniture line this spring. Notable clients: Jake Gyllenhaal, Liev Schreiber, Seth Meyers, Rashid Johnson, Naomi Watts. ► asheleandro.com

wife Michael and Alexandra Misczynski specialize in edited, elegant, cultivated interiors blending pedigreed furnishings with modern and contemporary art. Clients: Collectors, titans of business, entertainment execs. Obsessions: Chinese furniture; virtual reality applied to architecture. ► atelieram.com

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1. JASON SCHMIDT; 2. COURTESY OF AMY LAU; 3. ALEX POLILLO

► team-archers.com


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1. THE MALIBU HOUSE OF BEASTIE BOYS MEMBER MIKE D, ARCHITECTURE BY BARBARA BESTOR. 2. BARBARA BESTOR.

BESTOR ARCHITECTURE Architecture LOS ANGELES

“I want to redeďŹ ne Los Angeles architecture by rigorously engaging the city through design, art, and urbanism,â€? Barbara Bestor proclaims. And she has conjured a multitude of innovative residential, commercial, and institutional projects across the sprawling metropolis. She has designed homes for Jill Soloway (Transparent), Jenni Konner and Richard Shepard (Girls), Mike D of the Beastie Boys (see AD March 2017), fashion designer Trina Turk, and Sonic Youth’s Kim Gordon. Her design for the Beats by Dre headquarters received a national AIA Award, and her transformation of an erstwhile makeup factory into the new home of the Silverlake Conservatory of Music is widely seen as a model of communityfocused redevelopment. And with projects on the boards in Northern California and Oregon, she’s put the rest of the country on notice: Bestor Architecture is coming. â–ş bestorarchitecture.com

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BEN PENTREATH LTD.

BIG–BJARKE INGELS GROUP

BILHUBER AND ASSOCIATES

Architecture & Interior Design LONDON In the works: Tornagrain,

Architecture COPENHAGEN, LONDON, AND NEW YORK Just completed: A visitor

Interior Design NEW YORK Known for: Interiors

Inverness, a new town on the Earl of Moray’s Scottish estate; and continuing work for the Prince of Wales at Poundbury in Dorset. What’s next: A furniture collection for his London shop, Pentreath & Hall. ► benpentreath.com

center for Lego and the Tirpitz bunker museum, both in Denmark. What’s next: Headquarters for Google in London; a police station in the Bronx, New York; a factory for San Pellegrino in Bergamo, Italy. ► big.dk

centered on the best of the past while looking to the future. Highlights: Furniture and accessories collections for Henredon; rug designs for Elson & Co. What’s next: Porcelain tableware for de Gournay. ► bilhuber.com

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LEAP INDIGO BY DAVID ROCKWELL FOR BISAZZA. 8" SQ.; $24 PER SQ. FT. BISAZZA.COM.

E/S20 COLLECTION TILE BY PAUL FORTUNE FOR EXQUISITE SURFACES. 8" SQ.; $28 PER SQ. FT. XSURFACES.COM.

1. TREVOR TONDRO; 2. HAMISH ROBERTSON; ALL OTHERS COURTESY OF RESPECTIVE COMPANIES

100 T A D EBU D


100 T A D EBU D BILLY COTTON Interior Design NEW YORK

Although he counts some of the biggest names in the contemporary-art world as clients, Billy Cotton maintains no pie-inthe-sky illusions about what he does. “I make furniture and interiors, not art. I leave that to my artist friends and clients. If people like the work I do, that’s enough for me,” says the Brooklyn-based dynamo. And like it they do. Cotton has collaborated with Cindy Sherman, Carol Bove, Lisa Yuskavage, and other luminaries of the international art scene to create soulful homes. And he’s got the chair-and-table angle covered, too, with his signature line of crisp, tailored furnishings and accessories, which are coveted not only by the smart art set but also his fellow travelers on the cutting edge of design.

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► billycotton.com 2 1. JOINERY DINING CHAIR BY BILLY COTTON; $4,300. BILLYCOTTON.COM. 2. BILLY COTTON. 3. FERNANDO CARUNCHO’S MADRID GARDEN.

BRIAN J. McCARTHY INC. Interior Design NEW YORK Signature: A balanced mix

of classical, modern, and contemporary design and art. In the works: A 360-foot luxury motor yacht, a penthouse in Monaco, and an apartment overlooking Philadelphia’s Rittenhouse Square, among many other commissions. ► bjminc.com

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Interior Design NEW YORK Known for: Husband-and-

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Landscape Design MADRID AND PARIS

“My goal is to use the garden to link architecture and landscape, forming between the three an indissoluble unity,” says Fernando Caruncho, known for hypnotic commissions, from a private retreat in Maine to the Pereda Gardens at Renzo Piano’s Centro Botín in S TH I S I S Santander, Spain. Each is quietly influenced by Caruncho’s personal inspirations, among them sculptor Isamu Noguchi, architect Tadao Ando, painter Francisco de Zurbarán, ancient Greek engineer Eupalinos, and the gardeners and architects of the Alhambra. Authenticity, for him, is all. “We are going to want to return to nature, in opposition to a world too governed by technology.”

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CARUNCHO GARDEN & ARCHITECTURE

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wife team Jesse Carrier and Mara Miller create rooms as relaxed and livable as they are refined and sophisticated. Notable clients: Jessica Chastain and Gian Luca Passi de Preposulo, Annie Leibovitz, Jessica and Jerry Seinfeld, Anna Wintour. What’s next: Expanding beyond residential into commercial endeavors. ► carrierandcompany.com

► fernandocaruncho.com

1. AND 2. STEPHEN KENT JOHNSON; 3. SILVIA CERRADA

CARRIER AND COMPANY INTERIORS


Architecture & Interior Design PARIS Highlight: As a passionate

collector of works by Ettore Sottsass, Zana organized a nearly 70-piece exhibit of ceramics by the great Italian architect at last year’s Venice Biennale. What’s next: Carpets for La Manufacture Cogolin. ► zana.fr

COMMUNE DESIGN Interior Design LOS ANGELES Signature: Unpretentious

bohemian chic; California cool with a hint of Wiener Werkstätte glamour. Keywords: “Handcrafted, woodsy, elemental.” Clients: Ace Hotels, the Elder Statesman, Kiki de Montparnasse, actor Jim Parsons, plus a slate of high-profile tastemakers in fashion, culture, and business. What’s next: A 200room hotel in Kyoto, Japan. ► communedesign.com

CULLMAN & KRAVIS ASSOCIATES INC. Interior Design NEW YORK Aim: “To redefine the

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Architecture NEW YORK Aim: “To bring a human-

centered approach to the designing of space.” Projects: Performance Space 122 and the Women’s Building, a global hub for the women’s- and girls’rights movement, both in New York; Hotel Savoy in Kansas City, Missouri. ► dberke.com

THE GARDEN OF PETER MARINO (RIZZOLI, $85)

DÉCORATION JACQUES GARCIA Interior Design PARIS Clients: Crowned heads

(Brunei, Luxembourg, Belgium) as well as monarchs of business, such as the Mauboussin jewelry clan and Mélissa and Martin Bouygues of Bordeaux’s Château Montrose winery. Highlight: Opened a resort on his own property in Noto, Sicily. ► studiojacquesgarcia.com

A PLACE TO CALL HOME: TRADITION, STYLE, AND MEMORY IN THE NEW AMERICAN HOUSE, BY GIL SCHAFER (RIZZOLI, $55)

DILLER SCOFIDIO + RENFRO

VICTORIA HAGAN: DREAM SPACES (RIZZOLI, $55)

Architecture NEW YORK Just completed: The first

traditional interior for 21st-century living.” Personal cause: Firm principal Elissa Cullman is helping create a state-of-the-art kitchen for the Kips Bay Boys & Girls Club in the Bronx, New York, to help the kids learn about nutrition and the possibility of careers in the culinary arts. ► cullmankravis.com

phase of their ongoing MoMA expansion; a ground-up house in the Hamptons; Zaryadye Park in Moscow. What’s next: The Museum of Image and Sound in Rio de Janeiro; the U.S. Olympic Museum in Colorado Springs; a cultural center—the Shed—for Manhattan’s Hudson Yards. ATURE ► dsrny.com FE

DAN FINK STUDIO

DIMORE STUDIO

Interior Design NEW YORK Known for: Putting a

Interior Design MILAN S T Highlights: Leo’s supper H I S I S

contemporary spin on traditional and classical design ideas. Aim: “To simplify and demystify the design process.” Highlight: Renovation of the dancers’ lounge at the American Ballet Theatre practice studio in partnership with AD (see AD July 2017). ► danfinkstudio.com

and nightclubs in London; launch of first homeaccessories collection. In the works: A hotel in Paris; a private villa in Tuscany. ► dimorestudio.eu

DANIEL ROMUALDEZ ARCHITECTS

expresses both place and personality; environments should be inviting, delightful, and, above all, resolutely livable.” Personal causes: The Royal Oak Foundation; the Alpha Workshops. ► drakeanderson.com

profile (August 2017) and AD cover story (June 2017). Notable clients: Tory Burch (see AD October 2017), Anh Duong, Daphne Guinness, Aerin Lauder, Lauren Santo Domingo. ► 212-989-8429

FROM CLASSIC TO CONTEMPORARY: DECORATING WITH CULLMAN & KRAVIS (THE MONACELLI PRESS, $65)

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LORENZO CASTILLO (EDICIONES EL VISO, $75)

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that exude elegance. Highlights: Vanity Fair

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Architecture & Interior Design NEW YORK Signature: Sublime settings

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DEBORAH BERKE PARTNERS

POETRY OF PLACE: THE NEW ARCHITECTURE AND INTERIORS OF MCALPINE (RIZZOLI, $55)

DRAKE/ANDERSON Interior Design NEW YORK Credo: “The best decor

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FOX-NAHEM: THE DESIGN VISION OF JOE NAHEM (ABRAMS, $60)

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: JASON SCHMIDT/COURTESY OF PETER MARINO; COURTESY OF RESPECTIVE COMPANIES (2); SIMON UPTON/ COURTESY OF MCALPINE; COURTESY OF ABRAMS BOOKS; COURTESY OF LORENZO CASTILLO; COURTESY OF RIZZOLI

CHARLES ZANA ARCHITECTURE D’INTÉRIEUR


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FOX-NAHEM ASSOCIATES Interior Design NEW YORK Known for: Rule-breaking

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FRANCIS SULTANA Interior Design LONDON Signature: Sophisticated

FAYE TOOGOOD Interior Design LONDON

Designer Faye Toogood refuses to be boxed in. At the intersection of refined and raw, her earthy, elemental style nods to both past and present, a characteristic she credits to her academic studies in fine art and the history of art. As part of her holistic approach to environments, she designs everything for her spaces. Since founding her multidisciplinary practice in 2008, the former World of Interiors staffer has created installations, objects, and interiors for Comme des Garçons. Recent and ongoing projects include a holiday house in Ibiza, a penthouse apartment in London, and the flagship store for British brand Mulberry—all conceived to be fully immersive experiences of her distinctive vision.

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► fayetoogood.com

luxury built upon noble materials and quality craftsmanship. Personal cause: Raised in Malta, Sultana is a major supporter of the island nation’s contemporary art and design scene and a board member of a new museum opening there in 2021. Just launched: A collection of 1950sinspired upholstered furniture. ► francissultana.com

1. A FAYE TOOGOOD–DESIGNED LONDON PENTHOUSE. 2. FAYE TOOGOOD. 3. TOOGOOD’S ROLY-POLY CHAIR/MOON; PRICE UPON REQUEST. FRIEDMANBENDA.COM. 4. ARTIST JACK PIERSON’S NEW YORK LIVING ROOM BY FERNANDO SANTANGELO.

100 T A D EBU D FERNANDO SANTANGELO INC. Interior Design NEW YORK

Ever since star hotelier André Balazs tapped Fernando Santangelo to revitalize Hollywood’s legendary Chateau Marmont in the early 1990s—a job that helped launch both the boutique-hotel craze and Santangelo’s career—the Uruguay-born, New York–based interior designer has been conjuring richly layered interiors that retain a sense of history. These days, as he continues to appoint trendy hospitality hot spots (a surf-and-yoga hotel in Costa Rica; the McCarren Hotel & Pool in Williamsburg, Brooklyn), the decorator brings his signature sensitivity and virtuosity to residential projects for clients like Bette Midler, artist Jack Pierson (see AD December 2016) and Proenza Schouler designers Jack McCollough and Lazaro Hernandez. ► fernandosantangelo.com 4 88

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1. TOBIAS HARVEY; 2. WANG WEI/EYEVINE/REDUX; 3. ANGUS MILL; 4. STEPHEN KENT JOHNSON

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interiors outfitted with A-list contemporary art and design. Words of wisdom: “Don’t just decorate, curate.” What’s next: A new house in Malibu for Robert Downey Jr. and Susan Downey. ► foxnahem.com


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GEORGIS & MIRGORODSKY ARCHITECTS

Interior Design NEW YORK Aim: “To solve the

TH Architecture IS I NEW YORK Signature: Grounded in

challenges of young families who crave a stylish yet practical environment for themselves, their children, and their friends.” Notable clients: George Lindemann (see AD January 2017), Emilia Fanjul Pfeifler. What’s next: Finishing his own home in Tangier with partner Gene Meyer. ► frankdebiasi.com

historic American architectural traditions and taste, the firm’s houses celebrate the way people live today. Projects: Residential collaborations with decorators Thomas Jayne, Rita Konig, Miles Redd, Tom Scheerer, Virginia Tupker, and Bunny Williams. ► gpschafer.com

colleague Ilya Mirgorodsky was named a partner. Highlights: Interiors for the Grill and the Pool, the new restaurants in the former Four Seasons restaurant space in New York’s iconic Seagram Building. ► gma.nyc

GACHOT STUDIOS

GROVES & CO.

Interior Design NEW YORK Known for: Layered,

100 T A D EBU D HOLLANDER DESIGN LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTS Landscape Design NEW YORK, SAG HARBOR, AND CHICAGO

Architecture & Interior Design NEW YORK Credo: “Reflect each

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nuanced modernism that draws on the broad experience in residential and commercial work of husband-and-wife duo John and Christine Gachot. Aim: “To celebrate the possibilities of any physical space.” Projects: Shinola’s Los Angeles flagship and a Shinola hotel in Detroit; eateries for restaurateur Geoffrey Zakarian. ► gachotstudios.com

Architecture & Interior Design LA JOLLA, CALIFORNIA, AND NEW YORK What’s new: Longtime

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Edmund Hollander approaches landscape architecture from a holistic standpoint. “The three ecologies essential to a timeless project,” he explains, “are the architectural ecology of the buildings, the natural ecology of the vernacular landscape, and the human ecology of how the clients will inhabit the landscapes we create.” Which explains why Hollander’s award-winning firm was tapped to mastermind a 61,000-square-foot green-roof memorial as part of architect Steven Holl’s expansion of the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts in the nation’s capital. That ongoing commission is an especially prominent feather in a cap that includes private landscapes, from eloquent to heroic, for titans such as theater scion Jonathan M. Tisch, real-estate magnate William C. Rudin, and Goldman Sachs CEO Lloyd Blankfein.

A PARTERRE IN AN EAST HAMPTON GARDEN BY EDMUND HOLLANDER.

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► hollanderdesign.com


IKE KLIGERMAN BARKLEY

JAN SHOWERS & ASSOCIATES INC.

Architecture NEW YORK AND SAN FRANCISCO In the works: Reviving a

Interior Design DALLAS Credo: “Interior design is

INDIA MAHDAVI Interior Design PARIS Signature: Vibrant,

vivacious, enveloping color. Credo: “I am here to bring joy.” Highlights: Pieces for Louis Vuitton’s Objets Nomades; a collection of velvets for Pierre Frey; a collaboration with French retailer Monoprix. ► india-mahdavi.com

INGRAO INC. Interior Design NEW YORK Signature: Partners Tony

Ingrao and Randy Kemper bring an audacious vision to every project. Notable clients: Kim Cattrall, Kevin James, Howard Stern. ► ingraoinc.com

ISABEL LÓPEZ-QUESADA Interior Design MADRID Words of wisdom: “I love

this quote by Borges— ‘Not a day goes by that we are not, for a moment, in paradise’—and I believe good design makes this happen.” Highlights: Completed her first U.S. commissions, in the Brandywine Valley and New York City. ► isabellopezquesada.com

an art form that, if done properly, helps people live comfortably surrounded by beauty.” Other projects: A furniture collection for Kravet; a line of cowhide rugs for Kyle Bunting; modern Oushak-style carpets for Moattar. ► janshowers.com

JEAN-LOUIS DENIOT Interior Design PARIS Known for: A belief in the

importance of atmosphere more than the actual look. Aim: “Magic.” What’s next: Interiors for his first 57-story condo building, overlooking Biscayne Bay in Miami; introducing new pieces to his collection for Baker. ► deniot.com

JOHN PAWSON LTD. Architecture LONDON Signature: Rigorously

simple architecture grounded in fundamentals and modest in character. What’s next: Edition hotel, West Hollywood; W Tel Aviv; chapel and visitor center at the Monastery of Nový Dvůr in the Czech Republic. ► johnpawson.com

100 T A D EBU D JOHNSTON MARKLEE Architecture LOS ANGELES

JOHN STEFANIDIS BRANDS LTD. Interior Design LONDON Aim: “To be both

practical and visual.” Notable clients: The Duchess of Westminster, Noemi Marone Cinzano, Princess Sadruddin Aga Khan, Abigail and Leslie Wexner. In the works: Hotel Cappuccino, a groundup hotel in Pollensa, Majorca; a penthouse in Athens with views of the Parthenon. ► johnstefanidis.com

1. THE VAULT HOUSE IN CALIFORNIA, BY JOHNSTON MARKLEE. 2. SHARON JOHNSTON AND MARK LEE.

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As artistic directors of the 2017 Chicago Architecture Biennial, Sharon Johnston and Mark Lee conceived the theme “Make New History,” working with the exhibition’s 141 participants to explore how the latest design can upend convention and redefine our world. Certainly this design duo knows a thing or two about that. After founding their L.A.-based firm, Johnston Marklee, in 1998, the duo quickly built a reputation for daring houses with complex geometries, cerebral concepts, and sitespecific structural acrobatics. And residential architecture remains a passion. (Take, as evidence, their 2016 book, House Is a House Is a House Is a House Is a House.) But the firm has also branched out to institutional and commercial projects: an ongoing update to Chicago’s Museum of Contemporary Art, a retail building in Miami’s Design District, and the eagerly awaited Menil Drawing Institute in Houston, opening later this year. ► johnstonmarklee.com

1. AND 2. ERIC STAUDENMAIER

collection of 1960s handmade houses in rural Marin County, California; a shingle-style poolhouse in Water Mill, New York; a new Dutch Colonial in Greenwich, Connecticut. Personal cause: The firm recently announced the IKB Traveling Fellowship, a grant program that will fund up to two graduate students for travel and research relating to architectural history. ► ikekligermanbarkley.com


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tile collection with Ann Sacks; new designs for The Rug Company; wall covering, fabric, and trims with Lee Jofa. What’s next: Outdoor-fabric collection for Lee Jofa. ► kellywearstler.com

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JOSEPH DIRAND ARCHITECTURE Interior Design PARIS

Joseph Dirand’s understanding of space and romantic take on minimalism can be traced back to childhood days spent at the side of his father, a noted interiors photographer. Through that lens he learned to see architecture, and his soulful decor— spare but never cold—has earned devotion from a discerning clientele, including fashion houses like Chloé, Balmain, and Emilio Pucci, and restaurateur Joël Robuchon, whose upcoming New York space Dirand is designing. But he surpassed the expectations of even his most ardent fans with the opening last spring of the Surf Club at the Four Seasons, just north of Miami Beach. In Dirand’s hands the historic Prohibition-era club wasn’t just restored, it was magnificently reimagined.

1. A PARIS APARTMENT DESIGNED BY JOSEPH DIRAND. 2. JOSEPH DIRAND. 3. DIRAND’S SOFA MALAPARTE; PRICE UPON REQUEST. AURELIEJULIEN.COM

► josephdirand.com

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spaces that complement artworks and enhance engagement with a collection.” Highlight: Introduced a bespoke furniture line. Personal cause: In support of the French nonprofit Ligue pour la Protection des Oiseaux (Bird Protection League), the team incorporates wildlife sanctuaries in many projects. ► luislaplace.com

LEROY STREET STUDIO Architecture & Interior Design NEW YORK Credo: “Design that is

intelligent, responsible, and enduring.” Highlights: Alley Pond Environmental Center, Queens, New York, an immersive-learning center highlighting the wetlands ecosystem; Hester Street Collaborative, the studio’s sister nonprofit, completed a blueprint for future cultural development and investment in New York. Notable clients: Lyor Cohen (see AD February 2017), New York’s Charlie Bird restaurant. ► leroystreetstudio.com

LORENZO CASTILLO Interior Design MADRID Aim: “To balance the

classic with the modern.” What’s new: The firm’s

CHITINA BY LORENZO CASTILLO FOR GASTÓN Y DANIELA; TO THE TRADE. GASTONYDANIELA.COM.

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BANGALORE FLORAL BY JASPER FABRICS BY MICHAEL S. SMITH; TO THE TRADE. MICHAELSMITHINC.COM.

IVORY #14 BY MURIEL BRANDOLINI FOR HOLLAND & SHERRY; TO THE TRADE. HOLLANDSHERRY.COM

fifth collection of ultramaximalist, muchopolychrome fabrics, trimmings, and wall coverings for Gastón y Daniela. Projects: Hotels in Barcelona and Ibiza. ► lorenzocastillo.org

1. ADRIEN DIRAND; 2. LASSE FLØDE; 3. ADRIEN DIRAND/COURTESY OF JOSEPH DIRAND/AURELIE JULIEN COLLECTIBLE; ALL OTHERS COURTESY OF RESPECTIVE COMPANIES

Architecture & Interior Design PARIS Aim: “To create functional


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MARK HAMPTON LLC Interior Design NEW YORK Highlight: Firm principal

Alexa Hampton was named creative director of online retailer the Mine. What’s new: Hardware with S. A. Baxter, mantelpieces for Chesney’s, and updates to ongoing collaborations with Hickory Chair, MaitlandSmith, Visual Comfort, Stark, Kravet, and more. ► alexahampton.com

MARKHAM ROBERTS INC. Interior Design NEW YORK Known for: Savvy, erudite

interpretations that make old-school, all-American decorating fresh again. Highlight: Renovation of Tortuga Bay, the legendary Dominican Republic resort built by Oscar de la Renta. ► markhamroberts.com

MARTYN LAWRENCE BULLARD DESIGN Interior Design LOS ANGELES Credo: “Modern luxury is comfort.” Highlights:

His Palm Springs house was in AD’s April 2017 issue. Opened MLB Atelier, in West Hollywood. Partnered with Frontgate. Ongoing work with Schumacher, Christofle, Daum, Haviland,

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Ann Sacks, Perennials, and The Rug Company. What’s next: Wallpaper designs for Cole & Son. Notable clients: Dee and Tommy Hilfiger (see AD March 2017), Kendall Jenner, Khloé and Kourtney Kardashian, Ellen Pompeo. ► martynlawrencebullard .com

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McALPINE Architecture & Interior Design ATLANTA; MONTGOMERY, ALABAMA; NASHVILLE; AND NEW YORK Known for: Poetic layouts

MADISON COX ASSOCIATES Landscape Design NEW YORK

and soulful decor wrapped in beautifully crafted architecture. Highlight: Bobby McAlpine’s completion of his own house in Atlanta. Notable clients: Faith Hill and Tim McGraw (see AD July 2017), Harry Connick Jr. ► mcalpinehouse.com

MICHAEL S. SMITH INC. Interior Design SANTA MONICA, CALIFORNIA Credo: “Live with things you love.” Recent work:

The Obamas’ new residence in Washington, D.C. What’s new: Furniture and fabrics for Jasper, rugs for Mansour Modern, bathroom fittings for Kallista, and a collection of mirrors for Mirror Image Home. ► michaelsmithinc.com

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“Each place I’m working on has to have a relationship to its context,” publicity-shy Madison Cox once told AD. “I’m always striving to create harmony and order as well as a sense of retreat, a private world for the person I’m designing for.” And what a heady crew that is, from style queen Marella Agnelli to philanthropist Anne Bass to Moda Operandi cofounder Lauren Santo Domingo. Cox’s favorite gardens are just as eclectic, including Marrakech’s Fondation Jardin Majorelle (Cox, the garden’s longtime vice president, is its new director); Scotland’s Little Sparta; Ganna Walska Lotusland in Montecito, California; and the Mediterranean Garden Society’s Garden near Athens. Cox has only one professional hero, though: that would be the late, great Russell Page, the British garden grandee who counted Agnelli among his own devoted clients. ► madisoncox.com

1. AND 2. COURTESY OF MADISON COX; 3. AND 4. PASCAL CHEVALLIER

1. AND 2. ECOLOGICALLY FIRED HANDMADE TERRA-COTTA POTS WITH TADELAKT FINISH BY MC POTS. 26" AND 28" H; $131 EACH. +212-662-066-119. 3. A MADISON COX–DESIGNED GARDEN AT PIERRE BERGÉ’S COUNTRY HOME ON FRANCE’S NORMANDY COAST. 4. MADISON COX.


CONTEMPORARY LOUNGE CHAIR BY THAD HAYES; PRICE UPON REQUEST. MAISONGERARD.COM.

GRAND ILLUSION

Designer Kelly Wearstler’s fourth collection with Groundworks for Lee Jofa is a series of illusionistic fabrics, leathers, trims, and wall coverings. In vibrant hues and sophisticated

QUINTEN SIDEBOARD BY VINCENT VAN DUYSEN FOR MOLTENI&C; FROM $6,915. MOLTENIGROUP.COM.

ALCHEMY DINNER PLATE BY JEFFREY BILHUBER FOR DE GOURNAY; PRICE UPON REQUEST. 212-564-9750.

STROMBOLI TABLE BY INDIA MAHDAVI; $6,730. INDIA-MAHDAVI.COM.

NARMINA DAYBED BY FRANCIS SULTANA; $61,000. FRANCISSULTANA.COM.

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neutrals, embroideries, jacquards, and velvets pop with graphic trompe l’oeil patterns. Printed and laser-cut leathers, woven tapes, and textured wall coverings complete the collection, which launches this spring— just in time to celebrate the 100th anniversary of Groundworks’ parent company, Kravet. 98

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FRESH MIRROR BY JAMIE DRAKE FOR THEODORE ALEXANDER; $1,485. THEODORE ALEXANDER.COM. THE RU GLASS COLLECTION: CHAMPAGNE COUPE BY ROSE UNIACKE; $66. ROSEUNIACKE.COM.

CHELA CHAIR BY JAN SHOWERS; FROM $4,200. JANSHOWERS.COM.

COURTESY OF RESPECTIVE COMPANIES

RARITY WALLPAPER BY KELLY WEARSTLER FOR GROUNDWORKS; TO THE TRADE. LEEJOFA.COM. COLLECTION LAUNCHING SPRING 2018.


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that speak to your soul, and your work will always be authentic.” What’s new: Fabrics and trims for Schumacher and furnishings for Ballard Designs. Words of wisdom: “If you get the walls and floors right, the rest is easy.” ► milesredd.com

Interior Design NEW YORK Known for: A vibrant,

vibrating approach to color; sophistication without pretension. What’s new: Fabric collections for Holland & Sherry. Notable clients: Crown Prince Pavlos and Crown Princess Marie-Chantal of Greece, Matt and Annette Lauer, and Henry and Ana Pincus. ► murielbrandolini.com

NH DESIGN Interior Design LONDON Signature: Deluxe modern,

Anglo-whimsical, superswish chalet chic. (And Nicky Haslam’s a cabaret singer, too.) Notable clients: Bryan Ferry, Princess Michael of Kent, Rupert Everett, Charles Saatchi, Dame Janet de Botton, Nellee Hooper. ► nh-design.co.uk

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Nate Berkus has always championed the idea that great design is not only for the privileged. His vision of the well-crafted home centers on the fundamentals of scale, proportion, craftsmanship, and, perhaps above all, personal meaning. “I’ve always believed your home should tell your story,” he says. “The best interiors reflect what a person or a family loves most, and who they really are.” Refusing to enforce artificial distinctions between class and mass, Berkus democratizes great design through product collections for Target and the Shade Store as well as private commissions for the likes of Ricky Martin, Charlize Theron, and Karlie Kloss. It’s all in a day’s work for the dashing dynamo. ► nateberkus.com

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MILES REDD Interior Design NEW YORK Credo: “Select things

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In most designers’ careers there is an individual who urges them to break out on their own. For Monique Gibson that person was none other than Elton John. When she was a young apprentice at a firm in Atlanta, John encouraged her to go solo and then gave her her first project: his home in the South of France. Within a decade, whispers of Gibson’s thoughtful work had traveled through starstudded circles, attracting clients like John Mellencamp, Meg Ryan (see AD November 2016), and Tracey and Jon Stewart. Says Gibson of her design philosophy: “Allow the architecture to tell you what it requires. Allow the client to imagine their most beautiful life. Then connect the dots.”


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collectors, thrill seekers.

with historical references.

Signature: Rugged-meets-

Highlight: As much scholar

refined modernism, with the ultimate goal— individually expressed by firm principals Jim Olson and Tom Kundig—to unify architecture and landscape. What’s next: For Olson, museums in Denver and Pullman, Washington; for Kundig, wineries the world over. ► olsonkundig.com

as architect, Pennoyer was awarded an honorary doctorate of fine arts last year from the New York School of Interior Design and just published (with coauthor Anne Walker) the study Harrie T. Lindeberg and the American Country House (The Monacelli Press). What’s new: A collection for Mainebased Lowe Hardware. ► ppapc.com

PAUL FORTUNE DESIGN STUDIO

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leave a small footprint, make it beautiful.” Notable clients: Marc Jacobs, Sofia Coppola, Dasha Zhukova, Nate Ruess and Charlotte Ronson (see AD October 2017). In the works: A tell-all monograph-cum-memoir detailing significant projects and stories from Fortune’s peregrinations through the beau monde. ► paulfortunedesign.com

PIERRE YOVANOVITCH ARCHITECTURE D’INTÉRIEUR

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Interior Design OJAI, CALIFORNIA Credo: “Tread lightly,

cooked to perfection AD100 talents mix all the right ingredients at some of this year’s best new restaurants

Architecture NEW YORK AND MIAMI Known for: Designs imbued

MAJORELLE A MICHAEL S. SMITH– DESIGNED FRENCH BISTRO IN NEW YORK’S LOWELL HOTEL.

LADURÉE BEVERLY HILLS THE TEA HOUSE TAPPED INDIA MAHDAVI FOR ITS LATEST WEST COAST LOCATION.

FARINI A BAKERY AND CAFÉ IN MILAN DESIGNED BY JOHN PAWSON.

THE POOL LOUNGE GEORGIS & MIRGORODSKY ARCHITECTS REINVENTED PHILIP JOHNSON’S FOUR SEASONS RESTAURANT IN NEW YORK.

S TH Interior Design IS IS PARIS Credo: “The secret to great

interior design is a good layout; the architecture must leave nothing to chance; useless ornament must give way to the essential.” Highlight: The debut and exhibition of his furniture collection at New York’s R & Co. Notable clients: Christian Louboutin; the Pinault family, for whom he has done private residences as well as Kering’s corporate headquarters. ► pierreyovanovitch.com

100 T A D EBU D PERRY GUILLOT INC. Landscape Design SOUTHAMPTON, NEW YORK

Landscape architect Perry Guillot’s idol is not a garden giant of the past but rather an American minimalist sculptor. “Fred Sandback’s work is the all-time greatest example of accomplishing so much by doing so little,” explains Guillot, whose sweeping swards for fashion’s Tory Burch and style gurus Delphine and Reed Krakoff possess a similarly powerful restraint. Guillot shapes properties in poetic fashion, subtly blending heroic sight lines and vanishing points with swelling hills, artfully clumped trees, bands of boxwood, and frothing fescue grass. Small wonder that when AD asked Guillot about the earthly paradises that continually inspire him, he cited Central Park’s Sheep Meadow, an engineering feat that looks utterly natural. A GLIMPSE OF FASHION STAR TORY BURCH’S SOUTHAMPTON GARDEN BY PERRY GUILLOT.

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► perryguillotinc.com

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP RIGHT: TREVOR TONDRO; SCOTT FRANCES; OBERTO GILI; MAX GLEESON; ELIZABETH LIPPMAN/COURTESY OF THE LOWELL

S TH Architecture IS IS SEATTLE Clientele: Nature lovers, art

PETER PENNOYER ARCHITECTS

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ROBERT STILIN Interior Design NEW YORK AND EAST HAMPTON Credo: “Houses are for

living—they should be comfortable, warm, functional, and, of course, beautiful.� Highlight: His room for a collector at this year’s Kips Bay Decorator Show House took our breath away. ► robertstilin.com

ROCKWELL GROUP

Landscape Design HUMMELO, NETHERLANDS

When it comes to Piet Oudolf, the hospitality world’s loss is gardening’s gain. “I come from a family of restaurateurs and barkeepers, and I did not want to continue doing that,â€? says the undisputed maestro of cult landscapes—what he calls “gardens that look wild but are not wild.â€? That includes New York’s game-changing High Line and lush Battery Park and, in England, adventuresome nurseryman John Coke’s Bury Court estate in Hampshire and art dealers Hauser & Wirth’s complex in Somerset. “I’m always looking for plants not usually found in gardens, like Sporobolus heterolepis [prairie dropseed], Amsonia hubrichtii [bluestar], and Bouteloua [grama grass],â€? Oudolf explains. “I still like visiting decorative gardens like Sissinghurst and Great Dixter—I just don’t make them anymore.â€? â–ş oudolf.com

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RAFAEL DE CĂ RDENAS LTD. / ARCHITECTURE AT LARGE Architecture & Interior Design NEW YORK AND PARIS Credo: “Ever-focused on

the contemporary, we take diligent note of the past while daydreaming the future.â€? Milestone: His ďŹ rst monograph, published this past fall. What’s next: A collection of chairs to be executed by craftsmen in Portugal. â–ş architectureatlarge.com

ROBERT COUTURIER INC. Architecture & Interior Design NEW YORK Credo: “I design for clients

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LEE II BY CULLMAN & KRAVIS FOR CROSBY STREET STUDIOS; TO THE TRADE. CROSBYSTREETSTUDIOS.COM.

Architecture & Interior Design NEW YORK Credo: “We revere what

is genuine; we love to strip things down to their essence and excavate for integrity and character.� Highlight: Opening of Roman and Williams Guild NY. Notable clients: Gwyneth Paltrow, Ben Stiller, Kate Hudson. ► romanandwilliams.com

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MISTY BY DAVID ROCKWELL FOR THE RUG COMPANY; $85 PER SQ. FT. THERUGCOMPANY.COM.

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and not for myself. A successful project should be a direct reection of the client’s sensitivity.� Notable clients: Amy Fine Collins, Andrew Solomon. In the works: Interiors for a 16-story condo building on New York’s Upper East Side; a fashion boutique in Miami. ► robertcouturier.com

application of design thinking to work in all building types; product and industrial design; theater set design; event production; content creation; interactive technologies; and business incubation. In the works: The Shed (in collaboration with Diller ScoďŹ dio + Renfro), a center for the visual and performing arts in New York’s Hudson Yards. What’s new: Debut tile collection for Bisazza; new designs for The Rug Company. â–ş rockwellgroup.com

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OUDOLF FIELD BY PIET OUDOLF AT HAUSER & WIRTH SOMERSET IN ENGLAND.

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Architecture & Interior Design NEW YORK AND MADRID Known for: A wide-ranging

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such luxury fashion brands as Balenciaga, Aquazzura, and Altuzarra. Highlight: Completion of a 12-story, 61-unit luxury residential building in the heart of New York’s NoHo neighborhood. Notable clients: Alexander Wang (see AD September 2017), James Franco, Kanye West, Natasha Poly, and Debra Messing. ► ryankorban.com

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start with the architecture and work to make the best of it, but know that details, whether complex or simple, really make the design.” Highlight: Designed the interiors of the Belmond Royal Scotsman, the luxury train that tours Scotland and its Highlands. What’s new: Her first fabric line, as well as additions to her private-label homefurnishings collection. ► roseuniacke.com

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In fourth grade Rodman Primack subscribed to AD and was obsessed with Mark Hampton. After college, he went on to work with a succession of formidable tastemakers—Peter Marino, Larry Gagosian, Simon de Pury—and hone his eye at Christie’s and Phillips. Four years ago, business savvy and aesthetic sensibility achieved perfect balance when he was named executive director of Design Miami (he’s now the fair’s chief creative officer). His layered interiors—featuring curated collections, commissioned artworks, and his own unique textiles—are utterly bespoke compositions perfectly suited to his clients’ needs and desires. Up next? Starting on his first hotel, launching a collection of cashmere throws, and creating a line of housewares—projects that will give us all a chance to experience his sophisticated vision firsthand.

Interior Design NEW YORK Known for: Work with

Interior Design LONDON Words of wisdom: “Always

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SOLNA CHAIN PENDANT BY ROMAN AND WILLIAMS GUILD NY; PRICE UPON REQUEST. RWGUILD.COM.

BOWLINE BY STEVEN GAMBREL FOR THE URBAN ELECTRIC CO.; $4,608. URBANELECTRICCO.COM.

OSIRIS LARGE REFLECTOR CHANDELIER BY THOMAS O’BRIEN FOR VISUAL COMFORT; $2,730. CIRCALIGHTING.COM.

HAILEY MEDIUM OBLONG PENDANT BY ALEXA HAMPTON FOR VISUAL COMFORT; $840. CIRCALIGHTING.COM.

LIMOGES PENDANT BY SUZANNE KASLER FOR VISUAL COMFORT; FROM $570. CIRCALIGHTING.COM.

S. R. GAMBREL INC.

SAWYER | BERSON

Interior Design NEW YORK Known for: Lacquered

Architecture, Interior Design, and Landscape Design NEW YORK Aim: “To create unique

walls, patterned floors, and kitchens we could live in. Highlight: A new collection of statementmaking light fixtures for the Urban Electric Co. In the works: Gambrel’s second book will be released in the fall of 2018. ► srgambrel.com

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environments tailored to individual clients through architecture, landscape, and interior design.” Personal cause: Designing a community garden in the Bronx for Bette Midler’s New York Restoration Project, the latest in the firm’s ongoing pro bono efforts. Notable clients: Julianne Moore (see AD November 2017), Vera Wang. ► sawyerberson.com

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SELLDORF ARCHITECTS Architecture NEW YORK Highlight: Annabelle

Selldorf’s design for Mwabwindo School in Zambia, which will open this year, is the 2017 winner of the Panerai Design Miami/ Visionary Award. What’s new: Hong Kong galleries for both David Zwirner and Hauser & Wirth; a new home for Swiss Institute, the contemporary arts organization in Manhattan. What’s next: Selldorf will be in residence at the American Academy in Rome this winter and spring. ► selldorf.com

SHELTONMINDEL

SNØHETTA

Architecture & Interior Design NEW YORK Credo: “Strive to create

Architecture OSLO AND NEW YORK Aim: “To enhance a sense

what seems to be inevitable.” What’s new: The Four Seasons Hotel at the Surf Club in Miami (in collaboration with Richard Meier & Partners Architects). In the works: Residences around the world—from Cap Ferrat to Maine and New York to L.A.; a private Gulfstream jet. ► sheltonmindel.com

of place, identity, and relationship to others and the physical spaces we inhabit, both natural and human-made.” Just completed: A tree-house hotel suite in Sweden; an update to chef Thomas Keller’s the French Laundry; the Lascaux IV Caves Museum in France. What’s next: Europe’s first underwater restaurant. ► snohetta.com

COURTESY OF RESPECTIVE COMPANIES

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KRONAM BY STEVEN GAMBREL FOR THE URBAN ELECTRIC CO.; $18,551. URBANELECTRICCO.COM.


1

1. MUSÉE YVES SAINT LAURENT MARRAKECH BY STUDIO KO. 2. KARL FOURNIER AND OLIVIER MARTY.

STEVEN HARRIS ARCHITECTS

STEVEN VOLPE DESIGN

Interior Design NEW YORK Aim: “To respond to

Architecture NEW YORK Signature: Elegant spaces

Interior Design SAN FRANCISCO Aim: “Modern, thoughtful,

the existing environment and architecture in a respectful manner, using a selective palette of color, texture, and surface.” Notable clients: Jennifer Aniston and Justin Theroux, Diane Keaton, Woody Allen. ► stephenshadley.com

with clean lines and clear volumes. Notable clients: Aby Rosen and Samantha Boardman, Barneys New York. In the works: Restoring a modernist house by Donald Wexler in Palm Springs, California; creating a country retreat for a New York advertising exec. ► stevenharrisarchitects .com

STEPHEN SILLS ASSOCIATES Interior Design NEW YORK Known for: Creating

an original atmosphere tailored for creative clients with their own point of view. Notable clients: Tina Turner, Wes Gordon, various members of the Rockefeller family. ► stephensills.com

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STEVEN HOLL ARCHITECTS Architecture NEW YORK Credo: “Our work fuses

concept and phenomena.” Just completed: A Maggie’s Centre cancer-treatment facility in London; an arts complex for Princeton University. In the works: A public library in Queens, New York; the Institute for Contemporary Art in Richmond, Virginia; ongoing extensions to the Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C., and the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston. ► stevenholl.com

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forward-looking design.” In the works: Designing

a San Francisco flagship for Rothy’s, the sustainable shoe company, and renovating that city’s legendary, three–Michelin starred Quince restaurant. ► stevenvolpe.com

STUDIO GANG Architecture CHICAGO AND NEW YORK Aim: “Using design as

a medium to connect people to each other and their environment in order to bring about measurable positive change.” In the works: A training facility for the New York City Fire Department; the new U.S. embassy in Brasilia, Brazil; expansions of Little Rock’s Arkansas Arts Center and New York’s American Museum of Natural History. ► studiogang.com

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100 T A D EBU D STUDIO KO Architecture & Interior Design PARIS, MARRAKECH, AND LONDON

When Studio KO founders Karl Fournier and Olivier Marty put the finishing touches on the new Musée Yves Saint Laurent Marrakech this past October, the architects didn’t just complete a home for the fashion designer’s legacy—they cemented their own. Sculptural and spare, with walls of terrazzo, concrete, and brick, the building stands as a testament to their rugged brand of minimalism, a personal style rooted in craftsmanship, plainspoken materials, and sense of place. Marrakech holds special significance for the duo: It was here that they got their big break conceiving villas for members of the Agnelli and Hermès families. These days, however, Fournier and Marty can be found circling the globe, working on residential and commercial projects for Balmain and André Balazs, for whom they are now designing a new Paris hotel. ► studioko.fr

1. NICOLAS MATHÉUS/COURTESY OF THE FONDATION JARDIN MAJORELLE, MARRAKECH; 2. MATTHIEU SALVAING

STEPHEN SHADLEY DESIGNS


open invitation From blockbuster cultural institutions to dazzling improvements upon city infrastructure, these public projects deliver great design to the world at large

T LASCAUX IV SNØHETTA’S UNDULATING MUSEUM HOUSES A REPLICA OF THE CAVE AND ITS PAINTINGS AT THE UNESCO WORLD HERITAGE SITE IN MONTIGNAC, FRANCE.

W LEGO HOUSE IN BILLUND, DENMARK—THE ORIGINAL HOME OF LEGOLAND— BJARKE INGELS GROUP HAS TRANSFORMED AN ARCHITECT’S FAVORITE TOY INTO AN EXPERIENCE AND EDUCATION CENTER FOR FANS OF ALL AGES.

T CITTADELLA BRIDGE RICHARD MEIER & PARTNERS ARCHITECTS’ BOWSTRING ARCH RAISES PEDESTRIANS AND VEHICLES, SEPARATELY, ABOVE THE FLOODPLAIN OF ITALY’S TANARO RIVER.

T VICTORIA AND ALBERT MUSEUM EXHIBITION ROAD QUARTER AL_A’S GATEWAY FOR LONDON’S V&A FEATURES A PORCELAIN COURTYARD ATOP A NEW GALLERY FOR TEMPORARY EXHIBITIONS.

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CLOCKWISE FROM TOP RIGHT: IWAN BAAN (2); HUFTON + CROW (2); JEAN-FRANÇOIS TREMEGE

S ZARYADYE PARK ON A MOSCOW SITE STEEPED IN HISTORY, DILLER SCOFIDIO + RENFRO RE-CREATED FOUR RUSSIAN LANDSCAPE TYPOLOGIES—TUNDRA, STEPPE, FOREST, AND WETLAND.


100 T A D EBU D

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STUDIO SHAMSHIRI Interior Design LOS ANGELES

In April 2016, siblings Pamela and Ramin Shamshiri, two of the founding partners of the AD100 firm Commune Design, decided to strike out on their own. The duo hit the ground running with a slate of highprofile assignments, including homes for celebrity power couples Anne Hathaway and Adam Shulman, Seth Rogen and Lauren Miller, and Beck and Marissa Ribisi. Pamela, the firm’s design lead, describes their process as “narrative- and experience-driven.” That translates into a cultivated, bohemian aesthetic built on layers of alluring textures and colors, idiosyncratic vintage furnishings, and unpretentious natural materials. Current projects include a collaboration with fellow AD100 initiates Johnston Marklee on a house in L.A.’s Pacific Palisades, restoring a classic A. Quincy Jones home in Holmby Hills, and breathing new life into a Stanford White shingled beauty in Montauk, New York. ► studioshamshiri.com 2

Architecture & Interior Design MILAN Signature: The reinterpre-

1. PAMELA AND RAMIN SHAMSHIRI. 2. A SANTA MONICA HOME BY STUDIO SHAMSHIRI.

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tation of classical forms that reinvents and projects them toward the future. Words of wisdom: “Details are perhaps the most important thing in architecture.” Notable clients: Hamish Bowles, Rachel Feinstein and John Currin, Umberto Pasti. ► studioperegalli.it

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STUDIO SOFIELD INC. Interior Design NEW YORK Known for: Truly luxe,

yet eminently functional space. Credo: “As the legendary Billy Baldwin put it, ‘Sustainability always overrules fashion.’” Notable clients: Kelly Ripa and Mark Consuelos, Tom Ford and Richard Buckley, Brice and Helen Marden, Matthew Marks and Jack Bankowsky. ► studiosofield.com

STUDIOILSE Interior Design LONDON Aim: “To prioritize human

experience in creating spaces or products; to design in a way that makes the normal special.” Personal cause: The design of Refettorio Felix, a community kitchen in London created with restaurateur/chef-patron Massimo Bottura’s Food for Soul. In the works: A new home for the Anna Freud National Centre for Children and Families. ► studioilse.com

SUZANNE KASLER INTERIORS Interior Design ATLANTA Signature: Mixing high

and low, traditional and contemporary, new and old to create signature interiors and products that convey a sophisticated simplicity. What’s next: New collections for Hickory Chair; fabrics for Lee Jofa; wicker pieces for Ballard Designs; lighting for Visual Comfort. In the works: Kasler’s third book, to be published this fall. ► suzannekasler.com

1. DEWEY NICKS; 2. SHADE DEGGES

STUDIO PEREGALLI


Interior Design NEW YORK Known for: Interiors

infused with knowledge of the ďŹ ne and decorative arts and architecture. Aim: “To ďŹ nd the ordinary in the unique, rare, and beautiful and seamlessly work that into perfectly proportioned and tailored interiors.â€? Highlight: A new brushed bronze–and– copper contemporary lounge chair available through Maison Gerard. â–ş thadhayes.com

TINO ZERVUDACHI & ASSOCIÉS Interior Design NEW YORK, LONDON, AND PARIS Credo: “Focus on things

being simpler and freer, released from the constraining chains of overdesign.� Highlight: His Hydra, Greece, house was in AD’s April 2017 issue. In the works: A line of furniture and a collection of outdoor pieces. ► mhzlondon.com

TOM SCHEERER INC. Interior Design NEW YORK Known for: Traditional but

lively place-appropriate decorating, with justright modernist touches. What’s next: Completion of an island eco-resort and villas 25 miles off Panama’s PaciďŹ c coast. â–ş tomscheerer.com

TOSHIKO MORI ARCHITECT Architecture NEW YORK Credo: “Simplify without

reduction, embrace a sense of clarity, and always consider ambience and spatial experience.� Signature: Thoughtful modernism. Milestone: Thread Artist Residency and Cultural Center in Senegal won a 2017 Institute Honor Award from the American Institute of Architects. ► tmarch.com

VEERE GRENNEY ASSOCIATES Interior Design LONDON Words of wisdom: “Mix

the humble and the grand, clean modernity with classicism, but never forget beauty and comfort.� Latest obsession: Collecting 19th- and 20th-century oil paintings of Moroccan scenes for his home in Tangier. What’s new: New fabric collection for Schumacher. ► veeregrenney.com

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VICTORIA HAGAN INTERIORS Interior Design NEW YORK Credo: “Whether a

project leans modern or traditional, I strive for a classic spirit that’s understated and elegant.� Notable clients: Joe Biden, Judd Apatow and Leslie Mann, Conan O’Brien. ► victoriahagan.com

POPS OF VIBRANT COLOR AND MIDCENTURY LINES DEFINE THE ACE HOTEL CHICAGO, BY COMMUNE DESIGN.

VINCENT VAN DUYSEN ARCHITECTS Architecture & Interior Design ANTWERP, BELGIUM Known for: Embracing

an architectural language that is not shy of aesthetics but resists fashion and trends. Keywords: “Functionality, durability, and comfort.â€? Highlight: Reno of the façade, atrium, and ďŹ rst two oors of Rome’s iconic La Rinascente department store. What’s next: Outdoor furniture for Sutherland. â–ş vincentvanduysen.com

WALDO’S DESIGNS Interior Design LOS ANGELES Credo: “Invest in important

design, furniture, and art; build up a collection over time; hold on to the pieces you buy.� Notable clients: Brian Grazer, Goldie Hawn, Will and Jada Pinkett Smith ► waldosdesigns.com

SNĂ˜HETTA’S “THE 7TH ROOMâ€? CABIN IN THE SKY AT NORTHERN SWEDEN’S TREEHOTEL SETS THE SCENE FOR AURORA BOREALIS GAZING.

SET AMONG OLIVE TREES AND CACTI, THE VILLA DES OLIVIERS AT JACQUES GARCIA’S ESTATE IN NOTO OFFERS A ROMANTIC, PRETTY GETAWAY.

AT THE HOTEL HENRY IN BUFFALO, NEW YORK, ARCHITECT DEBORAH BERKE HAS TRANSFORMED HISTORIC INTERIORS INTO A WARM, SUNNY RETREAT.

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CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: SPENCER LOWELL; COURTESY OF JACQUES GARCIA RESORT; CHRISTOPHER PAYNE/ESTO; JOHAN JANSSON

THAD HAYES INC.


HALL OF FAME

A LONDON TOWNHOUSE BY CATROUX.

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X FRANÇOIS CATROUX

Interior Design PARIS

“I’m not one who likes too much clutter and fuss, so he gets me and I get him,â€? says Crown Princess MarieChantal of Greece, who has lived amid Catroux decors since childhood and recently asked him to take on her Manhattan home, “to modernize it in the Catroux way.â€? â–ş +33-1-42-66-69-25

INSIDE BLOOMBERG’S NEW EUROPEAN HEADQUARTERS.

S NORMAN FOSTER

“Norman was the perfect partner for us because we wanted to be bold and take risks, yet still blend into our historic surroundings,â€? said Michael R. Bloomberg, who commissioned Foster to build his company’s new London headquarters, now being hailed as one of the greenest ofďŹ ce developments in the world. “The result is an open, innovative, and sustainable workplace unlike any other in the world. It’s a true testament to Norman’s brilliance.â€? â–ş fosterandpartners.com

X ROBERT KIME

Interior Design LONDON

“Whilst every room in our house is different, Robert’s use of color and eclectic textiles—layered with his own fabric range—creates a unity and level of comfort that we adore,â€? say Madeleine and Andrew Lloyd Webber. â–ş robertkime.com

KIME’S OWN APARTMENT IN LONDON.

S 17 AS CL OF 20 MARIO BUATTA

THIERRY DESPONT

MICA ERTEGUN

JACQUES GRANGE

Interior Design NEW YORK

Architecture & Interior Design NEW YORK

Interior Design NEW YORK

Interior Design PARIS

â–ş 917-420-0317

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â–ş despont.com

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â–ş maciidesign.com

â–ş +33-1-55-80-75-40

HUGH NEWELL JACOBSEN Architecture WASHINGTON, D.C.

â–ş jacobsenarchitecture.com

FROM TOP: DOUGLAS FRIEDMAN; NIGEL YOUNG/COURTESY OF FOSTER + PARTNERS; CHRISTOPHER SIMON SYKES

Architecture LONDON, OTHER MAJOR CITIES


Architecture PARIS

“Jean firmly roots his designs in geographical and cultural contexts,” says Manuel Rabaté, director of Nouvel’s new Louvre Abu Dhabi— which, he adds, “gives the breathtaking impression that the museum floats upon the Arabian Sea.” ► jeannouvel.com

THE LOUVRE ABU DHABI.

T JUAN PABLO MOLYNEUX Interior Design NEW YORK AND PARIS

“He’s all about style, quality, and fantasy,” says Sheikh Mohamed Bin Suhaim Al-Thani, for whom Molyneux has decorated a palace in Doha, Qatar; five apartments in Paris; and, recently, two houses for the royal’s son. ► molyneuxstudio.com A MOLYNEUX PROJECT IN PEBBLE BEACH, CALIFORNIA.

THE L.A. HOME OF ART COLLECTORS EDYTHE AND ELI BROAD, DESIGNED BY TARLOW.

S ROSE TARLOW

Interior Design LOS ANGELES

“I didn’t want my house to look like hers, but I wanted that level of taste,” David Geffen, the film and music producer and philanthropist, explains. “Everything is flawless. But she doesn’t consider herself a decorator, and she’s vaguely insulted if you call her that.” ► rosetarlow.com

S 17 AS CL OF 20 PETER MARINO

RICHARD MEIER

ROBERT A.M. STERN

AXEL VERVOORDT

BUNNY WILLIAMS

Architecture & Interior Design NEW YORK

Architecture NEW YORK AND LOS ANGELES

Architecture NEW YORK

Interior Design WIJNEGEM, BELGIUM

Interior Design NEW YORK

► petermarino architect.com

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► richardmeier.com

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► ramsa.com

► axel-vervoordt.com

► bunnywilliams.com

FROM TOP: TDIC, © MOHAMED SOMJI/LOUVRE ABU DHABI/COURTESY OF JEAN NOUVEL ARCHITECT; ROGER DAVIES (2)

HALL OF FAME

W JEAN NOUVEL


KONA, HI AT A FAMILY’S HOME IN HAWAII, A GUEST SWIMS A LAP IN THE INFINITY POOL. ACROSS THE HUGO FRANÇA TREE-TRUNK BRIDGE FROM THE MAIN LANAI, THE PING-PONG ROOM IS ENCLOSED WITH NETTING TO PREVENT ERRANT BALLS FROM GOING ASTRAY. FOR DETAILS SEE RESOURCES.


DOUBLE VISION Same architect, same designer, same contractor, same family— two extraordinary homes halfway round the world from each other SHAX RIEGLER DOMINIQUE VORILLON KONA STYLED BY STEPHEN PAPPAS ORIENT STYLED BY HOWARD CHRISTIAN

TEXT BY

PHOTOGRAPHY BY


Picture two spectacular houses, both in breathtaking locations (one on the leeward coast of Hawaii’s Big Island, the other on a promontory of Long Island’s North Fork); both filled with treasures; both deserving of the word masterpiece. Each was created for the same family by an AD100 duo: designer Rodman Primack and architect Tom Kundig . (NEW TO THE LIST THIS YEAR; SEE PAGE 106)

(SEE PAGE 102)

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ABOUT TEN YEARS AGO this family decided they wanted

a place of their own in Kona, after traveling to the Four Seasons resort there for years. “They kept sending me pictures and saying, ‘But we don’t really like the houses,’ ” says Primack, who was in the middle of designing the clients’ New York City apartment. “And I was like, ‘Of course you don’t, because they’re terrible.’ ” Pastiches of clichéd Hawaiian style, none felt special. And after a summer of disappointed searching, Primack suggested that the then London-based couple, serious collectors of art and design, build something they would really like. They quickly found the perfect lot, and then the designer introduced them to Kundig. “I just thought his aesthetic would be right,” Primack explains. The clients agreed, and the designers got to work. A prime objective was to create a house that could host 20-plus family members and friends at a time but that wouldn’t feel big and fussy. “It’s full of amazing pieces, but at its heart, it’s a beach house,” says Primack. In addition to things the couple had bought over the years, the designers incorporated new finds like a big George Nakashima cabinet purchased at auction— Kundig made sure there was a living-room wall to accommodate it. Primack also likes to commission new work. Here, that includes a monumental chandelier by David Wiseman and a massive tree-trunk bridge by Hugo França spanning the pool. Even the little things are bespoke: tableware, linens, textiles, and carpets. And it’s all meant to be used. The clients, Primack says, are “very comfortable with letting things age and develop a patina.” That includes the architecture. For the Kona house, architect and designer thoughtfully chose materials and finishes that will weather the tropical climate, and the entire roof can be opened so that trade winds cool the house. “In no way is the structure meant to be hermetic,” Primack declares.

KONA, HI ABOVE A COLOSSAL CHANDELIER OF BRONZE BRANCHES ADORNED WITH PORCELAIN BLOOMS, BY DAVID WISEMAN, HANGS IN THE MAIN HOUSE’S SITTING ROOM. WENDELL CASTLE SPRING CHAIR; GEORGE NAKASHIMA CABINET; DOUBLE RECAMIER BY

RICE OWENS; YOSHITOMO NARA PAINTING; CUSTOM RUG FROM CRISTINA GRAJALES GALLERY. RIGHT DESIGNER RODMAN PRIMACK (LEFT) AND ARCHITECT TOM KUNDIG ON THE BRIDGE BETWEEN THE MAIN HOUSE AND THE KIDS’ HOUSE.


KONA, HI COUNTERCLOCKWISE FROM TOP A JULIA KRANTZ LOUNGE CHAIR IN STACK-LAMINATED SUMAUMA WOOD MAKES A STATEMENT IN THE FAMILY-HOUSE SITTING ROOM. IN A GUEST BATH, A HELLA JONGERIUS SHEEP CHAIR SITS BESIDE A DURAVIT TUB. IPE WOOD BOARDWALKS CONNECT THE STRUCTURES.

OPPOSITE LANDSCAPE ARCHITECT DAVID TAMURA ORIGINALLY IMAGINED VERTICAL PALMS LINING THE POOL, BUT AFTER A TRIP TO A NURSERY PLANTATION DECIDED TO USE SPECIMENS GROWING IN A NATURAL CURVE— TO DRAMATIC EFFECT.


AT THE END OF SUMMER 2013, after work had wrapped up in Hawaii, the family began to think about finding another place, out on the North Fork of Long Island, closer to their new home base of New York City. When they came upon a piece of land with a 100-year-old house spectacularly sited atop a promontory jutting out into the water, they, with Kundig and Primack, immediately thought, This is it. Though the house was a mess inside, its traditional New England farmhouse–like exterior had charm. “The shape was great,” says Kundig. “So I said, ‘Let’s try to discover the magic that’s already here rather than tear it down.’ It had great proportions, and I knew we could create a beautiful, grand space.” To do so, they opened everything up to the rafters to make one big perfectly proportioned volume anchored by two monolithic fireplace piers that give the sense of holding the house up. “Tom had the nerve to blow it all out so that it’s one truly great room,” says Primack. At 30-feet-by-28-feet and two-and-a-half-stories tall, the room is the center of family life. A suspended bridge (echoing the one that connects parts of the Hawaiian house) crosses the space, joining the master suite at one end with the kids’ rooms at the other. Vintage Swedish lights hang over a long Charlotte

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Perriand table that can seat 12; a pair of midcentury Edward Wormley sofas covered in Primack-designed fabric sit back-to-back, dividing the space in two; canopied Jean Royère outdoor chairs (a design once made for the Shah of Iran) cozy up to a fireplace. Other treasures include a Thomas Houseago artwork on one of the chimneys, bronze fire screens by David Wiseman, and an enormous custom wool rug that was woven in Guatemala. In addition to their rapport with each other, Primack and Kundig (who have now embarked on a third project together, for different clients) cite their faith in Jim Dow, the Seattle-based contractor who installed his team on both sites for the duration of construction. His frequent visits helped make sure the far-flung team’s wishes were executed to a T. “We were kind of galloping from day one,” Primack recalls. “And that trust makes it easy to work quickly.” Their success also boils down to the desire—and the discipline—to keep it simple. “Whenever things start to get complicated, Tom asks, ‘What would a farmer do?’ ” says Primack. “That question always brings us back down to earth.” Adds Kundig, “You can overthink, overengineer, and overcomplicate anything, but you don’t have to.”


ORIENT, NY CURTAINS IN PRIMACKDESIGNED TEXTILES HANG IN THE MASTER BEDROOM OF THE HOUSE ON LONG ISLAND’S NORTH FORK. JOSÉ ZANINE CALDAS CHAIR; CUSTOM RUG BY

RP MILLER FROM FEDORA DESIGN; ON BED, CASHMERE THROW BY I PEZZI DIPINTI. OPPOSITE THE HOUSE SITS ON ITS OWN PROMONTORY, ALMOST ENTIRELY SURROUNDED BY WATER.


ORIENT, NY AN ENORMOUS RUG (APPROX. 14' X 21.5') DESIGNED BY PRIMACK AND WOVEN IN GUATEMALA DEFINES THE MAIN HOUSE’S SITTING AREA. BACK-TO-BACK VINTAGE EDWARD WORMLEY SOFAS UPHOLSTERED IN PRIMACK-DESIGNED FABRICS; JEAN ROYÈRE CANOPY LOUNGE CHAIR AND OAK COFFEE TABLE; PLASTER ART BY THOMAS HOUSEAGO.

“You know you’ve done your job when you walk into the finished space and it just fits,” archıtect Tom Kundıg declares. “It feels like home and also someplace special.”


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PREVIOUS SPREAD: © 2018 THOMAS HOUSEAGO/ARTISTS RIGHTS SOCIETY (ARS), NEW YORK/ADAGP, PARIS; THIS SPREAD: © 2018 THE ISAMU NOGUCHI FOUNDATION AND GARDEN MUSEUM, NEW YORK/ARTISTS RIGHTS SOCIETY (ARS), NEW YORK

“We included lots of open shelving because basically everything’s been commissioned for the house, so it’s all worth looking at,” designer Rodman Primack explains.


ORIENT, NY BELOW THE WALLS OF THE GUESTHOUSE SITTING ROOM ARE COVERED IN A BACKED NAVY BURLAP. ISAMU NOGUCHI AKARI LANTERNS; CHARLOTTE PERRIAND AND PIERRE JEANNERET SHELF; VINTAGE DANISH LOVE SEAT WITH CUSHIONS OF A VINTAGE

SILK IKAT FROM JOHN ROBSHAW TEXTILES; DECO RUG FROM JAMAL’S RUG COLLECTION. OPPOSITE A MASSIMO VIGNELLI FOR VENINI MURANO PENDANT HANGS OVER THE KITCHEN ISLAND. GRETE JALK CHAIRS IN VINTAGE FABRICS.


ORIENT, NY SPIRITED WALL COVERINGS ADD PEP TO THE CHILDREN’S ROOMS. ABOVE MARTHE ARMITAGE HAND-PRINTED WALLPAPER IN THE DAUGHTER’S BEDROOM. PAINTING BY ELIZABETH PEYTON. OPPOSITE AN RP MILLER TEXTILES LINEN-COTTON, IN INDIGO, IN THE SON’S BEDROOM.

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“At first they told me that they didn’t like pattern or color,” Primack says with a laugh. “Things have definitely evolved over time.”


design notes

THE DETAILS THAT MAKE THE LOOK

PERRY’S (NEAR RIGHT) AND NEZU FABRICS BY RP MILLER TEXTILES; $125 PER YARD. RPMILLERDESIGN.COM

FUNICULÍ LAMP BY LLUÍS PORQUERAS FOR MARSET; $432. MARSET .COM/USA

LE WITT LOOM PILLOW; $225. RPMILLERDESIGN.COM

I love textiles,” says Primack. “I collect them and put them everywhere.” THE ASH-PANELED MEDIA ROOM OF THE NORTH FORK HOUSE.

HAND-THROWN FATHER VASES BY THE HAAS BROTHERS; PRICE UPON REQUEST. R-AND-COMPANY.COM

SEAGRASS BASKET; FROM $79. RH.COM

VINTAGE SOFA (EDWARD WORMLEY FOR DUNBAR) UPHOLSTERED IN LE WITT LOOM FABRIC WITH HANDEMBROIDERED GERANIUMS BY RP MILLER TEXTILES; PRICE UPON REQUEST. RPMILLERDESIGN.COM


LAYERS OF VIBRANT PATTERN IN A GUEST ROOM. KEEGAN LARGE CHANDELIER; $5,100. ARTERIORS HOME.COM

ANTIQUE GARDEN MAZE QUILT WITH WILD GOOSE CHASE BORDER; $2,650. STELLARUBIN.COM

THE WHITE EDITION MOLAR GROUP CLOUD SHELF BY WENDELL CASTLE; PRICE UPON REQUEST. R-AND-COMPANY.COM

INTERIORS AND EXTERIOR: DOMINIQUE VORILLON; VASES AND CLOUD SHELF: JOE KRAMM/ R & COMPANY; QUILT: STEVE GOLDBERG. ALL OTHERS COURTESY OF RESPECTIVE COMPANIES

AROUND SIDE TABLE BY THOMAS BENTZEN FOR MUUTO; $459. CENTURYHOUSEINC.COM

BARTLETT RAFFIA NESTING TABLES; $998. SERENAAND LILY.COM

There’s a beautiful vernacular in the Northeast, and it made sense to create a contemporary house within that language.”

LUCY SIDE CHAIR; $576. JANUS ETCIE.COM THE FRONT FAÇADE FEATURES A WELCOMING RED DOOR.

ARC H DI G E S T. CO M

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SWEET SPOT

Life is good for designers Nate Berkus and Jeremiah Brent as they move into a spectacular Los Angeles home for their growing family

IN THE ATRIUM, A 19TH-CENTURY SWEDISH BENCH WITH KRAVETVELVET UPHOLSTERY SITS ATOP ANTIQUE SPANISH TILES FROM PARIS CERAMICS. 19THCENTURY ENGLISH GLASS PENDANT; 1950S LOW TABLE FROM A PARIS FLEA MARKET; VINTAGE CLUB CHAIR IN A CAROLINA IRVING TEXTILES STRIPE. FOR DETAILS SEE RESOURCES.

TEXT BY

MAYER RUS

PHOTOGRAPHY BY

DOUGLAS FRIEDMAN

STYLED BY

LAWREN HOWELL


POPPY, IN A BONPOINT DRESS, PUSHES A WHEELED BASKET BY FIRE AND CREME KIDS WITH HARVEY (IN BASKET) AND SWIGGEN, TWO REX CROSS RABBITS. POOL DECK CLAD IN GRANADA TILE.


A FRONTGATE UMBRELLA SHADES A 19TH-CENTURY ITALIAN MARBLE TABLE SURROUNDED WITH IRONY BY STEFANIA BAGLATZI CHAIRS; CUSHIONS OF SUNBRELLA FABRIC.


GROOMING BY ABBY WOODMAN

o

BRENT AND POPPY (WEARING A D. PORTHAULT DRESS) AT THE KITCHEN ISLAND; CIRCA-1960 FRENCH BARSTOOLS; SINK FITTINGS BY WATERSTONE; 19TH-CENTURY FRENCH LANTERNS. BACKSPLASH AND SURROUNDING COUNTERTOPS BY OLLIN STONE; WHITECHAPEL BRASS KNOBS.

n first inspection, Nate Berkus and Jeremiah Brent felt that the house, clocking in at nearly 9,000 square feet, was much too grand for them and their toddler daughter, Poppy. “Our immediate reaction was, Who lives like this?” Berkus says, recalling his and his husband’s initial visit to the 1928 Spanish Colonial in Los Angeles’s Hancock Park neighborhood. “Certainly not us.” But as they made their way through the various salons and gardens, the designers soon began to heed the property’s siren call. First, there was the majestic 200-year-old oak tree rising in the backyard, like something out of a fairy tale. “We pictured Poppy, and eventually the rest of our family, playing under that tree, and we thought this was a place we could put down roots,” Brent says. Then there was the realization—perhaps

rationalization is a better word—that while the house is indeed large, its rooms, true to period style, are relatively intimate, particularly in comparison with the bloated volumes of contemporary McMansions and McModerns. But the clincher for Berkus and Brent was an encounter with the then–home owner and her eldest daughter, who were sharing a bottle of wine in the kitchen. “Jeremiah and I had the exact same thought— that we’d like to raise kids who want to hang out with us when they grow up. There was a lot of love there, and you could feel that energy,” Berkus says. For cynics, that scenario might read like a commercial for General Foods International Coffees. But the vision of domestic bliss and beauty that unfolds within the home defies even the most jaded misanthrope. Past the front door there’s the gorgeous grand stairway with its original wrought-iron balustrade, straight out of a movie from Hollywood’s Golden Age. Then room after room bathed in glorious sunlight, gurgling fountains, and that heavenly oak tree, literally topping

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everything off. And, of course, there’s Poppy, the mistress of the manor. Not even Central Casting could produce a more scrumptious sprite. “We were lucky that the house was in great condition. It had been looked after. All we really needed to do was give it a cosmetic makeover— the perfect assignment for two decorators,” Berkus says. That facelift entailed installing floors of antique marble to demarcate points of entry and transition; stripping, bleaching, and waxing the existing mahogany paneling in the dining room; replacing fireplace mantels and hardware with antique models; reworking the kitchen with new fixtures and surfaces; and furnishing the many rooms of the home in signature Berkus-Brent style. “We go for a very clean, masculine look. We don’t like to live with a lot of color,” Brent says. “Or any!” Berkus swiftly chimes in. As for what constitutes clean and masculine in this context, the designers layered the house with rustic French, Swedish, and American furnishings of wood and stone, juxtaposed with more tailored Continental

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LEFT IN THE LIVING ROOM, A SOFA BY AFRA AND TOBIA SCARPA FOR CASSINA, A CIRCA1950 ITALIAN CHAIR, AND A PAIR OF 1940S LINEN CLUB CHAIRS SURROUND A MARBLE COCKTAIL TABLE FROM HOLLYWOOD AT HOME. A 1950S ITALIAN SCONCE HANGS ABOVE A 1960S ENGLISH BENCH COVERED IN A LEE JOFA FABRIC; BELGIAN LINEN CURTAINS BY RH.

RIGHT BERKUS AND POPPY BESIDE A 19TH-CENTURY ITALIAN BOOKCASE IN THE GALLERY. 18TH-CENTURY SWEDISH TABLE; 1950S AMERICAN BENCH. LEFT IN THE DINING ROOM, 1950S JACQUES ADNET CHAIRS JOIN A 19TH-CENTURY ENGLISH TABLE. A PAINTING BY MATT CONNORS HANGS ABOVE A DIRECTOIRE LIMESTONE MANTEL; CIRCA-1970 GEORGES PELLETIER CERAMIC PENDANT LIGHTS.

“When you live with a small child, you don’t want to feel beholden to your possessions.” —Nate Berkus


OPPOSITE: © 2018 HUNT SLONEM/ARTIST RIGHTS SOCIETY (ARS), NEW YORK

ABOVE THE PLAYROOM’S “MEMORY” BOARD AND TABLE, BY RH BABY & CHILD; SOFA AND RUG BY RH TEEN. FLOOR PILLOWS AND HIPPO BASKET FROM ANTHROPOLOGIE. RIGHT THE PERGOLA IS PAINTED IN BENJAMIN MOORE’S ALABASTER. RH PENDANT LIGHTS; VINTAGE KREISS CHAIRS; POTTERY BARN PILLOWS. POPPY WEARS A MARYSIA BUMBY SWIMSUIT. OPPOSITE IN POPPY’S ROOM, A WALLPAPER BY APPARATUS AND ZAK + FOX HOSTS ART BY HUNT SLONEM, MICHAEL HAINEY, FERNANDO BENGOECHEA, AND MARY LITTLE. A JULIA CONDON MOBILE HANGS OVER AN ARMCHAIR BY CISCO HOME WEARING A MEXICAN OTOMI TEXTILE; CRIB, TABLE, AND CHAIR BY RH BABY & CHILD; NATE BERKUS STOOL FOR TARGET; CAITLIN WILSON RUG.

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BRENT AND BERKUS’S RH BED, DRESSED IN MATTEO LINENS, IS FLANKED BY 1970S ITALIAN TABLES. THE CIRCA-1960 CHAIRS WEAR AN EDELMAN LEATHER SUEDE. CIRCA-1950 FRENCH BRONZE SAUCER LIGHT; CUSTOM ROMAN SHADES BY THE SHADE STORE; MARIA PERGAY STEEL TABLE; HD BUTTERCUP RUG.

pieces by the likes of Jacques Adnet, Maria Pergay, Angelo Mangiarotti, and Afra and Tobia Scarpa. The through line is the doggedly neutral palette; Berkus and Brent rely on texture and patina to animate their personal interiors. “We chose to use more country antiques because they already feel timeworn. Another ding just adds to the life of the pieces,” Berkus explains, continuing, “When you live with a small child, you don’t want to feel beholden to your possessions.” The one exception to the rainbow-of-beige rule is Poppy’s bedroom and playroom. “She’s obsessed with pink and princesses—big shocker—so we try to keep the color and chaos confined to her zone,” Berkus explains. “But we like to help curate,” Brent adds, with an inflection that suggests not just any polyester princess getup will do. In her bedroom, Poppy has the beginnings of a proper art collection, stocked with gifts from her parents’ friends, including a dreamy mobile by Julia Condon and a Michael Hainey hummingbird painting. For Berkus and Brent, the one other space that seems to deviate from the distilled masculinity of

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“We don’t like to live with a lot of color,” Brent says. Berkus chimes in, “Or any!” the rest of the house is the master bathroom, which features hand-painted murals by James Mobley along with architectural details of a Prunella marble richly veined in deep purple and brown. “The stone’s a little weird for us, but we loved it,” Berkus confesses. “It has an old Venetian quality, and that influenced the molding profiles.” The couple took advantage of the ample space beyond the bathroom to install two very serious hisand-his closets. “Separate rooms are essential,” Brent avers. “When you marry a triple Virgo, there’s no way to meditate the stress away. Good closets make for a good marriage.” And that’s the gospel according to Jeremiah and Nate.


IN THE MASTER BATH, A JAMES MOBLEY MURAL AND MARBLE MOLDING AND PANELS FROM WATERWORKS. TUB BY SIGNATURE HARDWARE, WITH WATERWORKS FITTINGS; DURAVIT SINK.


Fun House Kelly Wearstler dreams up a color-soaked L.A. pad for a free-spirited young family

TEXT BY

HANNAH MARTIN

LANA GOMEZ AND SEBASTIAN MANISCALCO’S LIVING ROOM IS CHOCKABLOCK WITH COLOR AND PATTERN. CUSTOM SOFAS WEAR CLAREMONT FABRIC; CUSTOM STOOLS AND BOLSTER CHAIRS BY KELLY WEARSTLER; FLOOR LAMP BY ANTON ALVAREZ; CUSTOM RUG BY THE RUG COMPANY, DESIGNED BY GOMEZ. FOR DETAILS SEE RESOURCES.

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PHOTOGRAPHY BY

FRANÇOIS DISCHINGER

STYLED BY

MICHAEL REYNOLDS


THE ENTRY HALL IS COVERED WITH CANNON/BULLOCK WALLPAPER SHEETS. VENINI MURANO CHANDELIER; MARBLE SIDE TABLE BY DANTE-GOODS AND BADS; CHAIR BY VERNER PANTON; STAIR RUNNER BY CHRISTOPHER FARR. OPPOSITE A SHIMMERING CHANDELIER BY MISHA KAHN HANGS IN THE MASTER BEDROOM. CUSTOM BED BY KELLY WEARSTLER IN A ROBERT CROWDER & CO. FABRIC; CUSTOM TABLE BY AQQ DESIGN; CUSTOM RUG BY THE RUG COMPANY, DESIGNED BY GOMEZ.

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I

come from a family where you went to the furniture store, you bought a set, and you brought it home,” explains comedian Sebastian Maniscalco, whose old-school Italian upbringing in the Chicago suburbs fuels his searing stand-up routines. Needless to say, when he and artist Lana Gomez bought a new home for their soon-to-expand family (their daughter, Serafina, was born in April), he didn’t quite know what he was in for. “Decorating,” he explains, “is definitely not in my wheelhouse.” Thankfully, it was well within Gomez’s. She had worked as the resident painter for glamazon designer Kelly Wearstler soon after moving to L.A. in 2007, conjuring kaleidoscopic canvases for her boss’s high-octane projects— it was the giant commission hanging behind Wearstler’s desk that jump-started her painting career. So when it came time to decorate her own space, Gomez knew Wearstler could distill the couple’s fun-loving spirit into a warm, family-friendly home where they could live, work, and entertain. Conveniently, the designer’s office was just down the street. “They both love color, and their personalities are so unique,” explains Wearstler, who worked closely with Gomez on the project. “And Lana was pretty much up for anything.” But the house itself—a Spanish-style bungalow spec home near West Hollywood that the couple chose for its open layout and blank-canvas appeal—lacked pizzazz. To add a bit of architectural nuance, Wearstler had a few tricks up her sleeve: The rectangular front door was reshaped into an elegant arch, the switchback staircase was refashioned and lined with brass rails, and doorways into the kitchen and dining room were framed in Silver Portoro stone. A grid of Cannon/Bullock wallpaper sheets in a range of colors was applied to walls throughout the house, creating the illusion of rooms in the airy, open interior and giving the whole place a Technicolor glow. “A lot of people actually think it’s stone when they walk in,” Maniscalco says. Liberated by Gomez’s daredevil streak (she calls Italian provocateur Ettore Sottsass her “spirit animal”), Wearstler employed, with measured restraint, furnishings that are gutsy and creative. Collectible modern and postmodern trophies— Jean Royère sconces (Maniscalco jokingly calls them “scones”), Verner Panton’s Vilbert chair, an eye-popping assortment of Sottsass icons—sit with one-of-a-kind commissions from emerging talents. The leafy gesso cabinet in the living room came from Brooklyn-based createur Katie Stout. Another Brooklynite, Misha Kahn, dreamed up a plastic chandelier for the master bedroom. L.A.-based Matthew and Carly Jo Morgan devised the resin-coated Flintstones-esque credenza for the guest bedroom. And Wearstler teamed up with Echo Park legend Peter Shire (of Memphis Group fame) on a longlegged bar cabinet. “Kelly turned me on to a lot of these artists, and she worked with them to create things nobody has ever seen before,” Gomez says. “Serafina is going to grow up in a house filled with characters. Each piece looks like it could come alive.”

While the couple was down for decorating with art-forward furniture and blue-chip oddities, of course, there was one thing that neither Gomez nor Maniscalco wanted to budge an inch on: comfort. “Lana and I have had sofas in our relationship where one person would be comfortable and the other would be hanging off the side,” Maniscalco says with a laugh. Their current sofas, custom-made by Wearstler and upholstered in a patterned fabric intended to diminish the seating’s hulking silhouettes, are a whopping three and a half feet deep—which happens to be the perfect measurement for lying side by side while watching a movie. On the walls Wearstler paired Gomez’s own paintings (which she creates in her garage studio) with pieces by Op Art maestro John Townsend and rising San Francisco talent


THE MARBLE-CLAD MASTER BATH. SCONCES BY CHARLES BURNAND; TUB SURROUND BY ANN SACKS. LEFT A CALDERINSPIRED MOBILE HANGS IN THE NURSERY.

“Serafina is going to grow up in a house filled with characters,” says Gomez. “Each piece looks like it could come alive.”

Jonathan Anzalone. Rather than use Gomez’s creations throughout the house, though, Wearstler successfully proposed turning a few of them into painterly rugs fabricated by the Rug Company. While Wearstler’s fearless furnishing choices spoke to the couple’s dynamism, when a home is filled with such an tell Kelly we hate this lamp? It’s just too weird.” But leave it eccentric cast a moment of controversy is inevitable. to Wearstler to prove otherwise. Now Gomez and Maniscalco Maniscalco recalls the arrival of a lamp by Anton Alvarez, swear it’s one of their favorite things in the house. a Swedish-Chilean designer whose sculptural furnishings are “Kelly really educates you,” the comedian continues. made by wrapping raw materials in colorful, glue-soaked string. “After she’s done describing something, you walk away and “I thought it hadn’t been unpacked yet, but it turned out it you’re like, ‘Yeah, that does look great.’ I feel like I got a was,” he says of the leggy fixture, which was intended for the master’s in design.” living room. “Lana and I were thinking, How are we going to

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A CUSTOM TABLE BY WEARSTLER, MADE OF BLEACHED AND EBONIZED OAK, MAKES A SPLASH IN THE DINING AREA.

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design notes

THE DETAILS THAT MAKE THE LOOK

OCEANIC TABLE LAMP BY MICHELE DE LUCCHI; $1,750. 1STDIBS.COM

LALA SHWANTLA CABINET BY DOKTER AND MISSES; PRICE UPON REQUEST. SOUTHERNGUILD.CO.ZA

THE HOME OFFICE HAS A PALM SPRING DESK DESIGNED BY ETTORE SOTTSASS.

LEONA FOOTSTOOL; $7,450. KELLYWEARSTLER.COM ENCIRCLE VASE; $2,195. KELLYWEARSTLER.COM WEARSTLER ON A BRONZE CALIA CHAIR OF HER OWN DESIGN.

BALLA TABLE LAMP BY KELLY WEARSTLER FOR VISUAL COMFORT; $840. CIRCALIGHTING.COM

This is definitely one of my most playful projects,” Wearstler says.

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DURANT SOFA; $19,140. KELLYWEARSTLER.COM


MEDIUM ROUND LANDSCAPE VASE; $650. ELYSEGRAHAM.COM

GOMEZ AND MANISCALCO IN THE DINING AREA.

INTERIORS AND GOMEZ/MANISCALCO PORTRAIT: FRANÇOIS DISCHINGER. HAIR BY JEN BLANCHARD FOR ANDY LECOMPTE SALON; MAKEUP BY TSIPPORAH LIEBMAN USING MAC COSMETICS. KELLY WEARSTLER PORTRAIT: OLIVIA MALONE. ALL OTHERS COURTESY OF RESPECTIVE COMPANIES

MODEL B MOBILE BY CHARLES AND RAY EAMES; $125. VITRA.COM

TABLE FOR SHIRLEY JACKSON BY MATTHEW SULLIVAN; $3,685. KINDERMODERN.COM

Lana’s the visionary when it comes to design,” Maniscalco admits. “I’m along for the ride.” A CUSTOM CABINET BY KATIE STOUT IN THE LIVING ROOM.

VILBERT CHAIR BY VERNER PANTON; $2,291 FOR PAIR. 1STDIBS.COM

ROYERE III SCONCE BY JEAN ROYÈRE; $1,550. EDITIONMODERN.COM

TESSA BY MONTY J; $2,970. THEFUTUREPERFECT.COM


sacred grove

TOWERING CYPRESSES PUNCTUATE THE CURVING TERRACES OF A GARDEN, DESIGNED BY FERNANDO CARUNCHO, NEAR THE GREEK TOWN OF PORTO HELI. FOR DETAILS SEE RESOURCES.


Garden guru Fernando Caruncho cultivates an ancient attitude at an estate on the Aegean Sea TEXT BY

MITCHELL OWENS PEPE GÓMEZ-ACEBO

PHOTOGRAPHY BY


F

rom the vantage point of a sailboat crossing the wine-dark Aegean Sea, the house surmounts its hill like a modern acropolis: noble, impassive, an assemblage of intersecting stony-faced geometries, blocky and sequestered here, open and airy there. One of the last projects by Ricardo Legorreta, the eminent Mexican modernist, and commissioned by an elegant Greek family that flits between their native country and London, the building crowns a steep, stately landscape that was cultivated not long ago by yet another contemporary virtuoso, Fernando Caruncho, a suave, soft-spoken Spaniard known for classical allusions informed by his youthful studies of Greek civilization. Stone walls radiate out from the house, knitting it into the acreage as it shapes languid terraces where cypresses of the darkest green rise like quills at regular intervals, towering above a plantation of pomegranates, figs, apples, oranges, and olives, what the garden guru calls “a paradise in the middle of a citadel.” Grape ivy drips down the walls; rosemary, santolina, and lavender perfume the salty air; and Festuca and ryegrass feather hard edges into velvety softness. A field of wheat underscores the pastoral ambience, spreading out like a breeze-rippled carpet of palest Attic gold. The ancients would have understood this Arcadia. Indeed, it is easy to imagine graceful figures clad in chitons and peploi strolling down the long, curving paths—paved with rocks left over from the excavation of the house’s foundation— as if navigating a labyrinth, down to the crescent of beach below. “This is a dreamer’s place,” Caruncho quietly explains, “very open yet very mysterious.”

ABOVE THE LATE ARCHITECT RICARDO LEGORRETA DESIGNED THE PROPERTY’S HOUSE. LEFT SINUOUS PATHS LEAD FROM THE HOUSE TO THE SEA.

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BESPOKE ROSE UNIACKE WALLPAPER GIVES A GARDEN AIR TO THE LIVING ROOM. THE SOFAS, COCKTAIL TABLE, TUFTED ARMCHAIR, CURTAIN FABRIC, AND TIBETAN SHEEPSKIN RUG ARE ALL BY ROSE UNIACKE. ANTIQUE W.A.S. BENSON LIGHTS; GEORGE III MIRROR; ORIGINAL E. W. GODWIN MANTELPIECE. FOR DETAILS SEE RESOURCES.


R

ULE, BRITANNIA!

Rose Uniacke channels— and refreshes— the Aesthetic Movement in Oscar Wilde’s onetime London digs TEXT BY

MITCHELL OWENS SIMON UPTON

PHOTOGRAPHY BY


RIGHT UNIACKE IN HER OWN HOME. BELOW A MORRIS & CO. LINEN PATTERNS HER CLIENTS’ POWDER ROOM; UNIACKE DESIGNED THE SCONCES AS WELL AS THE SWEDISH MARBLE SINK.

“It’s like being inside an apple,” Uniacke says of the wallpaper that greens the living room.

PORTRAIT: FRANÇOIS HALARD

RIGHT A LUCIAN FREUD ETCHING HANGS ABOVE A MANTEL IN THE LIVINGROOM INGLENOOK. GODWIN ARMCHAIRS IN A UNIACKE FABRIC AND BUILT-IN GODWIN BENCHES IN A MORRIS & CO. PRINT. OPPOSITE THE LIBRARY FEATURES A UNIACKE SOFA, OTTOMAN, PILLOWS, AND CARPET. FRITS HENNINGSEN LOUNGE CHAIR; JACQUES ADNET DAYBED; MORRIS & CO. PATTERN ON WALLS.


T

ucked high in an 1880 house in London’s storied Tite Street—that Chelsea lane of terra-cottared houses where Oscar Wilde so artfully once lived—Rose Uniacke stands in a double-height living room that is wrapped with tart shades of green that seem to tint the very air with freshness. “It’s like being inside an apple,” the designer smilingly says of the verdant, hand-blocked wallpaper, spotted in the Victoria and Albert Museum archives, reproduced, and recolored for a family that now lives in Tite Street’s most admired dwelling. E. W. Godwin, a high priest of the art-for-art’s-sake Aesthetic Movement, designed the place, picturesquely melding Dutch and Japanese styles, for Frank Miles, a rich, handsome, young painter known for a reckless personal life and what a critic admiringly called “a series of pretty female heads” rendered in pastels. Chelsea was then “a paradise for artists,” Uniacke says, all drawn by the clear light glinting off the Thames. Whistler lived across the street, Sargent painted portraits a few doors down, and for a brief period, Wilde was Miles’s housemate. “My clients were keen to respect that history but didn’t want an academic re-creation of an Aesthetic Movement

scheme,” Uniacke explains. Instead, following a full-bore architectural restoration, she conjured up a decor in which Victorian bohemianism meets 20th- and 21st-century furnishings in a dégagé manner that is plainly, comfortably now. In the 40-foot-long studio turned living room, the owners encouraged Uniacke to assemble what she calls “an interesting collection of furnishings.” Thus, sparkling 1890s light fixtures coexist with Godwin-design ebonized chairs in the fetching Anglo-Japanese style (“Aesthetic Movement furniture is quite undervalued,” the designer notes), a monumental Uniacke table carved from Swedish green marble, and herringbone parquet blanketed with fluffy Tibetan sheepskins. Round the living room, atop the trelliswork wainscot, runs an iris-pattern border, the purple blossoms serving as a subtle reminder that Miles cultivated Japanese flowers while also giving the feeling that one might be sitting in a pavilion in the middle of a garden. That plein-air reverie is carried into the cozy adjoining library, a space that is swathed in an 1882 William Morris print on which rabbits and birds cavort. “My intention was to have a surprising mix of color and playful gestures,” Uniacke explains. “The point was to take a contemporary approach to a classic Godwin interior—but softer, cleaner, and less full of things.”

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PERFECT HARMONY Under the deft direction of Pierre Yovanovitch, a dowdy Belgian house gets a new lease on life TEXT BY

IAN PHILLIPS

PHOTOGRAPHY BY

JOSÉ MANUEL ALORDA


IN THE LIVING ROOM, A VIGGO BOESEN CHAIR SITS ADJACENT TO AN ANGULAR SOFA BY PIERRE YOVANOVITCH. SCULPTURE BY PHILIPPE HIQUILY. IN NICHE, ERNEST BOICEAU JARDINIÈRES. OPPOSITE THE CUSTOM SKYLIGHT BY YOVANOVITCH THROWS COLORED PATTERNS INTO THE STAIRWELL, WITH SCONCES OF HIS OWN DESIGN. FOR DETAILS SEE RESOURCES.


rench interior designer Pierre Yovanovitch avows more than a hint of reverence for craftsmanship. “If you want a creation not to look industrial, you’re obliged to work with artisans,” he asserts. Over the past decade, he has built up close relationships with several, including master carpenter Pierre-Eloi Bris, with whom he worked on the zigzag-like sofa in the living room of one of his latest projects—a six-bedroom house in an elegant Belgian enclave. Its complex structure was assembled with neither glue nor nails. “It’s very Pierre Yovanovitch,” he enthuses. He can use his own name as an adjective because his style is unmistakable. The words he apposes most regularly to describe it are simplicity and sophistication. Its fundamental components include furnishings by 20th-century Scandinavian masters

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like Axel Einar Hjorth and Paavo Tynell, and a graphic architectural approach. All are in evidence in the Belgian house, built in 1910 for an aristocratic family and transformed into offices 50 years later. It had polystyrene drop ceilings but neither a kitchen nor full bathrooms when first viewed by its current owners (he is a private-equity investor; she runs a foundation in Indonesia). “The whole house had lost its soul,” she laments. “Nobody even wanted to come and take the surviving fireplaces for free.” All that remains of the original structure today is the graceful brick façade. Yovanovitch’s redesign of the home’s interior features a huge picture window for the kitchen, while the most striking element inside is the majestic spiral staircase that winds its way up three stories and is topped by a geometric stained-glass skylight at its zenith. “It’s just brilliant,” gushes the wife. “People say it looks like the Guggenheim Museum.”

© 2018 PHILIPPE HIQUILY/ARTISTS RIGHTS SOCIETY (ARS), NEW YORK/ADAGP, PARIS; PORTRAIT: AMBROISE TÉZENAS; PRODUCTS: JEAN-FRANÇOIS JAUSSAUD/COURTESY OF PIERRE YOVANOVITCH

f

AN ARTWORK BY DAVID ALTMEJD HANGS OVER THE TRAVERTINE FIREPLACE IN THE LIVING ROOM. ASSIS(ASY)MÉTRIE ARMCHAIR BY PIERRE YOVANOVITCH; MONGOLFIERA FLOOR LAMP BY PAOLA NAPOLEONE.


ZOU! PENDANT IN HAND-CAST BLOWN GLASS AND IRON.

MADAME OOPS CHAIR IN OAK.

DESIGNER PIERRE YOVANOVITCH ON A FLOATING SOFA IN A SITTING AREA AT HIS PARIS OFFICE.

OTTO DESK IN OAK AND STEEL.

MARSHA FLOOR LAMP DESIGNED BY PIERRE YOVANOVITCH; BASE BY ARMELLE BENOIT.

Coming to America Yovanovitch exhibited his latest furniture creations in New York this past fall, and plans are afoot to open a Manhattan office. FOR ALL PRODUCTS: PRICE UPON REQUEST. R-AND-COMPANY.COM

PEBBLE TABLES BY ARMELLE BENOIT FOR PIERRE YOVANOVITCH.


Yovanovitch excels in his use of intriguing yet understated materials.


© THE HENRY MOORE FOUNDATION. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED, DACS 2018/WWW.HENRY-MOORE.ORG

A CUSTOM FIREPLACE SURROUND AND WALNUT BOOKSHELVES ARE BUILT TO THE CURVATURE OF THE WALLS IN THE LIBRARY. VINTAGE AXEL EINAR HJORTH ROCKING CHAIR AND SIDE TABLE. SVEND AAGE HOLM SØRENSEN FLOOR LAMP. HENRY MOORE SCULPTURE ON TABLE. OPPOSITE IN THE TRAVERTINE-COVERED MASTER BATH, CUSTOM SEATING PROVIDES A PLACE FOR REPOSE.

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ABOVE THE ATRIUM FEATURES A MIRROR ARTWORK BY JONATHAN HOROWITZ HUNG ABOVE A TWO-PIECE BENCH BY PIERRE YOVANOVITCH. VINTAGE PAAVO TYNELL LAMP. LEFT LIGHTING BY JEFF ZIMMERMANN IS SUSPENDED ABOVE THE YOVANOVITCH-DESIGNED TABLE AND CHAIRS IN THE

DINING ROOM. PATINATED STEEL COVERS THE WALLS. OPPOSITE IN THE KITCHEN, A CONE PENDANT LIGHT BY RU EDITIONS HANGS OVER A BESPOKE STONETOPPED ISLAND. SINK AND FITTINGS BY DORNBRACHT. COUNTER STOOL BY MARK ALBRECHT STUDIO. RANGE BY LA CORNUE. SCULPTURE BY STEPHAN BALKENHOL.

“If you want a creation to not look industrial, you’re obliged to work with artisans,” the designer asserts.


© 2018 STEPHAN BALKENHOL/ARTISTS RIGHTS SOCIETY (ARS), NEW YORK/VG BILD-KUNST, BONN

The clients, who have four adult sons, were drawn to Yovanovitch not just for his architectural prowess but also by his efforts to get a firm understanding of their requirements and lifestyle. “They’re really into entertaining, are very convivial and familyoriented,” notes Yovanovitch. They also share a number of his tastes. They already owned the Hjorth rocking chair and occasional table in the second-floor library, and are fellow collectors of the sculptures of Stephan Balkenhol. At times, some of their requests pushed Yovanovitch out of his comfort zone. For the family room next to the street-level kitchen, they demanded a dining table and sofa. “Having both in the same space perturbs me,” he admits. “For me, each room should have a specific function.” They also craved more color than habitually seen in his projects and insisted on hanging a 17th-century Japanese screen

in the dining room. “It’s not something Pierre would normally use,” admits the wife. One area in which Yovanovitch excels is in his use of intriguing yet understated materials, as witnessed by the gouged oak doors and chiseled walnut bookshelves, the nubby fabrics, and textured plasterwork of the library fireplace. Then there is the bar, with its rugged larch wood and Cordoba leather walls and a ceiling that was deliberately conceived to look as if it had suffered water damage. Inspired by both modernist architect Adolf Loos and the film Casablanca, the room is home to the husband’s extensive collection of whiskeys and cognacs. “Every time he joined me for a meeting with Pierre, it was the only space we talked about,” says the wife with a laugh. Still, she is the first to admit the result is pretty spectacular: “The only bad thing is that when people get in there, they never want to go home.”

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AGUSTIN HURTADO PAINTED THE ENTRY’S CEILING. AN ANTIQUE SWEDISH CLOCK HANGS ABOVE A ROCOCO-STYLE CONSOLE. OPPOSITE THE KIDS CRAFT IN THE BREAKFAST ROOM. CHAIRS CUSHIONED IN A COLEFAX AND FOWLER FABRIC. CUSTOM BANQUETTE IN A BRENTANO FAUX LEATHER. LARGE PHOTOGRAPH BY MASSIMO VITALI. FOR DETAILS SEE RESOURCES.


FANCY THAT

When a young San Francisco couple asks for old-fashıoned, deep-dish decorating, an overjoyed Miles Redd pulls out all the stops TEXT BY

MITCHELL OWENS

PHOTOGRAPHY BY

TREVOR TONDRO

STYLED BY

HOWARD CHRISTIAN


a

IN THE GRACIE WALLPAPER–CLAD DINING ROOM, THE HOUSE’S ORIGINAL CHANDELIER AND MANTEL ARE COMPLEMENTED BY AN ANTIQUE TABLE SURROUNDED BY LIZ O’BRIEN EDITIONS CHAIRS IN A LEE JOFA FABRIC.

nglo-Continental elegance was the cynosure of the decorating world back in the 1980s. Acres of flowered chintz. Deep-dish sofas dripping bullion fringe. Ball-gown curtains tumbling onto romantically threadbare carpets. It was all about layering—ranks of paintings, clusters of blue-and-white porcelain—achieving the kind of noble clutter that often took generations to achieve. Located in a posh precinct of San Francisco, the interiors shown here aren’t old at all. Surprisingly enough, given the venerable atmosphere, they were completed just seven months ago for an energetic young couple who have lively children and a delightfully old-fashioned idea of how they want to live. “It’s so nice when somebody doesn’t want modern—the wife’s Pinterest is everything that’s in my wheelhouse,” says Miles Redd, the Manhattan decorator known for his carbonated personality and an encyclopedic knowledge of great tastemakers of the past, from the dashing Nancy Lancaster to the obscure Mrs. Guy Bethell, creators of the kinds of seriously pretty, eminently inviting rooms that the California couple had been pinning up and pining for.

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Built in the early 1900s and renovated for the current owners by architect Gil Schafer, the San Francisco house has “a funny Norma Desmond vibe,” Redd says, largely because of the decades-old blanket of fig vine that threatens to smother the building’s redbrick façade. That vegetal extravagance is an outward manifestation of the livable opulence indoors—part English, part French, a soupçon of Venetian, and utterly comfortable. “Antiques are such a good value today, and they’re great for a family lifestyle; they’ve already been through a lot and will go through more,” says the mother of four, the youngest being a two-year-old boy who runs wild among the Georgian pier tables, Louis XV and XVI chairs, and clusters of blue-andwhite porcelain. Multiple patterns conceal wear and tear, and, the client observes, “old carpets are pretty much indestructible.” (When she told Redd that she wanted only well-worn Persians, the designer, delighted, responded, “More power to you.”) As for the richness of decorative effect, “it really combines high and low, but you would never know that,” she explains. “A lot of the furnishings are not significant, but they look significant. Miles is great at that, repurposing things and making them look amazing.” Re-dressing, repainting, redeploying, reinventing: Refreshening is the Redd way. In the living room— where the walls are slicked with aquamarine satin—


A PAINTED FLOOR BY CHRIS PEARSON AND A GRACIE WALLPAPER ADD A WHIMSICAL TOUCH TO THE MASTER BEDROOM. BERGÈRE PURCHASED AT AUCTION; LAMP FROM JOHN ROSSELLI ANTIQUES.


A BRUNSCHWIG & FILS SATIN COVERS THE LIVING-ROOM WALLS. ON ARMCHAIRS AT LEFT, PILLOWS, AND STOOLS, A SCHUMACHER FLORAL LINEN AND A CLARENCE HOUSE JAGUAR SILK VELOUR ADD PIZZAZZ. THE BANQUETTE, AT RIGHT, WEARS A DÉCOR DE PARIS FABRIC WITH SAMUEL & SONS TRIM. ANTIQUE PERSIAN RUG.


indifferent taborets get chic with a jaguar-print velour that also shows up on a handful of cushions. (Big-cat prints were a leitmotif of Elsie de Wolfe, the fabled 20th-century decorating dynamo who ranks tip-top on Redd’s list of worthies.) A nearby antique German fauteuil, which should by all rights be clad in a stuffy stretch of scratchy Aubusson, is splashed with a sleek fabric striped in green, blue, and white (bringing to mind the parallel lines associated with 1960s style goddess Pauline de Rothschild). Georgian tables, snapped up at auction for the dining room, now have fresh snow-white complexions. (Hello, Dorothy Draper.) “Why wouldn’t you buy a pedestrian old sideboard, something grandmotherly, and tweak it?” Redd asks. “Paint it, ebonize it, lacquer it, or gild it.” Dining room and master bedroom bloom with classic chinoiserie scenic wallpapers, a decorating trope since the 18th century. In the breakfast room, a Billy Baldwin hallmark (raffia wall covering) meets a canonical Colefax and Fowler print (Bowood rose-pattern chintz) and a dollop of Syrie Maugham (the Venetian-style chairs are a lyrical touch that the British grande dame often used). There’s a John Fowler echo, too, in the entrance hall’s apricot walls, a succulent shade that the Englishman famously splashed all over Christ Church Library in the 1950s.

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OPPOSITE IN THE DAUGHTER’S BEDROOM, THE BED CANOPY AND CURTAINS ARE OF CLARENCE HOUSE LINENS AND THE HEADBOARD AND BED SKIRT ARE IN A BRUNSCHWIG & FILS FABRIC; SWEDISH GUSTAVIAN DESK; CARPET BY STARK.

“Those are the designers I’ve always looked to emulate, and what I’ve learned from them comes out in its own unique way,” Redd says. He adds with a grin, “If you borrow from many, it’s research; if you borrow from just one, it’s plagiarism.” One outright copy to which Redd readily admits is the painted ceiling in the entrance vestibule, a small, sunlit space that leads from the front door to the apricot hall. Seeing the ceiling’s billowing contours for the first time, Redd let his mind wander to the big trompe l’oeil–tented room at Casa degli Atellani, a flamboyantly stylish house seen in the movie I Am Love. Artist Agustin Hurtado reduced that Milanese inspiration to fit the San Francisco space. Redd complemented the whimsical tabs and tassels with some pleasingly fussy furnishings, including a palazzo-perfect rococo-style table and a grandiose 18th-century Swedish cartel clock. French Abstract Expressionist watercolors add a dash of hipness. Tradition may be out of fashion at the moment, but given the allure of this family-friendly anachronism on the West Coast, perhaps it’s time to start stocking up on languishing antiques. “It’s a great, interesting, eclectic mix, the modern next to something very old,” the wife says. “And it’s still going to be amazing in 30 years. This will hold up.”

PREVIOUS SPREAD: @ 2018 GUY BARDONE/ARTISTS RIGHTS SOCIETY (ARS), NEW YORK/ADAGP, PARIS

ABOVE A DONGHIA STRIPED WALLPAPER COVERS A BATHROOM. LEFT A ROBERT SILVERS ARTWORK HANGS IN THE STAIRWAY. FARROW & BALL PAINT, PATTERSON FLYNN MARTIN RUNNER AND CARPET; BENCH IN A LEE JOFA FABRIC.


Re-dressing, repainting, redeploying, reinventing: Refreshening is the Redd way.


resources Items pictured but not listed here are not sourceable. Items similar to vintage and antique pieces shown are often available from the dealers listed. (T) means the item is available only to the trade. COLLECTING: ALL TOGETHER NOW PAGES 66 and 68: Interiors by Groves & Co.;

grovesandco.com. Architecture by Zivkovic Connolly Architects; zivarch.com. DOUBLE VISION PAGES 140–155: Architecture by Olson Kundig; olsonkundigarchitects.com. Interiors by RP Miller Design; rpmillerdesign.com. For Kona, landscape design by David Y. Tamura Assoc. Inc.; 808-935-3466. For North Fork, landscape design by Michael Boucher Landscape Architecture; boucherlandscape.com. PAGES 140–41: On custom chaise longues, Raffia acrylic, in tuscan, by Perennials (T); perennialsfabrics.com. PAGES 142–43: Branch chandelier by David Wiseman; dwiseman.com. Oak-and-leather sleigh chair by Wendell Castle; wendellcastlecollection.com. Double leather recamier by Rick Owens from Salon 94; salon94.com. Custom rug from Cristina Grajales Gallery; cristinagrajalesinc.com. Jean Royère low table and floor lamp from Maxfield; maxfieldla.com. Joaquim Tenreiro four-seat sofa from R & Co.; r-and-company.com. Custom lacquered cocktail tables by RP Miller Design; rpmillerdesign.com. Custom corner banquette by RP Miller Design. Mathieu Matégot leather and steel armchairs from Maxfield. PAGE 144: In sitting room, Poltrona Maia lounge chair by Julia Krantz from R & Co.; r-and-company.com. Pierre Jeanneret office cane chair from 1stdibs; 1stdibs .com. Custom daybed by RP Miller Design; rpmillerdesign.com; in a Calvin Fabrics linen (T); calvinfabrics.com; quilted by Avon Quilting; 323-651-3448. Bruno wall lights by Robert Abbey from YLighting; ylighting.com. Jute rug by Patterson Flynn Martin (T); pattersonflynnmartin .com. Cowhide rug from ABC Carpet & Home; abchome.com. In guest bath, tub by Duravit; duravit.com. Custom wall-mounted tub filler by Sonoma Forge; sonomaforge.com. Custom sconces and mirrors by RP Miller Design. Accent tiles on backsplash by Ann Sacks; annsacks.com. Custom vanity by Jarrard Construction; 949-295-1922. Axor sink fittings by Hansgrohe; hansgrohe-usa.com. PAGE 147: Curtains of linen-blend, in North Fork feza, by RP Miller Textiles; rpmillerdesign.com. Vintage chair by José Zanine Caldas from R & Co.; r-and-company.com. Custom rug by Fedora Design (T); fedoradesign.com; and RP Miller Design. On bed, cashmere throw by I Pezzi Dipinti; ipezzidipinti.com. Bedding by Schweitzer Linen; schweitzerlinen.com. PAGES 148–49: Custom rug by RP Miller Design; rpmillerdesign.com. On Edward Wormley sofas from 1stdibs; 1stdibs.com; Le Witt Loom linen-blend, in indigo, by RP Miller Textiles. On sofa, sculpture by the Haas Brothers from R & Co.; r-and-company.com. Vintage white floor lamp from Galerie Pascal Cuisinier; galeriepascalcuisinier.com. Bronze-and-porcelain fireplace screen by David Wiseman; dwiseman .com. Vintage chandeliers from Modernity; modernity.se. PAGES 150–51: In kitchen, Grete Jalk chairs and vintage Massimo Vignelli for Venini pendant lamp from 1stdibs; 1stdibs.com. In sitting room, Isamu Noguchi Akari lanterns; shop .noguchi.org. On love seat, vintage silk from John Robshaw Textiles; johnrobshaw.com. Vintage rug from Jamal’s Rug Collection; jamrug.com. Custom sofa by RP Miller Design; rpmillerdesign.com; in Gorgona cotton, in 24 mammola, by Loro Piana Interiors (T); loropiana.com. On vintage chairs, Pondicherry Lake linen-cotton by Raoul Textiles; raoultextiles.com. PAGE 152: On wall, Hop Garden wallpaper by Marthe Armitage for Hamilton Weston Wallpapers Ltd. (T); hamiltonweston .com. Parallel bed by Jeffrey Bernett, Nicholas Dodziuk, and Piotr Woronkowicz for Design Within Reach; dwr.com. Custom coverlet by C&C Milano; cec-milano.com. Around coffee table by Muuto; muuto.com. PAGE 153: On wall, Perry’s linen-blend wall covering, in indigo, by RP Miller Textiles; rpmillerdesign.com. The White Edition cloud shelf by Wendell Castle from R & Co.; r-and-company.com. Custom daybed by RP Miller Design; fabricated by Schuchart/Dow; schuchartdow.com. On daybed cushion, Perry’s linen, in indigo, by RP Miller Textiles. Around coffee table by Muuto; muuto.com. Custom cotton rug by Shyam Ahuja (T); shyamahuja.com.

SWEET SPOT PAGES 156–165: Interiors by Nate Berkus Assoc.; nateberkus.com; and Jeremiah Brent Design; jeremiahbrent.com. PAGE 156: Antique marble floor tile from Paris Ceramics; parisceramicsusa.com. On chair, Patmos stripe, in Mocha, by Carolina Irving Textiles (T); carolinairving.com. PAGE 157: Luggy basket by Fire and Creme Kids; fireandcremekids .com. On bench, 29431 velvet by Kravet (T); kravet .com. Tilework by Granada Tile; granadatile.com. PAGE 158: Umbrella, in brown, by Frontgate; frontgate.com. Minoan chairs by Irony by Stefania Baglatzi; irony.gr; in black fabric by Sunbrella; sunbrella.com. PAGE 159: Antique Sheraton knobs by Whitechapel; whitechapel-ltd.com. On counters and backsplash, Nero Marquina Neolith slabs from Ollin Stone; ollinstone.com. Traditional pot filler by Waterstone; waterstone.com. Annapolis sink fittings by Waterstone. On island, medium bronze ceramic bowl from Harbinger; harbingerla.com. PAGES 160–61: In living room, Belgian linen curtains by RH; rh.com. On right bench, Laguna fabric, in ivory, by James Huniford for Lee Jofa (T); leejofa.com. Turkish rug from Lawrence of La Brea; lawrenceoflabrea.com. PAGE 162: Oversize wool-felt giraffe, French Empire round play table with Madeleine play chairs, and Kennedy iron crib by RH Baby & Child; rhbabyandchild.com. On crib, Matteo linens; matteola.com. Faux sheepskin and wood stool by Nate Berkus for Target; target.com. On walls, Strata Study wallpaper, in Holocene, by Apparatus; apparatusstudio.com; and Zak & Fox; zakandfox.com. Romi mini chair by Cisco Home; ciscobrothers.com. Black spotted rug by Caitlin Wilson; caitlinwilson.com. On settee (far right), Tika fabric, in blush, by Lisa Fine Textiles (T); lisafinetextiles.com. PAGE 163: In playroom, Classic Tack linen memory board and Vintage Schoolhouse small play table by RH Baby & Child; rhbabyand child.com. Berlin Lounge Sherpa sofa and Sato rug, in stone, by RH Teen; rhteen.com. Wicker hippo basket and Tufted Amal floor pillows from Anthropologie; anthropologie.com. Faux Flokati stool, in ivory, from World Market; worldmarket .com. In pergola, Cambridge pendant lights by RH; rh.com. Pillows by Pottery Barn; potterybarn.com. On walls, Alabaster paint by Benjamin Moore; benjaminmoore.com. PAGE 164: Cloud platform slipcovered bed by RH; rh.com; with vintage linens in greige, by Matteo; matteola.com. On vintage bedside tables, Prunella marble from Waterworks; waterworks.com. Vases by Victoria Morris Pottery; victoriamorrispottery.com. On vintage club chairs, Royal Suede, in paper bag, by Edelman Leather (T); edelmanleather.com. Rug by HD Buttercup; hdbuttercup.com. Custom flat Roman shades of wool flannel, in caramel, by the Shade Store; theshadestore.com. PAGE 165: Scarlett cast-iron bathtub by Signature Hardware; signaturehardware .com. Universal Floor Union tub filler, in polished nickel, by Waterworks; waterworks.com. 1930 series pedestal sink by Duravit; duravit.com. Hand-painted mural by James Mobley; jamesmobleydesign.com. Molding and panels of Prunella marble from Waterworks.

FUN HOUSE PAGES 166–175: Interiors by Kelly Wearstler; kellywearstler.com. PAGES 166–67: Custom sofas by Kelly Wearstler; kellywearstler.com; in Les Emerauds #L4227 fabric by Le Manach (T); lemanach.fr. Willoughby stools by Kelly Wearstler; in Oblique viscose-cotton, in slate/graphite, by Lee Jofa (T); leejofa.com; and Borello lambskin leather, in electric blue, by United Leather; unitedleather .com. Custom bolster chairs by Kelly Wearstler; in Velours Gatinas linen-cotton, in saumon, by Clarence House (T); clarencehouse.com; and Mississippi fabric, in indigo, by Studio Four NYC (T); studiofournyc.com. Floor lamp by Anton Alvarez; antonalvarez.com. Custom rug by The Rug Company; therugcompany.com. Magnifying Lens cocktail table by Ma+39; ma39shop.com. Painting by Lana Gomez; lanagomez.com. Vintage whiteand-gold cabinet from Cosulich Interiors & Antiques; cosulichinteriors.com. Jean Royère triple-arm sconces by Edition Modern from Dering Hall; deringhall.com. On walls, wallpaper sheets by Cannon/Bullock (T); cannonbullock.com. PAGE 168: On walls, wallpaper sheets by Cannon/Bullock (T); cannonbullock.com. Vintage Venini chandelier from Avantgarden; avantgardenltd.com. Custom hand-knotted jute stairwell runner by Christopher Farr; christopherfarr.com. Marble Bavaresk cocktail table by Dante–Goods and Bads from Garde; gardeshop.com. Verner Panton Vilbert chair from 1stdibs; 1stdibs.com. Vintage area rug from Jamal’s

ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST AND AD ARE REGISTERED TRADEMARKS OF ADVANCE MAGAZINE PUBLISHERS INC. COPYRIGHT © 2018 CONDÉ NAST. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. PRINTED IN THE U.S.A.

VOLUME 75, NO. 1. ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST (ISSN 0003-8520) is published 11 times a year by Condé Nast, which is a division of Advance Magazine Publishers Inc. PRINCIPAL OFFICE: Condé Nast, 1 World Trade Center, New York, NY 10007. S. I. Newhouse, Jr., Chairman Emeritus; Robert A. Sauerberg, Jr., President and Chief Executive Officer; David E. Geithner, Chief Financial Officer; Pamela Drucker Mann, Chief Revenue & Marketing Officer. Periodicals postage paid at New York, NY, and at additional mailing offices. Canada Post Publications Mail Agreement No. 40644503. Canadian Goods and Services Tax Registration No. 123242885-RT0001. POSTMASTER: Send all UAA to CFS. (See DMM 507.1.5.2); NON-POSTAL AND MILITARY FACILITIES: Send address corrections to ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST, P.O. Box 37641, Boone, IA 50037-0641.

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Rug Collection; jamrug.com. PAGE 169: Plastic chandelier by Misha Kahn from Friedman Benda; friedmanbenda.com. Custom bed by Kelly Wearstler; kellywearstler.com; in custom rayoncotton by Robert Crowder & Assoc. (T); robertcrowder.com. Cocktail table by Matthew Sullivan of AQQ Design for Kinder Modern; kindermodern.com. Custom rug by The Rug Company; therugcompany.com. On walls, wallpaper sheets by Cannon/Bullock (T); cannonbullock.com. Custom fiber art panels by Ruben Marroquin; marroquinruben.com. Vintage table lamp from A La Mod; alamodps.com. Little White Lies side table, in green ombre, by Nick Ross; nckrss.com. On armchair, Rio Grande fabric, in Yves Klein blue, by Studio Four NYC (T); studiofournyc.com. PAGES 170–71: In nursery, mobile from Skysetter Mobiles; skysetter.com. On walls, wallpaper sheets by Cannon/Bullock; cannonbullock.com. Custom oak crib by Kelly Wearstler; kellywearstler.com. In bath, Triple Orb sconces by Charles Burnand from 1stdibs; 1stdibs .com. Statuary marble tub surround by Ann Sacks; annsacks.com. Custom floor mirror by Kelly Wearstler. Custom vanity with mirror and cabinetry with double sink by Kelly Wearstler. Tara sink fittings by Dornbracht; dornbracht.com. Alta racetrack mirrors by Kelly Wearstler. Marble stool by Kelly Wearstler. PAGES 172–73: Custom table by Kelly Wearstler; kellywearstler.com. On table, custom ceramic bowl from JF Chen; jfchen.com. On walls, wallpaper sheets by Cannon/Bullock (T); cannonbullock.com. Utopia ceiling light by Kelly Wearstler for Visual Comfort; circalighting.com. Vintage sconces from David Duncan Antiques; davidduncanantiques.com. Vintage Saporiti dining chairs from 1stdibs; 1stdibs.com. Custom brass barstools in hair-on-hide, in dame, by Kelly Wearstler. SACRED GROVE PAGES 176–79: Landscape design by Caruncho Garden & Architecture; fernandocaruncho.com. Architecture by Legorreta; legorretalegorreta.com.

RULE, BRITANNIA! PAGES 180–83: Interiors by Rose Uniacke Studio Ltd.; roseuniacke.com. PAGES 180–81: Custom-made wallpaper, wallpaper border, curtain fabric, tufted armchair fabric, pillows, and curly-haired Tibetan sheepskin rug, all by Rose Uniacke Studio; roseuniacke.com. Studio sofas, Patinated steel cocktail table, Rosewater tufted armchair, Hoof standing lamp, and Hoof occasional tables (flanking sofa on right, with custom Swedish green marble tops), all by RU Editions; roseuniacke.com. PAGE 182: In powder room, on walls, Brer Rabbit linen by Morris & Co. from Style Library (T); stylelibrary.com. Right Angle sconces, in distressed gilt, by RU Editions; roseuniacke.com. Custommade Swedish marble sink, vanity, and fittings by Rose Uniacke Studio; roseuniacke.com. In livingroom alcove, on armchairs, custom fabric by Rose Uniacke Studio. On benches, Brer Rabbit linen by Morris & Co. (T). On walls, custom-made wallpaper by Rose Uniacke Studio. PAGE 183: Drawing Room sofa, Upholstered ottoman, and Jesmonite Hourglass stool (between antique armchairs), all by RU Editions; roseuniacke.com. Custom-made pillows, mahogany bookshelf, and carpet, all by Rose Uniacke Studio; roseuniacke .com. Antique armchairs covered in, and window shade of, bespoke fabrics by Rose Uniacke Studio. Bamboo mirror from Pruskin Gallery; pruskingallery.com. On walls, Brer Rabbit linen by Morris & Co. (T); stylelibrary.com.

PERFECT HARMONY PAGES 184–191: Architecture and interiors by Pierre Yovanovitch Architecture d’Intérieur; pierreyovanovitch.com. PAGE 184: Custom skylight and sconces by Pierre Yovanovitch; pierreyovanovitch.com. PAGE 185: Sofa by Pierre Yovanovitch; similar style at R & Co.; r-andcompany.com. Pillows of Wallace Stripe woolblend, in petrol, by Ido Diffusion (T); ido-diffusion .com. Curtains of Linsey-Woolsey linen-blend, in halva, by Rogers & Goffigon (T); rogersandgoffigon .com. Custom rug by Pierre Yovanovitch; pierreyovanovitch.com. PAGE 186: Assis(asy)métrie armchair by Pierre Yovanovitch; pierreyovanovitch .com. Mongolfiera floor lamp by Paola Napoleone; paolanapoleone.com. Pebble tables by Armelle Benoit for Pierre Yovanovitch. PAGE 188: On custom borne by Pierre Yovanovitch;

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pierreyovanovitch.com; Brigadoon linen-blend, in van, by Rogers & Goffigon (T); rogersandgoffigon .com. Sink and fittings by Dornbracht; dornbracht.com. PAGE 189: Custom fireplace and walnut bookshelves by Pierre Yovanovitch; pierre yovanovitch.com. On vintage Axel Einar Hjorth Lovö rocking chair, custom fabric by Samuel Kasten Tisserand; samkasten.com. Vintage Axel Einar Hjorth side table from Modernity; modernity .se. Svend Aage Holm Sørensen floor lamp from Pierre Bergé and Associés; pba-auctions .com. PAGE 190: In atrium, two-piece bench by Pierre Yovanovitch; pierreyovanovitch.com. Vintage Paavo Tynell lamp from Piasa; piasa.fr. In dining room, custom glass globe light fixture by Jeff Zimmermann from R & Co.; r-and-company .com. Dining table and chairs by Pierre Yovanovitch. PAGE 191: Plaster Cone pendant light by RU Editions; roseuniacke.com. Custom island, cabinetry, and backsplash by Pierre Yovanovitch; pierreyovanovitch.com. Woven-back counter stool by Mark Albrecht Studio; markalbrechtstudio.com. Sink and fittings by Dornbracht; dornbracht.com. Château 150 range by La Cornue; lacornueusa.com. FANCY THAT PAGES 192–199: Architecture by G.P. Schafer

Architect; gpschafer.com. Interiors by Miles Redd; milesredd.com. Landscape design by Elizabeth Everdell Garden Design; everdellgardendesign.com. PAGE 192: Venetian Rococo-style console from John Rosselli Antiques (T); johnrosselliantiques .com. PAGE 193: Custom breakfast table by Larrea Studio; 718-742-6090. On chairs, Bowood cotton, in green gray, by Colefax and Fowler (T); cowtan.com. Custom banquette by Jaydan Interiors; jaydaninteriors.com; in Essence polyurethaneblend faux leather, in fresh water, by Brentano (T); brentanofabrics.com. On walls, Island Raffia wallpaper, in San Marino beige, by Phillip Jeffries (T); phillipjeffries.com. PAGE 194: On walls, Dorchester Park wallpaper by Gracie (T); graciestudio.com. Frances chairs by Liz O’Brien Editions; lizobrien.com; in Althea linen, in light green, by Lee Jofa (T); leejofa.com. Curtains of Jane silk taffeta, in medium green, by Christopher Hyland (T); christopherhyland.com; with Délicat silk tassel fringe, in green, by Samuel & Sons (T); samuelandsons.com. PAGE 195: On walls, Linda’s Garden wallpaper by Gracie (T); graciestudio.com. Lamp from John Rosselli Antiques (T); johnrosselliantiques.com. On floors, paintwork by Chris Pearson; chrispearsonfloors.com. PAGES 196–97: On walls, Satin La Tour cotton-blend, in blue, by Brunschwig & Fils (T); brunschwig.com. On armchairs (at left) and pillows (at left and right), Lotus Garden linen by Schumacher (T); fschumacher.com. On stools and pillows (at left and right), Jaguar Velours Soie silk velvet, in natural, by Clarence House (T); clarencehouse .com. Banquette by Luther Quintana Upholstery; lqupholstery.com; in Velludo Seda silk, in toast, by Décor de Paris (T); decordeparis.com; with Rouen rayon-blend tassel fringe by Samuel & Sons (T); samuelandsons.com. Antique Chinese cocktail table (at left) from Lee Calicchio; leecalicchioltd .com. On chairs (at right), Tassinari & Chatel Velours Uni silk, in turquoise, by Scalamandré (T); scalamandre.com. Fauteuil by Todd Alexander Romano; toddalexanderromano.com; in Rayure Marionettes silk, in brun/blue, by Clarence House (T). PAGE 198: In foyer, on stairs, Fordham wool carpet and runner, in cameo, by Patterson Flynn Martin (T); pattersonflynnmartin.com. On bench, Montespan Satin cotton blend, in espresso, by Lee Jofa (T); leejofa.com. On walls, Fowler Pink paint by Farrow & Ball; farrow-ball.com. Mini Bridget Weave abacá rug by Patterson Flynn Martin (T). In bathroom, Pembroke Stripe wallpaper, in beige on white, by Donghia (T); donghia.com. Towels by Matouk; matouk.com. PAGE 199: On canopy and exterior and interior bed curtains by David Haag Workroom; davidhaag.com; Dundee linens, in ceramic and birch, by Clarence House (T); clarencehouse.com. Curtains by David Haag Workroom; of Dundee linen, in bubble gum, by Clarence House (T); with Coeur Brush viscose fringe, in canton blue, by Brunschwig & Fils (T); brunschwig.com. Headboard by Jaydan Interiors; jaydaninteriors.com; covered in Tonga Leopard linen blend, in blue, by Brunschwig & Fils (T). Swedish Gustavian desk from 1stdibs; 1stdibs .com. Bed linens by Leontine Linens; leontinelinens.com. On walls, Shanghai wallpaper by Sonia’s Place; sonias-place.com. Erica wool rug by Stark (T); starkcarpet.com.

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last word

Sea Change At Manhattan’s hottest new restaurant, the Lobster Club—set in the Seagram Building’s basement—AD100 Hall of Famer Peter Marino (top left) has made his mark on every last design detail, from the punchy colors and robust materials down to the dishware and waitstaff uniforms. Still, his is not the only creative force you’ll feel as you dine. Paint-splattered floor tiles nod to Jackson Pollock, abstract sculptures to Pablo Picasso. Paeans to Mies van der Rohe also abound, among them bronze partitions and railings that mimic the Seagram’s façade and a floor plan that echoes the iconic Pool Room. As part of his research, Marino delved deep into the tower’s history, consulting Philip Johnson’s drawings for the original subterranean restaurant, destroyed by a 1995 kitchen fire. “I know Philip would love it here now,” Marino says, adding of the overall blend of references: “Mixed salads are always more interesting to look at than pea soup.” thelobsterclub.com. —SAM COCHRAN

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