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THE INTERNATIONAL DESIGN AUTHORITY JUNE 2018

LIEV SCHREIBER

INSIDE THE STAR’S NEW YORK LOFT

WEEKEND READY

COUNTRY HOUSES FROM CARMEL TO NANTUCKET + SUMMER SHOPPING: POOL, BEACH, BARBECUE


THE INTERNATIONAL DESIGN AUTHORITY JUNE 2018


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CONTENTS june

108 KEVIN WENDLE’S HOUSE ON THE RHODE ISLAND COAST.

100 A MARCEL BREUER– DESIGNED HOME IN NEW YORK’S HUDSON VALLEY.

22 Editor’s Letter 24 Object Lesson On its 50th anniversary, Verner Panton’s eponymous chair still feels ahead of the curve.

Anna Karlin creates the atelier of her dreams in New York’s Chinatown . . . Bill Ryall devises an eco-friendly house that can withstand the worst . . . Inside Amanda Brooks’s charming Cotswolds boutique . . . The best outdoor furniture, accessories, and entertaining essentials . . . Textile designer Zak Profera’s new studio . . . Suzanne Kasler’s latest for Hickory Chair . . . Fort Street Studio’s limited-edition carpets . . . and more!

72 Rock Star Designer Jamie Bush reimagines a coastal California landmark as a dazzling home for a young family. BY MALLERY ROBERTS MORGAN

82 New York Story Liev Schreiber enlists Ashe + Leandro to turn his old bachelor pad into a home for him and his two sons. BY MARK ROZZO

88 Petal Pusher Flowered fabrics and floral paintwork bloom inside a Nantucket retreat cultivated by Markham Roberts. BY MITCHELL OWENS (CONTINUED ON PAGE 16)

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116 DELAVAN LAKE IN WISCONSIN.

FROM TOP: STEPHEN KENT JOHNSON; FRANÇOIS DISCHINGER; BJÖRN WALLANDER

29 Discoveries


CONTENTS june

88 A SNAPPY SITTING ROOM IN A HOUSE ON NANTUCKET.

100 History Boys Marcel Breuer fanatics Ken Sena and Joseph Mazzaferro revive a little-known gem in upstate New York. BY BARRY BERGDOLL

104 Confronting the Past In Montgomery, Alabama, a new memorial and museum bear witness to the brutal legacy of racial injustice in America. BY FRED A. BERNSTEIN

108 Sea Change Designer Giancarlo Valle rejuvenates a New England mansion for the family of entrepreneur Kevin Wendle. BY MAYER RUS

116 Scout’s Honor An energetic Chicago couple transform a woebegone Wisconsin Boy Scout camp into the ultimate getaway. BY SHAX RIEGLER

124 Resources The designers, architects, and products featured this month.

126 Last Word Madison Cox’s never-before-seen pavilion at the legendary Villa Oasis.

VILLA OASIS IS ONE HIGHLIGHT ON A NEW TOUR OF MARRAKECH, HOSTED BY AD AND INDAGARE; FOR DETAILS, VISIT INDAGARE.COM/AD.

FOLLOW @ARCHDIGEST

LIEV SCHREIBER, IN A RAG & BONE SWEATER AND JEANS, IN HIS MANHATTAN LOFT. “NEW YORK STORY,” PAGE 82. PHOTOGRAPHY BY DOUGLAS FRIEDMAN. STYLED BY MICHAEL REYNOLDS. FASHION STYLING BY CHLOE HARTSTEIN.

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A NANTUCKET LIVING ROOM DESIGNED BY MARKHAM ROBERTS. “PETAL PUSHER,” PAGE 88. PHOTOGRAPHY BY NELSON HANCOCK.

A CONNECTICUT GARAGE—AN OUTBUILDING OF PHILIP JOHNSON’S 1953 WILEY HOUSE— BY ARCHITECTURE FIRM ROGER FERRIS + PARTNERS. PHOTOGRAPH BY PAÚL RIVERA.

SUBSCRIPTIONS FOR SUBSCRIPTION INFORMATION GO TO ARCHDIGEST.COM, CALL 800-365-8032, OR EMAIL SUBSCRIPTIONS@ ARCHDIGEST.COM. DIGITAL EDITION DOWNLOAD AT ARCHDIGEST.COM/APP.

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TOP LEFT: NELSON HANCOCK; INSET: MIGUEL FLORES-VIANNA

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THE INTERNATIONAL DESIGN AUTHORITY VOLUME 75 NUMBER 6

EDITOR IN CHIEF

Amy Astley CREATIVE DIRECTOR David Sebbah EDITORIAL OPERATIONS DIRECTOR Diane Dragan EXECUTIVE EDITOR Shax Riegler EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, DIGITAL Keith Pollock INTERIORS & GARDEN DIRECTOR Alison Levasseur STYLE DIRECTOR Jane Keltner de Valle FEATURES DIRECTOR Sam Cochran DECORATIVE ARTS EDITOR Mitchell Owens WEST COAST EDITOR Mayer Rus

FEATURES SENIOR DESIGN WRITER Hannah Martin DEPUTY EDITOR, DIGITAL Kristen Flanagan SPECIAL PROJECTS DIRECTOR, DIGITAL

Sydney Wasserman ENTERTAINMENT EDITORS

Carson Griffith (Digital), Maxwell Losgar DESIGN EDITOR, DIGITAL Amanda Sims EDITOR, DIGITAL David Foxley HOME EDITOR, DIGITAL Lindsey Mather DESIGN REPORTER, DIGITAL Hadley Keller ASSOCIATE FEATURES EDITOR, DIGITAL Nick Mafi EDITORIAL ASSISTANTS Elizabeth Fazzare, Katherine McGrath (Digital), Carly Olson ASSISTANT TO THE EDITOR IN CHIEF Annie Ballaine

MARKET MARKET DIRECTOR Parker Bowie Larson ASSOCIATE EDITOR, MARKET Madeline O’Malley PRODUCTION PRODUCTION DIRECTOR Kevin Roff EDITORIAL OPERATIONS MANAGER Nick Traverse PRODUCTION MANAGER Alexandra Kushel PRODUCTION ASSOCIATE Sarah Rath COPY AND RESEARCH COPY DIRECTOR Joyce Rubin RESEARCH DIRECTOR Andrew Gillings COPY MANAGER Adriana Bürgi RESEARCH MANAGER Leslie Anne Wiggins

CREATIVE DESIGN DIRECTOR Natalie Do VISUALS DIRECTOR Michael Shome VISUALS EDITOR, DIGITAL Melissa Maria ASSOCIATE VISUALS EDITOR

Gabrielle Pilotti Langdon JUNIOR DESIGNER Megan Spengler

COMMUNICATIONS + EDITORIAL PROJECTS EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, PUBLIC RELATIONS

Erin Kaplan DIRECTOR, EDITORIAL PROJECTS

Jeffrey C. Caldwell CONTRIBUTORS CONTRIBUTING EDITOR AT LARGE

Michael Reynolds

VIDEO PRODUCERS

Vince Cross, Matt Duckor, Sara Snyder, Chauncey McDougal Tanton, Rusty Ward ARCHDIGEST.COM SOCIAL MEDIA DIRECTOR Rachel Coleman ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR, AUDIENCE DEVELOPMENT

Geneva S. Thomas SOCIAL MEDIA MANAGER Jessica Gatdula PRODUCT MANAGER Joseph Cera ANALYST, DIGITAL INTELLIGENCE Kevin Wu

CONTRIBUTING INTERNATIONAL PROJECTS EDITOR

Carlos Mota CONTRIBUTING STYLE EDITORS

Lawren Howell, Carolina Irving CONTRIBUTING EDITORS

Amanda Brooks, Gay Gassmann CONTRIBUTORS Fabiola Beracasa Beckman, Derek Blasberg, Peter Copping, Sarah Harrelson, Pippa Holt, Patricia Lansing, Colby Mugrabi, Carlos Souza EDITOR EMERITA Paige Rense Noland

ARTISTIC DIRECTOR

Anna Wintour

CHIEF BUSINESS OFFICER

Craig Kostelic VP REVENUE Jeff Barish VP REVENUE Beth Lusko-Gunderman VP REVENUE Jordana Pransky DIGITAL GENERAL MANAGER Eric Gillin VP MARKETING Bree McKenney VP FINANCE & BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT Barbra Perlstein SENIOR DIRECTOR, SALES OPERATIONS Mary Beth Dwyer EXECUTIVE STRATEGY DIRECTOR Hayley Russman

ADVERTISING NEW YORK SALES DIRECTORS Jeannie Livesay, Melissa Goolnick Schwartz EXECUTIVE ACCOUNT DIRECTORS Nina B. Brogna, Francesca Coia,

Catherine Dewling, Wendy Gardner Landau, Priya Nat, Kathryn Nave SENIOR ACCOUNT DIRECTOR Emily Harris ACCOUNT DIRECTORS Sarah Coyle, Katie Tomlinson, Colleen Tremont ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES Alexandra Segalas, Sean Walter FINANCE & BUSINESS OPERATIONS DIRECTOR, FINANCE & BUSINESS OPERATIONS Katie Balin SENIOR BUSINESS DIRECTOR Jennifer Crescitelli BUSINESS MANAGER Jessica Reinhardt DIGITAL SALES OPERATIONS MANAGERS, SALES OPERATIONS

Alexandra Niemeyer

Isabel Kierencew,

SENIOR ACCOUNT MANAGER Jacquie Pelusi ACCOUNT MANAGERS Jena Johansen, Robert Nolan,

Brooke Pischke, Timothy Samson, Mandy Schmidt ASSOCIATE ACCOUNT MANAGER Lena Perlmutter SALES PLANNERS Nicole Bramble, Emily Byerly, Hallie Drapkin, Heather Dring, Nicole Guzman, Nick Papa, Adam Zakrzewski EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT TO CHIEF BUSINESS OFFICER Olivia Marder SALES ASSOCIATES Alessia Bani, Samantha Benedict, Paulina Carvajal, Catherine Civgin, Malia Estrada, Hannah Neuman, Samantha Pinto, Serena Sheth, Sarah Tinoco BRAND MARKETING EXECUTIVE DIRECTORS, BRAND MARKETING

Tara Melvin

Shelly Johnson,

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, MARKETPLACE STRATEGY Barri Trott DIRECTORS, MARKETING Dina Biblarz, Christin DeMaria,

Emma Greenberg, Casey McCarthy, Shannon Muldoon DIRECTOR, MARKETPLACE STRATEGY Brittany Bakacs ASSOCIATE DIRECTORS, BRAND MARKETING Jackie Albastro, Caitlin DiLena, Tom Heiss, Elena Korn, Caroline Luppescu, Nadine Rivoldi, Lucas Santos, Jessica Sisco, Arisara Srisethnil

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Alexis Aliquo, Alex Bair, Michele Bastin, Joshua McDonald, Justine Parker, Jordan Schaefer ASSOCIATES, BRAND MARKETING Chelsea Horhn, Marybeth Lawrence, Hillary Miller, Lauren Pernal EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, EXPERIENCE Benjamin Peryer ASSOCIATE DIRECTORS, EXPERIENCE Jennifer Mills, Joshua Robertson ASSOCIATE, EXPERIENCE Jennifer Lanzarone MANAGERS, BRAND MARKETING

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, COMMUNICATIONS, THE LIFESTYLE COLLECTION

Molly Pacala COMMUNICATIONS MANAGER, THE LIFESTYLE COLLECTION

Savannah Jackson CREATIVE SENIOR ART DIRECTOR Phuong Nguyen ART DIRECTORS Tanya DeSelm, Marisa Ehrhardt SENIOR DESIGNER Corinne Baptiste DESIGNERS Elena Scott, Stephanie Stanley SENIOR PRODUCER Julie Sullivan DIRECTOR OF CREATIVE CONTENT PRODUCTION Dana Kravis CONTENT DIRECTOR Kate Marsanico BRANCH OFFICES LOS ANGELES SENIOR ACCOUNT DIRECTOR Melissa Lee 323-965-3455 EXECUTIVE ACCOUNT DIRECTOR Elizabeth Murphy 323-965-3578 SAN FRANCISCO / NORTHWEST ACCOUNT DIRECTOR Conor O’Donnell 415-276-5158 MIDWEST VP, REVENUE Pamela Quandt 312-649-3526 EXECUTIVE ACCOUNT DIRECTORS Ashley Connor 312-649-3512, Jenna Ernster 312-649-3549 DETROIT EXECUTIVE ACCOUNT DIRECTOR Anne Green 248-765-9126 FLORIDA / SOUTHEAST / CARIBBEAN Peter M. Zuckerman, Z-MEDIA 305-532-5566 FLORIDA Esther Jackson, MDS INC 305-373-3700 SOUTHWEST Lewis Stafford Company 972-960-2889 CANADA Dodd Media Group 905-885-0664 MEXICO John Hillock 212-286-2035 ASIA Marcia Kline +62-813-60896848 UK Juliet Fetherstonhaugh +44-20-7349-7111, Steve Middleton, SMS LTD +44(0)7710-128464 MIDDLE EAST Skyscale Media Services +971-42-42-4579 INDIA Saurabh Wig 647-679-6005 EUROPE, FASHION/LUXURY Rula Al Amad +39-02-6558-4237

FRANCE/SWITZERLAND/SPAIN, WATCHES/HOME FURNISHINGS Laurent Bouaziz 33-065-2227801 ITALY, HOME FURNISHINGS MIA S.R.L. Concessionaria Editoriale +39-02-805-1422 PUBLISHED BY CONDÉ NAST PRESIDENT & CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER Robert A. Sauerberg, Jr. CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER David E. Geithner CHIEF REVENUE & MARKETING OFFICER

Pamela Drucker Mann CHIEF EXPERIENCE OFFICER Josh Stinchcomb EVP / CHIEF DIGITAL OFFICER Fred Santarpia CHIEF PEOPLE OFFICER JoAnn Murray CHIEF COMMUNICATIONS OFFICER Cameron R. Blanchard EVP / CONSUMER MARKETING Monica Ray EVP / RESEARCH & ANALYTICS Stephanie Fried HEAD CREATIVE DIRECTOR Raúl Martinez CONDÉ NAST ENTERTAINMENT PRESIDENT Dawn Ostroff EVP / CHIEF OPERATING OFFICER Sahar Elhabashi EVP / MOTION PICTURES Jeremy Steckler EVP / ALTERNATIVE TV Joe LaBracio EVP / CNÉ STUDIOS Al Edgington SVP / SCRIPTED PROGRAMMING Jon Koa CONDÉ NAST INTERNATIONAL CHAIRMAN AND CHIEF EXECUTIVE PRESIDENT Wolfgang Blau

Jonathan Newhouse

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editor’s letter

2

3

1

“I know of a cure for everything: saltwater… sweat, or tears, or the salt sea.” —Isak Dinesen Although we edit each issue of AD with a distinct preference for a lot of visual variety, in the June edition (themed “country houses and weekend escapes”) I really just want to see water—water everywhere. I know I’m not unique in this summertime desire, so the exceptional houses featured this month deliver glorious aquatic views and, accordingly, Dinesen-esque catharsis for their fortunate owners and our readers. But H2O is where the similarities end, as each of these residences is wholly sui generis. Perched on a rocky outcropping in the Pacific in Carmel, California, architect Frank Wynkoop’s 1951 Butterfly House marries classic midcentury modernism with completely current interior design. A grand 1903 “cottage” on the Atlantic in historic Watch Hill, Rhode Island, is now laden with an unexpected trove of

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contemporary creations by of-the-moment designers Faye Toogood, Rick Owens, Apparatus, and Dimore Studio. We visit a once-neglected Marcel Breuer masterpiece with sweeping Hudson River views that has been lovingly restored by the new owners. (The architect, who considered it one of his finest works, would approve.) Elsewhere, a traditional shingled beauty at the edge of a salt marsh in Nantucket is surely one of the prettiest houses AD has ever photographed; and we wrap up our tour at a onetime Boy Scout camp on a Wisconsin lake that’s now the dreamy getaway for one lucky Chicago family. But if you prefer to stay on dry land, step into the loft of television’s favorite fixer, Liev Schreiber, and experience old-school New York City—a totally different kind of cure.

1. THE BUTTERFLY HOUSE IN CARMEL, CA; 2. THE ZAPF-JOSEPHSON HOUSE IN ORIENT, NY; 3. A VIEW OF THE BEACH IN WATCH HILL, RI; 4. A MARCEL BREUER HOUSE IN CROTON-ONHUDSON, NY; 5. AT AN NYC EVENT; 6. BEDROOM WITH A VIEW IN NANTUCKET.

4

5

AMY ASTLEY Editor in Chief @amytastley

1. DOUGLAS FRIEDMAN; 2. MARTYN THOMPSON; 3. STEPHEN KENT JOHNSON; 4. FRANÇOIS DISCHINGER; 5. MAX LAKNER/BFA/REX/SHUTTERSTOCK; 6. NELSON HANCOCK

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object lesson

THE STORY BEHIND AN ICONIC DESIGN

One Fell Swoop On its 50th anniversary, Verner Panton’s eponymous plastic chair still feels ahead of the curve 24

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HENRI DEL OLMO/ELLIA ASCHERI/BASSET IMAGES

VERNER PANTON’S SWOOPING SEATS MEET RUGGED STONE WALLS AT ARCHITECT LUCA ZANAROLI’S HOUSE IN PUGLIA.


object lesson

1

1. PANTON CHAIRS SURROUND A REFECTORY TABLE IN BROOKLYN. 2. THE DESIGNER IN 1994. 3. A PANTON CHAIR BY VITRA. 4. A PANOPLY

OF PANTONS BRIGHTENS THE BREAKFAST ROOM OF ASH AND NIROUPA SHAH’S LOS ANGELES HOME, DECORATED BY LAURA ADAMS.

t was postwar Europe, and a new world power had emerged on the scene that would change the way people lived: plastic. Experimental Danish designer Verner Panton—fascinated with the progressive polymer that could be molded into any shape and mass-produced—set his sights on a fantasy: a chair made in one piece. The challenge? Finding someone who could produce it. “Fifteen to 20 manufacturers have tried it but have all rejected the project for different reasons,” Panton told Rolf Fehlbaum, of Swiss manufacturer Vitra, in 1963. They agreed to take on the task. Four years and ten prototypes later, a limited run of what became known as the Panton chair—a cantilevered seat in laminated, fiberglass-reinforced polyester—was debuted at the Cologne Furniture Fair. Though the chair became an immediate icon, its composition was never static. Panton and Vitra tirelessly experimented with new materials in pursuit of utmost durability and simplicity of production, oscillating from polyurethane foam to polystyrene (it was thinner but required ribs under the seat for support), back to polyurethane foam, and finally to today’s most popular rendition—a flexible, durable, but more matte polypropylene, which hit the market in 1999, just a year after Panton’s death. A new polypropylene version goes for $310; the polyurethane foam, $1,675. Through November, in honor of the design’s 50th anniversary, Vitra has released it in chrome ($2,375) and glow-in-the-dark ($2,125). “Big quantities were produced from the beginning,” explains Eckart Maise, the chief design officer at Vitra. “It’s not a chair that will cost four or five digits.” But that makes it an interesting acquisition for buyers of all budgets, who can seek out strange hues or early, clunkier editions that boast serious cred despite slight material disadvantages. “I try to find the odd ones,” says Niklas Maupoix, a Swedish collector and photojournalist who lives with nearly 1,500 Panton works (including nine Panton chairs) and is a connoisseur of seats made before 1999. “Ones that are shiny, thick, or in strange colors like beige or dark green are more desirable.” vitra.com —HANNAH MARTIN

I

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3

4

1. PAUL RAESIDE; 2. HEINER SCHMITT, CH-BASEL/COURTESY OF VERNER-PANTON.COM; 3. COURTESY OF VITRA; 4. TREVOR TONDRO/OTTO

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MAKEUP BY NATALIA LÓPEZ DE QUINTANA

EDITED BY SAM COCHRAN

AT HER NEW CHINATOWN SPACE IN MANHATTAN, DESIGNER ANNA KARLIN PERCHES ON A HANDCARVED BENCH BENEATH SCULPTURAL GLYPH LIGHT FIXTURES.

DISCOVERIES

THE BEST IN CULTURE, DESIGN, AND STYLE

In Her Element New York–based designer Anna Karlin designs the atelier and showroom of her dreams in Chınatown PH OTOG R A PH Y BY JASON SCHMIDT

AR C H DI G E S T. CO M

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DISCOVERIES 3 4

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1. KARLIN’S DIMPLE LAMP. 2. A SPEAR LIGHT HANGS ABOVE A STEEL DINING TABLE AND STOOLS IN THE SHOWROOM. 3. A BRASS CANDLEHOLDER. 4. CURVED-STEEL CHAISE. 5. SHELVES OF MATERIAL EXPERIMENTS IN THE STUDIO.

tepping into a vacant storefront in Manhattan last fall, Anna Karlin saw pure potential. Forget that the Chinatown space had fire damage, bad plumbing, and no proper electricity; she zeroed in on what it could become. “I’ve learned to trust my instincts,” the English-born designer reflects just six months later as she puts the finishing touches on her tailor-made new studio and showroom. It was impulse, after all, that drove Karlin to quit her first job, at a big-time London design firm in 2006, just two days in; impulse that, four years later, nudged her across the Atlantic to Manhattan to set up her own art-direction firm; and impulse that prodded her to create a line of furniture in 2012. Each risk produced reward: Her art-direction business has landed clients like Adidas, Lululemon, and Fendi. And her product line—which started with sleek glassware, a hoop-shaped light, and some chess-piece stools—has captivated the design world. Soon her starter studio downtown was bursting at the seams.

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“I needed someplace where I could communicate what’s going on inside my head,” says Karlin, whose practice now ranges from big-picture branding and interior-design initiatives to the fine jewelry that she launched last year. The Chinatown space needed work, but the self-taught designer took the gut reno in stride, refreshing the bones while adding touches of her own like a plaster banister and her dream English country kitchen. “I’m finishing up these lamp shades,” she says, gesturing to a cluster of ceramic flush mounts. Marked only by a brass A embedded into a concrete step, the deep-plum-lacquered storefront now welcomes visitors into a space that Karlin describes as “wabi-sabi meets Shaker.” A simple maple bench sits below organically shaped lights (sculpted in clay, cast in bronze) that hang on coat pegs. In the studio, dining tables serve as desks for her team, and open shelves are filled with material tests. “It’s like a painter’s palette,” she explains of the geometric wooden totems, slumpy bits of ceramic, and blown-glass orbs. Back in the showroom, realized furnishings in brass, marble, and glass mingle with a sprinkling of Gustavian antiques from nearby gallery Dienst + Dotter. Karlin is keen to partner with other designers and dealers to showcase works alongside her own. “It’s a way to say to our clients, ‘This is our taste,’ ” she explains. You could say that’s something she’s finally starting to hammer out. After dabbling in a mix of silhouettes and styles, Karlin’s come to a place that is honed and mature. “I feel like I’m truly learning what my voice is,” she says. “It took years to create, but now I have this world of my own.” annakarlin.com —HANNAH MARTIN

1., 3. & 4.: COURTESY OF ANNA KARLIN

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STYLISH DESIGN MEETS LEGENDARY PERFORMANCE

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DISCOVERIES architecture

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Rise and Shine

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On a waterfront stretch of Long Island, architect Bill Ryall devises an elegant, eco-friendly house to withstand the worst

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hen a New York couple—she’s an arts entrepreneur; he’s a high school counselor—bought 15 waterfront acres on the North Fork of Long Island, they envisioned a single-story house with outdoor access from every room. But their architect, Bill Ryall of Ryall Sheridan Architects, wanted to protect the house from the next Sandy-like storm and to give the couple expansive views of nearby waterways and islands. “So I ordered a 12-foot ladder from the hardware store and had it delivered to the site,” says Ryall. When his clients climbed up and saw the newly revealed vistas, they were, as the

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1. ELEVATED ABOVE THE FLOODPLAIN, THIS LONG ISLAND HOUSE, BY RYALL SHERIDAN ARCHITECTS, IS PROTECTED FROM STORM SURGES. 2. THE POOL SITS WITHIN A MEADOW OF NATIVE GRASSES.

P HOTOGRAP HY BY GI EV ES A N DE R S O N


DISCOVERIES architecture

1. FLOOR-TOCEILING WINDOWS BATHE THE KITCHEN WITH NATURAL LIGHT WHILE FRAMING SCENIC VIEWS; WOLF RANGE. 2. WILDFLOWERS AND GRASSES FLOURISH ON THE 15-ACRE PROPERTY.

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“If a house is going to relate to the site, it can’t be a formulaic box that you plop down.” —Bill Ryall husband puts it, “blown away.” They gave him the go-ahead to raise much of the house on stilts. Longtime North Forkers, the couple chose Ryall after seeing the house he designed for himself and his husband, Barry Bergdoll, the architectural historian and MoMA curator. Ryall’s projects aren’t pristine forms; they seem to be organized informally. “If a house is going to relate to the site, it can’t be a formulaic box that you plop down,” says Ryall. What he built for the couple is far from symmetrical. Its form follows interior functions—and captures the best views. But if there’s a casual quality to Ryall’s design, there is nothing nonchalant about the detailing of the house. Ryall dropped the sills of the sliding glass doors below the floor level, so from inside “you’re just seeing glass, not a window frame. It feels like you’re just floating in the landscape.” A spectacular skylight turns a shower into an otherworldly aerie, all the more so with its walls painted a yellow used by Le Corbusier. “I like bright colors but in confined spaces,” says Ryall, who otherwise worked with white oak and gray concrete. And even though he elevated

INTERIOR: TY COLE

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DISCOVERIES architecture DEBUT

FEELING THE PULLS Balancing old and new has long been a forte of designer Richard Mishaan, who has now partnered with SA Baxter to create his first line of architectural hardware. Inspirations range from Art Deco cuff links to ancient Chinese cloisonné. Says Mishaan, “The process reminded me of Florence, with all the jewelers working by hand on the Ponte Vecchio.” sabaxter.com —ELIZABETH FAZZARE 1

the house, he didn’t shortchange its connection to its setting, regrading the property just enough to let each of the guest bedrooms open directly into the garden. The screened porch—Ryall always includes one if he can—measures about 275 square feet and contains a fireplace that makes it usable much of the year. A student of passive-house standards, the European ways of keeping energy use to a bare minimum, Ryall applied their lessons to the house: He specified triple-glazed windows and installed a high-tech building wrap beneath the wooden sheathing. (He compares the insulation to athletic clothes that breathe while keeping moisture out.) And he installed a system that in winter exhausts air from the house, uses it to heat up fresh air, then pumps that outside air into the house—doing the same with cool air in summer. Thanks to constant circulation, “it’s never stuffy, even with the windows closed,” says Ryall, noting that the system uses far less energy than conventional climate control. But he wasn’t trying to prove a point with the green features. “It’s just the way every house should be.” —FRED A. BERNSTEIN

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1. A FLORIDA HOME BY RICHARD MISHAAN. 2. & 3. HIS NEW SA BAXTER DOORKNOBS WITH TURN KEYS IN BRASS WITH DIAMOND KNURLING AND AMETHYST CABOCHONS (LEFT) AND NICKEL WITH HUNTER-GREEN ENAMEL (RIGHT).

1. COURTESY OF RICHARD MISHAAN; 2. & 3. GEORGE ROSS

THE ELEVATED STRUCTURE WAS BUILT USING EUROPEAN PASSIVE-HOUSE TECHNIQUES.


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DISCOVERIES shops 1

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3 5

Country Girl American expat Amanda Brooks brings her singular style to the Cotswolds 4

1. AMANDA BROOKS IN THE OFFICE AT HER NEW COTSWOLDS BOUTIQUE. SHE WEARS A HESPERIOS DRESS AND CABANA X LE MONDE BERYL SHOES; ATELIER VIME WICKER PEDESTAL AND VASE. 2. HER LATEST BOOK. 3. VLADIMIR KANEVSKY FLOWERS; ROYAL TUDOR WARE BOWLS. 4. HER COUNTRY-CHIC FILE CABINET. 5. A PERSONALIZED PLATE BY LUKE EDWARD HALL.

P HOTOGRAP HY BY JAM I E S TO K E R

HAIR BY RACHAEL CAPOCCI; FLOWERS BY SILKA RITTSON THOMAS OF THE TUKTUK FLOWER STUDIO; BOOK: COURTESY OF PENGUIN RANDOM HOUSE

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eople kept saying, ‘Write a book,’ but I still didn’t know anything about anything,” says Amanda Brooks, the former Barneys New York fashion director who married an Englishman in 2001 and, 17 years and two children later, immersed herself in her husband’s native Cotswolds. “I had no focus other than my Instagram [@amandacbrooks].” Today Brooks, known as Amanda Cutter in her Manhattan days, is passionately, proselytizingly rural. Out this month is her book Farm from Home: A Year of Stories, Pictures, and Recipes from a City Girl in the Country (Blue Rider Press). Think A Year in Provence sans espadrilles. There’s a brick-and-mortar component, too: Cutter Brooks, a smart little style Mecca, opens this month in a 16th-century building in Stow-onthe-Wold, not far from Fairgreen Farm (AD, September 2016), the romantic demesne that has been in her husband, Christopher’s, family for generations. “This is the first I’m really working full-time in years, and it feels great,” Brooks says, adding, “I’ve always wanted to run a clothing shop. Cutter Brooks has an English theme but no Wellies— everyone here owns those in spades.” Instead she’s got 1940s Fair Isle sweaters, inviting installations with cottage-chic dinnerware (“I love setting tables”), and contemporary fashion brands (Le Monde Beryl shoes, LSJ recycled vintage clothing, Loretta Caponi nightgowns) edited for country life. “When I moved here I was a total tomboy, but now I’m in skirts and dresses.” The entrepreneurial Brooks is tapping into a Cotswolds renaissance that has led wits to dub the region (80-some miles northwest of London) “Poshtershire.” Michelin-starred restaurants like The Wild Rabbit in Kingham attract roadtripping Londoners, as do Lady Bamford’s Daylesford Farmshop & Café and Soho Farmhouse hotel and private club. “It is so worth coming up on the train for a day or a long weekend,” says Brooks, noting that she’d happily travel hours to see a smart shop. Soon there’ll be even more of a reason to hang out at Cutter Brooks: a garden café where, she says, “You can get a really good cup of coffee and a terrific scone.” cutterbrooks.com —MITCHELL OWENS


The frameless insulated sliding doors by Swiss manufacturer Sky-Frame blend naturally into their surroundings, creating a seamless continuity between indoors and outdoors and blurring the line between where the living space ends and the view begins. SKY-FRAME.COM


DISCOVERIES

SUNSET AT THE HOME OF CAROLINA ZAPF AND JOHN JOSEPHSON, ON LONG ISLAND’S

Beach days, barbecues, basking in the sun— we’ve got you covered for summer’s many pleasures. Here’s our roundup of the best outdoor furniture, accessories, and entertaining essentials. 40

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T H E O T H E R C O N V E R S AT I O N

8 SOFA DESIGNED BY PIERO LISSONI. Photographed at Shore House by Mount Fuji Architects, Japan discover more at cassina.com New York

Washington DC

Los Angeles

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DISCOVERIES SABRE BAMBOO FLATWARE; FROM $26. DIDRIKS.COM

A TABLE SET FOR ALFRESCO DINING BENEATH ZAPF AND JOSEPHSON’S TOWERING CENTURY-OLD AMERICAN ELM.

TIFFANY & CO. EVERYDAY OBJECTS TERRA-COTTA POT; $95 FOR A SET OF TWO. TIFFANY.COM

setting the mood Our favorite grill, glasses, dishware, and more for entertaining en plein air

MARIO LUCA GIUSTI ACRYLIC LENTE HIGHBALL; $22. DEVINECORP.NET

SERENA & LILY GINGHAM NAPKIN; $48 FOR A SET OF FOUR. SERENAANDLILY.COM

THOMAS FUCHS CREATIVE MELAMINE 1/2 & 1/2 DINNER PLATE; $70 FOR A SET OF FOUR. TFC-NYC.COM

ONE KINGS LANE MELAMINE BEACH PLATE BY NATALIE OBRADOVICH; $20 FOR A SET OF FOUR. ONEKINGSLANE.COM

HESTAN DELUXE GRILL; PRICE UPON REQUEST. HESTAN.COM

AERIN FOR WILLIAMS SONOMA MELAMINE FAIRFIELD DINNER PLATE; $15. WILLIAMS-SONOMA.COM

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EXTERIOR: MARTYN THOMPSON; STYLED BY JOCELYNE BEAUDOIN; GLASS: JOHN MANNO; ALL OTHERS COURTESY OF RESPECTIVE COMPANIES

COSCO HOME AND OFFICE PRODUCTS OUTDOOR FOLDING SERVING CART; $63. THEMINE.COM


FAST AS THE LEXUS HYBRID LINE Climb into the sumptuous cabin of the RX 450h or RX 450hL. Rev its 308-combined-horsepower1 3.5-liter V6. Bury the pedal. And smile. Switch it to Sport mode. Sink deeper into its 10-way poweradjustable driver’s seat. Grip its leather-trimmed steering wheel tighter. And smile. Pass a gas station. And another. And another. And smirk. Because when you choose the eiciency of a hybrid and get all the performance and luxury you want in return, it’s smart as h too. The Lexus Hybrids. There’s more to h than just hybrid. INSTANT ACCELERATION2 LUXURIOUS INTERIOR

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Options shown. 1. Ratings achieved using the required premium unleaded gasoline with an octane rating of 91 or higher. If premium fuel is not used, performance will decrease. 2. 2018 Lexus Hybrid base models compared to 2018 Lexus gas base models. ©2018 Lexus


DISCOVERIES FURNITURE BY TEAK WAREHOUSE AT RICKY MARTIN’S BEVERLY HILLS HOUSE. CUSHIONS IN A SUNBRELLA FABRIC; RH CONCRETE CYLINDERS.

sit back and relax From comfy chaises to stylish rockers, perfect seating for catching some rays and feeling the breeze

LUXURY LIVING GROUP WING CHAISE LONGUE; FROM $4,440. LUXURYLIVINGGROUP.COM RH POSITANO LOUNGE CHAIR BY TOAN NGUYEN; $2,395. RH.COM

PAOLA LENTI SHELL POUF; $2,695. DDC NYC.COM

McKINNON AND HARRIS COUPER CLUB CHAIR; TO THE TRADE. MCKINNON HARRIS.COM

DEDON.US

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B&B ITALIA RAY OUTDOOR FABRIC CHAISE LONGUE BY ANTONIO CITTERIO; $2,705. BEBITALIA.COM

EXTERIOR: TREVOR TONDRO; ALL OTHERS COURTESY OF RESPECTIVE COMPANIES

FOR THE 40TH ANNIVERSARY OF JANUS ET CIE, COMPANY FOUNDER AND DRIVING CREATIVE FORCE JANICE FELDMAN HAS INTRODUCED AN EXPANSIVE NEW COLLECTION BY PIERO LISSONI, INCLUDING THIS LOUNGE CHAIR; $3,828. JANUSETCIE.COM


®/™ ©2018 KitchenAid. All rights reserved.

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DISCOVERIES SANTA BARBARA DESIGNS CIRQUE BEVERLY HILLS UMBRELLA; TO THE TRADE. SANTABARBARA DESIGNS.COM

A SEASIDE HOME ON LONG ISLAND, FROM THE BOOK OUT EAST: HOUSES AND GARDENS OF THE HAMPTONS (VENDOME PRESS, 2017).

shore things Towels, tunes, games galore—this season’s must-haves for a blissful day by the beach DESIGN WITHIN REACH DUSEN DUSEN BEACH TOWELS; $85 EACH. DWR.COM

WOLFUM SYBIL TABLETOP BACKGAMMON SET; $220. WOLFUM.COM

LEXON TYKHO 2 RADIO; $65. LEXONUSA.COM

BUSINESS & PLEASURE CO. 2-PIECE CHAIR; $120. BUSINESSAND PLEASURECO.COM

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RALPH LAUREN HOME BAILEY SINGLE WINE TOTE; $495. RALPHLAUREN.COM

EXTERIOR: TRIA GIOVAN; ALL OTHERS COURTESY OF RESPECTIVE COMPANIES

HERMÈS BEACH RACKETS; $890 FOR A SET OF TWO. HERMES.COM


DISCOVERIES showrooms

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The Whole Nine Yards

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W 1. TEXTILE DESIGNER ZAK PROFERA (WITH HIS SIDEKICK, SHINJI) DESKSIDE AT ZAK + FOX’S NEW SHOWROOM. 2. A PINBOARD SHOWCASES SOME DESIGNS FROM THE LATEST COLLECTION.

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hen Zak Profera left his day job to launch a fabric business in 2012, he did what many self-employed New Yorkers do: turned his apartment into an office. “The biggest work space I had was my queen-size bed,” he recalls with a laugh. “I’d sit among a pile of fabric swatches, writing all the product info on the back of each sample.” Six years later, the rising textile talent behind Zak + Fox—which he runs with his Shiba Inu, Shinji— hit the real estate jackpot, moving into the top floor of a glamorous early-20th-century savings-and-loan building on Park Avenue South. “I can’t believe I come to work here every day,” he says of the building, which boasts an old-school gilded elevator (with operator), a spiraling iron staircase, and a rooftop space that Profera can’t wait to get his hands on (an outdoor fabric collection is reportedly in the works). Of course, like most buildings with rich histories, it needed a little TLC. Five decades of thick white

Textile designer Zak Profera and his trusty canine Shinji settle into a smart new studio in Manhattan

paint covered the bronze moldings; bleached pine floorboards hid turn-of-the-century herringbone parquet; and the drop ceiling concealed a large skylight. Renovation done, Profera rolled in racks of his globally inspired textiles—from ocher-hued linens printed with Tibetan dragons and Japanese obi-inspired geometrics to luxurious new additions in velvet, alpaca, and mohair. Shelves are filled with lively, patterned cushions, and his new wool throws (wittily named Yak + Fox) are stocked by the sofa. Profera also put his auction-shopping habit to good use, sprinkling the place with blue-chip vintage furniture, including Gio Ponti sofas and Lehr and Leubert chairs that he’s dressed up in his own textiles. Elsewhere are exotic trinkets from his travels, such as an Igbo spirit-dance costume and an assortment of exotic masks. The best part? It’s all for sale. At 25th Street, the showroom—not unlike its contents—feels like the perfect middle ground between the uptown and downtown design worlds. As a testament to that, Profera’s clients, which run

P HOTOGRAP HY BY GI EV ES A N DE R S O N


DISCOVERIES showrooms 1

the gamut from hip new firms like Damon Liss Design to decorating legend Cullman & Kravis Associates, have already popped in. “We want it to be a one-stop shop,” he explains. “I think the collection is robust enough that you can at least find something here, if not a whole room.” The only thing that isn’t for sale in the nearly 3,000-square-foot space? Profera’s hulking copper partner’s desk. Which is understandable, considering that it once belonged to revered furniture designer Edgar Bartolucci. “It was the first thing I got when I signed the lease,” Profera says, adding with a laugh,

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THINK PIECE

CURVES AHEAD

LOUIS VUITTON’S NEW RIBBON DANCE CHAIR BY ANDRÉ FU (RIGHT).

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For the latest addition to its covetable Objets Nomades collection, Louis Vuitton tapped Hong Kong designer André Fu. His Ribbon Dance chair features an infinity-loop frame of leather-wrapped wood that seats two people in conversation. “It’s important to me to create forums for people to gather and interact,” says Fu. Mission accomplished. louisvuitton.com —JANE KELTNER DE VALLE

2. & 3. COURTESY OF ZAK+FOX, CHAIR: ENRICO UMMARINO/COURTESY OF LOUIS VUITTON MALLETIER; PORTRAIT: ODILE LE MOAL/COURTESY OF LOUIS VUITTON MALLETIER

1. TEXTILE RACKS BY MATT McKAY STAND AMID REUPHOLSTERED VINTAGE FURNISHINGS, ALL FOR SALE. 2. ROTO COTTON. 3. AMITAN JACQUARD.


DISCOVERIES debut 1

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ost people go on trips and bring back souvenirs. Suzanne Kasler comes home with ideas. “I love flea markets, especially spotting a random piece of furniture that could be translated for a room today,” says the Atlanta-based AD100 interior designer, whose latest range of home furnishings for Hickory Chair is born from a deep dive into some of her favorite flea markets, notably Paris’s sprawling Marché aux Puces de Saint-Ouen. As for her use of the word random, the designer cautions that it doesn’t mean thoughtless. “To me, random means a mix, with stained-wood pieces, overscale sofas, a curious little chair,” Kasler explains, noting that her Hickory Chair collection has been christened The Paris Apartment for that very reason. Its eclectic, easygoing spirit references the chic if improvisational decors that have been concocted by French aesthetic movers and shakers she admires, creative types who have eschewed formulaic, follow-the-leader rooms in favor of the quirky, the wonderful, and the individualistic. That, she points out, is how many homeowners on this side of the Atlantic are decorating today.

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Playing Favorites Paris flea-market treasures inspire Suzanne Kasler’s latest for Hickory Chair 52

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1. & 2. EMILY JENKINS FOLLOWILL/COURTESY OF HICKORY CHAIR; 3. & 4. COURTESY OF HICKORY CHAIR

1. PRADO BOOKCASE, PIEDMONT DINING TABLE, AND LAURENT COUNTER STOOLS FROM SUZANNE KASLER’S PARIS APARTMENT COLLECTION FOR HICKORY CHAIR. 2. WORTH DINING TABLE AND WILLOW ARMCHAIR. 3. LOIRE CHAIR. 4. ASTOR SCULPTURAL BOOKEND.


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“Everything in The Paris Apartment has a story.” —Suzanne Kasler

Fine stonework to enhance your home and garden

1. NORMANDY KING BED, MONACO CHESTS, AND JOSEPHINE WING CHAIR. 2. WIMBERLY BENCH, IVY SIDE TABLE, AUBURN SMALL STOOL.

“People want furniture with style,” says the author of the September-release book Suzanne Kasler: Sophisticated Simplicity (Rizzoli), “but they also want to pick and choose to make a decor that’s their own.” In one flea-market booth in Paris, Kasler spotted a vintage parchment-covered cabinet with funky hornshaped feet. By the time her reinterpretation of it emerged from Hickory Chair’s workshops, it had been reduced in height and stretched in width to become a sideboard that stands on tapered feet, an edit that gives the storage unit a bit of Jean-Michel Frank chic. The collection’s dozens of other desirables include an unusual high-backed bench in Sweden’s Gustavian style that delighted Hickory Chair’s woodworkers, a pair of arguably 1960s gondola-back game chairs, and a cocktail table with Arts and Crafts attitude. “Everything in The Paris Apartment has a story,” Kasler explains. Best of all, she points out, everything works with the story you’re already creating. hickorychair.com; suzannekasler.com —MITCHELL OWENS

1. & 2. EMILY JENKINS FOLLOWILL/COURTESY OF HICKORY CHAIR; PORTRAIT: COURTESY OF HICKORY CHAIR

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That low groan wasn’t the branches.

It was the stealthy purr of a jungle cat.

And the shrill songs from overhead? The distant shriek of a prehistoric beast.

A brother’s tall tales turn little eyes large with wonder,

unleashing an explorer’s secret power – to truly see what some can only

imagine

Stay for a little or stay for a lifetime, it never leaves you. Follow our story at palmettobluff.com. For real estate inquiries, call 866-507-6485. For bookings at Montage Palmetto Bluff, 866-452-7062.

Obtain the Property Report required by federal law and read it before signing anything. No federal agency has judged the merits or value, if any, of this property. This does not constitute an offer to sell or a solicitation of any offer to buy where prohibited by law. The complete offering terms are in an offering plan available from sponsor. File no. H-110005


DISCOVERIES debut

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1. STRADA IN BLUE CARPET, ONE OF EIGHT DESIGNS FROM FORT STREET STUDIO’S NEW PROGETTO PASSIONE COLLECTION, DEBUTING IN COLLABORATION WITH SOTHEBY’S THIS MONTH. 2. CANTO IN COLOR RUG. 3. LULU IN LIGHT RUG.

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Watercolored Memories 3

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assion has always been the driving force for Brad Davis and Janis Provisor, the husband-and-wife duo behind Fort Street Studio. Twenty years ago, a trip to Hangzhou, China—a center of the silk industry—led them to design their own floor covering. That whim has since grown into a global carpet empire, with showrooms from New York to Hong Kong. Today the couple continues to travel the world, most recently finding inspiration in Roccantica, Italy, a hilltop community some 40 miles northeast of Rome. After wandering quaint streets, Provisor painted a series of abstract watercolor vignettes, which Davis has subsequently scanned and developed as weavable patterns on a computer. “The watercolor can be the

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end or the beginning,” Provisor says of their improvisational process, the results of which are eight new hand-knotted silk carpets. Titled Progetto Passione, Italian for “passion project,” the limited-edition collection debuts this month at Fort Street Studio’s Manhattan gallery. The exhibition is mounted in collaboration with Sotheby’s—a fitting partner for makers whose work straddles the art-design divide. In perhaps the most painterly carpet, splashes of pink—interwoven with rosy threads of copper—pop against a creamy background. Another rug features jewel-tone X shapes repeated in a grid, their lines bleeding into a deep gray. Says Davis, “We just felt we wanted to do something different, free from any constraints yet still recognizably us.” fortstreetstudio.com —CARLY OLSON

JOHN BIGELOW TAYLOR

Inspired by far-flung travels, Fort Street Studio’s newest carpets are strokes of genius


2 0 1 8 C O L L EC TI O N

furniture | lighting | accessories


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The Debut of Monolith The most recent and perhaps the most commanding invention from Liebherr was debuted at this year’s Kitchen & Bath Industry Show (KBIS). To show off its truly unique design and revolutionary technology, the leader in premium refrigeration teamed up with designer Richard T. Anuszkiewicz to create a functional display of the striking new refrigeration/freezer column, Monolith. Anuszkiewicz’s vision for the Monolith Inception Kitchen was inspired by the product name, which means “formed of a single block of stone.” “This idea can be found throughout the space in crisp, contemporary geometrics and long linear panels,” says Anuszkiewicz. The kitchen also features an Inception Wine Room, which includes Liebherr’s fully integrated wine cabinets as well as infinity mirrors to create the illusion of more space. The most striking piece, without a doubt, is the 84-inch-high Monolith refrigerator/freezer combination with custom-aged bronze panels, leather door pulls, and an interior marked by stainless steel and InfinityLight theater lighting. Virtually silent, the Monolith is a feat of technology that uses sound-absorbing compressors to ensure exact performance and energy efficiency. Users can remotely activate SuperCool and SuperFrost to help preserve the cold chain by temporarily, drastically lowering temperatures. InfinitySwipe is an intuitive touch-control panel featuring a full-color touch and swipe screen, and the optional FridgeCam takes a picture every time the door closes, allowing users to keep an eye on refrigerator contents. THIS IS THE REFRIGERATOR OF YOUR DREAMS. The Monolith Inception Kitchen featured brands include Premier Custom-Built Cabinetry, SUPERIORE ranges, KALLISTA Plumbing, Dekton by Cosentino countertops, Burchette & Burchette Hardwood Floors, Bradley USA Bridget Beari Designs wallpaper, and Grothouse Lumber Custom Wood Surfaces.

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DRAMATICALLY SITED AT THE EDGE OF THE PACIFIC, IN CARMELBY-THE-SEA, CALIFORNIA, THE “BUTTERFLY HOUSE” WAS ORIGINALLY DESIGNED BY ARCHITECT FRANK WYNKOOP IN 1951. FOR DETAILS SEE RESOURCES.


rock star

Designer Jamie Bush reimagines a coastal California landmark as a dazzling home for a young family transplanted from London MALLERY ROBERTS MORGAN DOUGLAS FRIEDMAN STYLED BY MICHAEL REYNOLDS

TEXT BY

PHOTOGRAPHY BY


t

he first time Londoner Hannah Comolli (then Hannah Broke-Smith) visited Northern California, she fell in love with the rugged beauty of the coastline. A few years later, still living in London, she would fall in love again, this time with Kevin Comolli, an American businessman based in the British capital. They quickly discovered a shared passion for the Golden State, and as luck would have it, Kevin’s technology– venture capital firm had a Palo Alto office he visited often. “Each time we would add a few extra days to explore the area,” Hannah recalls. “Increasingly we found it hard to leave.” Eventually the Comollis decamped from London for a new life in Carmel, hard by the Pacific. “We wanted to raise our children outside the noise of big-city life in an area that feels both invigorating and nurturing,” Hannah explains, adding, “There is something about the particularly golden light and blue sky and the smell of the ocean and cypress trees that just fills my soul. Although I was born and raised in England with English parents, California—and in particular Carmel—feels like my true spiritual home.” The couple had long admired architect Frank Wynkoop’s 1951 Butterfly House, so named for the structure’s signature winged roof design. Perched atop a rocky coastal outcropping, the residence was one of only a handful of oceanfront properties in the area. “I never imagined it could be a family home,” Hannah says of its relatively compact footprint of approximately 3,000 square feet. “But the moment we walked into the house I felt overcome with excitement. We knew immediately it was a treasure,” she says. “It feels like you’re living in the most fabulous aquarium, in harmony with the ever-changing seascape and the extraordinary array of marine life just beyond the doorstep.” Determined to respect Wynkoop’s original vision, the Comollis set about finding a designer attuned to the idiosyncratic architecture and spectacular setting. “We interviewed a lot of candidates, but when we met Jamie we were blown away,” Hannah says, describing the couple’s first meeting with Los Angeles–based designer Jamie Bush.

IN THE LIVING ROOM, A RATTAN LOUNGE BY BLACKMAN CRUZ HANGS OPPOSITE A DE SEDE SOFA. THREE-LEGGED SIDE TABLE BY JOHN DICKINSON; VINTAGE SERGIO RODRIGUES CHAIRS WITH MONGOLIAN LAMB BOLSTERS; IMBUIA WOOD COCKTAIL TABLE BY PEDRO PETRY; RUG BY TUFENKIAN.

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CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT HANNAH, KEVIN, AND POODLE PADDINGTON ON THE FRONT DECK. IN THE DAUGHTER’S BEDROOM, A PENDANT BY CHRISTY MANGUERRA HANGS ABOVE A CUSTOM BED BY JAMIE BUSH. THE MASTER BATH IS CLAD IN FLAMED QUARTZITE. TUB BY SIGNATURE HARDWARE WITH WATERMARK FITTINGS; CUSTOM CABINETRY IN STAINED WHITE OAK.

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“I wanted the interiors to celebrate the irregularities of pattern and texture in nature.” —Jamie Bush

ABOVE A BRUTALIST CERAMIC WALL BY ARTIST STAN BITTERS ENCLOSES THE FIREPLACE ON THE POOL PATIO. RATTAN POUFS FROM BONACINA 1889; CHAIRS AND OTTOMANS BY LIKA MOORE FOR BLACKMAN CRUZ; MARBLE COCKTAIL

TABLE FROM GLOBAL VIEWS; TEAK LOUNGES BY RODA. LEFT THE SON’S BEDROOM FEATURES A WICKER CHAIR BY PBTEEN WITH CUSHION AND PILLOW IN A ROBERT ALLEN FABRIC. WALLPAPER BY POTTOK; CUSTOM SHAG RUG BY DECORATIVE CARPETS.


LEFT TWO PENDANTS BY APPARATUS HANG IN THE DINING ROOM. TABLE BY SIGLO MODERNO; HANS WEGNER CHAIRS WITH CUSHIONS OF ZAK + FOX LINEN.

OPPOSITE ON THE FRONT DECK, A BENCH AND STOOL BY ZACHARY A. BORDER A TABLE WITH CERAMIC-TILE INLAY BY BRENT BENNETT. GREENSTAINED CONCRETE CHAIRS BY DESSIN FOURNIR.

Bush likens the restoration to an archaeological dig, with myriad discoveries both good and bad. Along with complex structural issues, the designer uncovered the home’s original steel beams, which had been hidden under drywall. Rather than entombing them again, Bush left the steel members exposed, treating them with a new waxed finish. He also deployed materials that could move seamlessly from indoors to out, including wire-brushed teak and hand-molded bricks chosen both for their aesthetic qualities and for their ability to withstand the coastal climate. Oversize quartzite flagstones were meticulously pieced together to create floors that flow from the interiors through the pool courtyard and onto the driveway. Since the family was downsizing from a much larger home in London, clever planning was essential. “It was like designing a boat—every space had to be considered and used to its maximum potential,” says Kevin. Bush seconds the notion: “We designed an incredible amount of built-ins, hidden drawers, cabinets, and bookcases, every piece elaborately detailed. That kind of craftsmanship takes a lot of time, precision, and, most important, patience.” The interiors are outfitted with hand-troweled plaster walls, carved-stone sinks, custom bronze hardware, and hemp-and-silk rugs, all joined by pedigreed vintage furnishings as well as site-specific commissions from contemporary artisans such as renowned California ceramist Stan Bitters. “Jamie’s great success was marrying midcentury with a contemporary sensibility and the practicality of a family home,” says Hannah. “He also managed to indulge our passion for luxurious furnishings.” “I really love that the house is so compact and very transparent. Sitting at my desk I can see the kids playing in the garden—it creates an intimate family experience,” Kevin notes. Hannah adds, “Our son’s favorite spot is the hanging chair in the great room. The pool is in use almost daily, and the addition “It’s a magical house in a magical spot,” Bush says of the hot tub is especially appreciated after surfing of the landmark architectural gem. “When you’re in in the chilly Pacific.” the living room, you feel like you’re standing on the Ultimately the Comollis look back on their prow of a ship, with fog rolling in, seals swimming by, whales breaching, and pelicans alighting on the rocks. transatlantic and transcontinental shift with deep satisfaction. “This house is so hugely different from It’s mesmerizing.” Bush says his design concept was the homes we created in London and the English based on bringing the rugged, organic, even brutal countryside. The project had many challenges and quality of the shoreline into the look and feel of the interiors. “The essence of midcentury design is about bumps along the way, but the end result speaks to a complete and unwavering commitment to quality and effortless indoor-outdoor living,” he explains. “I preservation,” says Hannah. “We feel very fortunate wanted the interiors to celebrate the irregularities to live here. To us the Butterfly House is a treasure. of pattern and texture in nature. Hannah and Kevin We feel honored to call it home.” really understood the power of that idea.”

“It feels like you’re living in the most fabulous aquarium, in harmony wıth the seascape.” —Hannah Comolli

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A WIRE-BRUSHED TEAK BENCH OFFERS VIEWS OF THE OCEAN FROM THE LIVING ROOM. ISAMU NOGUCHI TABLE LAMP IN FOREGROUND.

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The interiors balance glamour, practicality, and a bit of fun for the kids.” —Jamie Bush


IN THE MEDIA ROOM, A PAIR OF GRAND SPLENDID OTTOMANS SITS BENEATH A CHANDELIER BY JANE HALLWORTH FOR BLACKMAN CRUZ.

LITTLE WHALES WALLPAPER BY GEOFF MCFETRIDGE; $170 PER ROLL. POTTOKPRINTS.COM

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EBONIZED WALNUT BARSTOOLS FROM SIGLO MODERNO OVERLOOK THE KITCHEN’S CUSTOM TEAK CABINETRY BY DESIGNER GRAINS.

Jamie selected furnishings that feel right for a midcentury house but still avoid clichés.” —Hannah Comolli

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SCHREIBER, WEARING A RAG & BONE SWEATER AND JEANS, IN THE KITCHEN OF HIS NOHO LOFT. DOUGLAS-FIR AND BLACK LACQUER CABINETS BY ASHE + LEANDRO; BLACK SOAPSTONE COUNTERS. FASHION STYLING BY CHLOE HARTSTEIN. OPPOSITE IN THE LIVING AREA, A BOOKCASE BY ASHE + LEANDRO SURROUNDS THE TV. FOR DETAILS SEE RESOURCES.


GROOMING BY REIVA CRUZE FOR EXCLUSIVE ARTISTS USING CHANEL PALETTE ESSENTIELLE; HAIR BY CLYDE ELEZI FOR THE DRAWING ROOM NEW YORK

new york story

Liev Schreiber enlists Ashe + Leandro to turn his old bachelor pad into a home for him and his two sons TEXT BY

MARK ROZZO

PHOTOGRAPHY BY

DOUGLAS FRIEDMAN

STYLED BY

MICHAEL REYNOLDS


C

lient-designer communication can be a delicate thing. It doesn’t typically involve quoting “Sprockets.” But in 2016, when Liev Schreiber decided to retool his triplex apartment in Manhattan’s NoHo district, the Saturday Night Live reference just seemed right. The initial brainstorms yielded proposals that struck the actor as “uncomfortably Teutonic,” he says, recounting his lively give-and-take with Ariel Ashe and Reinaldo Leandro, the 30-something principals who head up the AD100 New York design firm Ashe + Leandro. “Like, ‘I know you want to touch my monkey.’ ” Schreiber, of course, nails this line—the accent, the inflection—with diamond-laser accuracy. He couldn’t have found a better audience for it. Ashe’s first design

job was on set at SNL, and her brother-in-law is Seth Meyers. Suffice it to say, she has a sense of humor. More to the point, Ashe and Leandro’s work has an easygoing cool to it; it’s rigorous, but it’s also relaxed, not unlike the duo themselves. So, you don’t want “Sprockets”? OK, no “Sprockets.” Put into practice at Schreiber’s apartment, the Ashe + Leandro approach— modernist yet utterly livable—has yielded something that all three agree is rare in the age of too-tall, tooskinny condo towers and Edison-bulbed brownstone renos. “We wanted it to feel like a real New York space,” Leandro says. And it does. Schreiber knows from real New York spaces. He grew up virtually around the corner, spending a chunk of his boyhood at the corner of 1st and First. “This reminds me of my friends’ lofts down in SoHo when we were kids,” the actor says, settling his sixfoot-three frame into one of the living room’s outsize sofas, which Schreiber already owned. (During the


OPPOSITE IN THE LIVING ROOM, A CUSTOM SOFA AND OTTOMAN BY ASHE + LEANDRO IS UPHOLSTERED IN HOLLAND & SHERRY FABRICS. ABOVE FIREPLACE, PAINTING BY JAN FRANK. RIGHT VINTAGE ITALIAN LEATHER AND LACQUER CHAIRS COMPLEMENT A TABLE BY BCMT CO. IN THE DINING ROOM. PENDANT BY ASHE + LEANDRO.

nine-month renovation, this specimen, too big to get out the door, was wrapped and lashed to the ceiling.) “That, for me, felt like home—something that had art in it and had that kind of rawness and openness.” Schreiber’s place has all of that, in spades. The space itself has some backstory: Starting in the late ’90s, Schreiber cobbled together the three-level, three-bedroom apartment from a couple of units in this circa-1880, redbrick, Neo-Grec industrial building. The Yale Drama grad’s career had taken off following a breakthrough role in Nora Ephron’s Mixed Nuts. Soon enough came Scream (and Scream 2), and an eyeopening turn as Hamlet in 1999 at the Public Theater, just a few blocks away. The bachelor pad, tricked out with help from his older brother, a stonemason, served Schreiber well. After he partnered up with Naomi Watts, in 2005, the place became the stage for a whole new production: family life. (Their sons, Sasha and Kai, are now

ten and nine.) Still, the couple got the itch for a new home. And in 2012, they found digs farther downtown, hiring Ashe and Leandro to do the job (AD, March 2016). When Schreiber and Watts separated, in late 2016, he was determined to create something new from his beloved old NoHo apartment. He felt a real rapport with the designers, so he enlisted them to update the space for his life now. “Liev was very clear that he didn’t want a bachelor pad,” Leandro says. “He wanted a real home, one that catered to family and kids.” So, with no shortage of punchy back-and-forth between client and design team, the bachelor pad grew up. As Schreiber puts it, “They’d do things, and I’d say, ‘You know, I’m not as butch as you think I am! Warm it up!’ ” Ashe admits that the bestubbled actor, with his hulking presence and flair for hard-bitten roles, did seem, at first, “sort of terrifying.” But, she says, she managed to emerge victorious: “We’d bring

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“Liev was very clear that he didn’t want a bachelor pad,” says Reinaldo Leandro. “He wanted a real home, one that catered to family and kids.” new stuff over, and he’d be like, ‘No. Hate it.’ And I’d say, ‘Call me in three days.’ ” The actor may play tough on TV, but we’re talking about a fellow who’s been known to dip into Seneca and Montaigne, who spends quality time with the novelist Jonathan Safran Foer, whose IMDb listing oozes quality, and who is a familiar presence around the neighborhood, walking Woody, his very cute Hurricane Harvey rescue dog, or cycling with his boys. With his mix of well-honed urbanity and street savvy, Schreiber is every bit a New Yorker’s New Yorker. So is the apartment, with its distressed-oak floors, steel staircases, wide-open flow, and old-school galley kitchen with new-school black stone counters and sleek Miele appliances, where Schreiber might offer a visiting friend fresh-baked banana bread and a cup of PG Tips tea. It’s also where he gathers his sons for meals, for their presence is unmistakable here, from the bedrooms outfitted with Prouvé and Eames chairs and Harry Potter wands to the board games and the student nylon-string guitar propped up in the living room.

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Schreiber’s own quarters are a low-key affair, with one indulgence: a walk-in closet, which prompts him to exclaim, “This I thought I would never have!” Up on the top floor, there’s a glassed-in mini gym flooded with light. “This is the room Ray Donovan built,” he jokes. It doubles as a meditation room. (Schreiber spent part of his childhood at an ashram school.) For an apartment overrun by two growing boys, there’s a lot of calm and order. Schreiber likes it that way. “I learned all about order, I think, from playing football in high school,” he says, referring to his days on the team at Brooklyn Tech. That touch of gridiron discipline morphed into the focus Schreiber brings to his craft, his career, his family life, his living space, and his friendships, including the one—powered by “Sprockets” jokes and mutual admiration—with Ashe and Leandro. The process of working to create these reborn digs, comfortable and familiar and yet all new, brings Schreiber back to the excitement of having scored the place 20-some years ago. What he thought then is just as true now: “I never dreamed I would own a place like this.”


CLOCKWISE FROM OPPOSITE IN THE MASTER BEDROOM, ART BY RICHARD FISHMAN HANGS ABOVE AN ASHE + LEANDRO BED. SCHREIBER, WEARING AN ERMENEGILDO ZEGNA SHIRT AND RAG & BONE PANTS, WITH SONS KAI (LEFT) AND SASHA. BARDIGLIO MARBLE SHEATHES THE MASTER BATH; JEAN PROUVÉ CHAIR BY VITRA. IN ONE OF THE BOYS’ ROOMS, RH BED LINENS COVER A DOUGLAS-FIR BUNK BED BY ASHE + LEANDRO. ★ EXCLUSIVE VIDEO: LIEV SCHREIBER AT HOME, ARCHDIGEST.COM.


PETAL PUSHER SYMMETRY RULES IN THE ENTRANCE HALL, WHERE A PAIR OF DELFT-VASE LAMPS AND OBJETS D’ART SIT ON AN ANTIQUE TABLE FROM JOHN ROSSELLI ANTIQUES. OPPOSITE PAINTED PANELS BY BOB CHRISTIAN HANG IN THE LIVING ROOM. FOR DETAILS SEE RESOURCES.

Flowered fabrics and floral paintwork bloom inside a Nantucket retreat cultivated by Markham Roberts TEXT BY

MITCHELL OWENS

PHOTOGRAPHY BY

NELSON HANCOCK


CUSTOM DINING CHAIRS ARE SLIPCOVERED IN A NO. 9 THOMPSON LINEN. PAINTED FLOOR BY BOB CHRISTIAN. OPPOSITE IN THE PANELED LIVING ROOM, A MIX OF PATTERNED AND PRINTED FABRICS COVERS THE CUSTOM SOFA AND PILLOWS. ANTIQUE QUILT.


o

n the hook-shaped Massachusetts isle of Nantucket, at the edge of a wind-ruffled salt marsh that fades away into the rolling Atlantic, sits a house of flowers. Not an address literally embowered by blossoms, mind you (the acreage is still a work in progress), but a smartly shingled affair with rooms that bring to mind a few high-summer herbaceous borders turned outside in. Colorful buds bloom on finely pleated lamp shades and atop a chubby little Napoléon III rope-twist stool. Flowering vines unfurl across the dining room’s crisp box-pleated slipcovers and the living room’s plump skirted sofas. Florets of undetermined origin sprout on walls, ramble up curtains, coil around cushions, effloresce on quilts, and unfold on a boldly stenciled floor. In a guest bedroom, a screen is inset with images of shaggy pink and red chrysanthemums, the polychrome prints taken from the 1890s One Hundred Chrysanthemums series by Japanese master Hasegawa Keika. As in any fertile demesne, there are butterflies (printed), birds (carved, gilded, painted), and even a frog (sculpted).

Given Nantucket’s seafaring industries, there is a fishmonger’s worth of artful shellfish and crustaceans, such as the 19thcentury Palissy-ware variety that scramble up the powderroom walls like a catch on the loose. Then there are the baskets—dozens of them, it seems—exquisitely woven rattan and cane receptacles that have been an island tradition since the 1830s, many of them fashioned by Susan Chase Ottison, scion of a generations-old hand-weaving dynasty. “Location matters—it matters a lot” when it comes to decorating, the house’s Southern-belle occupant says in a bourbon-and-branch drawl. As for the vintage residence she purchased a few years ago, it was precisely what she, a Nantucket regular since a newlywed trip took her there in the late 1960s, had always desired. “I walked straight through the front door, out into the yard, looked at that marsh, and told my son, ‘This house is perfect.’ ” One exquisitely timed pause later, she deadpans, “Then I knocked it down.” AD100 interior designer Markham Roberts explains, “She lived in it for a summer and realized it wasn’t perfect at all.” So his client proceeded to build something authentic, still shingled in the island vernacular, but with two scoops of Southern soul—plus dead-level floors and impressive soundproofing, which the earlier house signally lacked. “A book about Furlow was the inspiration,” she says. That would be Georgia aesthete Furlow Gatewood and One Man’s Folly, a 2014 celebration of rural charm. His signature wood

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ABOVE A STONE PATH LEADS TO A MARSH. ABOVE RIGHT A FLOCK OF PAINTED-WOOD SHOREBIRDS BY PAT GARDNER PERCH

ABOVE THE GUEST BATH’S KALDEWEI TUB. LEFROY BROOKS TUB FILLER; STAR LANTERN BY VAUGHAN.

When it comes to decorating, the lady of the house drawls, “location matters— it matters a lot.”


ABOVE BLUES—FROM THE CURTAINS OF AN AMANDA NISBET DESIGN LINEN TO THE ELIZABETH EAKINS CARPET—SET THE TONE IN AN AIRY BEDROOM. 19TH-CENTURY AMERICAN GILTWOOD CORNUCOPIA; ANTIQUE TRUNK. RIGHT A CUSTOM RUG BY HILLARY ANAPOL ADDS A POP OF COLOR TO A CHILD’S BEDROOM. SMALL CIRCA-1910 ORKNEY CHAIR. LEFT AN ANTIQUE EAGLE WATCHES OVER THE SITTING ROOM. CURTAINS OF A LES INDIENNES FLORAL COTTON; 18TH-CENTURY ENGLISH DESK; JOHN FOWLER RUG.

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“I wanted this place to feel like my grandmother’s house, which had beadboard everywhere.”

ABOVE A JOHN ROBSHAW TEXTILES LINEN COVERS THE MASTER BATH’S VAULTED CEILING. VINTAGE CHAUFFEUSE. RIGHT IN THE MASTER BEDROOM,

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ROBERTS DEPLOYED THE SAME BENNISON FLORAL CHINTZ ON THE WALLS, CURTAINS, LAMP SHADES, PILLOWS, AND VANITY SKIRT.


ABOVE A RAOUL TEXTILES LINEN COVERS THE SEATING AT THE KITCHEN TABLE. CUSTOM POT RACK BY ANN MORRIS. OPPOSITE A PAIR OF 19TH-CENTURY ENGLISH ARMCHAIRS IN A GP & J BAKER STRIPE COZY UP TO THE LIVING-ROOM FIREPLACE. ANTIQUE NEOCLASSICAL MIRROR OVER MANTEL; ANTIQUE FRENCH ROPE STOOL; CUSTOM RUG BY MARKHAM ROBERTS.

walls, puzzled together in ways that recall homespun farmhouses and dependencies, struck the owner and Roberts as eminently desirable as the new house got under way. Ditto Gatewood’s chalky painted finishes (decorative artists Bob Christian and Harry Lendrum channeled them for the Nantucket project), which look “as if they had been there forever,” she recalls. “I wanted old, I wanted detail, I wanted this place to feel like my grandmother’s house, which had beadboard everywhere,” she continues. “Well, had I known what it was going to cost”—cue a barely imperceptible arch of one eyebrow— “I might not have done it.” To fill the new yet old-fashioned envelope, she delivered decades of belongings into her decorator’s eager hands. From a romantic Chinese Export painting of sailing ships that references Massachusetts’s seafaring history (“I took it from my son because he didn’t like the frame—oh, deliver me, deliver me”) to round trivets (“I have a million of them”), her lifetime of oddments now commingle with fetching auction finds as well as captivating punctuations, among them the entrance hall’s Julia Condon mandala paintings, which she snapped up from the astute art-and-antiques dealer James Sansum, Roberts’s companion and office mate.

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“Better than owning a fashion-victim purse—who buys all that whoop-de-do?” the client tartly states, observing that her own handbags tend to be serviceable “because I’m boring.” Spread across the sitting-room floor is a leafy blue-andgreen carpet that the late, great British tastemaker John Fowler conjured up in the 1960s for Bunny Mellon’s Manhattan dining room. In a guest bath, plants are tucked into a rafraîchissoir, one of those French tables that have integral metal buckets for keeping bottles of wine cool. Painted-wood shorebirds by Nantucket legend Pat Gardner preen on plainspoken brackets that have been grouped, here and there, to form flocks. Roberts did more than just arrange and augment, of course. An old-school decorator at heart, despite his youthful demeanor, he trimmed, mixed, matched, commissioned, and, frankly, enjoyed himself. He designed dining chairs, colorful quilts, even mitered cushions in the living room. Striped red-and-white fabric was cut up and reassembled into soft paneling for the dining room, where Christian painted giant daisylike quatrefoils on the floor, a kicky combo that everyone agrees is a terrific success. “Not every client’s going to indulge your creativity,” Roberts admits. To which this particular patron instantly responds, “Honey, that’s why everything’s so vanilla.”


design notes

THE DETAILS THAT MAKE THE LOOK

IN A GUEST ROOM, THE CANOPY’S BED CURTAIN FABRICS ARE BY HODSOLL MCKENZIE AND PIERRE FREY.

CIRCLE STAR VINTAGE PIECED QUILT; PRICE UPON REQUEST. CALVINKLEIN.US

LETTUCEWARE TUREEN; $350. TORYBURCH.COM

CHINESE PAPER II LINEN; TO THE TRADE. BENNISON FABRICS.COM

Not every client indulges your creativity,” Roberts says. “But those are the people that excite you.”

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MR ALEXANDRA LAMP BY MARKHAM ROBERTS FOR CHRISTOPHER SPITZMILLER; $3,370. CHRISTOPHER SPITZMILLER.COM

GEO FLOWER TILE; PRICE UPON REQUEST. MIRTHSTUDIO.COM

INTERIORS: NELSON HANCOCK; BOTANICAL ART: NGOC MINH NGO; ALL OTHERS COURTESY OF RESPECTIVE COMPANIES

COLONIAL CONSOLE TABLE BY NOIR; $1,843. PERIGOLD.COM


A BEDROOM’S WALLS ARE CLAD IN FLORAL LINEN BY LEE JOFA.

KALEIDOSCOPE FABRIC BY ONE KINGS LANE FOR THE SHADE STORE; PRICE UPON REQUEST.

TO THE TRADE. LEEJOFA.COM

I wanted it to feel eclectic and bohemian,” the owner explains. “Not fussy but relaxed.” WHEAT AND MORNING GLORIES WITH GRASSHOPPER BY CARMEN ALMON, 2018; PRICE UPON REQUEST. CARMENALMON.COM


IN CROTON-ON-HUDSON, NEW YORK, THE MARCEL BREUER–DESIGNED 1953 NEUMANN HOUSE FEATURES A CURVY LOW STONE WALL AND ARCHITECTURAL PLANES IN BLUE, RED, AND WHITE. FOR DETAILS SEE RESOURCES.


TEXT BY

BARRY BERGDOLL

PHOTOGRAPHY BY

FRANÇOIS DISCHINGER

STYLED BY

MICHAEL REYNOLDS

Marcel Breuer fanatics Ken Sena and Joseph Mazzaferro revive a little-known gem by the modern maestro in upstate New York

HISTORY BOYS


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arcel Breuer’s architecture is enjoying a renaissance in popularity, enhanced by the rebranding of the Whitney Museum’s former inverted-ziggurat home as the Met Breuer. But what of the modest houses that marked Breuer’s rise to fame in the 1950s as he provided a vision of suburban life outside neocolonial saltboxes? Even as the Hungarian-born, Bauhaus-trained architect has reentered the spotlight, the overheated real estate market has still spawned towering or sprawling extensions to his generally compact single-story houses, often overshadowing their signature juxtapositions of glass planes with stone walls. Last year I encountered repeat Breuer-house owners with an opposite strategy—historians doubling as activists or perhaps activists as historians. At the time I had been procrastinating over a book of essays on Breuer, since published by Lars Müller. The same Google alerts that pinged me daily about tubular steel Cesca chairs on eBay alerted me to the existence of two fellow Breuer fans, if hardly fellow procrastinators. Ken Sena, an equity research analyst, and Joseph

Mazzaferro, an executive creative director in advertising, had spent more than a decade reviving two of the multiple residences—both in Litchfield, Connecticut—that Breuer had designed for one of his most faithful clients and friends, Rufus Stillman. Building on archival evidence and hours of conversation with Stillman himself, the couple peeled away awkward additions to the 1950 Stillman I house, bringing it back as close as possible to its original state. After selling the property to faithful recruits, the couple then embarked on a similarly scrupulous pruning of the cottage that Stillman had modeled, with Breuer’s blessing, after the architect’s own Cape Cod getaway. But even before Sena and Mazzaferro could complete this smaller project, they found themselves adopting yet another Breuer house in need: the 1953 Neumann House in Croton-onHudson, New York. The architect considered this residence, set on a commanding hilltop with views up and down the river, one of his finest; its colored floor plan hung on his office wall for years. Vera and George Neumann were both clients and collaborators. She was famous for her graphic textile designs (beloved by no less than Grace Kelly and Marilyn Monroe) and had worked with Breuer on her of-the-moment showrooms, notably on Fifth Avenue. In the case of her home, the architect conceived planes of white, red, and signature blue that extend


RIGHT THE TERRACE TAKES IN SWEEPING HUDSON VALLEY VIEWS. CHAIRS BY JULIA VON SPONECK. BELOW A 17TH-CENTURY PAINTING AND CONTEMPORARY FURNISHINGS BY RON ARAD, DROR BENSHETRIT, AND NADA DEBS DECORATE THE READING ROOM. OPPOSITE VINTAGE SEATING BY FRANK GEHRY, CHARLOTTE PERRIAND, AND GERRIT RIETVELD FLANKS THE LIVING ROOM’S SCULPTURAL FIREPLACE. MILO BAUGHMAN FOR THAYER COGGIN COCKTAIL TABLES; ARTWORK BY MARK LUYTEN.

Breuer considered this residence, set on a hilltop commanding views up and down the Hudson, one of his finest.

beyond the house to hover, literally, over the landscape, into which Breuer introduced an uncharacteristically sinewy low stone wall. When Sena and Mazzaferro bought the property in 2014, the only addition—a 1970 wing with an indoor swimming pool—had been made by Breuer’s own office for the Neumanns themselves. Still, many of the features that wed the house to its extraordinary plot had been obscured by years of inattention. Plunging into the archives and interviewing anyone with firsthand knowledge of the house, the couple rebuilt interior walls; replaced floors where radiant heating had failed with matching bluestone; and artfully fit thermal-pane glass into the floor-to-ceiling sliding doors that link the rooms with views. The couple spared no time in taming the overgrown landscape,

buying a neighboring house and demolishing all but its chimney, and tearing down trees and power lines to capture a panorama worthy of a Hudson River School painter. To have lunch with these modernism devotees, nestled between the sculptural fireplace and breathtaking vista, is also to commune with Breuer and Vera Neumann. We fell into conversation about their designs—patterns and motifs that repeated—while comparing notes on who among us had traveled the farthest to see a Breuer building: I to Bismarck, North Dakota, to dine with the nuns at Annunciation Monastery; they on a fruitless quest to see Breuer’s late Koerfer House overlooking Lake Maggiore in Switzerland. (Alas, you need a boat—the home is invisible from the road.) So what’s the next Breuer they long to nurse back to health? “Broadly speaking, I tend to be most attracted to the scale and floating cantilevers in Breuer’s earlier homes,” Sena told me. To which Mazzaferro quickly added, “I tend to prefer Breuer’s more experimental uses of concrete, stone, and steel that come in the later work.” For them, Breuer’s designs were the products of convergences among architect, clients, and artist friends—and they remain engrossed in exploring them. “The stories around the architecture are always expanding,” Sena noted. “But what helps preserve those stories is keeping the architecture pure.”

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In Montgomery, Alabama, a new memorial and museum bear witness to the brutal legacy of racial injustice in America TEXT BY

FRED A. BERNSTEIN

PHOTOGRAPHY BY

WILLIAM ABRANOWICZ


EQUAL JUSTICE INITIATIVE (EJI) CONCEIVED THE NEW NATIONAL MEMORIAL FOR PEACE AND JUSTICE.

FRONTING THE PAST


THE MEMORIAL’S WOODEN PATH UNEXPECTEDLY SLOPES SO THAT VISITORS EXPERIENCE THE HANGING COLUMNS FROM BELOW. EACH CORTEN-STEEL COLUMN CORRESPONDS TO A COUNTY WHERE A LYNCHING OCCURRED.


FAR LEFT EACH COLUMN IS INSCRIBED WITH THE NAMES OF A COUNTY AND OF KNOWN LOCAL VICTIMS. LEFT THE MEMORIAL’S SCULPTURE BY HANK WILLIS THOMAS WAS INSPIRED BY MASS INCARCERATION.

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ryan Stevenson, founder of the Alabama-based Equal Justice Initiative (EJI), has long demonstrated the power of language—as a civil rights litigator and the author of the best-selling 2014 memoir Just Mercy. But in 2013, Stevenson says, when EJI erected physical markers to the Montgomery slave trade, he was “blown away by their impactfulness.” So after the nonprofit organization issued a report on lynchings, in 2015, Stevenson and his colleagues set out to recognize that bleakest of American tragedies in more than mere words. That year EJI acquired six acres close to downtown Montgomery on which to build a centralized memorial to the 4,400-plus victims of lynching. Unveiled on April 26, EJI’s National Memorial for Peace and Justice now stands as a sobering reminder of racial inequality in America, from slavery to segregation to mass incarceration. The centerpiece is a group of 800 pillars that, from a distance, appear to be holding up a roof, Parthenon-style. Get closer and the columns are revealed to be suspended from above, rather than supported from below. Hanging, they represent the casualties of lynching, which occurred in some 800 counties from 1877 to 1950. (Each column bears the name of a county and its known victims.) The slabs are made of Corten steel, a material that will rust indefinitely. “Every piece

has blemishes and streaks that will evolve in terms of color and complexion,” says Stevenson. In the park around the central memorial are 800 duplicate pillars, waiting to be adopted by their respective counties. Over time, absences will reveal which communities have helped spread the memorial’s moving message—and which have not. The building that contains the hanging columns was conceived in collaboration with Michael Murphy of MASS Design Group, a Boston-based architecture firm best known for its public-interest projects in Africa and Haiti. In his 2016 TED Talk, viewed more than 1.3 million times, Murphy says that he read about EJI’s mission and was inspired to email Stevenson. Soon he was on a plane to Montgomery. “Murphy is an incredibly talented architect,” says Stevenson, who nonetheless took care to ensure that visitors “look beyond the architecture to the larger story.” Indeed, as the scope of the project expanded, EJI consulted writers like Toni Morrison and enlisted artists like Hank Willis Thomas, who conceived a sculpture inspired by police violence, and Dana King, who created statues dedicated to the women who carried out the yearlong Montgomery bus boycott (1955–1956). And a few blocks from the memorial, the organization added the Legacy Museum, in a renovated building on the grounds of a former slave warehouse. Taken together, the museum and the memorial cover the sweep of racial injustice in the United States and offer a place, Stevenson says, for all Americans to “confront our history.”

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SONS ALEX AND DYLAN, IN BONPOINT TUNICS, RUN THROUGH THE GARDEN AT THEIR HOME IN WATCH HILL, RHODE ISLAND. OPPOSITE THE 1903 MANSE TAKES IN STUNNING OCEAN VIEWS. FOR DETAILS SEE RESOURCES.


SEA CHANGE Designer Giancarlo Valle rejuvenates a stalwart New England mansion on the coast of Rhode Island for the family of high-flying, high-style entrepreneur Kevin Wendle TEXT BY

MAYER RUS

PHOTOGRAPHY BY

STEPHEN KENT JOHNSON

STYLED BY

MICHAEL BARGO


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early a century ago, Jean-Michel Frank made a compelling case for the compatibility of the old and the new. “The noble frames that came to us from the past can receive today’s creations. The house that we build now can welcome ancient things of beauty,” the eminent French designer wrote. Architectural and interior designer Giancarlo Valle and his client Kevin Wendle apparently got the message. On a bluff overlooking the Atlantic Ocean in the coastal village of Watch Hill, Rhode Island, the two have deftly brokered a rapprochement between past and present, reimagining a stately 1903 “cottage” with contemporary interiors laden with treasures of 20th- and 21st-century design. First, a bit about the homeowner. A mandarin of the newmedia age, Wendle has carved an extraordinary career path through the worlds of entertainment, technology, and design. His wide-ranging résumé boasts a slew of tech start-ups along with executive positions at CNET, Fox Entertainment Group, and E! Online. In the early 2000s, after riding the wave of the first internet boom, the trailblazing entrepreneur decamped to Paris, where he immersed himself in French avant-garde art, fashion, architecture, and design. During that time, Wendle forged a fertile relationship with the then up-and-coming French designer Joseph Dirand, first as a client and subsequently as a business adviser and investor. Wendle’s obsession

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ABOVE A MOBILE CHANDELIER BY MICHAEL ANASTASSIADES HANGS OVER THE PIERRE JEANNERET DINING TABLE AND CHAIRS. PICASSO OWL VASE ON TABLE. OPPOSITE THE SWIVELING ENTRANCE TO THE BOYS’ BEDROOM. VINTAGE RUG.


“Even though this was not an orthodox restoration, we wanted the interiors to project a level of authenticity in the materials and construction.” —Giancarlo Valle

ABOVE AN 18TH-CENTURY MANTEL CENTERS THE LIBRARY. PAINTINGS (FROM LEFT) BY NATHALIE DU PASQUIER AND LANDON METZ; JEAN ROYÈRE ARMCHAIR; WILLY GUHL CHAIR; GIANFRANCO FRATTINI COCKTAIL TABLE; JEAN PROUVÉ STOOL; JORGE ZALSZUPIN SOFA. OPPOSITE SEBASTIAN, KEVIN, AND THE BOYS PLAY CHESS AT A TABLE SET WITH VINTAGE ITALIAN GARDEN CHAIRS.


with travel, design, and premium real estate coalesced in his 2014 purchase of the idyllic Hotel Esencia in Tulum, Mexico. It was there, in 2016, that the budding hotelier first met Valle, at the wedding of fashion designer Jason Wu. “We sat next to each other at one of the dinners and bonded over our mutual interests,” Valle recalls. In short order, Wendle engaged the young, New York City–based designer to shepherd the transformation of his recent acquisition, the great house on the picturesque bluff, into a summer home for himself, his partner, Sebastian Uribe, and their two sons, Dylan and Alex. One might reasonably wonder how a globe-trotting entrepreneur with distinctly progressive tastes, born and raised in and around New York City, came to be the steward of a historic manse in a secluded Rhode Island summer colony. “When I

was young, we’d spend weekends in Stonington, Connecticut. I’ve always been enchanted with New England beach culture,” Wendle explains. “Although Mexico is home base, I wanted my boys to feel a connection to their identity as Americans,” he adds. Of course, the house itself—a 10,000-square-foot shingled pile redolent of patrician East Coast style—exuded its own allure. “It was magnificently handsome,” Wendle says, describing his initial reaction to the stately home, which he discovered while vacationing at the nearby Ocean House hotel. “The challenge was to bring it back to life in a meaningful way—something stylish, yes, but more important, something comfortable for my family, attuned to the way we like to live.” Valle, too, was seduced by the home’s arresting mien. “I fell in love with its proportions and its imposing cubic form. There was a solidity to the structure that we wanted to maintain even as we gutted the inside,” the designer says. He began by opening walls on the main floor for an easier, more gracious flow from room to room. He also streamlined the interior architectural details, eschewing elaborate crown moldings in favor of gently rounded coves and anchoring rooms with pared-down baseboards. “It was a reductive approach intended to instill a sense of softness. At the same time, we underscored the solidity of the architecture with thick, two-feet-wide passageways between rooms, chunky inset bookcases, and fireplace mantels imported from England. Even though this was not an orthodox restoration—frankly, there was nothing left to restore—we wanted the interiors to project a level of authenticity in the materials and construction,” Valle explains. “The best thing about buying a house this size is that I was finally able to reunite furniture and art that I had stashed in storage lockers in Paris, the south of France, New York,

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RIGHT AN AXEL EINAR HJORTH DINING TABLE WITH A CHARLOTTE PERRIAND CHAIR AND CUSTOM BANQUETTE CREATE A KITCHEN BREAKFAST NOOK. PHOTOGRAPH BY WIM WENDERS.

and Los Angeles. Giancarlo and I assembled the best of the best, and we recognized opportunities to fill in the collection with new additions and custom-upholstered furniture,” Wendle says. The resulting mélange encompasses a king’s ransom in vintage furnishings by Charlotte Perriand, Le Corbusier, Pierre Jeanneret, Jean Prouvé, Willy Guhl, and Axel Einar Hjorth, all paired with contemporary gems by Faye Toogood, Rick Owens, Michael Anastassiades, Dimore Studio, Apparatus, and others. “The homes I designed with Joseph [Dirand] were more black-and-white. Here in New England it’s all about the sunshine and beach, so I wanted to bring in more color,” Wendle notes. Valle obliged by juxtaposing monochrome rooms with closets painted emerald green and burgundy, a library in marine blue, and a pantry the color of radicchio. “Giancarlo has incredible vision and taste,” Wendle says, assessing the quality of the completed project. “I wanted tradition and classic style enlivened with a contemporary spirit and a slight edge. That’s a tricky line to walk, but he pulled it off with real finesse. The house isn’t old and stodgy, and it’s not defiantly new. It’s just ours.”

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TOP LEFT: © 2018 ESTATE OF PABLO PICASSO/ARTISTS RIGHTS SOCIETY (ARS), NEW YORK

ABOVE ART BY PICASSO AND PIERRE LE-TAN LINES THE STUDY, WHERE A TAPIO WIRKKALA LAMP SITS ON THE AXEL EINAR HJORTH DESK; JEAN PROUVÉ OFFICE CHAIR.


“The challenge was to bring the house back to life in a meaningful way, attuned to the way we like to live.” —Kevin Wendle

ABOVE IN THE LIVING ROOM, A PAIR OF ARMCHAIRS BY PIERRE JEANNERET, A ROLY POLY CHAIR BY FAYE TOOGOOD, AND A SOFA BY CHRISTIAN LIAIGRE SURROUND A JEAN PROUVÉ COCKTAIL TABLE. SERGE MOUILLE FLOOR LAMP; AXEL JARL PAINTING.


IN THE GREAT HALL, A ROMAN THOMAS CHANDELIER HANGS OVER A MISCELLANY OF CHAIRS. OPPOSITE THE IVY FIGURES ON THE TENNIS HOUSE’S WALLS WERE COPIED FROM AN ANTIQUE WEATHER VANE. FOR DETAILS SEE RESOURCES.


scout’s honor An energetic Chicago couple transform a woebegone Wisconsin Boy Scout camp into the ultimate getaway TEXT BY

SHAX RIEGLER

PHOTOGRAPHY BY

BJÖRN WALLANDER

STYLED BY

HOWARD CHRISTIAN


OPPOSITE CHAIRS BY SOANE IN FABRICS BY LE MANACH AND HOLLAND & SHERRY SURROUND A CUSTOM TRESTLE DINING TABLE. LIGHTING BY ROMAN THOMAS. BELOW DELAVAN LAKE BY DAY. RIGHT THE LITOWITZ FAMILY TAKES TO THE POOL.

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iking, canoeing, campfire sing-alongs— generations of Boy Scouts visited these 25 wooded acres on a glacial lake in Wisconsin. But one day in the 1980s Camp Delavan, named for the lake on which it sits, closed, then was divvied up and sold off. Besides a few moldering buildings and a landscape slowly being overgrown, all that was left were the memories of the boys who had spent time there. Until 2005, that is, when Jennifer Litowitz happened upon a real estate ad. She and her husband, Alec, the founder of Magnetar Capital, had harbored a fantasy of creating a bucolic getaway for friends and family, including the couple’s four sons, Jack, Luke, Nick, and Jude, now ages 12 to 20. Seeing the ad rekindled that dream. So they strapped baby Jude into his car seat, rounded up the other boys, and drove an hour-and-a-half north to check it out. “This is it, this is it!” Jennifer remembers thinking. “But Alec was somewhat less enthusiastic. It was in rough shape—really, really rough.” Even so, they took the plunge. Luckily, having recently completed their main residence—a Lutyens-inspired manse in suburban Glencoe, Illinois—they already had a great design

team in place: architect R. Michael Graham and designer Bruce Fox. Jennifer was determined to salvage as much of the camp’s charm as possible. Everyone adored the huge dining hall, where a massive stone fireplace rose nearly 20 feet. Unfortunately, that whole building was structurally unsound and would have to be taken down, then rebuilt. But not before they salvaged the hearthstones, wall boards, beams, and trusses that gave the space such personality. They performed a similar feat in the building that once housed the camp’s crafts studio. After it was enlarged to make a poolside game house, they reinstalled the wall planks covered with decades of carved initials and graffiti by the Scouts. “Jennifer’s directive was ‘I want it to feel like Wisconsin in the 1940s,’ ” recalls Fox. “One of my inspirations was a childhood memory of going to family lodges in northern Michigan in the summer,” says Jennifer. “I had this idea of a Midwestern hodgepodge that transcends time periods, a very comfortable aesthetic.” Take the old dining hall, now reconstructed as the great room, for example. At 64 feet long by 38 feet wide, it’s the kind of space that can eat up furniture and still feel empty. So Fox imagined a room that might have been put together over several generations, where interesting vintage pieces sit alongside

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ABOVE IN THE EAST CABIN BEDROOM, CUSTOM IKAT BENCHES SIT AT ANTIQUE BED FRAMES FROM CATHOUSE BEDS. ROMAN SHADES OF A LE MANACH COTTON. OPPOSITE THE MASTER BATH FEATURES PEWABIC TILE AND A CAST-IRON TUB BY WATERWORKS. CALACATTA MARBLE–TOPPED VANITY DESIGNED BY LIEDERBACH AND GRAHAM, ARCHITECTS.

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the new. “Everything had to feel like it was found, but also be comfortable for life today,” he declares. At one end, an eclectic mix of seating is organized around the fireplace. (“I definitely wanted a big fire circle,” says Jennifer.) At the other sits a pair of dining tables that when pushed together can seat up to 30 (not a rare occurrence in this house). To keep the surrounding squadron of chairs from creating the feeling of a conference table, Fox rhythmically upholstered them in a mix of complementary fabrics. Subtle variation governs the rest of the house, too. And Fox made sure that fabric and color choices would reinforce the theme. “If it didn’t look a little vintage, it wasn’t right,” he notes. For example, he used a blue handwoven fabric on one sofa because it felt old—“not dusty, but just like it’s been well loved”—and he strategically deployed plaids because “a little

“I had this idea of a Midwestern hodgepodge that transcends time periods,” says Jennifer Litowitz. plaid here and there feels retro.” For one room’s windows, he had his curtain-maker unravel the edges of the printed cotton to create a fringe out of the fabric itself. “I kept thinking, Oh, Aunt Martha made those a long time ago,” he says. “I was just going for that feeling.” Fox also thoughtfully chose art and accessories to add to the sense of history. He found a carved box with rope handles, made by a Boy Scout, and had it mounted for use as a side table. Another Scout piece depicting merit badges in carved wood hangs over the sunroom fireplace, and antique game boards decorate the game house. He and the clients also gathered paintings by artists associated with Chicago’s famed Art Institute. Inspired, the couple have added nostalgic pieces by Norman Rockwell and Thomas Hart Benton. Such a compound is always a work in progress. Since the original purchase, the Litowitzes have acquired the once subdivided lots to re-create the property’s original footprint. In addition to turning a small cabin into an eight-bed bunkhouse and refurbishing the existing boathouse, the couple have commissioned new buildings, including a couple of tidy guest cabins. There’s also a notable tennis house, inspired by the famous indoor court that architects David Adler and James W. O’Connor designed in the 1920s for Chicago’s stylish Blair family. Whatever the season, there’s a lot to do at the new and improved Camp Delavan. “In this day and age, everything’s so fast-paced and everyone’s always online,” says Jennifer, who delayed installing Wi-Fi and deliberately situated the few TVs in out-of-the-way places. “People come up and they really remember what it’s like to just have good old-fashioned fun together. That’s what I wanted it to be all about.”

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CLOCKWISE FROM ABOVE A RUSTIC BENCH BECKONS. THE KITCHEN’S PAONAZZO MARBLE–TOPPED ISLAND AND CABINETRY WERE DESIGNED BY LIEDERBACH AND GRAHAM, ARCHITECTS. FAMILY TIME IN THE GAME HOUSE, WHERE A CUSTOM POOL TABLE MEETS A VINTAGE TERMINATOR 2 PINBALL MACHINE.


resources Items pictured but not listed here are not sourceable. Items similar to vintage and antique pieces shown are often available from the dealers listed. (T) means the item is available only to the trade. ON OUR COVERS NEWSSTANDS (“NEW YORK STORY”): Interiors

by Ashe + Leandro; asheleandro.com. Project managers: Mia Dalton and Jonathan Brown. Douglas-fir and black lacquer cabinets by Ashe + Leandro. Cooktop and wall ovens by Miele; miele.com. Toaster by Cuisinart; cuisinart.com. CitiZ espresso machine, in chrome, by Nespresso; nespresso.com. SUBSCRIBERS (“PETAL PUSHER”): Interiors by Markham Roberts Inc.; markhamroberts.com. On wall, panels by Bob Christian Decorative Art; bobchristiandecorativeart.com. On custom sofa by Markham Roberts; embroidered floral wool by Lee Jofa (T); kravet.com. On Lazy Doris swing-arm wall lamp by Besselink & Jones; besselink.com; shade of Maze linen by China Seas (T); quadrillefabrics.com. On cocktail table, hurricane from John Rosselli Antiques (T); johnrosselli.com. On armchair, Diamond Batik linen by Kathryn M. Ireland (T); kathrynireland.com. Custom rug by Markham Roberts; fabricated by Studio Four NYC (T); studiofournyc.com. ROCK STAR PAGES 72–81: Interior architecture and

interiors by Jamie Bush + Co.; jamiebush.com. PAGES 74–75: Hanging lounge with sheepskin

throw by Blackman Cruz; blackmancruz.com. DS-600 sofa from de Sede; desede.com. Small African three-legged table by John Dickinson for Sutherland (T); sutherlandfurniture.com. Sergio Rodrigues Tonico armchairs from Espasso; espasso.com; in sheepskin, fabric, and leather from Mimi London Inc. (T); mimilondon.com. On table between armchairs, ceramic table lamp by Peter Lane; peterlane clay.com. Fallen Imbuia wood cocktail table by Pedro Petry from 1stdibs; 1stdibs.com. Shoreline Oatmeal rug by Tufenkian (T); tufenkian.com. Small woven ottomans by Txt.ure for Luteca; luteca.com. Next to sofa, white ashwood side table by Daniel Lee Pollock; dlpdesigns.net. PAGE 76: On front deck, stools and custom bench by Zachary A.; zacharyadesign.com. Barton Garden concrete chairs by Dessin Fournir (T); dessinfournir.com. In daughter’s bedroom, Poppy Small pendant by Christy Manguerra for Hive; ylighting.com. Custom bed in painted white oak and cabinetry by Jamie Bush + Co.; jamiebush.com; fabricated by Designer Grains; designergrains.com. On walls, Middleton Pink by Farrow & Ball; farrow-ball.com. Curtains of Edo linen, in opal, by Kelly Wearstler for Lee Jofa Groundworks (T); kravet.com; fabricated by Fine Draperies; finedrapes.com. Custom wool rug by Decorative Carpets (T); decorativecarpets.com. In master bath, tub by Signature Hardware; signature hardware.com. Anika 30 tub and shower fittings by Watermark; watermark-designs.com. Next to tub, custom side table, in white oak, by Stefan Bishop from Cristina Grajales Gallery; cristinagrajalesinc.com. Custom cabinetry in stained white oak by Jamie Bush + Co.; jamiebush.com. Thyme slab countertop from EuroStone; eurostonequartzcountertops.com. Bleached ivory basket weave jute rug from World Market; worldmarket.com. PAGE 77: On pool patio, custom ceramic wall by Stan Bitters; stanbitters.com. Taiko rattan poufs by Tomoko Mizu from Bonacina 1889 (T); bonacina 1889.it; in Rough ’N Rowdy acrylic, in grass, by Perennials (T); perennialsfabrics.com. Aura chairs and custom ottomans by Lika Moore for Blackman Cruz; blackmancruz.com. Taper Circle marble cocktail table from Global Views; globalviews.com. Orson Sunloungers in teak by Gordon Guillaumier for Roda; rodaonline.com. In son’s bedroom, Woven Cave chair from PBTeen; pbteen.com. On chair, cushion and

pillow in Deco Point linen-cotton, in peacock, by Robert Allen (T); robertallendesign.com. Little Whales wallpaper by Geoff McFetridge for Pottok; pottokprints.com. Custom shag rug by Decorative Carpets (T); decorativecarpets .com. Gray-stained white oak cabinetry fabricated by Neff Mill & Cabinet; neffmill.com. Shade of Canvas Weave, in grey matter, by Perennials (T), fabricated by Fine Draperies; finedrapes.com. PAGE 78: Arrow pendants by Apparatus; apparatusstudio.com. On chairs, Strata Study linen, in archean, by Zak + Fox; zakandfox.com. PAGE 79: Custom Aspen bench and Bilbouquet stool by Zachary A.; zachary adesign.com. On table, ceramic tile inlay by Brent Bennett; bjbdesign.com. Barton Garden concrete chairs by Dessin Fournir (T); dessinfournir.com. Custom seat cushions and throw pillows in Bazaar acrylic, in oasis, by Perennials (T); perennialsfabrics.com. NEW YORK STORY PAGES 82–87: Interiors by Ashe + Leandro;

asheleandro.com. Project managers: Mia Dalton and Jonathan Brown. PAGE 82: Douglas-fir and black lacquer cabinets by Ashe + Leandro; asheleandro.com. Cooktop and wall ovens by Miele; miele.com. Toaster by Cuisinart; cuisinart.com. CitiZ espresso machine, in chrome, by Nespresso; nespresso.com. PAGE 83: Bookcase by Ashe + Leandro; ashe leandro.com. On custom armchairs by Ashe + Leandro, Duet velvet, in porpoise, by Holland & Sherry (T); hollandsherry.com. PAGES 84–85: In living room, custom sofa by Ashe + Leandro; asheleandro.com; in Odeon cotton-velvet, in charcoal, by Holland & Sherry (T); hollandsherry.com. On custom ottoman by Ashe + Leandro, Brunswick wool bouclé, in feather, by Holland & Sherry (T). Lamp by Ashe + Leandro. On walls, Super White paint by Benjamin Moore; benjaminmoore.com. In dining room, round splay-leg dining table by BCMT Co.; blackcreekmt.com. Douglas-fir cabinet by Ashe + Leandro. PAGES 86–87: In master bedroom, bed by Ashe + Leandro; asheleandro .com; in Chamonix wool, in light grey, by Holland & Sherry (T); hollandsherry.com. Demetra sconces by Artemide; artemide.net. Rug by Ashe + Leandro. In master bath, Jean Prouvé Standard chair for Vitra; vitra .com. Bathtub by Zuma; zumacollection.com. In child’s bedroom, bedding by RH; rh.com. Douglas-fir bunk bed and ladder by Ashe + Leandro. Nightstand by Ashe + Leandro and Robert Pluhowski; pluhowski.com. PETAL PUSHER PAGES 88–99: Interiors and custom furnishings throughout by Markham Roberts Inc.; markham roberts.com. Painted floors throughout by Bob Christian Decorative Art; bobchristian decorativeart.com. Landscape design by the Garden Design Company; juliejordin.com. PAGE 88: Antique table and mirror from John Rosselli Antiques (T); johnrosselli.com. On chairs, Lillieberrie linen by Heather Chadduck Textiles (T); heatherchadducktextiles.com. Rug by Serena & Lily; serenaandlily.com. PAGE 89: On wall, panels by Bob Christian Decorative Art; bobchristiandecorativeart.com. On side table, on antique lamp, shade of Banon linen by Robert Kime (T); robertkime.com. On antique armchair, Vreeland cotton-linen by Sister Parish Design (T); sisterparishdesign .com. On custom sofa, embroidered floral wool by Lee Jofa (T); kravet.com. On cocktail table, hurricane from John Rosselli Antiques (T); johnrosselli.com. Custom rug by Markham Roberts; markhamroberts.com; fabricated by Studio Four NYC (T); studiofournyc.com. PAGE 90: On custom dining chairs, Arya Vine linen by Richard Smith for No. 9 Thompson (T); jimthompsonfabrics.com. Andrew Reflector sconce (on wall, at left) by The Urban Electric Co.; urbanelectricco.com. On walls, Blindside Stripe linen-blend by Jane Shelton (T); janeshelton.com; assembled into wall panels by Markham Roberts; markhamroberts.com. Custom curtains of linen by Lee Jofa (T); kravet.com; with trim of Tamarack Stripe

ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST AND AD ARE REGISTERED TRADEMARKS OF ADVANCE MAGAZINE PUBLISHERS INC. COPYRIGHT © 2018 CONDÉ NAST. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. PRINTED IN THE U.S.A. VOLUME 75, NO. 6. ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST (ISSN 0003-8520) is published

11 times a year by Condé Nast, which is a division of Advance Magazine Publishers Inc. PRINCIPAL OFFICE: Condé Nast, 1 World Trade Center, New York, NY 10007. Robert A. Sauerberg, Jr., President and Chief Executive Officer; David E. Geithner, Chief Financial Officer; Pamela Drucker Mann, Chief Revenue & Marketing Officer. Periodicals postage paid at New York, NY, and at additional mailing offices. Canada Post Publications Mail Agreement No. 40644503. Canadian Goods and Services Tax Registration No. 123242885-RT0001. POSTMASTER: Send all UAA to CFS. (See DMM 507.1.5.2); NON-POSTAL AND MILITARY FACILITIES: Send address corrections to

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cotton by Carleton V (T); carletonvltd.com. PAGE 91: On custom sofa, Victoria linen by

Raoul Textiles (T); raoultextiles.com. On antique French armchair (at left), Passiflora linen-blend by Chelsea Textiles (T); chelsea textiles.com. On lamps, shades of Papillons paper by Pierre Frey (T); pierrefrey.com. On vintage armchair (at right), Tripura linen by Elizabeth Eakins (T); elizabetheakins.com. Custom rug by Markham Roberts; markham roberts.com; fabricated by Studio Four NYC (T); studiofournyc.com. PAGES 92–93: In guest bath, tub by Kaldewei; kaldewei.us. Tub filler by Lefroy Brooks; lefroybrooks.com. Star pendant by Vaughan (T); vaughandesigns.com. On antique chair, Devonshire hemp by Jasper (T); michaelsmithinc.com. In sitting room, custom curtains of Veronique cotton by Les Indiennes; lesindiennes.com. On desk, on antique lamp, shade of Odhna cotton by Shyam Ahuja (T); shyamahuja.com. On vintage armchair (at left), cotton print by Brunschwig & Fils (T); kravet.com. In guest bedroom, curtains of Alannah Pitaya linen by Amanda Nisbet Design from Holland & Sherry (T); hollandsherry.com. Carpet by Elizabeth Eakins (T); elizabetheakins.com. On custom bed, linens by Leontine Linens; leontinelinens .com. Boston Functional library light sconces by E.F. Chapman for Visual Comfort; circa lighting.com. In child’s bedroom, custom rug by Hillary Anapol Custom Woven Rugs; nantucketweaver.com. PAGES 94–95: In master bath, on vaulted ceiling, Rabari Light Indigo linen by John Robshaw Textiles (T); john robshaw.com. Custom Roman shade of Chinese Paper II linen by Bennison (T); bennisonfabrics.com. Tub by Kaldewei; kaldewei.us. Fittings by Lefroy Brooks; lefroy brooks.com. On molding, custom glazed finish by Harry Lendrum; +44-7768-807-769. In master bedroom, on walls, and curtains, lamp shades, pillows, and vanity skirt of Chinese Paper II linen by Bennison (T). On antique French armchair, Jaipur linen by Bennison (T). On stool, Verrieres glazed chintz linen by Brunschwig & Fils (T); kravet.com. Custom bed upholstered in Great Kasumi linen by Bennison (T). Exterior and interior bed curtains of Ramsey linen by Colefax and Fowler (T); cowtan.com; and Plumettes cotton by Le Manach (T); pierrefrey.com; with Dolce Pom Pom Fringe trim by Samuel & Sons (T); samuelandsons.com. Bed linens by Leontine Linens; leontinelinens.com. Rug by Hillary Anapol Custom Woven Rugs; nantucketweaver .com. PAGE 96: On custom seating, Chunari linen by Raoul Textiles (T); raoultextiles.com. On kitchen table, glassware by Sara Japanese Pottery; saranyc.com. Custom pot rack by Ann Morris New York; annmorrislighting.com. Custom Roman shades of Shorto Petrel linenblend by Jennifer Shorto from Claremont Furnishing (T); claremontfurnishing.com. On cabinetry, custom glazed finish by Harry Lendrum; +44-7768-807-769. Sink fittings by Lefroy Brooks; lefroybrooks.com. On island, hurricanes from John Rosselli & Assoc. (T); johnrosselli.com. PAGE 97: On armchairs, striped cotton by Brunschwig & Fils (T); kravet .com. On antique French rope stool, Fleur Exotique cotton by Twigs from John Rosselli & Assoc. (T); johnrosselli.com. Mantel painted by Bob Christian Decorative Art; bobchristian decorativeart.com. American classical overmantel mirror, c. 1820, from James Sansum Fine and Decorative Art; jamessansum.com. Custom rug by Markham Roberts; markham roberts.com; fabricated by Studio Four NYC (T); studiofournyc.com. HISTORY BOYS PAGES 100–03: Curtains throughout of

India White linen by Kravet (T); kravet .com. PAGE 102: Milo Baughman cocktail tables for Thayer Coggin; thayercoggin.com. Mohair slate rug by The Rug Company; therug company.com. PAGE 103: On terrace, Sponeck chairs by Julia von Sponeck for Architonic; architonic.com. In reading room, on Misfits sofa by Ron Arad; ronarad.co.uk; Divina wool

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by Kvadrat (T); maharam.com. Peacock chair by Dror Benshetrit for Cappellini; cappellini.it. Pebble table by Nada Debs; nadadebs.com. Move Slow eucalyptus rug by Moroso; moroso .it. Eleganza Loft series porcelain tile flooring by Carminart; carminart.com. SEA CHANGE PAGES 108–115: Architectural restoration

and interiors by Studio Giancarlo Valle; giancarlovalle.com. PAGE 110: In entry, Cylinder down light by Apparatus; apparatus studio.com. In bedroom, on custom cabinetry by Studio Giancarlo Valle; giancarlovalle.com; paint by Farrow & Ball; farrow-ball.com. Carpet by Stark (T); starkcarpet.com. PAGE 111: Mobile chandelier 3, in black patinated brass with opaline spheres, by Michael Anastassiades; michaelanastassiades .com. PAGES 112–13: In living room, on custom bookshelves by Studio Giancarlo Valle; giancarlovalle.com; paint by Farrow & Ball; farrow-ball.com. Arrow light pendant, in blackened brass/black calfskin; and Horsehair sconce, in tarnished silver/palomino, both by Apparatus; apparatusstudio.com. Rug by Edward Fields (T); houseoftaiping.com. PAGE 114: In study, custom staircase with leather-wrapped handrail by Studio Giancarlo Valle; giancarlovalle.com. In kitchen breakfast nook, custom banquette by Studio Giancarlo Valle. PAGE 115: Roly Poly chair by Faye Toogood; fayetoogood.com. Augustin sofa by Christian Liaigre; liaigre.com. Custom curtains by Studio Giancarlo Valle; giancarlo valle.com; of Cordelia Sheer linen, in bone, by Schumacher (T); fschumacher.com. Sisal rug by Edward Fields (T); houseoftaiping.com. SCOUT’S HONOR PAGES 116–123: Interiors by Bruce Fox Design;

brucefoxdesign.com. Architecture by Liederbach and Graham, Architects; liederbachandgraham .com. Project manager: Suzanne Winters. PAGE 116: Custom pendant by Roman Thomas; romanthomas.com. Rocking chair by Old Hickory Furniture Co. from Cherry Gallery; cherrygallery.com. Custom tufted ottomans by McLaughlin; mclaughlinupholstering.com. Oak-top side table by Old Hickory Furniture Co. from American Garage; american garageantiques.com. PAGE 117: Court surface by Plexipave; plexipave.com. PAGE 118: Grange chairs by Soane; soane.co.uk; in Cottage Tweed wool, in rust, by Holland & Sherry (T); hollandsherry.com; and Toiles de Tours canvas by Le Manach (T); pierrefrey.com. PAGE 120: Custom benches by Bruce Fox Design; brucefoxdesign.com; fabricated by Interior Dynamics; interiordynamicsinc.com. On antique bed frames from Cathouse Beds; cathousebeds.com; percale bedding by Cuddledown; cuddledown.com. Roman shades of Indhira L4164 cotton by Le Manach (T); pierrefrey.com. Custom chandelier by Period Lighting Fixtures Inc.; periodlighting .com. PAGE 121: Tile by Pewabic; pewabic.org. Candide freestanding oval cast iron tub by Waterworks; waterworks.com. Custom vanity designed by Liederbach and Graham, Architects; liederbachandgraham.com; fabricated by KWI; kitchenwholesalers.net. Mini Stable pendant by the Urban Electric Co.; urbanelectricco.com. Over vanity, vintage frames from Cherry Gallery; cherrygallery.com; with mirror inserts by MCM Fine Framing; mcmfineframing.com. Antique side table from Niall Smith Antiques; 212-750-3985. PAGES 122–23: In kitchen, island and cabinetry designed by Liederbach and Graham, Architects; liederbachandgraham.com; fabricated by KWI; kitchenwholesalers.net. Roswell Flying Saucer Prism lights by Hector Finch; hectorfinch.com. Antique clock from American Garage; american garageantiques.com. Solid-oak bar stools from Robert Thompson’s Craftsmen Ltd.; robertthompsons.co.uk. In game house, custom pool table and bar billiards table both by Blatt Billiards; blattbilliards.com. Terminator 2 pinball machine from Northland Jukeboxes; northlandjukeboxes.com.

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last word

Full Bloom Gardens need structure. They also need structures, says AD100 landscape designer Madison Cox, “a reason to experience a garden as opposed to just walking through it.” Case in point is the never-beforepublished pavilion at his Marrakech home, Villa Oasis—the legendary house renovated by his late spouse, Pierre Bergé, and Yves Saint Laurent in the 1980s. Eight years ago, Cox added an octagonal structure of painted cedar, with French doors, a marble table, and chairs for which artist Lawrence Mynott devised needlework upholstery. Executed by a charity for lepers, the fetching stitchery mixes Marrakech scenes and botanical studies, plus a monogram or two. Now the one spot of the garden, Cox says, that was “pretty much never seen” has become an enticing destination for l’art de vivre. —MITCHELL OWENS

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P HOTOGRAP HY BY M I GU EL FLORE S -V I A N N A


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