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CONTENTS

THE ORGANIC ISSUE

12

MY STYLISH LIFE Belgian designer Laurence Leenaert on the things that add flair to her life and work

18

TRENDS, INNOVATIONS, WORD OF MOUTH Concrete sunglasses, 3D renderings by Alexis Christodoulou, James Mudge’s new showroom, a collaboration between Kenzo- Takada and Roche Bobois, glorious glassware and more

24

VIEWPOINT Zahira Asmal discusses future cities and the function of the African Architecture Awards

26

INSPIRATION Zeitz MOCAA’s young curators take us on an exclusive tour of Africa’s premier art museum

34

REPORT-BACK A rundown of all the inspiring new work at 100% Design South Africa

38

SHORTLIST Brother Vellies founder Aurora James on her favourite things

42

TREND ALERT Fresh floral designs, Eastern-influenced decor, and a retro-inspired palette

SHOPPING

112 HOMES 64

SECRET GARDEN This Milanese apartment cultivates the idea of an indoor garden with its plants, floral motifs and natural light

74

HEART & CRAFT Harry and Lerato Sitole’s colourful Woodstock home is artfully decorated with Africana

84

DUTCH COURAGE An Amsterdam-based couple find joy in renovating and redecorating

94

BETTER NATURE Craig Price’s seaside retreat in Scarborough shows that a tree house can be sophisticated

50

DETAILS The best that nature has to offer: raw and natural materials

52

ETCETERA Create a dramatic dinner table tableau with artistic candlesticks

67

50

TOOLBOX STORAGE Nifty solutions for decluttering your bedroom, bathroom and kitchen

LIVING 112 TRAVEL IBIZA The easygoing, rustic side of the Balearic isle chiefly known for its nightlife 116 WEEKEND ESCAPE White River is a quiet Lowveld town with plenty of places to eat, stay and see wildlife

78

118 FOOD & DRINK Natural, organic wines and the estates producing them 121 RESTAURANTS A directory of the restaurants getting creative with raw food 120 HOTELS Miavana Luxury Eco Resort off Madagascar and ION Adventure Hotel in Iceland offer luxury stays in out-of-the-way locations 122 TECH Dolce&Gabbana’s striking kitchen line, produced by SMEG 124 ICON: ARDMORE The ceramics workshop that has become a national treasure 126 GARDENS Tips for making beautiful bouquets from Botanicus online florist 130 LAST LOOK The spectacular Link light by willowlamp 4 ELLEDECORATION.CO.ZA THE ORGANIC ISSUE

19

PHOTOGRAPHS CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT ALBERT FONT; FABRIZIO CICCONI; ADAM LETCH; CAR LIGHT

SPOTLIGHT


PUBLISHER & CEO: NDALO MEDIA

Khanyi Dhlomo EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

Leigh Robertson MANAGING EDITOR

Nicole Newman ASSISTANT EDITOR

Ntombenhle Shezi DÉCOR DÉCOR STYLIST Sanri Pienaar DÉCOR ASSISTANT Lungile Nkosi

ART CREATIVE DIRECTOR Marushka Stipinovich JUNIOR DESIGNER Carla Latsky

EDITORIAL & PRODUCTION COPY EDITOR Alice Inggs PRODUCTION CO-ORDINATOR Farhana Makda

DIGITAL CONTENT PRODUCER Modupe Oloruntoba SOCIAL MEDIA MANAGER Palesa Kgasane MULTIMEDIA JOURNALIST Lufuno Ramadwa

CONTRIBUTORS Zahira Asmal, Tony Budden,

Megan Morris and Hilary Prendini Toffoli

ADVERTISING SALES, MARKETING & EVENTS GROUP SALES MARKETING DIRECTOR Cilla Thompson. GROUP SALES MANAGER Michelle Lawrenson. SALES MANAGER Caroline Martin. KEY ACCOUNTS MANAGER (CT) Bernice Blundell. GROUP DIGITAL SALES MANAGER Hana Schneeberg. DIGITAL ACCOUNTS MANAGER Linda Snyman. KEY ACCOUNTS MANAGER Natalie Barker. ADMINISTRATION EXECUTIVE Naazneen Baulackey. SALES & EDITORIAL CO-ORDINATOR Kareesha Naidoo COMMERCIAL CONTENT HEAD OF COMMERCIAL CONTENT Julia Pretorius. COMMERCIAL CONTENT MANAGER Nicola Popplewell COMMERCIAL CONTENT CO-ORDINATOR Tasneem van der Byl MARKETING & PR STRATEGIC MARKETING MANAGER Onke Dumeko. MARKETING ASSISTANT Makoma Manyama CIRCULATION, DISTRIBUTION & SUBSCRIPTIONS OPERATIONS MANAGER André Brink. OPERATIONS CO-ORDINATOR Sindi Khoza. SUBSCRIPTION ENQUIRIES: Call centre: 087 740 1052.

Email: ellesubs@media24.com. SMS: ‘ELLE’ to 32361 (each SMS costs R1,50). Online shop: www.mysubs.co.za/magazine/elle-deco

MANAGEMENT DIRECTORS Khanyi Dhlomo & Lwazi Dhlomo. GROUP BUSINESS DIRECTOR Elaine Chandler. GROUP PUBLISHING DIRECTOR Ingrid Wood EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT TO CEO Marinda Brink. FINANCIAL MANAGER Cherise Rae. FINANCIAL EXECUTIVE (DEBTORS) Lientjie van den Heever WHERE TO FIND US ADDRESS: Bryanston Corner, 1st Floor, Building B, 18 Ealing Crescent (off Culross Road), cnr Main Road & Bryanston Drive, Bryanston 2191 POSTAL ADDRESS: PO Box 2077, Lonehill 2062. TEL: 011 300 6700. FAX: 011 300 6767. MAGAZINE WEBSITE: www.elledecoration.co.za COMPANY WEBSITE: www.ndalomedia.com DISTRIBUTION BY RNA, Anthea Clark (011 248 3514) PRINTED BY CTP Cape Town

Trademark Notice Elle® is used under licence from the trademark owner, Hachette Filipacchi Presse. LAGARDÈRE ACTIVE CHAIRMAN & CEO LAGARDÈRE ACTIVE Denis Olivennes. CEO ELLE FRANCE & INTERNATIONAL Constance Benqué CEO ELLE INTERNATIONAL MEDIA LICENCES François Coruzzi. SVP/INTERNATIONAL DIRECTOR OF ELLE Valéria Bessolo Llopiz. SVP/DIRECTOR OF INTERNATIONAL MEDIA LICENCES, DIGITAL DEVELOPMENT & SYNDICATION Mickael Berret. ELLE INTERNATIONAL PRODUCTIONS Charlotte Deffe, Virginie Dolata. DEPUTY SYNDICATION TEAM MANAGER Thérèse Genevois. SYNDICATION CO-ORDINATOR Audrey Schneuwly COPYRIGHTS MANAGER & DIGITAL SYNDICATION Séverine Laporte. www.ellearoundtheworld.com. INTERNATIONAL AD SALES HOUSE: LAGARDÈRE GLOBAL ADVERTISING CEO François Coruzzi. SVP/INTERNATIONAL ADVERTISING Stéphanie Delattre. Lagardère Global ADVERTISING Postal 124 RUE DANTON, 92300 LEVALLOIS-PERRET, FRANCE WORLD’S LEADING DÉCOR MAGAZINE – 25 INTERNATIONAL EDITIONS

China--Croatia--Denmark--France--Germany--Greece--India--Indonesia--Italy--Japan--Korea--Mexico--Middle-East--Netherlands--Philippines--Poland--Russia South Africa--Spain--Sweden--Taiwan--Thailand--Turkey--UK--US

ELLE (ISSN 1025-9791) October 2017. Editorial contributions are welcome and should be sent to The Editor, ELLE, PO Box 2077, Lonehill 2062. All due care will be taken with material submitted, but the magazine and publishers cannot be held responsible for loss or damage. ELLE assumes no responsibility for returning unsolicited editorial, graphic or other material. All rights in letters and unsolicited editorial and graphic material will be treated as unconditionally assigned for publication and copyright purposes and material will be subject to ELLE’s unrestricted right to edit and comment editorially. ELLE is fully protected by copyright and nothing may be reprinted in whole or part without written permission from the publisher. While reasonable precautions have been taken to ensure the accuracy of advice and information given to readers, the Editor, publisher and proprietor cannot accept responsibility for any damage or inconvenience that may arise therefrom.


PUBLISHER’S NOTE

@khanyidhlomo

Versace dress R21 895 Steve Madden shoes R1 499 Thula Sindi dress Khanyi’s own Roller table lamp R10 000 Studio 19 Legs11 powder-coated stool (excluding fabric) R3 900, Studio 19 Nesting bronze crescent table R9 500, Studio 19 Diamond Shuttle Weave Dhurrie Carpet R2 995, Weylandts

‘We never have to search further than the natural elements around us for an aesthetic that speaks directly to the heart and soul. The connection between earth, sky, botanical, animal and human is stronger than anything synthetic could ever hope to emulate’

8 ELLEDECORATION.CO.ZA THE ORGANIC ISSUE

he recent opening of the Zeitz Museum of Contemporary Art Africa in Cape Town has created a glorious showcase for the continent’s finest visual creatives. The first space offering a permanent exhibition of African works, it is also a hub of inspiration for every facet of our lives. Anyone walking through the space and being exposed to myriad perspectives in terms of composition, angles, light, shadow, proportion, colour and suggestion in the works can’t help feeling as if they’ve undergone a life-transforming experience – and it manifests in the way they look again at their own surroundings, including their living and working spaces. The dynamic energy radiated by the ethos of Zeitz MOCAA manifests the imaginative brilliance and organic power of Africa. The stories of the continent and its peoples are told here by photographers, watercolourists, multimedia creatives and portrait and installation artists in ways that remain with one forever. Speaking of organic energy, this issue celebrates its special warmth and beauty in everything from textiles to furnishings, accessories and colours. We never have to search further than the natural elements around us for an aesthetic that speaks directly to the heart and soul. The connection between earth, sky, botanical, animal and human is stronger than anything synthetic could ever hope to emulate. With the changing season bringing renewed vigour and joie de vivre, it’s an ideal time to rethink style. In this issue, we showcase spectacular homes – in Milan, Cape Town and Amsterdam – that make one long to roll up one’s sleeves and start reshaping, refurbishing and re-exploring every facet of one’s home. That includes outdoor spaces – and the feature on gardens in these pages offers plenty of inspiration. It’s also a time of change for ELLE Decoration. I am pleased to welcome Leigh Robertson as the new Editor-in-Chief of this powerful brand. Leigh brings with her admirable experience, taste and passion for decor and design that will take ELLE Decoration to exciting new heights. As you mark this time of metamorphosis in your own special way, do it with joy and plenitude. And have a great month!

PHOTOGRAPH SHAUN MALLETT; MAKE-UP BY CLARA BANX

@KhanyiDhlomo


...wide plank oak oors for Green Living. Cape Town: 021 510 2846 | Paarden Eiland Johannesburg: 011 262 3117 | Sandton Durban: 031 000 1000 | Umhlanga nicholas@oggie-sa.co.za www.oggie-sa.co.za

hardwood ooring


‘Alain de Botton says that home means the place where our soul feels that it has found its proper physical container, where, every day, the objects we live amongst quietly remind us of our most authentic commitments and loves’

an you feel the change in the air? The season has officially turned and spring’s softer mood and light touch are evident pretty much everywhere, from the optimistically flimsier clothes we choose to wear and the food we feel like eating to the subtle (or more serious) adjustments our surroundings seem to demand. My own rather sad little patio, with its neglected plants and scruffy floors, is begging for a complete overhaul and the old hippie-chic garden furniture I once loved, along with the cushions my husband has always despised, have to go. I think I’m finally ready to let go of all those misguided, mostly sentimental attachments and move on. Joining the ELLE Decoration team just as we began compiling the October issue couldn’t have been better timed. I’ve been able to mull over pages offering plenty of considered ideas for both indoor and outdoor spaces, while the cover encapsulates the uplifting spirit of the month and sets the tone for the fresh inspiration that is coming your way in spades. Since launching in South Africa in 1998, ELLE Decoration has steadily evolved to reflect the vision of its respective editors and the prevailing cultural climate, while staying true to the brand’s ethos of being visually beautiful and a practical read. It’s for the latter reason especially that a friend on a recent and particularly driven bout of spring-cleaning hung onto her stash of magazines, which includes copies from the early years through to the present – the ultimate compliment and a goalpost for future issues. Embracing our increasingly diverse and culturally conversant audience with more intent – and heart – is a driving force behind our new chapter, allowing the magazine and all its related platforms to be a true commentary of who and where we are now. Along with a broader point of view, you can expect more useful and attainable decor stories. The talented people behind the brand might come and go, but a hands-on approach to decorating has always been part of ELLE Decoration’s blueprint. There will also be other new features that take shape as we continue to refine and grow our offering over the following months. We look forward to inviting you inside a more varied selection of homes. In this issue, we couldn’t resist the surprise juxtaposition of a Cape Town cottage with a distinctive African style and a classically elegant, old-world Milanese apartment, among other cleverly conceived contemporary spaces. In an essay titled ‘Why we need to create a home’, philosopher Alain de Botton says our homes serve as reminders of our essence. ‘[They have] a memorialising function, and what they are helping us to remember is, strangely enough, ourselves. ‘Home means the place where our soul feels that it has found its proper physical container, where, every day, the objects we live amongst quietly remind us of our most authentic commitments and loves.’ It’s a sentiment we share and hope always to honour.

leigh.robertson@ndalomedia.com x @lil_robertson

10 ELLEDECORATION.CO.ZA THE ORGANIC ISSUE

PHOTOGRAPH ADAM LETCH

ED-IN-CHIEF’S NOTE


1817-2017. 200 YEARS DURAVIT. RE YOUR FUTUR BATHROOM.

Luv. Nordic elegance. The design of Cecilie Manz‘ bathroom series Luv combines Nordic purism and timeless, emotional elegance. Soft shapes follow a stringent geometry. The result is a new unique design language with precise, clear and ďŹ ne edges. For more information: Duravit South Africa (Pty) Ltd, 30 Archimedes Road, Kramerville, Sandton, Johannesburg, Telephone +27 (0) 11 555 1220, info@za.duravit.com and at www.duravit.co.za


MY STYLISH LIFE x @lrnce

LRNCE textiles are made in Marrakech

THE STYLISH LIFE OF LAURENCE LEENAERT Belgian designer Laurence Leenaert, owner of trendy Marrakech-based textiles and accessories label LRNCE, tells us about the things that add flair to her life and work Sandals from the LRNCE range Nude colours in Morocco

ROTHKO PHOTO BY MATT MCCLAIN/THE WASHINGTON POST VIA GETTY IMAGES

^

12 ELLEDECORATION.CO.ZA THE ORGANIC ISSUE

What was the first fragrance you owned? Oilily. After that I think it was a classic Ralph Lauren scent. The person who has most influenced your career? Lieven Deconinck from Leo Gabin. He is always so encouraging. He also really inspired and motivated me to be focused on work, to dare to try new things, to dare to destroy work and do it all over again… What’s on your decor wish list? A table made from a piece of raw marble. Favourite materials to work with? I’m really into textiles at the moment – wool and cotton to weave blankets and carpets. At the atelier where I make the blankets and pillows [for LRNCE], we try out a lot of new techniques and colour the wool ourselves. I’m discovering more about Moroccan weaving every day; it gives me a lot of ideas. Quote to live by? ‘Everything you can imagine is real.’ – Pablo Picasso Colours you can’t get enough of? Nude colours, like the walls of Marrakech. My friend Youssef, who sells me leather, calls me ‘Madame Nude’. He has a section in his [storeroom] with only nude leather – he knows it’s the only colour I really want. lrnce.com

Art by Mark Rothko

^

An artist everyone should have their eye on? Jess Fuller. I think that what she’s doing with shapes, textures and colours is very interesting. There is a harmony in her work that I really like. An important part of your everyday style? I wear oversized clothes and always have jewellery on my hands, which makes [the look] a bit more feminine. I’m addicted to oversized white T-shirts – I always want to grab a white T-shirt out of my closet instead of something more special. Who or what are you inspired by right now? Rothko’s colours and the work of Cy Twombly. I recently visited an exhibition in Paris where I saw Twombly’s art and I was very impressed. It really stayed on my mind. Designer you’d most like to have lunch with? It’s very hard to only give one answer. My first thought is Consuelo Castiglioni from Marni, which is one of my favourite brands along with Proenza Schouler. Otherwise, Ana Kras – she’s so cool! The accessory everyone needs right now? Colourful sandals or a lot of hand jewellery – I’m crazy about Lara Frankl pieces. Favourite furniture you own? My test mirrors and lamps that I made from rattan in Marrakech. [They come in] different shapes and forms. I really like them because I’ve seen the whole process. I see them more as objects though, not really as things to hang up.

Ana Kras Mara bench (left) and Bonbon lamp tower (above)


DIGITAL WE LOVE BEAUTIFUL THINGS #TR AVELTUESDAY

Dreaming of a holiday or just love reading people’s travel diaries? We have your insider guide to the coastal town of Porto.

AESTHETIC VIBES

Our Insta feed is filled with design inspiration from around the world, covering everything from art to interiors. With over 40 000 followers, @elle_deco is the page you should be following.

IN CASE YOU MISSED IT

ELLEDECOR ATION.CO.ZA INSIDER TIPS

If you’re tired of your interiors and need to make a few changes, visit our website to see our checklist for reworking your living room.

WE LOVE LOCAL

Get an exclusive look into what some of South Africa’s best creatives are up to. From Lukhanyo Mdingi to the Zeitz MOCAA curators, we get to know the people behind the magic.

ARCHITECTURE Surreal buildings from some of the most innovative architects in the world.

PRINCE OF PURPLE

We’ve got the lowdown on the Pantone shade that gets its name from pop music’s Purple One.

See the ELLE Decoration team’s highlights from Decorex, 100% Design South Africa and the FNB JoburgArtFair.

FACEBOOK & TWITTER

Follow us on Twitter and like our page on Facebook to stay upto-date with what’s hot in the world of design, homeware and decor.

DECO EATS

You don’t have to join MasterChef to be clued-up on the latest culinary trends – find recipes for just about any occasion.

Follow our Insta Story for a front-row seat at some of the most exciting events and product launches.

x @ELLE_DECO b ELLEDECORATIONSA d ELLE_DECOSA a @ELLE_DECO


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CRYSTAL SENSES

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SPOTLIGHT JAMES MUDGE SHOWROOM PHOTOGRAPH SUPPLIED

ARCHITECTURE • DESIGN • ART • CULTURE • PEOPLE • PL ACES

Fashion designer Kenzō Takada teams up with Roche Bobois for a Japanese-inspired decor line (p21) and James Mudge opens a new showroom (p22). Zahira Asmal talks future cities (p24), Zeitz MOCAA opens its doors (p26) and we highlight the best of 100% Design (p34)


N EIGH BOU RHOOD WATCH : BRIXTON , JOBU RG The iconic Sentech Tower (popularly known as the Brixton Tower) looms over Brixton, an old neighbourhood on Johannesburg’s western ridge. Brixton is about two kilometres from the city centre, has biking lanes and is accessible from many affordable public transport routes. The neighbourhood is home to artists, students (it is close to two of the city’s largest universities) and working class families. Thomas Chapman, a former Brixton resident who founded architecture and urban design practice Local Studio, worked and lived in the area for several years. ‘Brixton has charm and is an affordable and accessible location. Large parts remain run-down. It is an interesting time [to live here],’he says. Chapman and his business partner, David du Preez, are currently developing 29 Chiswick, the first project of its kind in the Local Studio portfolio. It will include creative studios and other transformative spaces for the community. ‘We do not do private housing. Our focus includes social programmes, community centres and healthcare facilities. We partner with creative developers in the affordable housing sector,’ says Chapman, adding that as a developer he is not interested in turning the neighbourhood into another exclusive enclave. Rather, he is interested in working with the resilience and sustainability of the VISITING BRIXTON Breezeblock This inclusive restaurant, which has an affordable menu, is owned by Du Preez. The architecture was designed by Chapman and has a selvedge aesthetic. The interior, designed by Justin Brett, opens up to a courtyard with beautiful landscaping and succulents. breezeblock.co.za Zietsies Guest House Situated on Brixton koppie, the second-highest hill in Johannesburg, Zietsies boasts impressive views – all the way to the Magaliesburg. Expect cooking that reminds you of home. zietsies.co.za Roving Bantu Kitchen Owner Sifiso Ntuli describes the Roving Bantu Kitchen as part of his contribution to making Brixton an enjoyable place to live. Enjoy live jazz music on a Sunday and take part in the Bantu Trek, a walking tour that takes you past a few of Johannesburg’s heritage sites between Brixton and Braamfontein. The restaurant serves traditional South African food and offers a residency for artists. 072 223 2648 clockwise from top Breezeblock; Zietsies Guest House dining room and staircase; Roving Bantu Kitchen mural

PHOTOGRAPHS THEMBA MBUYISA

Brixton is home to a close-knit community that is actively involved in the development of this area, while maintaining its historic character


SPOTLIGHT: TREND

Trend: Glass The transparency and liquid feel of glass objects add a dreamlike effect to any space

clockwise from top left Parabola lamp, R21 995, Weylandts; Alabaster glass planter, R150, Woolworths; Glass paperweight with black swirl, R880, Cécile & Boyd; Mercury Vessel by David Reade, R6 200, Okha; WING occasional table, from R185 560, Roche Bobois; Coil, R46 900 for set of three, Casarredo; Bubble Bean, R7 513, Paul Alexander; Coloria by Evangelos Vasileiou, R10 128, Ligne Roset; Marcel caraffes, R1 300 (clear) and R1 700 (grey), Casarredo; Marble Patch Round table, from R18 600, Egg Designs; Krystal square lamp, R16 000, Dokter and Misses; Clyde table, R33 040, Ligne Roset

THE ORGANIC ISSUE ELLEDECORATION.CO.ZA 19


SPOTLIGHT: WHAT’S NEW HEAVY DUTY

DIARY DATES: EXHIBITION OPENINGS A Continent Beyond

20 eight design studio’s customisable concrete sunglasses push the perceived boundaries of cement-based products. The design, by architect Handre de la Rey, was inspired by the work of Japanese architect Tadao Ando and will be produced in a limited run of 1 000 units, each handcrafted and individually numbered. The concept won a 2017 PPC Imaginarium award in the industrial design category. The sunglasses are available from GUILD. 20eight.co.za Concrete sunglasses, R6 500

ARCHITECTURE IN FOCUS: RESPONSIBLE DESIGN Braam de Villiers of Earthworld Architects is inspired by buildings that are simple but provocative, and which respect the natural environment. These are also the kinds of buildings that his practice designs. Earthworld was established in October 2000 by Braam and award-winning architect André Eksteen. Since then, the practice has designed numerous standout buildings in South Africa that are premised on sustainability and site-specific context. These include the commanding low-energy I-Cat Eco-Factory in Pretoria, the modernist Centenary Building at the University of Pretoria and the interactive Foghound Coffee Shop in Midrand, which is constructed from shipping containers. ‘Our clients are demanding sustainable solutions,’ says Braam. ‘Together, we discover innovative processes.’ ewarch.co.za

14 September to 14 October A Continent Beyond features the work of 19 artists who have helped define and redefine contemporary art within and beyond South Africa. Exhibiting artists include Roger Ballen, Mary Sibande, Andrew Tshabangu and Maurice Mbikayi. The show takes place at the Gallery MOMO in Cape Town. gallerymomo.com

1:54 Contemporary African Art Fair 5 to 8 October The fair dedicated to contemporary African art will return to London for its fifth edition. The programme includes the first UK solo exhibition by British-Moroccan photographer Hassan Hajjaj in seven years, showcasing both new and celebrated works. Additional highlights include a courtyard installation by Cameroonian artist Pascale Marthine Tayou, the 1:54 Lounge designed by Rashaad Newsome and a sound installation by Nigerian artist Emeka Ogboh. 1-54.com

Frieze London 5 to 8 October The annual international contemporary art fair, taking place in Regent’s Park, will feature more than 160 leading galleries from around the world, including South Africa’s Goodman Gallery, Stevenson and blank projects. frieze.com

Guy Tillim 12 October to 25 November A solo exhibition of new work by photographer Guy Tillim. stevenson.info


ROCHE BOBOIS X KENZÒ TAK ADA Japanese-French fashion designer Kenzō Takada is currently focused on decor, creating a collection for Roche Bobois. ‘From the outset, I wanted to use inspiration from the patterns found on kimonos, specifically the weaving used for the Nō theatres. These designs and patterns were the guidelines of this collection, but I wanted to completely change their colours and interpret them in a new way,’ says Takada. The collection includes fabrics, pillows, ceramics, rugs, pillows, poufs and vases. Of the graphic fabrics, Takada says, ‘Every effort has been made to ensure that these new fabrics, although made industrially, still respect the spirit of the old kimonos, paying particular attention to the jacquards and materials used.’ roche-bobois.com

THE ORGANIC ISSUE ELLEDECORATION.CO.ZA 21


SPOTLIGHT: WORD OF MOUTH Showing off Furniture designer and manufacturer James Mudge has opened a showroom next door to his factory on Hope Street, Cape Town, providing an ambient environment in which to showcase his work and the work of fellow designers and artists. The capacious interior is a blank canvas against which Mudge’s artisanal wooden pieces, crafted using traditional cabinet-making techniques, are artfully displayed. Exhibitions are curated by Mudge’s sister, Rosie. jamesmudge.com

James Mudge furniture on display in the design studio’s new showroom, with 3D architectural renderings by artist Alexis Christodoulou

Creative spaces Winemaker, writer and artist Alexis Christodoulou makes intriguing digital renderings of surreal architecture and interiors How did you start making 3D renderings? I was always interested in this type of design, but it looked like something that required formal training. My friends introduced me to the software aspect of it and it suddenly occurred to me that I could teach myself. The next day I was on YouTube, watching tutorials. That’s basically how I learn everything now, including how to iron a shirt properly. How long does it take to complete a single work? Sometimes I can make one in a few hours. Sometimes I have to sit for a few days to figure something out.  x @teaaalexis

Alexis’s work is on display at the James Mudge showroom.


French twist A French-inspired collection from homeware retailer @home and local fashion designer Gavin Rajah Gavin Rajah and @home have produced a limited-edition collection of scented candles and richly embroidered linen called Prêt Á Vivre/Ready to Live. Rajah’s team was afforded complete creative freedom, from product and packaging design to the creative direction of the product shoot. ‘@home understood and embraced the vision I had, and refined it,’ says Rajah.

ROUND UP: GEOMETRIC SHAPES AND PATTERNS

Interactive, functional art from Xavier Clarisse Design Fan, R37 000

Dirty Mirrors by Stay Evil Kids Kal-a-bunga solid jacaranda sphere base with sunset gradient mirror, R8 500, and Electric Moon solid eucalyptus diamond base with black mirror, R10 000

Wallpaper from Robin Sprong Mosaic Quartz by Paula Pappenheim; Boomschors in Warm Brown Black and Spinnerag in Skin Cream, both by Sarah Corynen, all R587/m2

TASTEFUL CELLAR Graham Beck Wines’ new direction – a focus on Méthode Cap Classique – will result in the construction of a new pressing cellar with equipment imported from France. In the meantime, it’s worth visiting the estate’s tasting room. The terracotta-coloured building has been designed to blend into the surrounding area. The interior is accented in marble, leather, copper, wood and glass and has a 180° view across the valley. A mural and framed contemporary prints in the style of Anton Kannemeyer and Conrad Botes tell the story of the estate.

THE ORGANIC ISSUE ELLEDECORATION.CO.ZA 23


VIEWPOINT

ARCHITECTURE IN MOTION The Director of research, publishing and placemaking company The City, Zahira Asmal, considers the function of the Africa Architecture Awards and the ways in which architects might create future spaces, places and cities that facilitate the movement of ideas

from top (left to right) Zahira Asmal inspiring architecture: National Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington, DC designed by Sir David Adjaye; Apartheid Museum in Johannesburg; detail of the Serpentine Pavilion 2017 designed by Diébédo Francis Kéré It also honours the important work undertaken by entities (and individuals) that engage with the built environment. There is a general understanding that governments make cities. Since my time working with David Adjaye on his book, Adjaye Africa Architecture, I have been preoccupied with the role of architecture in making cities. I often questioned David about this – ‘What if this idea were located at the core of making spaces, places and cities? What would be the architect’s role? Who would write the brief ?’ Our dialogues have informed my thinking in relation to placemaking in African cities. There is a new force of ideas exchange emerging. Rapid technological development, increased global travel and immediate media access facilitates fast and wide-reaching communication, which means that there is expanding connectivity in the world. This also means that the frameworks underpinning how we engage have changed. Ideas formulate within the context of an evolving local-global paradigm and the power of ideas is moving rapidly beyond borders. Ideas move as people move; they invigorate places through an infusion of new perspectives. It is ultimately these ideas that make inclusive spaces, places and cities of the future. A rigorous interrogation of our histories, traditions and cultures should be undertaken. Ideas that are developed in this way are inclusive and constructive. Only when understanding and engaging takes place at the intersection of geography, culture, old and emerging identities and equally represented histories will the ideas that develop be sustainable. My advice to architects has always been to write the brief and imagine the world for future societies. The aim is to go beyond the ‘request for proposal’ and tender-based systems currently available; to move beyond the role of facilitator-and-promoter of someone else’s ideas. Instead, architects should reimagine spaces, places and cities that facilitate the movement of ideas. Architects are in a unique position to widen the platform for exchange to include people from differing backgrounds who share common interests and to instigate a flow of ideas between formal and informal sectors, vulnerable groups, artists and curators – in addition to government, corporate entities and other powerful decision makers. Rather than creating places that highlight difference and contribute to marginalisation, architects should work with others to create places where collaborative ideas can flourish and new societies can form. We should not be limited by present opportunities; rather, we should focus on future possibilities.

The Africa Architecture Awards celebrates design excellence and promotes awareness of the role and importance of architecture across Africa. Read about the winners and find out about the ceremony held at Zeitz MOCAA on elledecoration.co.za 24 ELLEDECORATION.CO.ZA THE ORGANIC ISSUE

ARCHITECTURE PHOTOGRAPHS (FROM LEFT TO RIGHT) GEORGE ROSE/GETTY IMAGES; CHRISTOF KOEPSEL/BONGARTS/GETTY IMAGES; NIKLAS HALLE'N/AFP/GETTY IMAGES

In addition to my day job as Director of The City, I have the honour of serving as advisor to the Africa Architecture Awards. The awards have an ambitious aim: ‘to celebrate design excellence and promote an increased awareness of the role and importance of architecture across Africa’. What appeals to me is the inclusion of a ‘critical discourse’ category alongside the ‘built’, ‘speculative’ and ‘emerging’ categories. The addition of this category outlines a clear mission to include a range of professions that intersect with architecture. It also shows that the awards go beyond backslapping and look deeper into the development of architectural craft. Ultimately, this elevates architectural discourse and highlights the accountability of architecture professionals in the pursuit of making better buildings, spaces and cities in our urbanising, globalised world.


standing, from left African Arts Trust Assistant Curator for the Moving Image Michaela Limberis; Mikael Kamras and Fredrik Oweson Assistant Curator of Sculpture Marijke Tymbios; Adrianne Iann Assistant Curator of Books and Works on Paper Sven Christian; AKO Foundation Assistant Curator of Costume at the Costume Institute Githan Coopoo; AKO Foundation Assistant Curator of Photography at the Roger Ballen Foundation Centre for Photography Gcotyelwa Mashiqa and AKO foundation Assistant Curator of Painting Xola Mlwandle seated, from left AKO Foundation Assistant Curator of Special Projects of the Curatorial Lab Sakhisizwe Gcina, SAIFM Assistant Curator of Photography at the Roger Ballen Foundation Centre for Photography Bafana Zembe and Wendy Fischer Assistant Curator of Performance Tammy Langtry

ZEITZGEIST Zeitz MOCAA’s young curators take us on an exlusive tour of the world’s largest museum dedicated to contemporary art from Africa and its diaspora TEXT NTOMBENHLE SHEZI PORTRAITS THE SEPPIS ARCHITECTURAL IMAGES IWAN BAAN


INSPIRATION

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ast month marked the highly anticipated grand opening of the Zeitz Museum of Contemporary Art Africa (Zeitz MOCAA) in Cape Town’s Silo District. The museum was constructed in collaboration with the V&A Waterfront and entrepreneur and philanthropist Jochen Zeitz. Zeitz’s own collection of art is on long-term loan to the museum and includes works by Zanele Muholi, Kudzanai Chiurai, Cyrus Kabiru and Michele Mathison, as well as commissioned artworks that have not been available for public viewing until now. Various cultural institutions around the world have created dedicated exhibition spaces for art from Africa. The Smithsonian National Museum of African Art in Washington DC has over 9 000 pieces of art from almost every African country, including photography, sculpture, paintings and textiles. The Contemporary African Art Collection (CAAC), a private collection owned by Italian businessman Jean Pigozzi, comprises nearly 7 000 paintings, sculptures, drawings, photographs, installations and videos from artists living in sub-Saharan African countries and is on loan to art institutions like the Louis Vuitton Foundation and the Tate Modern. In comparison, Zeitz MOCAA fares favourably: it is the largest museum in the world dedicated to contemporary art from Africa and the diaspora. The monumental structure that houses the museum is situated in what used to be the Grain Silo building. London-based architect Thomas Heatherwick and his studio – who are behind notable architectural developments such as Pacific Place, a 640 000m2 complex in Hong Kong; the UK Pavilion at the 2010 Shanghai World Expo and the London 2012 Olympic Cauldron – were commissioned with the task of reimagining the Grain Silo complex for the museum, while maintaining the texture of the building’s heritage. ‘What do you do with a giant building made out of tubes? We were so used to property developers making shopping spaces. It was unconventional – an open brief to make this a cultural institution,’ says Heatherwick.

‘We did not want something that felt like a spaceship that had just landed, where people would only come to take pictures outside. We wanted a place people would want to go into and explore’ The construction, which took several years to complete, saw Heatherwick cutting into the heart of the building to create an oval-shaped interior with nine floors of gallery spaces; a rooftop sculpture garden; a storage and art conservation area and centres for Art Education, Curatorial Excellence, Performative Practice, and Photography and the Moving Image, as well as a Costume Institute. ‘We did not want something that felt like a spaceship that had just landed, where people would only come to take pictures outside. We wanted a place people would want to go into and explore,’ says Heatherwick. One of the most important aspects of the establishment of Zeitz MOCAA is the museum’s curatorship programme, which is designed to give several young candidates practical curatorial experience and skills by involving them in all components of a functioning art museum. Under the mentorship of Executive Director and Chief Curator Mark Coetzee, each candidate will be encouraged to do individual research, while working on a special project in their field of expertise. We spoke to a few of the candidate curators to find out more.

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Gcotyelwa Mashiqa AKO Foundation Assistant Curator of Photography at the Roger Ballen Foundation Centre for Photography Has being involved in photography and visual arts on many levels changed your way of seeing the world? Absolutely. Photography and visual arts train the eye to look and look until you can see beyond the familiar. Its documentary ability to stage and re-enact events has allowed photographers to either positively or negatively portray Africa. One of my roles is to establish critical debate and awareness about the effects of photography on the world’s perception of the continent, its diaspora and its people. Is it always important to tell the story of a photograph – the context in which it was made, the photographer’s relationship to the subject and his or her perspective? Context is always important, but it is especially important for photography about Africa and its cultures. Photography describes and conveys a sense of place and establishes ideas about the people of that place and how they live. Africa has become abstract and conceptual. It carries a history of misconceptions, myths and stereotypes. The viewer’s prior experience and the context of the viewing play a part in how meaning is derived. Each photograph encourages the viewer to contemplate or decipher the physical context in which the picture was taken. It allows the viewer to (re)imagine and (re) construct the picture’s context or location. Can you give us some insight into a project you are developing at the moment? I am assisting in the preparation of an early career retrospective by Kudzanai Chiurai, which is being curated by internationally respected curator Azu Nwagbogu, Zeitz MOCAA’s Curator at Large for Photography. I have also co-curated the exhibition on the Tunisian artist Mouna Karray that will inaugurate the opening of the Centre for Photography at the museum. Helping to curate this inaugural exhibition is an honour. How do you see the role of a curator? I see curators as mediators who attempt to meet the needs of the artist, preserving and maintaining the institutional vision of the museum, and opening up meaning for the public.

‘One of my roles is to estabish critical debate and awareness about the effects of photography on the world’s perception of the continent, its diaspora and its people’ this page AKO Foundation Assistant Curator of Photography at the Roger Ballen Foundation Centre for Photography Gcotyelwa Mashiqa; Zeitz MOCAA has nine floors of gallery spaces opposite Adrianne Iann Assistant Curator of Books and Works on Paper Sven Christian


INSPIRATION

Sven Christian Adrianne Iann Assistant Curator of Books and Works on Paper How does your experience in academia and publishing influence the work you are doing at Zeitz MOCAA? Academia was helpful in beginning to understand the theoretical concerns that underpin a lot of contemporary practice. It also helped to broaden my knowledge of art history. This can be very useful when thinking about the cultural relevance of objects and the various processes that give birth to them. At the same time, universities and institutions can also be places where ideas stagnate and solidify. My experience of publishing was quite the opposite. You’re constantly engaging with new ideas and new perspectives. At the museum, I try to find the middle ground. Is there one type of medium – paintings, sculpture, visual, digital – that you identify with or prefer? I majored in painting, so I am very familiar with the medium, but wouldn’t go so far as to say that I prefer or identify with it over other mediums, I’ve just spent more time with it. As a curator, I feel it’s important to understand various mediums and how they best serve what the artist is trying to communicate. It’s about building a vocabulary.

’Our primary objective as curators is to find a way for our audiences to have meaningful engagements with the work on exhibition‘ Can you give us some insight into a project you are developing at the moment? The exhibition I am busy working on is called Publishing Against the Grain and was originally conceived by Independent Curators International in New York as a travelling exhibition that focuses on the current state of alternative publishing globally. Travelling exhibitions are unique in that they are not designed with a specific geographical context in mind. The content of this exhibition is rooted in multiple histories of dialogue and exchange, much of which will be new for local audiences. How do you see the role of a curator? Our primary objective as curators is to find a way for our audiences to have meaningful engagements with the work on exhibition. Rather than trying to bridge the gap between the artist and the institution, I view our role as an attempt to bridge the gap between the artist and the public. The institution is simply the vessel. I don’t think it should be regarded as the end goal.

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Sakhisizwe Gcina AKO Foundation Assistant Curator of Special Projects of the Curatorial Lab What does your work entail? The Zeitz MOCAA Curatorial Lab is a multi-disciplinary space for experimental curatorial practice and research. We explore under-represented topics and social issues within the context of a contemporary art museum and help generate new ways of doing exhibitions. I co-ordinate the conception and execution of researched topics, subjects and themes of the Curatorial Lab’s projects and exhibitions. How do you pick a theme for each exhibit? I think about how we can change the stereotypical perceptions of Africa and the history of misinformed and false representations of the continent’s culture. I consider the current trends in the art fairs, biennales and auction houses and then attempt to determine what is absent or needs to be explored further within the prevailing arts industry discourse. Museums have a responsibility to educate the public through fair artistic representation and the portrayal of a diversity of ideas that question the status quo. You were part of a panel discussion on Afrofuturism at the Cape Town Art Fair. What is your take on Afrofuturism in art? We are currently seeing a resurgence of the embrace of an African black beauty aesthetic, popularised during the anti-apartheid and civil rights movements; the success of African literature and African storytelling, and the

reinterpretation of African diasporic narratives in mainstream media like cinema, music and fashion. Political ideas such as pan-Africanism and the Black Consciousness Movement are being expressed through the removal of symbols of oppression, statues and artwork. There is also an increase in conscious-awakening debate about the legacy and effects of colonialism and slavery. Afrofuturism continues to reflect and interrogate these issues through a subversive science-fiction lens and elevates their significance, helping us to re-imagine a different world where racial equality, sexual transgression and spiritual freedom can exist as realities. Which artists are currently on your radar and why? The first Zeitz MOCAA Curatorial Lab project will celebrate and engage with the LGBTQI+ community, particularly how the current oppression of the gay rights movement and homophobia on the African continent is a major human rights issue. The project strives to promote intercultural understanding between the general public and the LGBTQI+ community. The project will promote education through the arts and develop critical thinking about gender, sexual orientation and human rights. It is important for us to show work by queer artists that comes from lived experience.

’I think about how we can change the stereotypical perceptions of Africa and the history of misinformed and false representations of the continent’s culture‘


INSPIRATION

Michaela Limberis African Arts Trust Assistant Curator for the Moving Image Can you tell us about your creative process? How long does it take you to complete an exhibition? The exhibitions I have curated in the past all draw from the same conceptual impetus: the camera as a self-reflexive medium. Essentially, I have only ever ‘started’ an exhibition once, because they all function as extensions of a single idea. I often select artwork that doesn’t necessarily deal directly with the issues I am looking at, but by framing [the artworks] in the context of the show, I can draw attention to the process of how they were made. The physical installation of an exhibition goes extremely quickly because they’re sitespecific and everyone involved works together to install the work. What are your thoughts on how museums and galleries are engaging with new media? I think that museums and galleries recognise that new media artwork is an effective way to engage the general public because of the relatability of its components and processes. It also manages to create a multisensory experience. Tell us more about your Art Meets Camera, Art Meets TV and Art Meets App projects. They all fall under the umbrella of ‘Art Meets’, an initiative I founded to provide a platform and support base for local artists through exhibitions, video and critical dialogue. Art Meets App is currently on a local scale but is developing towards reaching artists and audiences across the continent. Can you give us some insight into a project you are developing at the moment? We are currently installing Isaac Julien’s nine-screen installation, Ten Thousand Waves. It required an enormous amount of planning and preparation. Communication is key when so many people are involved in a cross-continental single installation. It has been a privilege to watch Tom Cullen, who assists Julien with all his installations, at work. He is so well-versed in the process, having worked internationally with prominent new media artists. Q

’The exhibitions I have curated in the past all draw from the same conceptual impetus: the camera as a self-reflexive medium‘ ZEITZ MOCAA IN NUMBERS

116 The number of tubular structures comprising the original Grain Silo building 2-3 million Thomas Heatherwick’s estimation of the number of hours spent carving out the interior space 106 galleries in the museum 6 000m2 of dedicated exhibition space 1 800 visitors The museum’s capacity 10pm Closing time on ‘Late Night Fridays’ R180 Entry fee for a single day R250 Annual membership fee R0 Entry fee for citizens of African countries on Wednesdays between 10am and 1pm

this page, from top left African Arts Trust Assistant Curator for the Moving Image Michaela Limberis; the Zeitz MOCAA building was orginally a grain silo comprising a number of concrete tubes opposite interior detail of Zeitz MOCAA; AKO Foundation Assistant Curator of Special Projects of the Curatorial Lab Sakhisizwe Gcina

Find out more about the curators and their upcoming projects on elledecoration.co.za THE ORGANIC ISSUE ELLEDECORATION.CO.ZA 31


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above Check scatter cushion, R250; Wide Wonky Bottle, R295; Tall Wonky Bottle, R395; Slated table lamp, R1 695 below Kerry 100% linen slipcover occasional chairs, R8 995 each; Knox 2 Seater couch, from R7 995; Thomas coffee table, R6 995 opposite page Edison dining chairs, R2 995 each; Thomas console, R5 995; Thomas 2,8m dining table, R12 995; Thomas bench, R6 495

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LIGHT FANTASTIC Mema Design Joburg-based studio Mema Designs’ latest line of sculptural and ethereal pendants – handcrafted using woven aluminium fabrics – were a showstopper. The result of intensive research and experimentation by designers Ari Geva and Sian Eliot, these innovative pieces are as functional as they are works of art. memadesigns.co.za Dokter and Misses x Ngwenya Glass Dokter and Misses’ Katy Taplin and Adriaan Hugo worked with the artisans of Swaziland’s Ngwenya Glass to create their Moonjelly lights, winning them the award for Best Lighting Design. dokterandmisses.com

design

ON DISPL AY

This year’s 100% Design South Africa launched inspiring new work by leading names, presented some outstanding collaborations and introduced tomorrow’s stars Innovation and impeccable craftsmanship were at the fore at We Are Joburg, an installation showcasing the edgy urban sophistication inherent to the city’s design mien.

BURNING UP Gregor Jenkin Feature Designer for 2017, Gregor Jenkin, also won the top honour of South African Designer of the Year in recognition of the consistent quality, originality and sustained success of his work. His unique fireplace design won Product of the Year.

from left Façade cabinet by Tonic Design; Menagerie shelf by Julia Day of Generation


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COOL COLLAB:

Caeserstone Concepts

Luxe surface manufacturer Caesarstone is no stranger to teaming up with design luminaries the world over, including Jaime Hayon and Tom Dixon, with the resulting work showcased at the Milan Design Fair. Caesarstone’s collaborations with three local masters of their craft – Dokter and Misses, father-and-daughter duo Chris and Anna Weylandt and Gregor Jenkin Studio – officially launched at 100% Design South Africa. The designers were tasked with incorporating the classic marble-esque surface product into their pieces, contrasted with materials such as raw timber or steel. caesarstone.co.za

above Chris and Anna Weylandt’s slick Convivium range, comprising the Luma drinks cabinet and a trio of side tables below Dokter and Misses used various Caesarstone quartz products in their striking lights. Gregor Jenkin Studio incorporated Caesarstone’s Rugged Concrete quartz surface in their elegant table, making it suitable for indoor and outdoor use

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FOR THE LOVE OF CHAIRS Houtlander ‘We are artisans firstly; our designs come out of understanding how wood is a changing material and knowing what manufacturing methods work best. We’re inspired by the love and connection people develop towards well-crafted furniture,’ says Phillip Hollander of Houtlander. Together with business partner Stephen Wilson, Hollander relaunched the Joburgbased brand at the show. Houtlander took the award for Best Furniture Design with a finely crafted spindle-back seating range in durable, sustainable oak. houtlander.co.za Jacobs Collection With a background in fine art, designer Christine Goosen brings a confident visual language into her striking, clean-lined pieces, produced with contemporary architectural spaces in mind. jacobscollection.co.za Seed to Seat

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Commissioned by the American Hardwood Export Council, seven local furniture designers applied themselves to the task of crafting a chair from sustainable hardwood. seedtoseat.info

Pone Creatives

Luvarre

Textile designer Lesego Maloka’s vibrant, soulful range of hand-tufted rugs and textiles take inspiration from African heritage, with skills gleaned from her late grandmother.

Lumar Fourie and Navarre Ebersohn, who both have a strong background in design, founded their Pretoria-based furniture manufacturing company just over six months ago, with the aim of creating timeless pieces that also serve as ‘functional art’. The pair experiment with unusual combinations of materials, such as concrete, timber and handstitched leather. ‘Our ethos is to bring detail back into design,’ says Ebersohn. Look at the underside of any of their pieces for an ‘element of surprise’.

Pone means seed in Sesotho and light in Setswana. A seed I have planted has become a light in my life


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opposite page, clockwise from top David Krynauw seated on his playful, interactive Playbench 2 in American red oak; Jacobs Collection’s Lounge chair; Andrew Dominic’s elegant Eve chair in American cherry this page, clockwise from top The Coronation Bench by Houtlander; Laurie Wiid van Heerden combined his signature cork with American soft maple in the Meraki Daybed. Dokter and Misses used American tulipwood to craft The Blue Chair, a reimagining of the first chair the design company produced in 2007

Kino Winner of the Best of 100% Talent award, Kino’s Nico Hendriksz and Anton Louw opened their woodworking workshop on a farm in Durbanville straight after completing their Industrial Design studies. Of their furniture brand, Hendriksz says, ‘We wanted a project that we could grow over time, with products we could perfect.’ Their Botanic Cupboard (right) combines a black ash exterior with wallpaper designed by Room13 and supplied by Robin Sprong. kino.co.za

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Furniture must have aesthetic appeal, be functional and inviting to touch

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SHORTLIST

SHORTLIST: AUROR A JAMES The Brother Vellies founder’s favourite things I am always hypnotised by the spices, bright colours and snake charmers. The smell of fresh flowers at La Sultana [hotel] in Marrakech makes it my home away from home. 2. MEZCAL

I love Mezcal, which is a very specific type of tequila. Hotel Delmano in Brooklyn makes the best Mezcal drink in the city! 3. MÙN’S ORGANIC ARGAN OIL

It’s a one-stop shop for all-over beauty. 4. BROTHER VELLIES STORE, NEW YORK

It has been a labour of love that I am over the moon about. I also really love LCD – it’s the cutest little boutique in Venice Beach, Los Angeles. x @aurorajames

Above: Mezcal Right: Brother Vellies store, NY

For Brother Vellies founder and 2015 CFDA/Vogue Fashion Fund-winner, Aurora James, it is important to preserve craft and create new jobs for artisans in the countries where her products (shoes and accessories) and materials are made – Burkina Faso, Ethiopia, Ghana, Kenya, Mali, Morocco, Namibia, Nigeria and South Africa. The Brother Vellies supply chain is transparent, the wages fair and the production sustainable. James, who is based in the US, tries to visit the five Vellies workshops every two to three months, and sees her suppliers as family. The designs, which use elements like python skin, ostrich feathers, textiles and shearling, and riff on traditional African footwear – the tufted Dhara Sandal, colourful Burkina Slide, goatskin clog and black springbok hide Erongo, for example – have drawn support for the brand from celebrity fashion enthusiasts like Kanye West and Hailey Baldwin. Since the company’s conception, the Brother Vellies range has expanded to include heels, pumps, boots and handbags, as well as vellies and sandals; a reflection of James’s broadening horizons. As the well-travelled entrepreneur notes, ‘Our shoes are made for magical adventures’ – wherever those might be. brothervellies.com

5. SEAN KELLY GALLERY IN NEW YORK

I really loved seeing Hugo McCloud’s work here. 6. HANDMADE DIAMOND RING

I made it when I was nominated for a CFDA award. It means a lot to me because I made it for myself during a really special time. That ring is part of a personal celebration. 7. MY PLANTS

All 18 of them. 8. GREAT EXPECTATIONS (1998, ALFONSO CUARÓN)

Starring Gwyneth Paltrow and Ethan Hawke, it’s my favourite movie. I am also known to frequently reference the ’90s movie Clueless. 9. HOTEL AMOUR, PARIS, AND LEEU HOUSE, FRANSCHHOEK

I travel to Paris twice a year and love Hotel Amour. I have been dying to visit Cape Town again and would like to check out Leeu House. 10. BRANDON MAXWELL

Brandon is an incredible designer and a very good friend. He makes dresses that empower women to feel and look their best. 11. BROTHER VELLIES TOTE

It goes everywhere with me! 12. GOLDENEYE BOUTIQUE HOTEL & RESORT, JAMAICA

It’s an amazing getaway. Goldeneye Boutique Hotel & Resort

38 ELLEDECORATION.CO.ZA THE ORGANIC ISSUE

PHOTO OF AURORA JAMES BY FERNANDO LEON/GETTY IMAGES; BRANDON MAXWELL BY CARLOS OSORIO/TORONTO STAR VIA GETTY IMAGES

1. MOROCCO


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I NS T I NC T

Floral designs take a turn for the eclectic. Patterned, oversized or abstract – whichever style you choose, it’s all about the flowers (left) Rosette drinks cabinet from R100 600, Egg (below) Porcelain Rose rug from R22 241, Voke Rugs

Agate dining chair in Christian Lacroix velvet R13 700, Egg Designs

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THIS PAGE VICTOR VIRGILE/GAMMA-RAPHO VIA GETTY IMAGES; OPPOSITE ESTROP/GETTY IMAGES

Violet rug in light green from R11 284, Voke Rugs


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The marble not yet carved can hold the form of every thought the greatest artist has – Michelangelo

this page (clockwise from top left) Thibaut Montado Cork wallpaper in Putty and Metallic Pewter and White and Pearl both R2 510/roll, St. Leger & Viney; Quartz surface in Atlantic Salt R3 990/m2 including installation, Caesarstone; Peacock Green 30mm granite R2 850/m2, WOMAG; Polished Tundra Grey marble from R1 197/m2, The Tile Gallery; Venice Red 20mm marble R6 840/m2, WOMAG opposite 1: Oliato rustic European FSC oak in Mink Grey R1 402/m2, Oggie 2: Sisal fine boucle rug in Grey from R792/m2, Rebtex; Polished Tundra Grey marble from R1 197/m2, The Tile Gallery; Powafix dry black oxide R14/500g, Builders 3: Sardo Lon tile R626/m², WOMAG; Market Mosaics 4mm glass mosaics in Coffee Bean R59/sheet, Douglas Jones 4: Large green marble handle holder R450, Mezzanine

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BEHIND THE CANDELABRA No table setting is complete without candlesticks. Try mixing and matching styles to create a tableau straight out of a Renaissance painting PHOTOGRAPH SARAH DE PINA PRODUCTION AND STYLING SANRI PIENAAR ASSISTANT HELANZI DREYER

this page (clockwise from top left) Medium stone candlestick R850, Egg Designs; Siluet candle holders by Gaia & Gino R2 800 for a set of three, Tonic; Glass jellyfish in blue and orange R450, Egg Designs; Carlos glass candle holder R1 425, La Grange Interiors; Belt candle holder R995, La Grange Interiors; Cream ceramic vase R1 200, Egg Designs; Black candle holders small R370, and large R450, Mezzanine; Glass candlestick R210, Inappropriate Décor; Zoffany Birogo fabric in Mimosa R2 844/m, St. Leger & Viney


COMPILED BY LUNGILE NKOSI

ETCETERA

Fulcrum candlesticks, from R6 880 each, Créma Design

Flower stem effect candle holder, R279, Zara Home

Carlos glass candle holders, from R1 300, La Grange Interiors

Knysna Loerie candlesticks, R17 500 each, Ardmore

Ferm Living diamond candle holders, R540 each, Mezzanine Interiors

Candleholder Belt in assorted colours, R599, La Grange Interiors

Forrester candle holder in Terracotta Black, R855, La Grange Interiors

Sagaform candle holder, R389, Yuppiechef

Votive blue tealights, R70, Cécile and Boyd

Marlena candle holders, R1 400, Joe Paine

Blessing candle holders, from R500, Egg Designs

Abbesse candle holder, R1 568, Ligne Roset

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DECO PROMO THE BATHROOM, YOUR LUXURIOUS HAVEN The most private room in your home is no longer just a place to freshen up – bathrooms have become havens for luxury and relaxation A luxurious, peaceful bathroom is the best space to relax your body and ease your mind after a long day, whether you unwind by indulging in a bubble bath and a good book, singing in the shower or simply taking a break from everything. Your bathroom floors should be the first to inspire your mood. Belgotex makes selecting the perfect flooring for your bathroom much simpler and more fun. With the Lifestyle Collection you can discover your element and get the best flooring for your bathroom, regardless of how you choose to spend your time there.

WATER Water is ever-flowing. It is dreamy and inconsistent, like the tides. It is nautical themes and beach decor, always cool like a driftwood sculpture, a flowing water feature or picture of wild waves crashing on a wall or seashells draped over a kitchen chandelier. Water is where you go to relax and recharge.

Find out which element suits you best by taking our quiz at inyourelement.co.za and discover the perfect floor for you!

IN YOUR ELEMENT Inspired by the tones and textures of the five elements – Earth, Air, Fire, Water and Spirit – you’ll find the perfect foundation for your bathroom with the Lifestyle Collection, conveniently organised into colours and textures that will make you feel right at home. From cushion vinyl to luxury vinyl tiles, the Lifestyle Collection has a variety of options for you to choose in order to complete your bathroom. The wood-look flooring trend has taken the design and decor world by storm, making vinyl flooring perfect for bathrooms because it is warm and comfortable underfoot, water resistant and slip-proof.

Visit belgotexfloors.co.za

facebook.com/belgotex | @belgotex

(From top) The sleek and fashionable real-wood look of Toledo’s oak-inspired Barn Pine 694M, Chalet Oak 000S and Chalet Oak 939M will give your bathroom the ultimate sophistication. Charleston in Partridgewood gives you the beauty of the forest captured in a smooth-finish luxury vinyl tile perfect for your luxurious haven.


PLANT A SEED

Green Living 2017 House Doctor housedoctor.dk


TOOLBOX

Even if you’ve only just started cultivating cuttings or are having to think small, you can still dream big. Get going in your garden with expert tips on tools to use, decor that works outdoors, urban gardens and plants with a purpose

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The trendiest plants you can grow are ones that you can eat! – Jane Griffiths

GROW YOUR OWN ORGANIC VEGETABLES – Jane Griffiths, author of Jane’s Delicious Garden

· Start small and get used to planting and maintaining one or two beds.

GARDENING NEED NOT BE A CHORE. USE BEAUTIFUL TOOLS AND PRODUCTS TO MAKE WORKING IN THE GARDEN A PLEASURABLE ACTIVITY.

· Replenish your soil using organic matter such as compost and manure. This will encourage beneficial micro-organisms to thrive. · Plant a variety of vegetables and herbs as densely as possible in each bed. · Start with easy-to-grow vegetables like Swiss chard, beans, lettuce and cherry tomatoes, and a few herbs like basil, chives and rocket.

Don’t panic at the sight of damage from bugs – the bad bugs are food for the good ones. Never use chemicals or poisons.

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Secateurs R549, Yuppiechef

· Keep vegetable beds well mulched. · Grow edible flowers to attract beneficial insects (like bees). Leave some of your vegetables and herbs to flower. · If you really are challenged for space, plant vegetables and herbs among flowers.

Gardening apron R800, Babylonstoren

Trowel & gardening fork set of two R599, Yuppiechef

Calamondin R295, Garden Shop

janesdeliciousgarden.com

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A gardener’s journal will help you to keep track of planting and harvesting seasonal flowers and vegetables

Karin Miller notebook R420, Babylonstoren

Sophie Conran bird food tin R379, Yuppiechef

Summer vegetable garden in a box R80, Reel Gardening


TOOLBOX

Casa Fayette Mexico Guadalajara by Interiors Dimore Studio dimorestudio.eu; designhotels.com

Fabricate an open-air, spring feeling indoors that can be enjoyed throughout the seasons. Verdant Delicious Monster is a popular plant to grow inside, creating a lush, tropical effect. Large green leaves look good in a minimally decorated room.

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ONCE YOU DISCOVER THE REWARDS OF SOWING SEEDS, NURTURING PLANTS AND RELISHING THE ABUNDANT HARVEST, YOU’LL BE HOOKED

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Vertical gardens can be used to create different effects in your backyard and are great if you are strapped for space. Use a trellis and creepers to green a wall, or arrange terracotta pots on a metal frame for a more stylised look.

Capri Suite Resort Hotel Anacapri, Italy, by Zatastudio zstudioarchitetti.it; caprisuite.it

Outdoor furniture can instantly enhance your space. Pick chairs and tables made from materials that will weather well. Coated aluminium is sleek and lightweight . Traveler outdoor chair with hood R44 690, Roche Bobois

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@gardendaysa

Garden Day 2017 is on 15 October. It’s not about toiling in the sun, but rather about enjoying your garden

German terracotta pots from R9,95, Garden Shop Parade wall chest in Terracotta R960, Ligne Roset Small pot R79, H&M Home

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TIPS FOR CULTIVATING USEFUL PLANTS – Sandy Roberts from Margaret Roberts Herbal Centre

Making cuttings from bay, elder, rosemary, basil and many succulents is easier than planting seeds, but seed trays with little leaves that have just emerged are exciting. Edible gardens are becoming more important as our economy changes. Edible flower gardens are as important as herb and vegetable gardens. Simplicity is key. I prefer a few interesting herbs that I can use in the kitchen. Vertical gardens require a sensible watering structure. Even small vertical gardens can be very useful, especially if planted with herbs for the kitchen.

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margaretroberts.co.za

Stainless steel planter from R5 800, Egg Designs

8. ‘I love to use specific indoor plants like motherin-law’s tongue, coffee plants and a small hedge of good, even cuttings of spekboom. Spekboom absorbs carbon phenomenally well, especially if you live in a flat and have dust and fumes coming through your windows’

Boca Chica Acapulco, Mexico, by Frida Escobedo fridaescobedo.net; designhotels.com Charcoal parasol R7 995, Weylandts

White parasol with bamboo stick R1 995, Weylandts

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Elegant and practical parasols provide style and shade in any outdoor area

‘Plant to provide nectar and pollen for bees. The diversity of flowers in our gardens is making a difference as wild vegetation is decreasing’

9.

‘Grow water-wise plants and use plants adapted to the local climate to structure your garden. Indigenous is first prize’ – Liesl van der Walt, Head Gardener at Babylonstoren; babylonstoren.com


TOOLBOX

11. MAKE USE OF EXPOSED STONE WALLS, MATCH TONES AND USE LAID-BACK, RUSTIC FURNITURE TO CREATE A STYLISH OUTDOOR AREA

12.

AW17 planter housedoctor.dk

Work with the space you have, using on-trend outdoor decor, like statement planters and hammocks, in natural tones and untreated materials.

San Giorgio, Mykonos, Greece by Annabell Kutucu annabellkutucu.com; designhotels.com

Choose outdoor furniture in colours and textures that complement the setting in which it will sit.

Rosalina chair R11 120, Ligne Roset

Hammock with wooden slat R525, Garden Shop

Wrapped patio olive tree R230, Woolworths

La Granja Ibiza, Spain, by Dreimeta dreimeta.com; designhotels.com

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HOMES SCARBOROUGH SYNERGY TREE HOUSE PHOTOGRAPH BY WARREN HEATH

MIL AN • CAPE TOWN • AMSTERDAM • SHOP THE LOOK

A Milanese apartment is reminiscent of a grand 1800s greenhouse (p64). A Victorian house in Cape Town is reimagined with Africana (p74), a Dutch couple create an oasis in Amsterdam (p84) and a tree house in Scarborough is surprisingly sophisticated (p94)


HOME MILAN

SECRET GARDEN Angelo and Antonella Grampa’s Milanese apartment allows the outdoors inside, creating the impression of living in a lush garden PHOTOGRAPHS FABRIZIO CICCONI TEXT AND STYLING FRANCESCA DAVOLI

this page The living room leads to the dining room and kitchen. The sofas are Piero Lissoni. The pillows are embroidered silk, decorated with patterns drawn by Federica Tondato for Fedora Design. The floor is hand-finished oak opposite Boxwood, Mexican bush sage and fleabane thrive outside the window

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The atmosphere is reminiscent of a grand 19th-century greenhouse


HOME MILAN this page The painted iron table was designed by Corinna Cappa and Stefania Martinelli, the architects involved in the renovation of this home opposite (clockwise from top left) An antique Aubusson tapestry; Antonella reads between plants on the enclosed veranda; the living room; the view from the terrace

s soon as Angelo and Antonella Grampa stepped into this wonderful apartment situated in the heart of Brera, Milan, it was love at first sight. This elegant neighbourhood is where they met. Later, they decided it would be where they’d live together. They found a large house – 250m2 of open space and light – that has since been transformed into a domestic garden. ‘We knew about the apartment before we went with Angelo and Antonella to see it, but we were still struck by the light and majesty of the space. It was like being in a royal lodge overlooking the Brera district. We immediately accepted the challenge of developing a space with such charm and personality,’ recall the architects, Corinna Cappa and Stefania Martinelli. ‘The wood-block floor, the refined decorations, the Milan-like character of the building and neighbourhood – all these features made us feel at home.’ From the start of the build, there was a great balance between professionalism and fraternity and the craftsmen who joined the tight-knit construction group were welcomed into a trusting and enthusiastic environment. ‘The carpenter had previously made furniture for the Grampas’ country house; the upholsterer went to school with Angelo and the blacksmith has been working with us for several years. The workers developed a passion for the house that was almost bigger than ours,’ explains Stefania. ‘This was a really special undertaking that started true friendships.’

The house was conceived out of a search for balance. There was an ongoing alternation between enhancing the original elements of the building and introducing contemporary features. The choice of furniture and the way space is organised in the apartment reflects a ‘double soul’ – both modern and traditional. The internal glass walls, doors with knockers and hand-finished wooden floors are inspired by traditional furnishings, while the huge sliding doors are a more contemporary feature. A series of main rooms, all with high ceilings, are linked through large glass walls. The spacious kitchen, which used to be located in the back of the house, now opens onto the dining room. This allows Antonella, a refined cook, to share her skills with guests and friends. Although Antonella has always lived in Milan, she has a strong connection to nature – a legacy of her Umbrian and Tuscan heritage. She has treasured a lifelong dream of living in the countryside, which is why she brought the countryside into the heart of Milan. Through the arched glass windows, lush vegetation seems to enter the house and, together with many indoor plants, this creates an atmosphere reminiscent of a grand 19th-century greenhouse. The long balcony was conceptualised with the help of landscape architect Gianluigi Cristiano. Specific types of wood were chosen to recall field vegetation. Natural materials and neutral colours in the home contribute to a soft palette. The lighting in the apartment was designed to spread elegantly over the objects and furnishings in each room – like natural light falling over a large garden. Q

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HOME MILAN this page The double hob and ovens from La Cornue make it easy for Antonella, an accomplished cook, to share her skills with friends. The worktop is Carrara marble. The lacquered bentwood kitchen table was manufactured by GebrĂźder Thonet

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this page Homeowner Antonella Grampa and architects Corinna Cappa and Stefania Martinelli struck up a firm friendship during the renovation. The sculptural chandelier is by Arik Levy for Vibia opposite (clockwise from top left) The French windows were a feature of the original apartment; Stefania, Antonella and Corinna; a Luigi XVI fireplace in Bianco Carrara marble; vases by Paola Paronetto; wildflowers and bright blue cornflowers


HOME MILAN

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We were struck by the light and majesty of the space

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HOME MILAN this page The nightstands were designed by Cappa and Martinelli; the bed linen is by Society Limonta opposite Chandelier by Forestier, chair from Loos Café and tiles from Carocim. The wall is plastered with cement resin

The lighting in the apartment was designed to fall like natural light over a large garden

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HOME CAPE TOWN opposite Wooden artefacts and hand-crafted pieces add a soulful quality to this characterful Victorian cottage. Here, a Ghanaian asante cloth creates a striking wall hanging behind a vintage couch, layered with textured Kuba cloth cushions

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HEART CRAFT Harry and Lerato Sitole’s colourful Woodstock home is furnished in a way that reflects the couple’s interests in Africana, art, food and family TEXT LEIGH ROBERTSON PRODUCTION VANESSA LETCH PHOTOGRAPHS ADAM LETCH

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this page Harry Sitole, owner of African Image, sits on a prized Fante stool from Ghana opposite In the living room, an artwork by Brett Murray makes a graphic statement alongside a collection of wooden stools, walking sticks, Tanzanian Makonde sculptures and a printed fabric blind from African Image


HOME CAPE TOWN

Harry has layered the family’s living spaces with the accumulation of his life’s passions

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This is how we are. We enjoy what surrounds us

Sisters Phethile (left) and Lujulile Sitole on the sunny front stoep of their parents’ house in Woodstock


HOME CAPE TOWN

n a Woodstock neighbourhood notable for its Victorian vernacular, a corner cottage with chalk-green walls and white-framed windows inspires passers-by to pause for a moment – not only to stand back and admire the house’s characterful features. Children in the know might reach up for the fruit hanging from the granadilla creeper that forms a luxuriant arch over the gate and entwines like an ornamental garland over the shaded stoep. It’s just as likely that the spicy aromas escaping from under the front door give locals a reason to stop on the pavement – it’s an enticing hint of the creativity at play in the house. In the bright, sunny kitchen, private chef Lerato Sitole chops vegetables and fresh coriander, stirring cumin seeds and curry leaves into pots simmering on the stove, preparing for a catering gig where she’ll share local flavours with a clientele of mostly international visitors. The artistry of Lerato’s dishes is matched by a home that is fittingly storied and colourful; her husband, Harry Sitole, owns Cape Town’s African Image store. Harry was a painter before he joined African Image – a retailer known for its vibrant, often witty aesthetic and considered mix of contemporary and traditional artefacts – and he has layered the family’s living spaces with the accumulation of his life’s passions. There are books devoted to African history, politics, travel and art leaning against walls and crowding the shelves in most of the rooms, along with stacks of well-worn catalogues and design magazines. Works by Brett Murray and Conrad Botes hang alongside some of Harry’s own paintings, which document township life. There are also pieces from the original African Image store on Church Street; not to mention artefacts amassed on buying trips across the continent. Among these are Lerato’s treasured handcrafted textiles; a troupe of rare Baule spirit spouse figures from Côte d’Ivoire and a playful, carved Ghanaian stool in the shape of an aeroplane. The couple fell in love with the house because it had not undergone the sort of radical contemporisation that might have stripped it of its authenticity. ‘We saw it as a blessing that it was in its original state,’ says Harry. They set about fixing it up; making it their own. Having undertaken the decorating of Lerato’s Nzolo Café at around the same time, there were certain elements that overlapped – like the cheerful shade of yellow that Harry used to paint the kitchen ceiling. Vintage furniture pieces in retro ice-cream tones add to the house’s eclecticism. In the lounge, the popping tangerine of the leatherette sofa complements wooden artefacts. ‘I appreciate old things,’ Harry states. ‘They can be so much more alive than newer stuff.’ Sharing the house with a teenage son, Zwelibanzi, and two young, spirited daughters, Lujulile and Phethile, has added a patina of its own to the Sitoles’ living spaces. Harry points out a pair of stools once used solely by Zwelibanzi, now commandeered by his younger sisters. ‘Everything in the house is used,’ says Harry. This includes his collection of Zulu meat platters, a constant feature on the dinner table. ‘I have a weakness for southern African pieces – the meat platters and my stash of delicate Zulu spoons. I don’t know how many I have,’ Harry says with a laugh. ‘Lerato sometimes reminds me that her kitchen is not a gallery, but where she needs to cook.’ African Image has evolved to comprise several pop-ups and an online store. Harry is currently focusing on developing a clothing line. When both their busy schedules allow it, the Sitoles are happiest at home, entertaining friends in the courtyard, which is decorated with a quirky display of barbershop signs; or walking on nearby mountain trails with the children. ‘This is how we are,’ says Harry. ‘We enjoy what surrounds us.’ Q

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this page A love of uplifting colour informed the kitchen’s decor scheme, from the bright upholstery and chairs to the wire baskets on the wall opposite (clockwise from top left) Zulu meat platters are a constant feature on the dinner table; Lerato in her chef’s whites, with a collection of Zulu spoons and Brett Murray lights; one of Lerato’s delicious dishes; a collection of moulded plastic dolls from Ghana

The artistry of Lerato’s dishes is matched by a home that is fittingly storied and colourful


HOME CAPE TOWN

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this page In Harry and Lerato’s bedroom, a Xhosa beaded blanket hangs on the wall opposite Barbershop signs on the walls of the courtyard. Harry and Lerato like to entertain here


HOME CAPE TOWN

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Old things can be so much more alive than newer stuff

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this page The bedroom has space for custom-made chaises longues and a clever floorto-ceiling room divider that displays a collection of vases and other objects opposite The hallway is constructed from white Carrara marble. The big glass doors are framed in powder-coated steel


HOME AMSTERDAM

DUTCH COURAGE

Moving and renovating can be intimidating, but Amsterdam-based couple Fred and Jade find joy in treating houses like projects. Their current home in the Dutch capital is a vision of meticulous design TEXT EVELIEN REICH STYLING LISA VAN DER KLOK PHOTOGRAPHS DIM BALSEM

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this page There is an uninterrupted view of the spacious living room and open-plan kitchen from the upper level of the house. Below, glass doors open onto a patio. Despite the immense floor space and the height of the roof, the apartment is warm, even cosy


HOME AMSTERDAM

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You almost forget that a busy capital city is right outside the front door


HOME AMSTERDAM

fter three years in Dubai, Fred and his wife Jade (who is originally from Australia) knew exactly what they wanted: to be back in Amsterdam. ‘We wanted an urban sanctuary,’ explains Jade, ‘a refuge, but in the middle of the city we are so fond of.’ To this end, they have succeeded: once you enter their home on the canal belt, you almost forget that a busy capital city is right outside the front door. Fred and Jade move and renovate frequently, each time setting the bar a bit higher. The couple see their houses as projects; this former school, in use as a photographic studio, was a nice challenge. The renovation lasted around two-and-a-half years. Fred, who practises architecture, worked meticulously on the design. ‘Look,’ he points out, ‘when you’re at the top of the stairs, the points of the marble slabs come together. I’m a real perfectionist and I think those kinds of details are very important.’ This attention to detail is also evident in the layout of the building. As a result of the front windows being very high up, a split level was created on the street side of the house. By raising the floor, there is now not only a view of the canal, but an unobstructed line of sight into the living room and open-plan kitchen. Despite the immense floor space and the height of the roof and windows, the apartment is strikingly warm, even cosy. The couple chose a rich colour palette and their collective interests are reflected in the decor: geodes, ceramics, paintings, plants, fossils, taxidermy and sculptures are all on display. The family bedrooms, with en suite bathrooms, are on the upper floors and overlook warehouses. Although the house does not lack for square metres, a guest room did not fit into the plan. But Fred had another solution: he bought a houseboat directly opposite the building and converted it into a comfortable guest house. With such an ideal home, you’d be forgiven for wondering why Fred and Jade would ever consider leaving. But a leopard doesn’t change its spots and the couple’s next project is already on standby: a house in the countryside. As Jade explains: ‘Really living in the Dutch countryside – we’ve never done that before!’ Q

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this page Sliding doors fitted with smoky black glass conceal the stove, bar, refrigerators and storage space on either side of the concrete kitchen island. The kitchen was constructed by De Elementen in Mijdrecht


HOME AMSTERDAM

The overall design of the house is meticulous. The couple’s collective interests are reflected in the decor


this page The bath and twin basins are marble; the taps are Leftroy Brooks opposite The green wall plays a major role in the feel of the rooftop terrace; the couple got the idea for it in Australia. The lounger and stone table are from the Dala outdoor furniture collection at Co van der Horst


HOME AMSTERDAM

We wanted an urban sanctuary – a refuge in the middle of the city

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this page Craig Price and India Rostad enjoy the view from the balcony overlooking Scarborough beach. The home’s steel framework extends out to form a monopitch roof that houses solar panels opposite Dramatic cliffs drop off into the Atlantic Ocean as you approach Scarborough


HOME SCARBOROUGH

BE T TER NATURE The sophisticated, minimalist design of Craig Price’s Synergy Tree House in Scarborough dissolves the boundaries between the home and its setting on the mountainside at the edge of the Atlantic Ocean PHOTOGRAPHS WARREN HEATH TEXT SALLY RUTHERFORD STYLING SVEN ALBERDING/BUREAUX


It’s hard to tell where the boundary lies between the beautifully low-key interiors and the great outdoors


HOME SCARBOROUGH this page The home’s interiors flow seamlessly to the exterior living spaces via glass walls that fold away. The front verandah is perfectly positioned for drinks with a view. The teak Dario sofa from Weylandts was reupholstered in outdoor fabric from Mavromac. The Vietnamese Water Lily and Pond concrete stools are from Weylandts opposite Craig’s business colleague and good friend India Rostad is a Life Alignment practitioner

he design of Craig Price’s Synergy Tree House in Scarborough is deceptively simple: modular spaces are connected by balau pathways that wind up through the leafy, sloping garden. Look a little closer and you’ll discover an experiment in structure, form and enclosure that gives the house a unique architectural character. ‘A tree house should never overpower the tree in which it is built,’ says professional treehouse designer Jeanie Stiles. Craig’s beachfront escape winds through and among the trees on an ocean-facing mountain slope with particular grace and sensitivity. The steel-framed wood panels, sheer glass walls and doors that slide away completely make it hard to tell where the boundary lies between the beautifully low-key interiors and the great outdoors. Craig originally lived next door. His first home had a braai pit accessed via a path through the steep, scrambling garden. Craig decided to build a convenient kitchen boma in situ. This was the seedling that grew into today’s mature Tree House. Justin Willis, a builder and Scarborough local was a frequent guest at Craig’s braais; together, the two friends imagined, planned and paced out every single element of this tranquil escape. The process was organic, allowing Craig to be unusually responsive to the climatic and site conditions. ‘Designing and creating Synergy Tree House was like stroking a paintbrush across canvas. It just flowed naturally, as if the land was instructing the creators what to do. We started off planning to build only a kitchen. The home just grew and grew,’ he says. ‘I was forced to stop when I wanted to excavate under the top bedroom to put in a wine cellar. Justin put his foot down.’ The result – an architectural steel structure clothed in a textured skin of panelled wood, glass, steel and stone – creates an unusual experience of space and light that sits lightly on the mountainside. Steel beams form the bones of the house. This skeleton is clad with wooden panels – certified cedar in the main living space and kitchen; American blackwood in the luxurious double bedroom and bathroom at the top of the property. Nutec panels painted in a natural dark hue blend into the indigenous fynbos on the mountainside. Frameless glass windows and doors concertina and slide away, allowing walls to simply disappear.

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this page The balau steps lead up to the ‘Nest’ double bedroom suite opposite Master stonemason Rogers Sayi crafted the firepit using local Table Mountain sandstone


HOME SCARBOROUGH

The downstairs master bedroom suite overlooking a navy-blue plunge pool is an exercise in glass, stone and Quartz Carpet. The master suite features a feng shui water channel. Overall, the home has a strict palette of textures: wood panelling, exposed stone, glass and steel and exposed nuts and bolts. The precision and quality of each element define the home, giving it a sophisticated edge. In the tech-savvy kitchen – designed by master craftsman Andy de Klerk – an extractor rises up out of the central cooking island at the touch of a button. The island and counters are clad in charcoal Neolith in a satisfying and sleek contrast to the cedarwood-panelled walls. The home’s interiors were decorated under the professional eye of Lisa Fabbri. Texture is key and bright colours are used sparingly to add fresh notes and echo the saturated hues of the sea and sky in summer. Comfort was the single most important factor. After a day on the beach, visitors are invited to sprawl on chairs and loungers for sundowner cocktails. Given the house’s location on the weather-exposed tip of the Cape of Storms, Craig has accommodated the wind that makes Scarborough a magnet for fellow kitesurfers – you can slide away different windows or doors to create a still sanctuary or embrace the fresh air. For the garden, he sought out the input of another savvy local – landscaper and ‘conscious gardener’ Mark Wellens, who helped to install a clever grey-water system. ‘This garden offered me a sense of grounding that was the starting point for the first of many visions for the home’s design,’ explains Craig. ‘It had to be a place that shelters and feeds our diverse insect and birdlife indigenous to the area.’ A canopy of branches shelters Synergy Tree House’s dining room on the balau deck – the heart of this home. A luxurious carpet, recycled teak furniture, a roof of leaves and the sea sparkling in the distance all combine to form Craig’s favourite space. ‘I feel the whole house was made for this,’ he says. Q

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The dining room on the balau deck under the shade of the trees is the heart of this home

this page Helen's bedroom is spacious, open yet private – the French antique bed and silk Hereke rug introduce romantic elements in the sleek space opposite A gilt mirror finds new life with a sticker addition; antique chairs were reupholstered in towell

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this page Perched at the top end of the property is the ‘Nest’. Furnishings are deliberately stripped back. Narrow balau strips form a statement ceiling; the floor is covered in engineered oak. The blackwood cabinet at the foot of the bed conceals a TV that slides up at the touch of a button opposite The modular ‘Nest’ bathroom tucked under the trees has a glass ceiling and windows that give you the feeling of showering in the fresh air

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The precision and quality of each element define the home, giving it a sophisticated edge


HOME SCARBOROUGH

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HOME MILAN

shop the look . 1

Achieve a modish Milanese look with modern decor in a palette of soft greys, stone and duck egg blue

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1. (from left) Herringbone Natural flooring R79/m2, Oggie Misty Carrera quartz surface R3 500/m2, Caesarstone Authentic Herringbone flooring in oak R570/m2, Finfloor 2. AGA Total Control 3-over in Duck Egg Blue from R199 000, AGA 3. Kavali lamp table R2 995, Coricaft 4. Berber zig-zag rug with black border R5 500/m2, Gosenhausers 5. Belmont wingback chair in blue R4 995, Block & Chisel 6. Gentle Calming Shampoo R275, Eco Diva 7. Smoked Fired bowls R295 each, La Grange Interiors 8. Brenton dining chair R4 595, Weylandts 9. Textured glass tumbler R65, Woolworths 10. Monique vase R995, Weylandts 11. Isabella vase R575, Block & Chisel 12. Throws in Stripe Stone and Grey R795 each, La Grange Interiors 13. Sprout Mushroom R7 397, Paul Alexander 14. Family sofa in Gobi Desert (3,2m) R42 283, Gatehouse 102 ELLEDECORATION.CO.ZA THE ORGANIC ISSUE


W&Y1187_19

THERE’S NO TASTE LIKE HOME The range of premium appliances brings exquisite design and state-of-the-art German technology into stylish homes everywhere, with one goal in mind... making people’s lives better. Through a combination of cutting-edge innovation and beautifully simplistic usability, GRUNDIG ensures that your modern home is now the best place to be.

southafrica.grundig.com


HOME CAPE TOWN

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1. (from left) Wall paint in Lobster Red R498/5L, Plascon; Peppermint Beach 3 R495/5L, Night Jewels 4 R428/5L, both Dulux 2. Moulded plastic dolls R90 each, African Image 3. Metal cafĂŠ chairs R980 each, Amatuli 4. Fauna & Flora rug R3 500, Smir Design 5. Mokhonde figure R28 000, African Image 6. Zulu hat R388, Amatuli 7. Emperor Floor Lamp by Neri & Hu R29 015, Edge Interiors 8. The Tuber Planter from R17 950, Indigenus 9. African Image tea towel R136, African Jacquard 10. Sim-ply dining chair from R3 835, Haldane Martin 11. Pythag Stool in Charcoal Bemba Block fabric R1 195, Indigi Designs 12. Zombe hanging lamp R3 995, Weylandts 13. Crocs melamine placemat R100, A Love Supreme 104 ELLEDECORATION.CO.ZA THE ORGANIC ISSUE


COME DINE WITH ME Gather family and friends and dine in style with the Grande extendable table. The table extends in seconds and provides four extra places. Made from high quality, powder coated aluminium means it is easy to maintain and can stay outside all year round. For ultimate comfort pair with Net Relax chairs.

Find us on... Paarden Eiland | Sea Point | Illovo Fourways | Umhlanga | Menlyn Plazza

mobelli.co.za


HOME AMSTERDAM

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1. (from left) Taste Pece tile R600/m2, Ferreiras Morrocotto in Rose tile R34/tile, Douglas Jones Arizona Grey tile R285/m2, Ferreiras 2. Solid colour totem lights R3 500, Studio19 3. Versace occasional chair R9 995, SHF 4. Desk Fran R27 995, La Grange Interiors 5. Gloster raw teak log side table R9 890, Marlanteak 6. Beat Table Lamp brass R10 338, Créma Design 7. Chevelle Horse R595, Coricraft 8. Polyresin moose antler R1 995, SHF 9. Catch Lounge Chair R37 172, Créma Design 10. Kutu coffee table R34 897, Okha 11. Nupe pot on stand R1 595, Weylandts 106 ELLEDECORATION.CO.ZA THE ORGANIC ISSUE


INTRODUCING DULUX

COLOUR OF THE YEAR 2018

PICTURED ROCKS ALSO KNOWN AS NORDIC SAILS 2

Colour of the Year 2018 Pictured Rocks Nordic Sails 2

Manor House

Wet Granite

Blush Noisette 5

Steel Symphony 2

Transform your home with Dulux Colour of the Year Pictured Rocks. This sophisticated warm yet versatile colour is also available in Luxurious Silk. From South Africa’s icon and most loved paint brand. * The new Dulux Colour FuturesTM trends brochure is available in-store from October 2017. .

For product information or painting advice please contact Dulux Careline on 0860 330 111 or visit our website at www.dulux.co.za www.facebook.com/LetsColourSA

@DuluxSA

www.pinterest.com/duluxza

*Voted Icon Brand and Paint Category winner in the 2017/2018 Ask Afrika Icon Brands™ by TGI. Colour reference is as accurate as the printing process allows. Please reference the Dulux colour charts for accurate representation of colours.

See how our trend colours for 2018 will look in your home with the Dulux Visualizer App.


HOME SCARBOROUGH

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Cabanas can be sophisticated: choose decor that has clean lines in colours that echo wood and water

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1. (from left) Diamond Black white body ceramic rectified wall tile R581/m2, Ferreiras Minori Shower fabric R958/m, Hertex Legno Range Living walnut oil flooring R695/m2, Oggie 2. Riga chair R3 000 excluding fabric, Woodbender 3. Evora platter R259, @Home 4. Large storage jar in Marseille R720; Signature round Casserole pot in Marseille R2 050, both Le Creuset 5. Velvet stitched scatter cushion R495, Weylandts 6. Air Chair in solid Kiaat with Nylon Braid Strap R2 079, Korongwe Furniture 7. Cube coffee table from R14 500, Ebony Curated 8. Medium bucket vase R295, Weylandts 9. Solid raw oak side table on tapered legs R6 690, LIM 10. Jambi grande basket R1 795, SHF 11. Small Colour-Me-Bright beakers R340 each, Clementina 12. Tribu Vis Ă Vis lounger R41 450, Marlanteak 108 ELLEDECORATION.CO.ZA THE ORGANIC ISSUE


Aordable

LUXURY

Malls Tiles boasts the largest range of tiles and tiling products in Southern Africa. The brand has a presence in South Africa’s major cities, and has recently developed a state-of-the-art showroom at their Cape Town branch in Paarden Eiland.

These tiles are made of either glazed or polished porcelain, and due to their size, their ďŹ nish appears more seamless, with fewer grout lines.

“We undertook the task of showcasing our full consumer range in a way that accentuates each tile and its properties to the intended market,� explained Malls Tiles marketing manager, Tarina Mohan.

Other unique ranges that you will ďŹ nd in Malls Tiles showrooms include: • DĂŠcor tiles suitable for walls and the oor • Wood look tiles • Commercial tile ranges • Standard tile ranges (including polished porcelain)

The ranges being showcased extend to the larger format tiles, including 450mm x 900mm and 600mm x 1200mm. These tiles are referred to as SLABS and are immensely popular in Europe and Australia.

We would like to invite you to come and view our showroom. To make an appointment, please email wecare@mallstiles.com. @MallsTiles www.mallstiles.com

COMMERCIAL TILE RANGES

WOOD LOOK TILES

STANDARD TILE RANGES

 -PYL[YLL, 6,

DOLOMITE RANGE


LIVING TANIS IN IBIZA PHOTOGRAPH BY ALBERT FONT

TR AVEL • FOOD • DRINKS • GARDENS • PEOPLE

Get to know the other side of Ibiza (p112), or escape to White River for a relaxed weekend in the Lowveld (p116). Cultivate a taste for organic wine (p118), try these raw restaurants (p121) and find out why hemp is important (123) and ceramics studio Ardmore is iconic (124)


SUBTLE IBIZA

Forget the chaos of summer festivities and discover another side to Ibiza. Here, a taste for good living is cultivated in restaurants overlooking the sea, trendy new hotels and decor boutiques and galleries off the beaten track TEXT FRANÇOISE LEFÉBURE PHOTOGRAPHS ALBERT FONT


TRAVEL

ESPACIO MICUS T SPOTLIGHT ON ART German artist Eduard Micus settled on Ibiza in 1972. In 1985, he built a grand architectural space; 800m2 of light and stone. Fifteen years later, Micus’s daughter, Katja, took ownership of the property and transformed it into a gallery, which is only open on Sundays from 11am to 2pm, or by appointment. Micus’s work is on permanent display on show, alonside contemporary artists like Linde Bialas. Four temporary exhibitions are organised throughout the year. The gallery – a testament to island culture and artistic freedom – is worth a visit. Carretera Jesús Cala Llonga, Jesús (+34 971 19 19 23) espacio-micus.com

LOS ENAMORADOS S A BOUTIQUE HOTEL WITH AMBIENCE AND STYLE This old fisherman’s cottage from the 1960s has been decorated in a joyful new style, bursting with colour. Los Enamorados boutique guesthouse was reimagined by Rozemarijn de Witte and Pierre Traversier, two ‘compulsive hoarders’ who redecorated the cottage with a lot of attention to detail. The result is trendy, laidback luxury. The nine bedrooms face the sea and have a singular harmony. At Los Enamorados, everything is for sale – from the Tom Dixon lights and Piet Hein Eek table to the plates from Tamegroute in Morocco. The terrace has 300m2 of space on which to take a nap, have a drink next to the bar, or enjoy a fresh meal. Vénda de Portinatx 103, Portinatx (+34 971 337 549) losenamoradosibiza.com THE ORGANIC ISSUE ELLEDECORATION.CO.ZA 113


THE GIRI T A RESIDENCE WITH TWO SIDES One side of this guesthouse in San Juan has five curated hotel rooms with en suite terraces and views of the church in the village. The other side has a cool coffee shop overlooking the village square. A pan con tomate or tortilla breakfast is served from 10am to 12pm, while lunch and dinner are served until late. Locals head here on Sunday mornings, after going to the market, to laze next to the veggie garden and enjoy natural fruit juice or a healthy meal. Guesthouse: 3-5 Calle Principal (+34 971 333 345) Café: Plaza Espana 5, San Juan (+34 971 333 474) thegiricafe.com

MON CHÂTEAU EN ESPAGNE S VINTAGE LOVE AT FIRST SIGHT Antique collectors Isabelle and Badisse Kolli have amassed pieces from almost every decade in the 20 th century, including tiled coffee tables from the 1950s, leather chairs from the 1960s and plastic side tables from the 1970s, as well as lights, mirrors, glassware and costume jewellery. Carretera San Juan, San Juan de Labritja (+34 971 333 239)

S HÔTEL LA GRANJA SECOND NATURE This hotel was designed to be as close to nature as possible. Have a drink at the bar under the carob tree. Carretera Forada a Sant Mateu, (+34 615 406 588) lagranjaibiza.com W SLUIZ BIG BOUTIQUE This concept store in an industrial warehouse overflows with crockery, furniture, curios, bed linen and accessories. Eivissa Rd, Sant Miquel, Santa Gertrudis (+34 971 931 206) sluizibiza.com


TRAVEL CHARLOTTE CERAMICS T EARTHY WORKS Brussels-born Charlotte de Lantsheere had been living in Ibiza for almost three years when she opened a small ceramic studio in her garage, where she could practise her passion. Her plates, cups and salad bowls have raw and simple shapes and are produced in natural colours (and sometimes white and black). Her collections and artisanal pieces are sold on-site. Rens (+34 605 14 15 76 and +32 495 184 384) charlotteceramics.com

W LES TERRASSES A CHARMING FINCA Half hotel and half private house, this haven of serenity has been open since 1988 and is now almost iconic. However, Les Terrasses wouldn’t be what it is today without owner Françoise Pialoux, a fine cook whose recipes are set to be published in 2018 in a book called Éditions de la Martinière. Pialoux has injected a very special and familiar atmosphere into her finca (Spanish for ‘estate’). There are a dozen very chic and bohemian bedrooms, two swimming pools and a magnificent garden. Breakfast and dinner are served throughout the day, wherever you would like to enjoy them. Don’t miss the couscous on Thursdays. Carretera Santa Eulalia, Santa Eulalia Del Rio (+34 971 332 643) lesterrasses.net

BABYLON BEACH X SOMEWHERE ON THE BEACH There is a Caribbean air about Babylon Beach, a restaurant next to Santa Eulalia. The tropical shape of the palm roof, joyful background music and laid-back atmosphere of the beach contribute to it. Lie back on mattresses on the sand, sipping organic fruit juice, or try a fresh baby coconut with avocado nectar and cocktails made from watermelon and agave syrup. The menu includes gazpacho, carpaccio, calamari, burgers and orange almond cake. Carrer Bartomeu Tur Clapés, 20, Santa Eulalia del Rio (+34 971 332 181) babylonbeachbar.com THE ORGANIC ISSUE ELLEDECORATION.CO.ZA 115


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W E E K E N D G E TAWAY: W H IT E R I V E R The quiet Lowveld town of White River is a gem – the residents are friendly, dining options abound and there are plenty of fabulous places to stay in the area. Plus, the Kruger National Park is just a 30-minute drive away

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COMPILED BY MEGAN MORRIS; KRUGER NATIONAL PARK TWO LEOPARDS IN A TREE PHOTO GETTY IMAGES

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STAY 1-2. Summerfields Rose Retreat & Spa in Hazyview is a five-star retreat on a macadamia and litchi farm just 10km from the Kruger National Park’s Phabeni Gate. There are 12 luxury tented suites, a spa and a gourmet dining experience on offer. Even if you don’t stay, it’s worth driving out to Summerfields for a delicious lunch at the River Café. summerfields.co.za 3-5. Figtree House is built in the branches of a giant wild fig tree and can accommodate four to six guests. thefigtreehouse.com Casterbridge Hollow Boutique Hotel is Mpumalanga’s first green hotel. It’s situated between mango trees on the original Casterbridge Farm. @casterbridgehollow EXPLORE 6-8. The Panorama Route is a fantastic scenic route with lots of viewpoints. It includes a stop at the Blyde River Canyon, one of the largest canyons on earth. 9. The Artists’ Press is a print studio that produces limited-edition lithographs by South African artists. Visit the studio to see how each print is made. artprintsa.com 10. Kruger National Park is home to a high density of wild animals, including the Big Five. Hundreds of other mammals make their home here, as do diverse bird species. Kruger has 12 main rest camps, five bushveld camps, two bush lodges and four satellite camps. sanparks.org Sabie Brewery offers craft beer at its best. Try the easy-drinking Glynn’s Gold or the creamy, well-balanced Shangaan Stout. The brewery is located in Sabie, 47km from White River. sabiebrewery.com Kaapsehoop is a little town with a rich history, 50km south-west of White River. Go hiking or horse riding along the escarpment, or discover the Adam’s Calendar ruins. EAT 11. Picasso’s Mexican Taqueria is a local favourite offering fresh Mexican food. Enjoy a margarita in the funky outdoor area. picassoismexican.co.za 12. 64 Coolmore is a country cookhouse in an avocado orchard, serving a variety of cuisines. 082 896 4646 (booking essential) 13. Zest is a fine-dining restaurant situated between Nelspruit and White River in the picturesque Lowveld countryside. zestrestaurant.co.za 14. Potluck Boskombuis is a hidden kitchen just outside Graskop, an hour outside White River. There are wooden tables, log seats, tin crockery and beautiful views of the gentle Treur River and surrounding bushveld. potluckbushkitchen.co.za

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FOOD AND DRINK

FRUIT OF THE VINE Avondale Wine Estate exhibits a truly holistic, sustainable approach to the processes of wine-making and maintaining the vineyard ecosystem. Their organic wines pair wonderfully with on-site restaurant FABER’s farm feasts

(clockwise from top) FABER restaurant interior, Avondale proprietor Johnathan Grieve, Chef Eric Bulpitt, a Bulpitt creation, the egg-mobile

Natural wine revolution These wineries make natural, organic wines without chemicals and with minimal use of technology. Give our picks a go: Avondale The estate’s lively, complex and expressive wines, all aimed at the top end of the market, are a testimony to Avondale’s ethos of Terra Est Vita, or ‘Soil is Life’. Proprietor and viticulturist Johnathan Grieve is a firm advocate of the benefits of organic farming – both for the environment and the health of consumers. avondalewine.co.za Reyneke Wines Pioneering viticulturist Johan Reyneke converted his 154-year-old family farm in Stellenbosch into an organic operation in the early ’90s and was the first in South Africa to farm biodynamically. Reyneke Wines’ reach is generous, from its top-scoring Reserve Red and Reserve White to its easy-drinking Organic range. reynekewines.co.za

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Almost 20 years ago, Avondale Wine Estate introduced a forwardlooking approach to viticulture, implementing organic and biodynamic practices and looking to innovations in science and technology for ways to contribute to sustainability. The multi-pronged approach was developed by Johnathan Grieve, the youngest son of John and Ginny Grieve who own Vital Health Foods and acquired Avondale in the late ’90s. In October 2016, acclaimed chef Eric Bulpitt opened his latest restaurant, FABER, on Avondale estate. This year, Bulpitt and Johnathan Grieve teamed up to introduce Field to Feast lunches. Grieve explains that these feast days are ‘an opportunity for us to invite our guests to the farm and share our biodynamic journey with them, showcasing how the farm, FABER and Avondale tie together’. Feast days begin with a tour of the farm on a tractor-trailer, where biodynamic principles are explained. Here, you might encounter the marvellous duck squad (which deals with snails with much vigour and excitement), or the egg-mobile that supplies the kitchen with free-range eggs. After the tour, guests are welcomed at FABER with a glass of Avondale’s award-winning Armilla Méthode Cap Classique before being served a farm feast.

Sadie Family Wines Trailblazer Eben Sadie led the Swartland revolution with his maverick minimalist and terroir-driven approach that has resulted in wines of astounding depth and vigour. Sadie has farmed organically and biodynamically since starting his first label some 16 years ago. His wines – notably the Sadie Family Columella Red, priced upwards from about R700 per bottle – are considered among the very best in South Africa. thesadiefamily.com Intellego Wines Jurgen Gouws makes wines that are first and foremost an expression of the terroir in which they are grown. He’s been farming organically and buying in organic grapes since he started his Swartland label a few years ago. The Kolbroek Syrah is a must. intellegowines.co.za Testalonga Former Lammershoek winemaker Craig Hawkins grows and crafts his soulful limited-edition wines on his farm near Piketberg, which he bought with his wife and partner in winegrowing, Carla. Their Twitter handle says it all: made from grapes. @madefromgrapes


HOTELS

Miavana Luxury Eco Resort Miavana is situated on Nosy Ankao, a private island off Madagascar’s north-eastern coast. With 14 sea-facing villas available, guests have complete privacy while enjoying views across the Indian Ocean, or walking straight into the sea to snorkel amid coral beds. The tranquil hues of sand, wood and water have been brought into the interiors of each villa and there are hand-dyed curtains, hand-crafted chairs and light fittings resembling old glass buoys. Miavana was designed by award-winning architects Silvio Rech and Lesley Carstens and took nearly four years to build, employing over 500 local workers in the construction team. Hop onto an electric buggy and head to the resort’s main village to lounge in the infinity pool or sip cocktails at the rooftop bar. With a multitude of activities available, including kitesurfing, scuba diving, helicopter flights and forest walks, you’ll never want to leave. timeandtideafrica.com/miavana

G R E AT E S C A P E S

Looking for a luxury stay somewhere off the beaten track? These two hotels offer not only a chance to recharge, but also thrilling activities in out-of-the-way locations

ION Luxury Adventure Hotel The ION Adventure Hotel, less than an hour’s drive from Iceland’s capital, Reykjavík, is isolated in an arresting landscape of mountains and lava fields. It is near the ’Golden Circle‘ travel route, making it the perfect base from which to explore the country’s natural wonders – trek across an ancient glacier, fly-fish in the icy rivers, bathe in a geothermal pool or watch the dancing Northern Lights. You can relax at the hotel in Scandi-inspired rooms, dine at Silfra Restaurant (which offers fresh Nordic cuisine), order a drink at the award-winning Northern Lights Bar, unwind at the Lava Spa or just gaze onto the wild landscape that stretches out, unbroken by buildings, to the distant horizon. And there’s no need to feel guilty about the impact your stay might have on the surroundings – ION won a 2014 World Boutique Hotel award in the ‘Sustainability’ category. ioniceland.is 120 ELLEDECORATION.CO.ZA THE ORGANIC ISSUE


RESTAURANTS

DIRECTORY Other raw restaurants on which to set your sights RAW AND ROXY 8 Bree St, Cape Town 079 599 6277 @rawandroxy

LEAFY GREENS CAFÉ Rocky Ridge Rd, Muldersdrift, Johannesburg 010 595 4563 leafygreens.co.za

GREENSIDE CAFÉ 34 Gleneagles Rd, Greenside, Johannesburg 011 646 3444 thegreensidecafe.co.za

TREE NATURAL 71–74 Lighthouse Rd, Umhlanga 031 561 1169 treenatural.co.za

OUT TO LUNCH 28a Ronan Rd, Durban 083 449 2880 @outtolunchdbn

CLEAN PLATE Raw food restaurants are all the rage, but can they really compete in a gourmet league? Our top pick, Scheckter’s Raw, proves that healthy eats can have epicurean appeal Scheckter’s Raw This spot in Sea Point serves gourmet raw food in bold, bright and ultra-appetising ways. The breakfast menu boasts a range of guilt-free delights, like hearty quinoa porridge, organic matcha flapjacks and vegan scrambled eggs (using tofu instead of eggs). Lunch options include raw zucchini pasta with an avocado, sunflower seed and lemon pesto; a vegan burger (smashed avo, caramelised onions, lettuce and tomato served with sweet potato fries and vegan aioli) and a range of other tasty, healthy meals. If you’re popping in for a post-workout pick-me-up, try a freshly pressed juice or one of the restaurant’s organic drinks, like the golden (turmeric) latte or yerba mate tea. 98 Regent Rd, Sea Point, Cape Town 021 434 1364 | schecktersraw.com

COUNTRY LIFE


TECH

LA DOLCE BEATER SMEG’s collaboration with international fashion powerhouse Dolce&Gabbana adds spirited Sicilian style to commonplace kitchen appliances Sicily Is My Love, a collaboration between Dolce&Gabbana and SMEG, is a collection of kitchen appliances decorated with the fashion brand’s signature take on Sicilian folk iconography. Bright lemons, prickly pears, red cherries, floral motifs and ornamental friezes decorate toasters, citrus juicers, coffee machines, blenders, kettles, stand mixers and slow juicers. The style of painting used emerged in the 19th century; the traditional scenes depicted were considered auspicious. The Sicily Is My Love collection will launch in South Africa in 2018, allowing you to accent your kitchen with Italian art and style.

DORNBRACHT The Cyprum Collection

Tara Cyprum - Kitchen

MEM Cyprum - Bathroom

www.dornbracht.com

37 Paarden Eiland Rd, Cape Town

Tel: 021 5117888 - E-mail: info@flushbathrooms.co.za - www.flushbathrooms.co.za


KNOWLEDGE

Wall Finishes Decorative and durable wall coatings that wear well over time

HEMPOWERED Despite its unfounded association with recreational drugs and anti-fashion, hemp (Cannabis sativa) remains a popular material in green design; for good reason – this plant is versatile and sustainable. Hemporium’s Tony Budden tells us more

unique

Creating distinctive cement finishes as as you are.

CONSTRUCTION Hemp is one of the oldest cultivated crops in the world. It can be used as an industrial building material in the form of hempcrete, a mix of ground hemp stalks, lime and cement. As hempcrete dries and hardens, it absorbs carbon dioxide from the air. Hemp, sand and lime can also be mixed into a rough plaster. An added benefit of a hemp structure is that it is ultimately biodegradable. Building sites that use hemp materials are easy to clean and have a low carbon footprint.

FABRIC Hemp fabric provides high UV protection, retains colour better than cotton and is both breathable and an excellent insulator. It is soft but durable (three times stronger than cotton) and can be mixed with cotton or silk to produce a variety of fabric types and weights. Hemp fabric can be used for clothing, curtains, indoor and outdoor furniture covers, duvet covers, upholstery and home furnishings and finishes.

HEALTH Hemp is hypo-allergenic, which means that materials made from hemp are safe for asthma sufferers. It also has natural antibacterial properties, making it resistant to mildew and mould, even in high humidity.

Floor Finishes Both skim-on coatings and new screed floor finishes

ORGANIC FARMING Hemp is a low-impact crop and can be grown organically with ease as cultivation methods require minimal agro-chemicals, herbicides and pesticides. hemporium.co.za

R

Manufacturers of Distinctive Decorative Coatings www.cemcrete.co.za

0860 CEMCRETE

enquiry@cemcrete.co.za


DECO ICON: ARDMORE Fee Halsted and a team of dedicated artists created a global design brand that uses Africa’s flora and fauna as inspiration. Ardmore now produces fabrics, furniture, wallpaper, scarves and beachwear, along with the initial sculptural ceramic pieces that made the brand a national treasure TEXT: HILARY PRENDINI TOFFOLI

F

ee Halsted lives in the lush hills of the KwaZulu-Natal Midlands; rivers tumble through endless stretches of green past her house in the Caversham valley. Fee’s home used to be a lavender farm. Now it houses the Ardmore studios where a community of about 70 South African and Zimbabwean ceramic artists have produced an extraordinary body of work over the past three decades. Each Ardmore piece is a one-off, depicting local fauna and flora in an irresistibly witty style that has captured the attention of collectors worldwide – both the White House and Buckingham Palace have Ardmore pieces.

Fee’s seven-hectare farm also houses a museum – a memorial to the gifted Zulu woman without whom Ardmore might never have come into being. Bonnie Ntshalintshali was a skilful craftswoman who combined a traditional Zulu approach to clay, while working with the Western imagery and techniques that Fee had been taught at Natal University. Together, the two women created a body of work so compelling that they won the Standard Bank Young Artist Award in 1990. Nine years later, Bonnie died of an AIDS-related illness at the age of 32. By then, several of Bonnie’s friends and family members had joined Ardmore. Here, they

sculpted elephants, lions, zebras, monkeys and giraffes bursting out of luxuriant foliage on bowls, jugs, tureens and vases. Fee is a self-confessed ‘warrior woman’ and owns an Ardmore sculpture that jokingly depicts her as Boudicca, naked on a cow, with rows of nipples. ‘I’m mother to so many people,’ says Fee. With knowledge of what the market wants, she’s guided Ardmore’s artists the way she was guided at art school. ‘I expect those who have extraordinary qualities to work at their full potential all the time,’ she says. ‘It’s about talent and excellence at all levels.’ The artists are paid individually for their artworks.


ICON this page, from top left Fee Halsted and Ardmore artists Jabu Nene, Sydney Nyabeze and Zinhle Nene; Hippo Rider ornament; Ardmore’s Leopard Walk wallpaper and Leopard Rider ornament opposite the Flowers of South Africa Hermès scarf print was designed by Ardmore

“ Zimbabwe-born Fee has lived most of her life in this thatched, terracotta-coloured country house, which is as richly textured as the Ardmore collectables themselves. Fee’s children – Jonathan, Catherine and Megan – grew up here and are now also involved in putting Ardmore on the international map. A collaboration with the British company Cole & Son has produced a striking range of Ardmore wallpaper. Another collaboration, this time with the French luxury brand Hermès, generated exquisite silk scarves and beachwear. When Fee first decided to translate Ardmore’s fantasy world into a range of fabrics in 2010, she based the designs on artworks by the artist-poet Wonderboy Nxumalo, who’d been Ardmore’s star until his death in 2008. Wonderboy’s work contained messages painted or etched into the glaze that communicated a simple but inspirational view of life. His visual wit was equally engaging: his monkeys prayed or played soccer; his rabbits leaped or did gym. It was a short step from fabric to Ardmore’s bespoke range of furniture. Starting off with a limited edition of the Qalakabusha Sofa – a fun riot of colour that sold out fast – the collection now includes chairs, ottomans and benches. Fee and her son, Jonathan, went on to launch Ardmore Design as the marketing outlet for the lifestyle ranges, followed by an Ardmore Design flagship store in Johannesburg’s Hyde Park. Still relentlessly focused, Fee created a second limited-edition sofa this year – The Zambezi. ‘It’s a sexier, more elegant design than the Qalakabusha,’ she says. ‘[It is] less country comfy; slightly more modern. [Its design features include] pinkymauve tones on a dark background, with more realistic motifs of leopards and monkeys – a real statement piece.’ British interior designer Kit Kemp has used The Zambezi in Crosby Street, New York’s contemporary design hotel. ‘She loves the quirkiness and bold colours of our work,’ Fee says. ‘She’s used two Qalakabusha sofas and two ottomans in the Ham Yard Hotel in London, as well as several of our other designs.’ Ardmore ceramics continue to be showcased around the world. A charity Ardmore show at the Monaco Yacht Club will take place in November, followed by Ardmore’s annual February show at the Cellars Hohenort Hotel in Constantia. Q

I expect those who have extraordinary qualities to work at their full potential all the time

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GARDENS

BEST OF THE BUNCH For Botanicus, a Johannesburg-based fine florist, good design has always been the bottom line – from thoughtful colour pairing to quality ribbons and wrapping paper. Owner, Jonette van Greunen, tells us her top tips when it comes to picking a bouquet FLOWERS FOR THE SEASONS? For autumn and winter: dahlias, daffodils, delphiniums, snapdragons, tulips, anthurium and hellebores. For spring and summer: magnolias, lotus flowers, anemones, cherry blossom, peonies, poppies, amaryllis and lily of the valley. INDIGENOUS AND EXOTIC FLOWERS TO USE IN ARRANGEMENTS? When it comes to indigenous flowers, I like working with strelitzias to add a more structured look and feel to the arrangement. Magnolias and lotus flowers are exotic additions that take any arrangement to another level. FLOWERS TO SUIT DIFFERENT OCCASIONS? Thank a fashionable hostess with a loosely bunched selection of soft flowers all in the same shades – such as ranunculus, hellebores and hydrangeas. If you’re visiting the in-laws, a large hand-tied bunch of tulips or David Austin roses never fails to amaze. When decorating a Sunday brunch table, keep it simple with a single-variety arrangement of peonies or poppies loosely mixed with soft greens.

PHOTOGRAPHS NINA BUYS

botanicus.co.za


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1. 20 EIGHT 083 451 6964 | 20eight.co.za 2. @HOME 086 057 6576 | home.co.za 3. A LOVE SUPREME 021 683 4041 | alovesupreme.co.za 4. AFRICA NOVA  021 425 5123 | africanova.co.za 5. AFRICAN IMAGE african-image.co.za 6. AFRICAN JACQUARD 076 516 4237 | africanjacquard.com 7. AGA 082 4999 499 | agaliving. co.za 8. ANATOMY DESIGN 010 594 5397 | anatomydesign.co.za 9. AMATULI 011 440 5065 | amatuli.co.za 10. ANDREW DOMINIC andrewdominicfurniture.com 11. ARDMORE 033 940 0034 | ardmoreceramics.co.za 12. BABYLONSTOREN  021 863 3852 | babylonstoren.com 13. BELGOTEX 011 380 9300 | belgotexfloors. co.za 14. BLOCK & CHISEL 011 442 0809 | blockandchisel.co.za 15. BLU-LINE KITCHENS 0860 548 464 | blu-line.co.za 16. BUILDERS  0860 284 533 | builders. co.za 17. CAESARSTONE 011 822 1350 | caesarstone.co.za 18. CASARREDO 011 786 6940 | casarredo.co.za 19. CÉCILE AND BOYD 031 303 1005 | cecileandboyds.com 20. CLARISSE DESIGN 084 414 9736 | clarissedesign.com 21. CLEMENTINA 021 447 1398 | clementina.co.za 22. COUNTRY ROAD 021 405 4300 | countryroad.com 23. CRÉMA DESIGN 021 448 775 | cremadesign. co.za 24. CORICRAFT 012 663 1067 | coricraft.co.za 25. DANIEL WELLINGTON danielwellington.com/za 26. DAVID KRYNAUW 011 021 3515 | davidkrynauw.com 27. DESIGN STORE 082 940 9200 | designstore.co.za 28. DOKTER AND MISSES 011 403 1024 | dockterandmisses.com 29. DOUGLAS AND DOUGLAS 082 890 2032 | douglasanddouglas.co.za 30. DOUGLAS JONES 081 667 242 | douglasjones. co.za 31. DREAMWEAVER 011 262 4946 | dreamweaverstudios.co.za 32. DULUX 0860 330 111 | dulux.co.za 33. EBONY CURATED 021 424 9985 | ebonycurated 34. ECO DIVA ecodiva.co.za 35. EDGE INTERIORS 076 945 2260 | edgeinteriors. co.za 36. EGG DESIGNS 011 268 2378 | eggdesigns.co.za 37. ESTABLISHMENT 021 462 6492 | establishment.co.za 38. EVOLUTION PRODUCT 011 486 1171 | evolutionproduct.co.za 39. FERREIRAS 011 699 3500 | ferreias.co.za 40. FINFLOOR 0860 346 356 | finfloor.co.za 41. GARDENSHOP.CO.ZA 011 465 4216 | garden shop.co.za 42. GATEHOUSE 011 444 8555 | mavromacandthegatehouse.co.za 43. GENERATION 011 325 5963 | generationdesign.co.za 44. GONSENHAUSERS 021 426 4819 | finerugs.co.za 45. GREGOR JENKIN gregorjenkin.com 46. H&M HOME  0860 690 707 | hm.com 47. HALDANE MARTIN  021 286 0136 | haldanemartin.co.za 48. HERMÈS hermes.com 49. HERTEX  021 461 7420 | hertex. co.za 50. HOME FABRICS 011 262 3492 | homefabrics.co.za 51. HOUTLANDER  084 427 4665 | houtlander.co.za 52. INDIGI DESIGNS 021 447 0165 | indigidesigns. co.za 53. JACOBS COLLECTION jacobscollection.co.za 54. JAMES MUDGE  079 448 1683 | jamesmudge.com 55. JO MALONE jomalone.co.za 56. JOE PAINE 010 125 0324 | joepaine.com 57. KARTELL 010 594 5109 | kartell.com 58. KINO 072 621 1195 | kino.co.za 59. KNUS 021 825 9908 | knus.co 60. KORONGWE FURNITURE 082 955 0715 | karongwefurniture.co.za 61. L'OCCITANE 011 326 5433 | loccitane.com 62. LA GRANGE INTERIORS  021 447 3508 | lagrangeinteriors. co.za 63. LE CREUSET  086 177 3321 | lecreuset.co.za 64. LEMON 011 262 4116 | madebylemon.co.za 65. LIGNE ROSET 011 262 5055 | ligne-roset.com/za 66. LIM 021 423 1200 | lim.co.za 67. LIMELINE INTERIORS 021 424 8682 | limeline.co.za 68. LUME BEAUTY  021 286 1201 | lumebeauty.com 69. MAISON MARA 021 418 1600 | maisonmara.co.za 70. MARLANTEAK 021 461 4049 | marlanteak.com 71. MASTER STUDIO 084 525 0020 | masterstudio.co.za 72. MAVROMAC 021 797 4739 | mavromacandthegatehouse.co.za 73. MAXIM DECOR & LIGHTING  021 465 6943 | maximdecor.net 74. MEMA DESIGNS  0083 651 6772 | memadesigns. co.za 75. MEZZANINE INTERIORS 011 778 1200 | mezzanineinteriors.co.za 76. MIMCO woolworths.co.za/store/mimco 77. MOBELLI 021 512 2662 | mobelli. co.za 78. MOOOI BY EDGE INTERIORS 076 945 2260 | edgeinteriors.co.za 79. OGGIE 021 510 2846 | oggieflooring.com 80. OKAPI  021 418 1600 | okapi.com/ za 81. OKHA INTERIORS  021 461 7233 | okha.com 82. PAUL ALEXANDER  074 924 5115 | paulalexander.co.za 83. REBTEX  083 616 0535 | rebtexrsa.com 84. REEL GARDENING 011 782 0661 | reelgardening.co.za 85. ROBIN SPRONG  021 447 9842 | robinsprong.com 86. ROCHE BOBOIS 021 286 0793 | roche-bobois. com/en-za 87. SHF shf.co.za 88. SIYAZAMA peek.org.za 89. SMIR DESIGN  082 923 3665 | smirdesign.co.za 90. SOUTHERN ART CERAMICS  028 316 3296 | tiledesign.co.za 91. SOUTHERN GUILD  021 461 2856 | southernguild.co.za 92. ST LEGER & VINEY  011 444 6722 / 021 462 1811 | stleger.co.za 93. STABLE  021 426 5922 | stable.org.za 94. STAY EVIL KIDS stay-evil-kids.org.za 95. STUDIO 19 010 023 0071 | studio19.co 96. T&CO  011 262 4718 | tandco.co.za 97. THE RUG COMPANY 021 418 0972 | therugcompany.com 98. THE SILK & COTTON COMPANY  011 448 2578 | silkco.co.za 99. THE SOFA COMPANY 021 200 5904 | za.sofacompany.com 100. THE TILE GALLERY  011 312 5038 | tilegallery.co.za 101. THE URBANATIVE theurbanative.com 102. TONIC  011 262 4513 | tonicdesign.

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co.za 103. TRUE DESIGN 010 594 5109 | truedesign.co.za 104. U&G FABRICS  011 444 6162 | ugfabrics.com 105. VAMP  021 448 2755 | vampfurniture.co.za 106. VOKE RUGS 083 297 0589 | vokerugs.co.za 107. WEYLANDTS  021 914 1433 | weylandts.co.za 108. WIID DESIGN  021 447 2512 | wiiddesign.co.za 109. WOMAG  021 447 6161 | womag.co.za 110. WOOLWORTHS  086 002 2002 | woolworths.co.za 111. YUPPIECHEF  021 702 4969 | yuppiechef.com 112. ZARA

HOME zarahome.hom/za


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LAST LOOK

MAKING THE LINK The Link by willowlamp

‘This is a pure, geometric, sculptural form inspired by supersize chain links. The design is simple in its use of planes, surfaces and elements yet it is incredibly complex at the same time. The two chain colours, smoke and brass, enhance the dimensions of the work in a subtle yet dramatic way.’ – Adam Hoets, Lighting Designer at willowlamp From R70 000, willowlamp.com 130 ELLEDECORATION.CO.ZA THE ORGANIC ISSUE


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