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THE INTERNATIONAL DESIGN AUTHORITY MARCH 2018

EXCLUSIVE!

AT HOME WITH

JENNIFER ANISTON

STAR POWER

NICKY HILTON ROTHSCHILD, CANDICE BERGEN, SCOOTER BRAUN + DESIGN’S NEXT-WAVE TALENTS


CONTENTS march

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BELOW A GUEST ROOM IN JOHN DEMSEY’S NEW YORK CITY TOWNHOUSE. VELVET CUSHION WITH SPANIEL EMBROIDERY BY GUCCI DÉCOR; GUCCI.COM.

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22 Editor’s Letter 26 Object Lesson: High Ground David Hicks’s groovy 1960s carpets still hold the floor.

31 Discoveries Casa Perfect rocks its new location (in Elvis Presley’s former L.A. home) . . . Schumacher revives Paul Poiret’s sassy Jazz Age prints . . . Rediscovering the work of photographer Marvin Rand . . . Oscar de la Renta’s Tortuga Bay resort gets a thoughtful update . . . Inside Carpenters Workshop Gallery’s VIP-only treasure vault . . . Laure Heriard Dubreuil brings the Webster to New York . . . and more!

64 View from the Top High above Los Angeles, Jennifer Aniston and Justin Theroux craft a scene of pure domestic bliss. BY MAYER RUS (CONTINUED ON PAGE 16)

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ON THE COVER JENNIFER ANISTON IN HER LOS ANGELES HOME. SHE WEARS A GABRIELA HEARST SWEATER, GRLFRND JEANS, AND A ROLEX WATCH. HANGING LOUNGE WITH SHEEPSKIN THROW BY BLACKMAN CRUZ. “VIEW FROM THE TOP,” PAGE 64. PORTRAIT BY ALEXI LUBOMIRSKI. FASHION STYLING BY RYAN HASTINGS. INTERIORS STYLING BY LAWREN HOWELL.

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: STEPHEN KENT JOHNSON; FRANÇOIS DISCHINGER; STUART TYSON

THE SUNROOM OF AN ESTATE IN MONTECITO, CALIFORNIA.


CONTENTS march

Beauty exec John Demsey’s six-story townhouse on Manhattan’s Upper East Side bursts with exuberant life. BY ALINA CHO

88 Fresh Breeze Atelier AM animates a historic 1930 Montecito estate with a contemporary spirit grounded in classic connoisseurship. BY MAYER RUS

94 Bringing Up Baby For Nicky Hilton Rothschild, home is a chic yet child-friendly New York penthouse filled with family treasures. BY CHLOE MALLE (CONTINUED ON PAGE 18)

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JUSTIN THEROUX AT HOME IN LOS ANGELES.

“I look around at my husband and my dogs and our home, and there’s nowhere else I want to be.” —Jennifer Aniston

FRANÇOIS DISCHINGER

78 More More More


CONTENTS march

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ALESSANDRO MENDINI: INSIDE THE ARCHITECT’S HOME (FAR RIGHT) IN OLDA, ITALY. CORKSCREWS BY MENDINI FOR ALESSI.

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100 Family Roots At their home in East Hampton, mother/daughter duo Candice Bergen and Chloe Malle find common ground—and room to craft. BY CHLOE MALLE

104 In Living Color Legendary architect Alessandro Mendini fills his vacation home in Italy with highlights from his career. BY HANNAH MARTIN

110 Sweet Spot

FOLLOW @ARCHDIGEST

Mega talent manager Scooter Braun’s idyllic retreat in the California countryside is the perfect escape. BY LAUREN WATERMAN

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118 Resources

COMMENTS CONTACT US VIA SOCIAL MEDIA OR EMAIL US AT LETTERS@ARCHDIGEST.COM.

120 Last Word: Hot Seats

The designers, architects, and products featured this month.

Irish sculptor Joseph Walsh fashions bold, modern seating for an iconic English dining room.

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP RIGHT: DANILO SCARPATI; OBERTO GILI; COURTESY OF ATELIER MENDINI (2)

THE GUESTHOUSE AT CANDICE BERGEN AND CHLOE MALLE’S EAST HAMPTON HOME.


THE INTERNATIONAL DESIGN AUTHORITY VOLUME 75 NUMBER 3

EDITOR IN CHIEF

Amy Astley CREATIVE DIRECTOR David Sebbah EDITORIAL OPERATIONS DIRECTOR Diane Dragan EXECUTIVE EDITOR Shax Riegler EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, DIGITAL Keith Pollock INTERIORS & GARDEN DIRECTOR Alison Levasseur STYLE DIRECTOR Jane Keltner de Valle FEATURES DIRECTOR Sam Cochran DECORATIVE ARTS EDITOR Mitchell Owens WEST COAST EDITOR Mayer Rus

FEATURES SENIOR DESIGN WRITER Hannah Martin DEPUTY EDITOR, DIGITAL Kristen Flanagan SPECIAL PROJECTS DIRECTOR, DIGITAL

Sydney Wasserman ENTERTAINMENT EDITOR, DIGITAL Carson Griffith DESIGN EDITOR, DIGITAL Amanda Sims EDITOR, DIGITAL David Foxley HOME EDITOR, DIGITAL Lindsey Mather DESIGN REPORTER, DIGITAL Hadley Keller ASSOCIATE EDITOR, DIGITAL Nick Mafi FEATURES ASSOCIATE Maxwell Losgar EDITORIAL ASSISTANTS Elizabeth Fazzare,

MARKET MARKET DIRECTOR Parker Bowie Larson ASSOCIATE EDITOR, MARKET Kathryn Given ASSISTANT EDITOR, MARKET Madeline O’Malley PRODUCTION ART PRODUCTION DIRECTOR Karrie Cornell EDITORIAL OPERATIONS ASSOCIATE Nick Traverse COPY AND RESEARCH COPY DIRECTOR Joyce Rubin RESEARCH DIRECTOR Andrew Gillings COPY MANAGER Adriana Bürgi RESEARCH MANAGER Leslie Anne Wiggins

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Jessica Gatdula

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ARTISTIC DIRECTOR

Anna Wintour

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Craig Kostelic VP REVENUE Jeff Barish VP REVENUE Beth Lusko-Gunderman VP REVENUE Jordana Pransky VP FINANCE & BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT Barbra Perlstein VP MARKETING Bree McKenney DIGITAL GENERAL MANAGER Eric Gillin EXECUTIVE STRATEGY DIRECTOR Hayley Russman SENIOR DIRECTOR, SALES OPERATIONS Mary Beth Dwyer

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Shannon Muldoon

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editor’s letter 1

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Bingo! In this quote from our cover story, not only does Jennifer Aniston pithily summarize her approach to interior design, she also unwittingly expresses the secret to her own enduring appeal. Sexy? For sure. But even more crucially, Aniston conveys a warmth, an authenticity, and good humor that are—yes—comforting. In her home, the sophisticated yet easy interiors seem perfectly suited to their mega-famous owner. Such affirmation is certainly part of the fun of seeing celebrities in their personal space. It can also swing the other way—and we at AD have witnessed plenty of disconnects in which the houses seem jarringly out of sync with the owners’ public personas. But that, too, can be revelatory— perhaps we don’t know them quite as well as we thought we did! It takes bravery and trust for well-known people to allow AD’s cameras into their cocoons, and we thank all the supernovas featured in our annual Star Power issue for letting us share an intimate glimpse with our readers. Candice Bergen is captured by her beloved daughter, writer Chloe Malle, in her “pretty, not perfect” Hamptons garden; young mother and social-media sensation Nicky Hilton Rothschild opens up her child-friendly Manhattan apartment; 86-year-old giant of Italian design Alessandro Mendini treats himself to his first vacation house; music impresario Scooter Braun shows us around his romantic Montecito estate; and beauty executive John Demsey reveals a NYC townhouse as colorful as a rainbow-makeup palette. Each of these homes is surprising, and yet absolutely fitting.

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1. CANDICE BERGEN AND DAUGHTER CHLOE MALLE IN THE HAMPTONS. 2. JENNIFER ANISTON, IN A DRIES VAN NOTEN DRESS, POOLSIDE IN L.A. 3. SCOOTER BRAUN’S MONTECITO MANSION. 4. SCULPTOR JOSEPH WALSH CRAFTING HIS SIGNATURE CHAIRS FOR A SPECIAL COMMISSION— THE DINING ROOM AT CHATSWORTH. 5. WITH NICKY HILTON ROTHSCHILD AT AN AD EVENT IN NYC.

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AMY ASTLEY Editor in Chief @amytastley

1. OBERTO GILI; 2. ALEXI LUBOMIRSKI; 3. TREVOR TONDRO; 4. ANDREW BRADLEY; 5. JOE SCHILDHORN/BFA.COM

“Sexy is important, but comfort is essential.” —Jennifer Aniston


THE STORY BEHIND AN ICONIC DESIGN

High Ground David Hicks’s groovy 1960s carpets still hold the floor 26

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INSPIRED BY HIS FATHER’S FAB FLOORS, ASHLEY HICKS DESIGNED AN EGGPLANT-HUED CHAINLINK CARPET FOR THE LONDON APARTMENT HE SHARES WITH WIFE KATA.

DERRY MOORE

object lesson


object lesson

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1. DAVID HICKS USED A GRAPHIC CARPET TO ENLIVEN THIS ROOM AT THE HYDE PARK HOTEL IN 1971. 2. A VINTAGE DAVID HICKS HEX MOTIF IN AMANDA BROOKS’S SON’S BEDROOM. 3., 4., AND 5. CUSTOMCOLORED LOGO, YOGI, AND OCTAGRAM PATTERNS BY ASHLEY HICKS FOR STARK. 6. DAVID HICKS IN HIS SHOP ON LONDON’S LOWNDES STREET, 1960.

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1. AND 6. COURTESY OF THE ESTATE OF DAVID HICKS; 2. MILES ALDRIDGE; 3., 4., AND 5. COURTESY OF STARK

t all started at Britwell House, designer David Hicks’s country place in Oxfordshire. “He carpeted his bathroom in a Chinese pattern with interlocking Ys, which he found in Owen Jones’s The Grammar of Ornament,” explains Ashley Hicks of his father, who showed the world in the early 1960s that carpeting, of all things, could have a wild side. No one was making patterned floor coverings—at least not to the elder Hicks’s ultramod standards—so he had some whipped up by artisans in the north of England, where narrow, antique looms produced swaths of Brussels weave that could be stitched together to fit a room’s measurements. Soon Hicks was creating colorful confections for Windsor Castle and the Prince of Wales. The latter, a cousin by marriage, commissioned an octagonal number in royal blue with Welsh red dragons for his first apartment in Buckingham Palace. As American decorator Billy Baldwin put it, Hicks “revolutionized the floors of the world with his small-patterned and striped carpeting.” Decades later, the Brit’s hallmark hexagonal design infiltrated pop culture: A scaled-up version paved the hotel halls in Stanley Kubrick’s The Shining. Another rendition covered the floors chez Sid, the kid-villain of Toy Story. As for the fashionable set, it still adores all things Hicksian. “I had a saved search on eBay for anything vintage Hicks,” admits writer Amanda Brooks, who designed her son’s room around an original blue-and-white carpet she snagged at auction. Now Hicks the younger, an architect and designer, has partnered with Stark to reproduce his father’s designs. But not without a few lively additions of his own—some of which, a mischievous Ashley says, “he would not approve of at all.” starkcarpet.com —HANNAH MARTIN


DISCOVERIES

THE BEST IN CULTURE, DESIGN, AND STYLE

EDITED BY SAM COCHRAN

FURNISHINGS BY DIMORE STUDIO, ROOMS, AND LUCA NICHETTO FOR DE LA ESPADA INHABIT THE FORMER DINING ROOM.

AD VISITS

Keys to the Kingdom At Casa Perfect, the former Los Angeles home of Elvis Presley roars back to life as a dazzling showplace for contemporary furnishings PH OTO G R A PH Y BY T REVOR TONDRO STYL ED BY MICHAEL REYNOLD S

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DISCOVERIES

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Alhadeff observes. “I was excited to leverage the Elvis connection as part of our story.” Although the Future Perfect was founded in 2003, the Casa Perfect experiment began barely over a year ago, when Alhadeff thwarted conventional retail wisdom by opening a showroom within a midcentury house in the hills above West Hollywood. “The feedback was overwhelmingly positive. It gave us the confidence to scale up the size and ambition of the project,” he recalls. “Our goal is still the same—to present gallery-like vignettes in a residential setting so that our clients can have a more intimate, personal experience with the work on display.” Located in the tony Trousdale Estates enclave of Beverly Hills, the new Casa Perfect maintains the existing floor plan and many of the original details from the Presley era. The rooms feature a mix of designs from the Future Perfect’s stellar roster—including Dimore Studio, Piet Hein Eek,

3 1. A HEATED CHAISE BY GALANTER & JONES (FAR LEFT) NEXT TO THE POOL. 2. DAVID ALHADEFF, FOUNDER OF THE FUTURE PERFECT, AT THE HOME’S ENTRANCE. 3. ELVIS PRESLEY, A FORMER OWNER, ON THE GROUNDS.

3. GARY LEWIS/MPTVIMAGES

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n the high-stakes game of Los Angeles real estate, a good celebrity pedigree is always a bonus. Of course, not all celebrities are created equal. A home that was once owned by Cary Grant or Elizabeth Taylor, for instance, would probably hold broader appeal than one formerly inhabited by, say, Zsa Zsa Gabor. On that score, David Alhadeff definitely struck gold when he discovered the new location for Casa Perfect, the L.A. outpost of his furniture mecca, the Future Perfect. Designed in 1958 by architect Rex Lotery and renovated in the mid-1960s, the house is an idiosyncratic mash-up of classic California modernism and Hollywood Regency. For six years, beginning in 1967, it belonged to Elvis Presley. Those were good years for the King, encompassing his marriage to Priscilla Presley and the birth of their daughter, Lisa Marie. “Celebrity is such a vital part of the cultural commerce of this city,”


DISCOVERIES 2

1. PAUL POIRET’S ANANAS FABRIC, ONE OF NINE PATTERNS NOW AVAILABLE FROM SCHUMACHER. 2. HYDRANGEA. 3. ANTELOPES. 4. A 1911 POIRET ENSEMBLE. 5. HIS 1913 MODEL DINING ROOM FOR A BERLIN DEPARTMENT STORE.

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Bold Strokes

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attern and color rule the decorating world today, the splashier and more boho the better. So it stands to reason that style gurus are thrilling again to French couturier Paul Poiret, once hailed as the “greatest living dress artist,” who also happened to be a high priest of free-spirited home furnishings. “I saw Poiret’s fabrics for the first time in our archives four years ago and fell in love—but it didn’t occur to me to bring them back,” says Dara Caponigro, creative director of Schumacher, referring to a collection that Paris’s portly genius created for the American fabric company in 1929 and which debuted a year later. “Now he’s relevant again because people are embracing maximalism.” Thus, Schumacher’s relaunch of the nine punchy, polychrome patterns, from giant magnolia blossoms to darting antelopes. Though Poiret’s fashions were fantastically exotic—a legendary 1913 tunic flared like a lampshade—it was his Fauvist palette that seduced a world becoming disenchanted with sweet pastels. “Everything pale and washed-out and insipid had been the rage,” Poiret wrote in King of Fashion, an impressively self-congratulatory memoir. “All I did was let loose a few wolves among these lambs: reds and purples and royal blues that made the rest come to life and begin to sing.” Those wild colors were mirrored in his fabrics’ powerful, primitive motifs. Many were adapted from naive watercolors by École Martine, the workshop he founded in 1911 and staffed with working-class girls. “He was looking for young women with an untutored eye and the kind of originality that could spring from the untouched,” explains Erica Warren,

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1., 2. AND 3. COURTESY OF SCHUMACHER; 5. HEIDELBERG UNIVERSITY LIBRARY, DEUTSCHE KUNST UND DEKORATION

Schumacher revives Paul Poiret’s sassy Jazz Age prints for a new generation


DISCOVERIES a textiles curator at the Art Institute of Chicago, home to some original examples of the Schumacher prints. “This philosophy wasn’t new to Poiret, but he certainly capitalized on it.” One of Caponigro’s favorites is Plumes, which, like several of the new offerings, comes in a wallpaper. “It’s just delightful—big, glamorous, handdrawn ostrich feathers against a ground of dots,” she enthuses. “Poiret’s designs are funny and spirited but still sophisticated. Even if you’re a minimalist you can’t help but appreciate them.” fschumacher.com —MITCHELL OWENS

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1. PLUMES ET RUBANS. 2. JUIN.

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1. AND 2. COURTESY OF SCHUMACHER; 4. COURTESY OF SALON 94 AND THOMAS BARGER

3. THOMAS BARGER POSES IN HIS BROOKLYN STUDIO. 4. A TRIO OF RECENT CHAIRS CREATED USING HIS SIGNATURE PAPER-PULP TECHNIQUE.

ONE TO WATCH

Pulp Fiction THOMAS BARGER KNOWS New York City’s recycling schedule by heart. On pickup day, he sets out ahead of the trucks, snatching bags of shredded paper. “It’s eco-friendly but also economical,” Barger says of the material, which he blends into pulp and applies to simple chairs. Wonderfully wacky—with cartoonish forms and vibrant paint jobs—his furniture and sculptures have seduced dealers Paul Johnson and Jeanne Greenberg Rohatyn, who are giving Barger his first solo show at Salon 94 Design this month. Consider it a breakthrough for the 25-year-old, who moved to the city in 2014, having grown up on a farm and studied architecture in Illinois. He quickly found work under architect Christian Wassmann, then artists Jessi Reaves and Misha Kahn, whose practices dissolved any notions about what one could or could not do. “I’m not trained to make furniture,” admits Barger, who is now expanding his techniques—building his own timber frames, experimenting with resin, and incorporating rocks from the creek where he played as a kid. One new piece is inspired by his mom folding laundry, another by his family’s Sunday suppers. As he puts it, “I guess I’m feeling nostalgic.” salon94design.com —SAM COCHRAN

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P ORT RAI T BY AM Y LO M B A R D


DISCOVERIES

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LEGACY

Exposure Time

P 3 1. MARVIN RAND’S 1949 IMAGE OF A LOS ANGELES DRIVE-IN BY ARCHITECT DOUGLAS HONNOLD. 2. CALIFORNIA CAPTURED (PHAIDON, $60). 3. THE PHOTOGRAPHER IN HIS L.A. DARKROOM IN 2004.

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ostwar Los Angeles was a boomtown, industrially and culturally—an ideal playground for architects. The result was some of America’s great midcentury homes and commercial buildings, devised by talents such as John Lautner, Richard Neutra, and Rudolph Schindler. There to record these masterworks—for promotion and posterity—were a handful of photographers, the most famous among them Julius Shulman. But the forthcoming book California Captured (Phaidon) makes a case for his peer Marvin Rand as an equally significant chronicler of the scene. An L.A. native, Rand (1924–2009) launched his studio in 1950, focusing on advertising and product pictures before

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shifting—partly on the advice of design historian Esther McCoy—to architectural photography. One of his early clients was Craig Ellwood, a charismatic architect who was married to the actress Gloria Henry and had a fondness for sports cars. Rand shot nearly all of Ellwood’s most celebrated projects, including two Case Study houses, brilliantly capturing their interplay of rectilinear volumes as well as their integration with nature. For Ellwood’s 1955 Hunt House, overlooking the Malibu surf, Rand photographed the highway-facing exterior as a hyperminimalist silhouette: two cubic garages flanking an opaque glass wall, all framed by open sea and sky. “It’s the incredibly graphic sensibility and the way Rand approaches buildings almost as exercises in abstraction that

1. AND 2. COURTESY OF THE ESTATE OF MARVIN RAND; 3. KWAKU ALSTON

The late architectural photographer Marvin Rand finally gets his due


DISCOVERIES really stand out,” says Emily Bills, who coauthored California Captured with Sam Lubell and Pierluigi Serraino. Another defining aspect of Rand’s work, she adds, is that “it was never about photographing a lifestyle image of L.A. His interest was really the structures and how they fit into the city.” Take Rand’s 1956 shot of the Capitol Records Tower in Hollywood. The cylindrical building, with its distinctive sunshades and spire, is seen from across a parking lot through an opening of tropical foliage. That building is perhaps the most famous creation by another of Rand’s key clients, Welton Becket and Assoc., the firm behind such L.A. landmarks as the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion and the Mark Taper Forum at the Music Center complex, and the Equitable Life Building—a modernist monolith with striking vertical striations, memorably shot in 1969 by Rand in three-quarter profile. As California Captured vividly shows, Rand (a onetime AD contributor) photographed high-profile projects across Southern California, from the Salk Institute to the LAX Theme Building. But the

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1. A LUTAH MARIA RIGGS–DESIGNED HOUSE IN CARPINTERIA, CA, SHOT BY RAND IN 1961. 2. HOLLYWOOD’S ICONIC CAPITOL RECORDS TOWER AS CAPTURED BY RAND IN 1956.

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book also highlights rarely seen works by such lesser-known architects as Lutah Maria Riggs and Douglas Honnold. The latter is represented by Rand’s nighttime shot of the drive-in Tiny Naylor’s, an evocative essay in light and shadow with cars parked beneath a soaring canopy. The authors, who spent more than five years combing through Rand’s archive— some 20,000 images strong—not only give the photographer his due but also further embellish “the grand mosaic,” as they put it, that is the story of California modernism. —STEPHEN WALLIS

1. AND 2. COURTESY OF THE ESTATE OF MARVIN RAND

“His interest was really the structures and how they fit into the city.” —Emily Bills


DISCOVERIES A MURAL BY KATE SCHELTER ENLIVENS THE BEDROOM OF LARA CONNOR (PICTURED).

DESIGN

On the Edge

BEFORE & AFTER

FLOWER POWER

STUDIOLO CHAIR AND CABINET BY PIERRE GONALONS; AVAILABLE THROUGH TWENTY FIRST GALLERY (21STGALLERY.COM).

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When 14-year-old New Yorker Lara Connor moved out of her shared childhood bedroom and into a space of her own, she and her mother—the writer and Vogue contributing editor Marina Rust—couldn’t agree on a decorating scheme. That is, until they discovered artist Kate Schelter, whose freehand botanical murals won over both mother and daughter. To make the 6' x 12' space feel bright and airy, Schelter suggested an overall treatment that stretched across the shelving and onto the closet door. The flower was an easy sell: They all loved geraniums, a perfect complement to the room’s pale-green carpet. “It looks like the flowers are growing out of the floor,” says Connor after decorator Ramey Caulkins of Griffin Design Source added the finishing touches to the space. She admits: “It didn’t feel like my own room until we changed the walls.” —H.M. P ORT RAI T BY C LAI BORNE S WANS O N F R A N K

HAIR BY KEVIN LEE FOR THE JULIEN FAREL RESTORE SALON AND SPA; MAKEUP BY NINA SORIANO USING NARS COSMETICS. LEFT: JEAN LUC PETIT (2)

“I HAD NEVER WORKED with wood before,” admits French furniture designer Pierre Gonalons, who has long been inspired by the painted-timber folk furniture of northern Europe. So for his latest collection, Gonalons collaborated with a traditional cabinetmaker in Bourgogne to create chairs, tables, and cabinets that pair colorfully stained frames with live-edge slabs. Says Gonalons: “It’s simple, it’s sincere, it’s not overdecorated.” pierregonalons.com —HANNAH MARTIN


DISCOVERIES THINK PIECE

Go for Baroque THIRTY-SIX MILLION DOLLARS. That’s roughly how much the 18th-century Badminton cabinet fetched at Christie’s in 2004, making it the most expensive piece of furniture ever sold—and an enduring source of fascination for 29-year-old designer Kostas Lambridis. “It communicates the wealth, elitism, and aristocracy of its time,” reflects the rising star, who riffed on the cabinet for his 2017 graduation project at Design Academy Eindhoven. Traveling to Vienna’s Liechtenstein Garden Palace, where the piece is now exhibited, Lambridis made a 3-D scan of the original, then created his replica with materials arranged according to weight. Moving up from the base, hunks of concrete, stone, and ceramic give way to wood and plastic. The cabinet’s famous clock, meanwhile, is reconstructed in textiles and recycled electronics. Says Lambridis, reflecting on his materials palette: “I tried to follow a non-hierarchical approach.” kostaslambridis.com —H.M.

ELEMENTAL CABINET, A UNIQUE 2017 WORK BY KOSTAS LAMBRIDIS.

SHOPS

DESIGNER PATRICK MELE OUTSIDE HIS NEW BOUTIQUE IN GREENWICH, CONNECTICUT.

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Decorator Patrick Mele has returned to his native Greenwich, Connecticut, to set up shop, bringing a fresh dose of style to the suburb. “A store has always been a goal,” explains Mele. “But it came together like a whirlwind.” Spontaneity certainly suits him. Just 500 square feet, the space brims with art and furnishings of assorted styles and periods—from antique Turkish carpets to Nicholas Newcomb pottery. “I want it to be a place people long to revisit.” Patrick Mele, 60 William St., Greenwich, CT. —HADLEY KELLER

FROM TOP: YEN-AN CHEN; KYLE KNODELL

TALK OF THE TOWN


DISCOVERIES 1. THE NEWLY REFRESHED TORTUGA BAY HOTEL IN PUNTA CANA. 2. A REVISITED GUEST ROOM FEATURES A WOVENRATTAN BED AND CHAISE LONGUE. 3. THE LATE FASHION DESIGNER OSCAR DE LA RENTA AT HIS BELOVED HOME IN PUNTA CANA. 4. THE MAIN DINING ROOM WAS REDECORATED AS PART OF THE RENOVATION.

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HOT SPOT

In True Fashion Oscar de la Renta’s Tortuga Bay hotel gets a thoughtful update

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1., 2. AND 4. BJÖRN WALLANDER; 3. FRANÇOIS HALARD

e wanted a small jewel of a hotel,” Oscar de la Renta once said of Tortuga Bay, the iconic Punta Cana resort he designed some ten years ago. “We wanted something that would be unbelievably comfortable, that people would come back to and would tell their friends about.” Spreading the word proved easy: Seemingly overnight, the hotel’s sunny yellow villas and ocean-facing suites landed on every jet-setter’s bucket list. But time and ocean air take a toll. So, early last year, in consultation with the late fashion maestro’s wife Annette, the owners set about restoring the property to peak comfort, enlisting AD100 decorator Markham Roberts to help revamp the villas and common spaces while retaining Oscar’s vision. “We didn’t have to reinvent the wheel,” says Roberts, who worked with Annette to refresh the public dining room’s seating in Oscar’s original textiles. The new outdoor lounge and bar, meanwhile, stay true to the overall vibe with a tiled roof and Caribbean-style accents. And to honor Oscar’s Dominican heritage, the design team enlisted local artisans to create each piece of new furniture, from upholstered wicker chairs to carved-wood tables. Ever the ardent researcher, Roberts even dug into decades-old family photos, duplicating a mahogany table and bookcases from the de la Rentas’ Connecticut home. “There isn’t anyone whose taste I respect more,” Roberts notes. “Oscar’s gone, but his spirit is sure alive and well down here.” tortugabayhotel.com —CARLY OLSON


DISCOVERIES design JULIEN LOMBRAIL (LEFT) AND LOÏC LE GAILLARD OF CARPENTERS WORKSHOP GALLERY POSE WITH A WENDELL CASTLE CHAIR IN THEIR SECRET VAULT IN ROISSY, FRANCE.

DESIGN

The Room Where It Happens Carpenters Workshop Gallery keeps the best of the best in a VIP-only vault on the outskirts of Paris that’s a museum unto itself 50

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he land around Charles de Gaulle Airport is dotted with drab corrugatedmetal warehouses, and the one I pull up to with Julien Lombrail looks no different. Except, that is, for the arresting cluster of solid bronze conical pods on the front lawn, with what seems like a giant’s throne sticking out of them. Is it a sculpture? Is it a chair? It turns out to be both. Lombrail has taken me to the hidden atelier of Carpenters Workshop Gallery, the international design empire that he and his childhood friend Loïc Le Gaillard started 11 years ago out of a woodworking atelier. That oddly beautiful chair? It’s a piece by Wendell Castle—one of more than 30 leading lights whom the gallery represents. Chronicled in a new book published by Rizzoli, Carpenters now has permanent outposts in London, Paris, and, most recently, New York, on the top two floors of a Fifth Avenue building. But unless you’re an important collector, you can’t get into the warehouse, which opened in 2015 in the suburban town of Roissy. Much of the structure’s 90,000 square feet is taken up by studios where some 25 artisans fashion wax and plaster molds, forge metal, and transform parchment into desks and cabinets. When I tour the space, a young woman is slathering a pirarucu-fish skin with silicone to make a mold for an aluminum commode by the Campana Brothers. Her progress is slow going—the silicone keeps flattening the fish’s large, rough scales—and the piece will likely take over a month to finish. As I soon discover, Carpenters doesn’t display its most valuable pieces. Those Lombrail and Le Gaillard store in a locked vault, a space reserved for only their most VIP clientele. “It’s like a bank safe, but the size of a room,” says Lombrail. “The whole workshop has a security system and 24-hour surveillance, but the vault has its own protective system over and above that, along with special temperature and humidity controls to protect the pieces inside.” The works here are intended as a survey of the best in art furniture, a kind of secret museum. Most were made by

P HOTOGRAP HY BY M AT T HI EU S A LVA I N G


DISCOVERIES design

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“The only criterion is that the piece must be an icon.” —Julien Lombrail 1. MATHIEU LEHANNEUR’S 2017 OCEAN MEMORIES LOW TABLE. 2. CLAY DINING CHAIR IN BRONZE, 2016, BY MAARTEN BAAS. 3. WORKS BY STUDIO JOB AND RON ARAD FILL THE VAULT. 4. THE FIRM’S EPONYMOUS NEW BOOK.

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a jagged hole in its middle, as though a cannonball has blasted through it. The humor doesn’t obscure the skill required to make it. Not everything gets played for laughs, which is a good thing. An Ingrid Donat commode is pure craftsmanship, its bronze surface enlivened with a pattern of interlocking flywheels. Donat, who has a permanent studio here, also happens to be Lombrail’s mother—and one of the first artists on Carpenters’ roster. She didn’t take up professional furniture-making until she was in her 40s, just about the time Lombrail was figuring out what to do with his life, and the two forged their careers in tandem. “When our principal foundry went bust in 2015, we decided to jump into the deep end and create our own atelier,” notes Lombrail. Many of that foundry’s best artisans continue to work here, producing about half of the pieces Carpenters shows. “For a bronze piece, there are anywhere from 25 to 30 steps—25 to 30 chances for something to go wrong,” he says. “It may be art, but a cabinet’s doors have still got to open and close.” carpentersworkshop gallery.com —JOSHUA LEVINE

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1. AND 2.: COURTESY OF CARPENTERS WORKSHOP GALLERY; 4.: CARPENTERS WORKSHOP GALLERY BY LIDEWIJ EDELKOORT AND DEYAN SUDJIC, RIZZOLI, 2017

the gallery’s own talents, but several were not. “The only criterion is that the piece must be an icon,” says Lombrail. He punches in the code. There stands Vincent Dubourg’s Nouvelle Zélande double buffet, which looks like a large wooden console ripped in half, its planks violently shredded, except that it’s made entirely out of steel. On a high shelf sits Marc Newson’s Orgone chair— contemporary design doesn’t get more collectible than that. Nearby, Studio Job’s massive Robber Baron cabinet reveals


DISCOVERIES 1

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WORLD OF

Laure Heriard Dubreuil At her new Manhattan outpost, the fashion impresario artfully blends tropical joie de vivre and city chic 4

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2. COURTESY OF LADOUBLEJ.COM; 3. AND 5. JOSH GADDY/COURTESY OF THIS PLACE

his is my Scarface moment,” marvels Laure Heriard Dubreuil, sinking into the Vladimir Kagan sofa in the VIP suite of the Webster’s recently opened Manhattan boutique—the fifth outpost of her lifestyle emporium (which sells a curated array of fashion and home treasures, from vintage ceramics to 5 Gaetano Pesce resin cups). The first was born nine years ago in Miami Beach, hence the cinematic nod from the French expat, who, along with her husband, artist Aaron Young, and their son, Marcel, now calls New York City home. A quick tour of the new six-level store affirms that it mimics the gangster flick in glamour alone. This particular chapter began in 2013, when our heroine spotted a vacant building on one of SoHo’s preeminent blocks. Damaged by a fire, the structure was but a two-story shadow of its former self. Undeterred, Heriard Dubreuil bought the building and—shortly before giving birth—won approval to add 1. LAURE HERIARD DUBREUIL, BESIDE A VLADIMIR KAGAN SOFA AND ADAM MCEWEN PAINTING, IN THE NEW YORK OUTPOST OF THE WEBSTER. 2. LA DOUBLEJ PLATE, $90 FOR A SET OF TWO. 3. VINTAGE FRANÇOIS LEMBO CERAMIC-ANDENAMEL BOX, $2,900. 4. CUSTOM GAETANO PESCE CHILDREN’S CABINET. 5. VINTAGE FRANÇOIS LEMBO CERAMIC VASE, $1,400.

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P HOTOGRAP HY BY BROO K E H O L M


DISCOVERIES

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1. THE BACK WALL ON THE GROUND FLOOR FEATURES A TROPICAL OCEANWAVE MOTIF HAND-PAINTED ON GLASS BY NEW YORK–BASED ARTIST MIRIAM ELLNER; THE BANQUETTE IS COVERED IN PIERRE FREY FABRIC; A GAETANO PESCE WORK HANGS ABOVE IT. 2. BETIL DAGDELEN PEACOCK CHAIR COMMISSIONED FOR THE WEBSTER. 3. VINTAGE FRANÇOIS LEMBO CERAMICAND-ENAMEL MIRROR, $2,900. 4. THE PENTHOUSE VIP SUITE OVERLOOKS A TERRACE WITH A “LOCALS ONLY” SCULPTURE BY AARON YOUNG. 5. GAETANO PESCE RESIN VASE, $800.

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2. WILLY SOMMA; 3. JOSH GADDY/COURTESY OF THIS PLACE; 5. MARIO FULFARO/COURTESY OF GAETANO PESCE

four stories. The city played matchmaker, pairing her with one of the last local cast-iron artisans. “My stores tend to be site-specific,” she says, noting that the Webster’s Miami Beach flagship is in an Art Deco building. Her own melting-pot background is reflected in the Manhattan boutique’s interiors, a collaboration with designer Christopher Osvai. There’s the entrance’s terrazzo floor—a salute to both the Miami store’s 1930s lobby and Empire State towers of that era. A bronze version of the Webster’s flamingo mascot, which Heriard Dubreuil credits to growing up watching Miami Vice, was made by Rogan Gregory and is displayed on the ground floor. Elsewhere, paintings by New York artists Nate Lowman and Adam McEwen depict a pressed-tin ceiling and a gum-speckled sidewalk, bringing in local grit. Meanwhile, furnishings by Jansen, Gio Ponti, and Pierre Paulin (whose Concorde lounge chairs she reupholstered in fabric the color of Air France blue) wink at her European heritage. “The space is an extension of my own home,” says Heriard Dubreuil, who commissioned Pesce to create a resin children’s cabinet that resembles a smiley face sculpted out of Play-Doh. “It was important to me to have a kids’ area. I wanted something playful that gives good vibes.” It takes guts to open a shop in the age of the internet. “People ask me, ‘Don’t you know it’s the end of retail?’ And I do think one type of retail is over,” she reflects. “But what makes the Webster special is that it is so residential—you want to take off your shoes, relax.” It’s a sentiment that echoes all the way up to the Scarface suite. “Be careful,” she warns of sitting on the Kagan sofa. “Marcel had a playdate the other day, and there might be some Legos hiding in the folds.” At 29 Greene St.; thewebster.us —JANE KELTNER DE VALLE


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View From the Top

THE HOUSE OFFERS SWEEPING VIEWS OF THE CITY BELOW. MARCELLO VILLANO AND ANNE ATTINGER DESIGNED THE LANDSCAPE. CUSTOM TEAK CHAISE LONGUES (ON TEAK DECKING) BY DESIGNER STEPHEN SHADLEY WITH CUSHIONS OF A PERENNIALS FABRIC. FOR DETAILS SEE RESOURCES.


High above Los Angeles, Jennifer Aniston crafts a scene of pure domestic bliss with husband Justin Theroux, a spectacular midcentury house, and a trio of very happy dogs TEXT BY MAYER RUS FRANÇOIS DISCHINGER STYLED BY LAWREN HOWELL

PHOTOGRAPHY BY


PORTRAIT BY ALEXI LUBOMIRSKI

HAIR BY CHRIS MCMILLAN FOR SOLO ARTISTS/CHRIS MCMILLAN STUDIO; MAKEUP BY GUCCI WESTMAN FOR HOME AGENCY; MANICURE + PEDICURE BY MIWA KOBAYASHI; EXTERIOR BY TY COLE; PORTRAIT OF MICK JAGGER AND JOHN LENNON: RON GALELLA/WIREIMAGE

ANISTON, IN HER HOME OFFICE, WEARS A BALENCIAGA CARDIGAN AND GRLFRND JEANS. FASHION STYLING BY RYAN HASTINGS.


RIGHT THE MIDCENTURY HOUSE OVERLOOKS THE POOL. BELOW PICTURES OF THE COUPLE STAND ON A VINTAGE ROSEWOOD CREDENZA IN THE FAMILY ROOM. OTHER PHOTOGRAPHS FROM STALEY-WISE GALLERY.

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THEROUX AT THE MAIN ENTRANCE WITH HIS BMW (LEFT) AND DUCATI (RIGHT) MOTORCYCLES. FOR THE BRONZE FRONT DOORS, SHADLEY TOOK INSPIRATION FROM THE BACKDROP OF JOHNNY CARSON’S TONIGHT SHOW SET FROM THE 1960S.


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here’s a seriously imposing desk in Jennifer Aniston’s home office that looks as if it might have been plucked from the executive suite of some international conglomerate. It positively radiates authority. “I feel extremely powerful when I sit at that desk—so powerful, in fact, that I’m almost never there,” the effervescent actress jokes. Instead, Aniston prefers to work at the relatively modest computer setup in the light-filled kitchen of the Los Angeles home she shares with her husband, actor and screenwriter Justin Theroux, and their three dogs. “It’s much cozier,” she explains, “and I’m all about cozy.” It’s hard not to love Jennifer Aniston. More than two decades after the Friends star first laid claim to the title of America’s Sweetheart—a dubious distinction, perhaps, but nevertheless apt—Aniston shows no signs of relinquishing the role. She’s funny, selfeffacing, and miraculously down-to-earth, especially given the insane tabloid scrutiny that has accompanied her every career move, romantic liaison, and, yes, haircut. And for aficionados of design, Aniston boasts one added attraction: She has terrific taste. “If I wasn’t an actress, I’d want to be a designer. I love the process,” the serial home renovator says. “There’s something about picking out fabrics and finishes that feeds my soul.” Aniston’s commitment to the craft was certainly put to the test in her latest residential project, the reimagining of a Bel Air house that was designed by architect A. Quincy Jones and completed in 1965. The actress acquired the property in 2011, after selling her beloved Hal Levitt–designed home in L.A.’s Trousdale Estates enclave (AD, March 2010) and attempting to relocate to Manhattan—a move ultimately thwarted by the rabid paparazzi that swarmed outside her Greenwich Village apartment building. When she bought the Bel Air property, it had recently emerged from a renovation by architect Frederick Fisher, which, despite its sympathetic embrace of Jones’s vision, skewed a bit too cool and minimal for Aniston’s taste. “It had a very dramatic entry sequence that led to this massive front door painted in Chinese red,” the actress recalls. “Aesthetically, it was the furthest thing from what I wanted,

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THE LIVING ROOM IS OUTFITTED WITH 20TH-CENTURY CLASSICS. JEAN ROYÈRE POLAR BEAR SOFA; ARTURO PANI COCKTAIL TABLE; LEATHER-WRAPPED ARMCHAIR BY JACQUES ADNET; PIET HEIN FOR FRITZ HANSEN BARSTOOLS FROM WYETH IN A HOLLY HUNT LEATHER. CUSTOM WALNUT, BRONZE, AND MICA BAR BY SHADLEY; PAINTING ON FAR RIGHT BY ROBERT MOTHERWELL.


“There’s something about picking out fabrics and finishes that feeds my soul,” says Aniston.


IN THE MASTER BATH, A CUSTOM CALACATTA MARBLE TUB BY SHADLEY WITH WATERWORKS FITTINGS LOOKS OUT ON A COURTYARD GARDEN. VINTAGE ROSEWOOD STOOL FROM JF CHEN. LEFT CUSTOM TEAK, LEATHER, AND BRONZE CHAIRS BY SHADLEY SURROUND A COCKTAIL TABLE ON A TERRACE. ANTIQUE BRONZE CHINESE STATUE.

“Every corner you turn, you have an experience,” Aniston says. but I immediately had the sense that it could work. It’s hard to describe, but I felt a connection.” Aniston enlisted the aid of AD100 interior designer Stephen Shadley, with whom she had collaborated on her previous L.A. home, to perform a similar alchemy in Bel Air—namely, to preserve the modernist ethos of the original scheme while softening some of its sharp lines and outfitting the interior with tactile, organic finishes and furnishings. “Jen is drawn to wood, stone, and bronze, materials that have real substance and depth. No matter how beautiful or glamorous something is, it has to be warm and inviting,” Shadley says. Aniston seconds the notion. “Sexy is important, but comfort is essential,” she avers, pointing as evidence to the vintage Jean Royère Polar Bear sofa, Jacques Adnet armchairs, and Mies van der Rohe daybed arranged in the living room. Aniston credits the home’s deftly layered interiors to a team effort, with important contributions by Shadley and L.A. designers Kathleen and Tommy Clements and Jane Hallworth. Theroux weighed in as well.

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★ FOR MORE EXCLUSIVE IMAGES AND VIDEO, VISIT ARCHDIGEST.COM.


“Sexy is important, but comfort is essential.” “Justin definitely wanted to be involved, so there was a bit of a learning curve for me on how to include another voice in the design process,” Aniston explains. “For instance, I figured out that immediately saying ‘No!’ to any suggestion is not the most collaborative move.” Aniston describes the centuries-spanning decor as “Old World meets New World,” a polyglot mix of hand-painted wallpaper and midcentury furniture, silk rugs and polished concrete, antique Japanese screens and Abstract Expressionist paintings. Yet for all the pedigreed pieces on display—artworks by Adolph Gottlieb, Robert Motherwell, and Glenn Ligon; furnishings by Vladimir Kagan, Edward Wormley, and Arturo Pani—the real triumph rests in the harmony of the various decorative compositions within Shadley’s reconceived interior architecture. “Every corner you turn, you have an experience. Everywhere you look, you get a vista. We worked

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very hard to get that flow right,” Aniston says. The same imperative guided the transformation of the extensive grounds, which previously featured a hillside vineyard. Garden designer Marcello Villano and landscape architect Anne Attinger reorganized the alfresco spaces as a series of interconnected outdoor rooms, terraces, and Asian-inspired pocket gardens. Sundays at the Aniston-Theroux home are reserved for cooking and frolicking by the pool with friends, children, and dogs. “We put out a mean taco bar, and the chili’s pretty good in the colder months,” the actress says. Although Aniston’s career remains as big as ever (next up she plays a former beauty-pageant queen in the indie comedy Dumplin’), the life and home she has built keep her priorities in order. “There was a time when I thought there was something romantic about picking up and trotting off somewhere different every three months. Now I’m becoming more particular about the projects I take,” she says. “I look around at my husband and my dogs and our home, and there’s nowhere else I want to be.”


IN ANISTON’S OFFICE, A PAIR OF VINTAGE LEATHER CLUB CHAIRS FACE A DESK BY DON S. SHOEMAKER FROM JF CHEN. TIFFANY LAMP. OPPOSITE IN THE MASTER BEDROOM, DOLLY, ONE OF THE COUPLE’S THREE DOGS, LOUNGES ON THE PLATFORM’S PASHMINA SHAG CARPET. CUSTOM WALNUT BED WITH SUEDE HEADBOARD BY SHADLEY.


design notes

THE DETAILS THAT MAKE THE LOOK HANGING TEARDROP-SHAPED CERAMIC BIRDHOUSES IN ORANGE AND YELLOW BY ALPINE; $27 EACH. HAYNEEDLE.COM

STOOLS BY BLACKMAN CRUZ FLANK THE KITCHEN ISLAND.

WYETH SPLIT-BAMBOO MEDIA SIDEBOARD BY JOHN BIRCH FOR RH; FROM $4,495. RH.COM

OURS POLAIRE SOFA BY JEAN ROYÈRE; 1950S. PHILLIPS.COM

“ SECOLO PORCELAIN SLAB IN MARRON GLACE BY WALKER ZANGER; PRICE UPON REQUEST. WALKERZANGER.COM

URCHIN BY CLAIRE PALASTANGA FOR CREEL & GOW; FROM $200. CREEL ANDGOW.COM

I dream of building an art studio and spending crafty Sundays at the pottery wheel.” R. W. ATLAS DECK-MOUNTED MARQUEE LAVATORY FAUCET WITH METAL LEVER SIDE-MOUNT HANDLES IN UNLACQUERED BRASS BY ROMAN AND WILLIAMS FOR WATERWORKS; $2,454. WATERWORKS.COM

INTERIORS: FRANÇOIS DISCHINGER; ARTWORK: © DEDALUS FOUNDATION/LICENSED BY VAGA, NEW YORK, NY/COURTESY OF CHRISTIE’S IMAGES LTD. 2018; ALL OTHERS COURTESY OF RESPECTIVE COMPANIES

TITAN 1 PENDANT LAMP WITH DIFFUSER BY PETER BOWLES FOR ORIGINAL BTC; $659. DWR.COM


BC WORKSHOP MOLAR STOOL BY BLACKMAN CRUZ; $5,700. BLACKMANCRUZ.COM

IMMERSION I CARPET BY TAI PING; TO THE TRADE. HOUSEOFTAIPING.COM

BRANCHING BUBBLE CHANDELIER BY LINDSEY ADELMAN STUDIO; $9,000. LINDSEYADELMAN.COM

My favorite compliment is when people say how warm the house is.”

CLYDE IN ANISTON’S OFFICE LIBRARY. LINDSEY ADELMAN STUDIO CHANDELIER; ANTIQUE RUG.

ANASTASIA RUG BY LOLOI; $529 FOR 5’ X 8’. LOLOIRUGS.COM

THROW OF DICE #17 BY ROBERT MOTHERWELL, 1963. CHRISTIES.COM

BIEDERMEIER CANDLESTICKS BY TED MUEHLING FOR E. R. BUTLER & CO.; FROM $360. THEFUTURE PERFECT.COM

GALLERY TABLE LAMP BY DARRYL CARTER FOR MILLING ROAD; $1,425. BAKER FURNITURE.COM

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MORE MORE MORE

A riot of color, pattern, and art, beauty exec John Demsey’s six-story townhouse on Manhattan’s Upper East Side bursts with exuberant life

TEXT BY

ALINA CHO

PHOTOGRAPHY BY

FRANÇOIS DISCHINGER

STYLED BY

MICHAEL BARGO

ABOVE BRIMMING WITH ART, THE LIVING ROOM IS A CABINET OF CURIOSITIES INCLUDING A PEDRO FRIEDEBERG HAND-FOOT CHAIR, A KENNETH SNELSON SCULPTURE, AND PHOTOGRAPHS BY DAVID BAILEY. A ROMO VISCOSE VELVET COVERS THE VINTAGE WILLY RIZZO SOFA; COCKTAIL TABLE BY VINCENZO DE COTIIS; CUSTOM RUG BY STARK. OPPOSITE A TONY DUQUETTE FOR BAKER GHOST SNAIL LIGHT SIDLES UP TO BOLDLY UPHOLSTERED CHAIRS IN THE SUNROOM. FLOOR LAMP AND PENDANTS BY APPARATUS. CUSTOM DE GOURNAY SCREEN. FOR DETAILS SEE RESOURCES.


f

or John Demsey, it all began with a sofa: an enormous Willy Rizzo curved number that can seat 18. “In the mid-’70s my parents had an apartment at Olympic Tower in New York and they bought some furniture from Willy Rizzo, and the dealer at the time for Rizzo in the United States was C. Z. Guest,” remembers Demsey. (Guest’s representation of the Italian designer Rizzo in the 1970s is a little-known aspect of her illustrious life.) “When they left the city, they sent it back to Cleveland and it went into storage. So the idea was I wanted to start everything with this couch. And I was in a blue mood. I was very much obsessed with Yves Klein and shades of turquoise.” That inspiration set the direction for a 17-month gut renovation of his turn-of-the-century townhouse on Manhattan’s Upper East Side. Demsey, executive group president of the Estée Lauder Companies (overseeing such brands as Tom Ford Beauty, Jo Malone, MAC Cosmetics, and more), bought the 5,300-square-foot home, which he shares with his nine-yearold daughter, Marie-Hélène, after spending nearly a decade in a rented townhouse just two doors down from his new space. “I decided finally to plant a stake in the ground and to do something all the way,” he avers. “Everything I’ve ever done

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A PAINTING BY JAMES NARES HANGS OVER A SOFA BY B&B ITALIA BEDECKED WITH PILLOWS BY GUCCI; ALEXANDER CALDER SCULPTURE.

before was like a stage set. I was never able to have the bathroom I wanted, the closets I wanted, the backyard I wanted, the kitchen I wanted.” Enter Joseph Cornacchia, his architect, who changed everything (even down to the wiring), and Bibi Monnahan, Demsey’s longtime friend and designer. “John said Yves Klein blue and David Hicks,” recalls Monnahan. “So I went to Stark, and lo and behold they had some Hicks-inspired carpeting that could be done in any size.” Monnahan worked closely with Stark to create custom rugs for the entire house. She then replaced the old brown suede on the Willy Rizzo sofa with a luxurious Romo viscose velvet in a rich azure hue. With the palette set, the project took off. Each piece was painstakingly curated by Demsey and Monnahan, including a few key pieces Demsey found while traveling on business, like the Vincenzo De Cotiis brass coffee table picked up during a trip to Milan and the Golden Clover table by Guy de Rougemont bought at Galerie Diane de Polignac in Paris. Demsey’s vast art collection is also on display. The fourth-floor guest suite features several paintings by his mother, Renée Demsey, who was the in-house artist for Bergdorf Goodman in the 1970s.


A MIRRORED CABINET FROM EDRA DIVIDES THE FIFTH FLOOR. A LIONHEAD SCULPTURE BY SERGIO BUSTAMANTE SITS IN FRONT OF A FRAMED SCARF BY HIROSHI SUGIMOTO FOR HERMÈS. CHRISTIAN LIAIGRE DESK; FORNASETTI RUG.


RIGHT A SCHUMACHER FABRIC COVERS THE HEADBOARD, SHADES, AND WALLS OF MARIEHÉLÈNE’S BEDROOM; ARMCHAIRS BY INDIA MAHDAVI; ARTWORK BY ALBER ELBAZ. BELOW MARIE-HÉLÈNE.

PORTRAIT OF MARIE-HÉLÈNE DEMSEY COURTESY OF NINA VAN ARSDALE

The installation of 575 pictures from his trove was mapped out with military precision.

ABOVE DEMSEY IN THE WORKOUT ROOM. OPPOSITE A POWDER ROOM SWATHED IN A SCHUMACHER WALLPAPER BOASTS A SUITE OF ILLUSTRATIONS BY DONALD ROBERTSON. MIRAGGIO MIRROR BY FERNANDO AND HUMBERTO CAMPANA FOR EDRA; ROBOT SCULPTURE BY MIA FONSSAGRIVES-SOLOW.

The beauty executive is also a passionate collector of photography, and the installation of 575 pictures from his trove was mapped out room-by-room with military precision. The installation—covering all six floors—took nine weeks. One recent acquisition Demsey is especially proud of is a striking Steven Klein portrait of Nicki Minaj painted blue and wearing a pink Marilyn Monroe wig. (Demsey recently worked with Minaj on a lipstick collaboration for MAC Cosmetics.) “His life is his work and his work is his life,” notes Aerin Lauder, a close friend and associate. “You see that in his home, his love of pattern and package and texture; it translates into everything he does. He’s definitely more is more.” That’s for sure. “Less is bore,” declares Donald Robertson, roving creative director of the Estée Lauder Companies, of his boss’s style. The prolific illustrator, known as the “Andy Warhol of Instagram,” created a Dita Von Teese–themed wallpaper for one of Demsey’s powder rooms, and his whimsical artwork is sprinkled throughout the house. “He’s a fearless kid with a job and a credit card,” says Robertson. “Imagine a four-yearold with really good credit.” As for that Willy Rizzo sofa, what would the late C. Z. Guest think of its being the design inspiration for Demsey’s home? “My mother adored John and would get a kick out of him having this beautiful sofa in his house,” says her daughter and another Demsey friend, Cornelia Guest. “Especially since he got it from his parents—and I always took all her furniture. Great minds think alike!” Meanwhile, has Demsey planted a stake in the ground for good? “As long as I can continue walking up the stairs, yes.”

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ABOVE A BUBBLES CHANDELIER BY CHARLES PARIS HANGS OVER A GOLDEN CLOVER TABLE BY GUY DE ROUGEMONT IN THE ART-FILLED LIBRARY. OPPOSITE A WINGBACK CHAIR BY BDDW WEARS A LELIÈVRE FOR SCALAMANDRÉ FABRIC; NICKI MINAJ PORTRAIT BY STEVEN KLEIN; BLUE URN BY MICHAEL EDEN.

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design notes

THE DETAILS THAT MAKE THE LOOK

CHARLOTTE CHAIR BY INDIA MAHDAVI; $6,408. RALPHPUCCI.NET

ZÉNITH CHANDELIER BY PHILIPPE STARCK FOR BACCARAT; $99,100. BACCARAT.COM

I was in Paris and my friend was wearing these rad Louboutin boots that were turquoise, ocher, red, and gold, and I thought, That’s my color scheme!” DRIZZLE WALLPAPER BY SCHUMACHER; TO THE TRADE. FSCHUMACHER.COM

SOLAIRE MIRROR BY HERVÉ VAN DER STRAETEN; $7,560. RALPH PUCCI.NET

LOOK MIRROR BY ELIZABETH GAROUSTE; $21,120. RALPHPUCCI.NET

GOLDEN CLOVER TABLE BY GUY DE ROUGEMONT, 2012. 1STDIBS.COM

BENJAMIN MOORE’S CALIENTE PAINT WARMS UP THE MASTER BEDROOM; ART BY LEN PRINCE AND MARK GAGNON; BED BY BIBI MONNAHAN IN A NOBILIS FABRIC; CUSTOM CARPET BY STARK.


A LUCIEN CLERGUE PHOTOGRAPH OF PABLO PICASSO HANGS IN DEMSEY’S OFFICE; SCHUMACHER MAP WALLPAPER; CUSTOM CARPET BY STARK.

DEBASED BRILLO BY CHARLES LUTZ, 2014. 1STDIBS.COM

WYCOMBE CARPET BY DAVID HICKS FOR STARK; TO THE TRADE. STARKCARPET.COM

INTERIORS: FRANÇOIS DISCHINGER; ALL OTHERS COURTESY OF RESPECTIVE COMPANIES

THE DRESSING ROOM FEATURES CUSTOM CABINETRY BY CORNACCHIA ARCHITECTS & PLANNERS; CHRISTIAN LIAIGRE CHAIR WITH PILLOW BY GUCCI.

NEROLI PORTOFINO BODY OIL BY TOM FORD; $74. TOMFORD.COM

TALL YELLOW BLOOM VESSEL BY MICHAEL EDEN; $8,944. ADRIANSASSOON.COM BOIS DE SANTAL CANDLE BY EDITIONS DE PARFUMS FRÉDÉRIC MALLE; $125. FREDERIC MALLE.COM

C90 UTRECHT ARMCHAIR BY GERRIT RIETVELD IN BERTJAN POT BOXBLOCKS JACQUARD BY CASSINA; $5,900. CASSINA.COM

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Atelier AM animates a historic 1930 Montecito estate with a contemporary spirit grounded in classic connoisseurship TEXT BY

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MAYER RUS

PHOTOGRAPHY BY

STEPHEN KENT JOHNSON

STYLED BY

MICHAEL BARGO

SCULPTURE: © 2018 THE ISAMU NOGUCHI FOUNDATION AND GARDEN MUSEUM, NEW YORK/ARTISTS RIGHTS SOCIETY (ARS), NEW YORK

FRESH BREEZE


A MURANO-GLASS CHANDELIER BY SEGUSO PRESIDES OVER THE DINING ROOM. CUSTOM BLEACHED WALNUT TABLE BY L’ARTIGIANO STUDIO; 18TH-CENTURY ITALIAN CHAIRS; BRONZE BOAT SCULPTURE BY EDOUARD MARCEL SANDOZ. OPPOSITE AN ISAMU NOGUCHI SCULPTURE STANDS BEYOND THE ENTRY CORRIDOR. PAINTING BY MORRIS LOUIS. FOR DETAILS SEE RESOURCES.


ABOVE IN THE LIVING ROOM, A PAIR OF ANTIQUE TORTOISESHELL-AND-EBONY CABINETS FLANK A SOFA BY DESIGN QUEST CUSTOM IN A DE GOURNAY SILK VELVET. CLUB CHAIR BY DESIGN QUEST CUSTOM IN LORO PIANA INTERIORS LINEN; EARLY-19TH-CENTURY PORPHYRY TABLETOP MOUNTED ON NEW WOOD BASE; GILTWOOD CHAIR IN A ROGERS & GOFFIGON BLUE VELVET. OPPOSITE A BRONZE SCULPTURE BY ÉMILE-ANTOINE BOURDELLE.


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lexandra and Michael Misczynski, the wife-and-husband team behind the Los Angeles–based AD100 design firm Atelier AM, are standard-bearers for the increasingly superannuated concepts of quality and connoisseurship. In an imagedriven culture, where novelty and extravagance so often masquerade as virtues, the Misczynskis remain steadfast in their belief that true style can emerge only from substance. It’s an oldfashioned idea, perhaps, but as the firm’s work so eloquently demonstrates, it can be applied in ways that celebrate the present and future as well as the past. Consider the spectacular Montecito estate recently reimagined by Atelier AM in collaboration with Richard Manion Architecture. Built in 1930 by architect Reginald Johnson, author of such Southern California landmarks as the Santa Barbara Biltmore Hotel and the mansion at Ganna Walska Lotusland, the Montecito property was ripe for reinvention when it was purchased roughly seven years ago by longtime clients of both the Misczynskis and Manion. Instead of a slavish renovation that would have ossified the Italianate villa into a baronial relic, the designers conspired to revitalize the home in order to serve contemporary tastes and needs without sacrificing any of its patrician élan. “The house had been bastardized over the years, and we wanted to bring it back to what it had been, but not in a literal sense,” Michael explains. “Our work was more of a reinterpretation, calculated to instill a modern spirit and energy suitable for a similarly modern, multigenerational family.” Atelier AM’s modus operandi is predicated on a reverence for patina and the evidence of appreciation that materials

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“We focus on form, line, and the integrity of the objects that inhabit our interiors.” —Alexandra Misczynski

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT ALEXANDRA AND MICHAEL MISCZYNSKI. MAJOLICA ROOSTER SCULPTURES PERCH ON KITCHEN ISLANDS BY ARCLINEA. PENDANT LIGHTS BY PAUL FERRANTE. A 17TH-CENTURY ITALIAN MANTEL EMBELLISHES THE LIVING ROOM. ANTIQUE STOOLS AND TABLE.


accrue over years of loving use. In the Montecito project, that approach is manifested in the deployment of reclaimed, timeworn wood beams and decking, vintage terra-cotta tile floors, artisanal plaster, Italian marble, and ample architectural details of gray Pietra Serena sandstone. “It was a favorite building material of Brunelleschi’s,” Manion says, striking an appropriately lofty Renaissance note. The Misczynskis outfitted the graciously scaled rooms with meticulous compositions that span centuries—indeed, millennia—of art and design. Gilded Italian furnishings from the Baroque and Rococo periods mingle amicably with important 20th-century French tables and chairs by JeanMichel Frank, Jean Royère, and Jean Dunand. Lighting encompasses a magnificent Viennese giltwood chandelier, a floor lamp by Alberto Giacometti, repurposed Han Dynasty vases, and a flamboyant confection of Murano glass that hangs above the dining table. A Roman statue of Fortuna and a nearly 5,000-year-old Bactrian stone object expand the heady mix into the realm of the ancient.

The natural hues and textures of the wood, plaster, and stone building materials establish the serene mood of the rooms, while jewel-toned upholstery silks and velvets add strategic jolts of lush color. “We don’t do a lot of kooky wallpapers and graphic prints,” Alexandra says. “Our color sensibility is a bit more subtle and organic. We focus on form, line, and the integrity of the objects that inhabit our interiors.” The Misczynskis’ sympathetic embrace of both the antique and the contemporary is manifested with particular brio in the design of the newly expanded kitchen. Beneath a ceiling of rough-hewn, reclaimed wood beams, two minimalist stainlesssteel islands, as taut as Donald Judd boxes, suggest a home that has evolved over time, with modern amenities unapologetically inserted into a historic envelope. “It’s not about artificial theatrics,” Michael says of the style clash. “We simply believe that the past and the present do not exist in opposition. They are complementary. Harnessing the tension between the two to create something beautiful, meaningful, and of the moment—that’s the essence of modernity.”

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BRINGING UP BABY

For Nicky Hilton Rothschild, home is a chic yet child-friendly New York penthouse ямБlled with family treasures TEXT BY CHLOE

MALLE

STEPHEN KENT JOHNSON MIRANDA BROOKS

PHOTOGRAPHY BY

STYLED BY

SEATED BY THE DRAWING-ROOM FIREPLACE, NICKY WEARS A SHIRT, PANTS, AND SHOES BY TORY BURCH. HER DAUGHTER LILY GRACE IS IN A ROMPER BY CARAMEL. PAINTING BY ELLIOTT PUCKETTE. OPPOSITE A WALLPAPER BY PETER FASANO ADDS A BLUE-SKY NOTE TO THE CHEERY NURSERY. CARPET BY STARK. FOR DETAILS SEE RESOURCES.


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lmo’s unmistakable squawk floats out of the nursery and into the hallway of the downtown penthouse that year-anda-half-old Lily Grace shares with her parents, James and Nicky Hilton Rothschild, new sister Teddy Marilyn (born this past December), and two cats, Mac and Cheese. With the drunken-sailor stagger of one who has just recently learned to walk, the toddler topples into her mother’s lap, revealing pink-heart D. Porthault bloomers that match the bedding on her cream crib. “I had so much fun doing

this room; you just get to relive your childhood again with all the things you loved: kitties and bunnies and princesses,” says Nicky, cozily roosted on the nursery’s hand-darned felt ball rug (found on Etsy). The room’s sky-blue Peter Fasano wallpaper adds to the cheerful mix of Pottery Barn Kids essentials and a menagerie of animals. “James did the vast majority,” she says of the apartment’s decorating, “but I added my little feminine touches, my little accessories.” “I don’t know where I got it from,” muses James, scooping Lily Grace up into his arms, when asked where he picked up the design bug. “I just quite enjoy doing it.” Nicky, of course, is the younger sister of Paris and a fashion designer whose latest endeavor, a Mommy & Me collection for Tolani, debuts this

HAIR AND MAKEUP BY PHOEBE GOULDING

ABOVE A PAIR OF TUFTED ARMCHAIRS COVERED IN A FABRIC BY FLEURONS D’HÉLÈNE GREETS GUESTS IN THE HEIRLOOM-FILLED DRAWING ROOM. A CUSTOM DE GOURNAY SILK ACCENTS A WALL. CARPET BY STARK. RIGHT IN AN OSCAR DE LA RENTA GOWN, NICKY LOUNGES ON A SOFA THAT IS COVERED IN A FABRIC BY COLEFAX AND FOWLER.


spring (though her 1.1 million Instagram followers have already seen glimpses). And James, a financier, is a scion of the aristocratic, multibranched European banking dynasty. When the couple met, at a wedding outside Rome in 2011, James was living in London and Nicky in Los Angeles. So when they got married, in 2015, the compromise was to set up house in the middle. And when James sold his family’s Suffolk estate, that same year, many of the home’s treasures migrated with him across the Atlantic. The heirlooms range from the easily portable— a pair of chairs used by Lord and Lady Rothschild at the 1902 coronation of King Edward VII—to the more cumbersome: the antique marble mantelpiece that now anchors the couple’s NoHo drawing room. “I mean, look, I’m not that into the decorating. I do enjoy it, but I would never do it as a job,” he adds

“James did the vast majority,” Nicky says of the decorating. “But I added my little feminine touches.”

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ABOVE A RED FARROW & BALL PAINT WARMS THE LIBRARY WALLS, WHICH ARE LINED WITH VINTAGE RACE MEMORABILIA FROM JAMES’S FATHER; SOFA BY RH. ABOVE RIGHT LILY GRACE’S CRIB BY POTTERY BARN KIDS IS DRESSED IN D. PORTHAULT LINENS.

a bit bashfully as he leads the way down the hallway past an allée of framed illustrations of Rothschild ancestors. “They’re a good-looking bunch—strong genes!” he jokes. The family settles into a Holland & Sherry navy wool-covered Howard sofa that, along with the armchairs and ottoman, also came from the England estate. “We worked with an incredible upholsterer who just brought these pieces back to life,” says Nicky, “but they still have that cozy, old feeling. They don’t make things like this anymore.” Fortunately, Mac and Cheese keep their kneading to the room’s steel-blue Stark carpet. Lily Grace is free to roam at will, messy hands and all. “I grew up in a house full of antiques and fancy fabrics and certain rooms you weren’t allowed to go in,” Nicky explains. “And as a child I always told myself that I will never have that when I’m grown up; I would have a house where no room is off-limits.”

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The loftlike drawing room is the heart of the home, with the dining area and open kitchen at one end. On one wall, built-in limed-oak bookshelves flank the fireplace, where an oval gessoand-kaolin painting by Elliott Puckette is the focal point. (A collage of whimsical linocuts by Puckette’s husband—and James’s uncle—Hugo Guinness hangs farther down the wall facing the black walnut dining table.) On the opposite wall, a Modigliani watercolor that was a gift to James from his father hangs atop the custom de Gournay cherry-blossom wall covering. Of course, the next generation is making its own mark as well: Lily Grace’s first-haircut certificate from Doodle Doo’s is pinned to the refrigerator next to a Happy Father’s Day card, and around the corner a trio of silhouettes by Puckette depicts the family, waiting for a fourth to be added soon.


“As a child I told myself that I would have a house where no room is off-limits.”

ABOVE A CLUSTER OF PRINTS BY HUGO GUINNESS ADDS WHIMSY TO THE DINING AREA, WHERE AN OAK CONSOLE IS FLANKED BY CHAIRS FROM THE CORONATION OF KING EDWARD VII. LEFT ONE OF THE FAMILY CATS NAPS ON D. PORTHAULT LINENS IN THE GUEST BEDROOM. A BENNISON FABRIC COVERS THE HEADBOARD.


FAMILY ROOTS

ABOVE TUCKED INTO THE GARDEN AT CANDICE BERGEN AND CHLOE MALLE’S EAST HAMPTON HOME IS A SETTEE BY WEATHEREND ESTATE FURNITURE; THE GROUNDS WERE UPDATED BY AD100 FIRM HOLLANDER DESIGN. OPPOSITE WINDSOR CHAIRS SURROUND A FARMHOUSE-STYLE TABLE BENEATH A EUROPEAN BEECH. FOR DETAILS SEE RESOURCES.

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At their home in East Hampton, mother/daughter duo Candice Bergen and Chloe Malle find common ground— and room to craft TEXT BY

CHLOE MALLE

PHOTOGRAPHY BY

OBERTO GILI

STYLED BY

HOWARD CHRISTIAN


But back to breakfast. Summer in the Hamptons is a blood sport—survival of the richest or the earliest. Candice and I try to be the earliest. We get to Round Swamp by 7:55 a.m. and wait for the doors to open at eight so we can nab fresh blueberry muffins from the “Swamp ladies,” as my mother reverentially calls the farm’s sister owners. Back home, coffee is sipped from monogrammed Emma Bridgewater mugs, and muffins disappear within minutes. Later, Graham and I go to the beach or for a run at a nearby nature preserve. In the afternoon, Candice, Marshall, and Phyllis head to the pool, where—after a youth spent tanning—my mother swims laps in a long-sleeved shirt, shorts, and fins for hands and feet, successfully achieving the look of Aquaman’s kooky aunt. The rest of her day is devoted to Bergenbags, her artistic hobby turned fashion sensation. (Proceeds from each personalized purse go to charity.) It began two years ago, on the Friday before Memorial Day, when she and Phyllis were waiting to pick me up from the jitney. As I emerged harried from hours on the LIE, she noted the Louis Vuitton weekender I had been wanting to get monogrammed and proudly jangled a paper bag full of paint pens she had just bought at the local art-supply store. It seemed the perfect opportunity had presented itself. At first she was nervous and careful, then quickly less so as my initials evolved into a patch of grass and a trio of bunnies. Today, East Hampton remains Bergenbags’ HQ, though Candice has graduated from paint pens to specialty acrylics and brushes. Recent commissions include a Rebel Alliance shield for George Lucas’s wife, Mellody Hobson; a Fragonard-style portrait of Barbra Streisand’s Maltese, Miss Fanny; and hedgehogs for Lena Dunham. The wait list grows and grows. Candice has yet to paint her garden— she might need a bigger canvas.

HAIR BY SAUNDRA TAGUE FOR WARREN TRICOMI; MAKEUP BY JULIE HARRIS FOR TRACEYMATTINGLY.COM USING GIORGIO ARMANI BEAUTY

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very now and then a Bunny can be spotted hopping across my family’s East Hampton garden. Usually it’s morning, when the creature is hungry, lured by the prospect of breakfast. She is also, I should clarify, human— Bunny being the nickname my mother, Candice Bergen, has used for me (and I for her) for over 15 years. For nearly as long, she and I have shared the lawn that separates the cottage, where I stay with my husband, Graham, from the main house, which was built by my stepfather, Marshall Rose, and his late wife, Jill. Ten years ago, Candy and Marsh set about updating the gardens with landscape architect Edmund Hollander. “The man works on vast farms, incorporating Henry Moore bronzes into rolling hills,” the elder Bunny admits. “We stepped up and said, ‘We’d like you to refresh two acres!’ And he did.” Hollander divided the lawn with a white picket fence and a border of hydrangea and Japanese anemones, beyond which he created a secret garden of shade plants, wide-leaf hostas, and ostrich ferns beneath the 150-year-old maples. “Every property tells a story, and this story was the trees,” recalls Hollander, who trucked in a 35-foot sycamore from New Jersey, causing a temporary closure of the George Washington Bridge. The apple trees that line the property’s perimeter were an anniversary gift to my mother from Marshall. Meanwhile, the border garden (conceived by Jill and landscape designer Jane Lappin, who still tends to it) is the yard’s colorful crown, with loose tiers of hollyhocks, dahlias, and snapdragons. “This isn’t a garden you’re a slave to; this is a garden you enjoy, where dogs can run around,” says Hollander, just as our surly cavachon, Phyllis, relieves herself on the geranium rozanne. “It’s pretty, not perfect.”

★ EXCLUSIVE VIDEO: CANDICE BERGEN AND CHLOE MALLE IN THE HAMPTONS, ARCHDIGEST.COM.


CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT PHYLLIS, THE FAMILY’S CAVACHON, STRIDES ACROSS THE LAWN FROM THE GUEST COTTAGE. MOTHER AND DAUGHTER WITH BERGENBAGS IN PROGRESS. AN ARCHED GATE BY HOLLANDER DESIGN PUNCTUATES A HEDGE. RECENTLY CUSTOMIZED GOYARD AND LOUIS VUITTON TOTES.

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IN LIVING COLOR Legendary architect Alessandro Mendini fills his vibrant vacation home in the mountains of northern Italy with highlights from his illustrious career

TEXT BY

HANNAH MARTIN

PHOTOGRAPHY BY

DANILO SCARPATI

ABOVE ALESSANDRO MENDINI IN THE LIVING ROOM. THE ARMCHAIR WEARS A PROUST FABRIC BY THE DESIGNER. OPPOSITE THE ENTRANCE HALL OF MENDINI’S RETREAT IN OLDA, ITALY, MIXES CONTEMPORARY ACCENTS WITH THE HOME’S ORIGINAL STILE LIBERTY DETAILS. FIBERGLASS VASE BY MENDINI; SUSPENSION LIGHT BY HOPF & WORTMANN. FOR DETAILS SEE RESOURCES.


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DESIGNS BY MENDINI: 1. POLTRONA DI PROUST CHAIR. 2. & 3. ANNA G. AND ALESSANDRO M. CORKSCREWS FOR ALESSI. 4. THE OLDA HOME’S EXTERIOR. 5. TAVOLINO COFFEE TABLE–SEATING BENCH. 6. GORKHA RUG FOR JOSEPH CARINI CARPETS. 7. KANDISSI SOFA. 8. PLASTIC STOOLS FOR KARTELL. 9. ELISA’S BEDROOM.

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Mendini’s own works—rare prototypes, wild cabinets, charming rugs—mingle with those of his friends. 9

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PRODUCTS: 1., 2. AND 3.: COURTESY OF ATELIER MENDINI; 5. FABRICE GOUSSET/COURTESY OF GALERIE KREO; 6., 7. AND 8.: COURTESY OF ATELIER MENDINI

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lessandro Mendini has a confession to make: “I never created furniture for a house of my own.” The 86year-old Italian architect has long separated work and home, filling his humble Milan apartment—just upstairs from his atelier—with only simple, functional basics. But 12 years ago, as Mendini looked for a vacation home outside the city to share with his two grown daughters, Fulvia and Elisa, a photograph of a beauty in the Stile Liberty mode (Italy’s term for Art Nouveau) caught his eye in a real-estate agent’s office. “I immediately loved it,” he recalls. A private residence that served for a time as a summer camp for children managed by nuns, it sat snugly in the mountains of Olda, a village north of San Pellegrino Terme. Soon, keys in hand, Mendini felt something change: “I put my own furniture on display as if it were a museum and positioned them next to Liberty-style antiques.” With a wildly prolific career of more than 50 years and counting, there was a lot of material to choose from. Mendini’s affinity for environments began earlier than most. Born prematurely in Milan in 1931, he and his twin sister were placed along with a couple of hot-water bottles in a large, zigzagpatterned armchair designed by Piero Portaluppi (who also decorated the family house) and left to incubate. From that improvised cradle, an infant Mendini gazed up at the Annunciation, a Surrealistic artwork by Alberto Savinio. “That was my first habitat,” he once wrote. “A Tyrolean Futurist armchair and a metaphysical painting.”

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After he graduated from architecture school at Milan Polytechnic, Mendini’s career took off in wild and unprecedented directions. Critical of bourgeois culture, he moved within the late-1960s anti-design Italian Radical movement, from which he went on to cofound (along with luminary Ettore Sottsass) Studio Alchimia and later designed for Memphis (founded by Sottsass). All the while, he built buildings, penned books, and served as the editor of Domus and Casabella. Discerning as he is, he created not only objects of contemplation, but also ones for practical use—corkscrews for Alessi, watches for Swatch, and plastic stools for Kartell, among countless others— that tirelessly deliver his cheerful wit to the masses. Of his new home, Mendini says, “It allows me to experiment, especially with color.” Sweet pastels— calamine-pink; pistachio-green—splash the rooms, which are filled with Technicolor furnishings. Like so much of Mendini’s work, the juxtapositions are improbable, even jarring. As design dealer Didier Krzentowski of Paris’s Galerie Kreo, a longtime collaborator with the designer, puts it: “He will never do something that is not himself. He really has his own world.” The star player of that world, of course, is Mendini’s unforgettable 1978 ode to French writer Marcel Proust: a baroque seat hand-painted with thousands of Pointillist brushstrokes. One of the limited-edition versions shares a sitting room with Fulvia. Two green plastic models produced by Magis—the design has been reimagined in dozens of materials ranging from marble to cast bronze—sit downstairs in the belvedere, and Pointillist spots sprinkle headboards, mirrors, and rugs all over the house. Mendini’s own works (rare prototypes, wild cabinets, and charming rugs) mingle with those of his friends, such as a gelatinous vase by Gaetano Pesce and circus-like poufs by Anna Gili, as well as a table that she designed for the Memphis Group. And all that vibrant modernity sits with the Stile Liberty antiques that came with the house and a cache of other venerables—small tables, lamps by Émile Gallé and Tiffany, a few bronze sculptures— purchased at an auction of decorations from the nearby Grand Hotel. “I do four things here,” Mendini says, reflecting on his new place of solitude. “I read, I write, I draw, and I take walks in the mountains. The house makes me think, links me to the past, and detaches me for a few days from the speed of life and work.” Thinking about the arc of Mendini’s lengthy (and still extremely active) career, the filmmaker Francesca Molteni—whose documentary about the architect debuted in 2016— laughs. “He said that he started his career as an anti-bourgeois designer, and he ended up being a bourgeois in the end,” she says. “But a good one.” And now, like every good bourgeois, Mendini has a country house, too.

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ABOVE MENDINI’S RANGE OF TALENTS IS ON DISPLAY IN THE PLAYROOM—THE PAINTING, BOOKCASE, AND RUGS ARE ALL BY THE DESIGNER. CEILING LIGHTS BY MARZIO RUSCONI CLERICI. OPPOSITE IN THE LIVING ROOM, OTTOMANS BY ANNA GILI SIT ON A SPECKLED RUG BY SOTIRIOS PAPADOPOULOS. CHAIR AND COCKTAIL TABLE BY MENDINI; ORIGINAL GILT-BRONZE CHANDELIER.

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ROSE BEDS IN THE GARDEN. OPPOSITE YAEL (WEARING A LUISA BECCARIA DRESS) AND LEVI. ALVAR AALTO CEILING PENDANT; RICK OWENS DOUBLE RECAMIER; RAYMOND PETTIBON ARTWORK. FASHION STYLING BY ARIANA WEISNER. FOR DETAILS SEE RESOURCES.


SWEET SPOT

Mega talent manager Scooter Braun’s idyllic retreat in the California countryside is the perfect escape TEXT BY

LAUREN WATERMAN

PHOTOGRAPHY BY

TREVOR TONDRO

STYLED BY

MICHAEL BARGO


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there. “We were like, ‘We’re not going to buy a house.’ We weren’t even married yet!” Scooter recalls. “Then they took us out to lunch, and when we got back to their house afterward, there was a broker waiting for us. We said, ‘This is ridiculous! We’re not doing this.’ ” But the pair, whose primary residence is roughly 90 miles south, in Brentwood, Los Angeles, nevertheless agreed to check out a few properties in the charming, celebrity-friendly enclave. “We saw two places, and we weren’t interested,” Scooter says, “and then this was the third. As soon as we pulled into the driveway, between all those trees, we kind of instantly knew that we were going to buy it.” (“It’s 100 years of growth on five acres,” he enthuses, later in the conversation. “You just don’t see that!”) He and Yael were especially taken with the butterfly-shaped rose garden. “We were like, Let’s get married here. We had no idea we had a two-year project on our hands.” Of course, the house had plenty going for it. A six-bedroom, 7,000-square-foot Arts and Crafts structure (with a separate guesthouse) originally built in 1916 by the renowned Bay Area architect Bernard Maybeck, it had, as Yael says, “fantastic bones.” But it was also “kind of a gingerbread color,

HAIR BY ALISHA CHENEY; MAKEUP AND GROOMING BY SARAH MAXWELL

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f there’s one thing Scooter Braun is known for, it’s his ability to spot potential. After all, this is the man who discovered Bieber, back when Justin was just a shaggy-haired, small-town tween whose mother had posted a couple-dozen clips of him singing R&B covers to YouTube. (Scooter seems to have found his wife, Yael Cohen Braun, in much the same way: “I saw [a video of ] her TEDx talk,” he reports, referring to a speech she gave in 2010 about her nonprofit, F*** Cancer, “and I just really wanted to meet her.”) So perhaps it’s no surprise that Scooter—a mega talent manager and record-label boss whose other clients include Ariana Grande, Karlie Kloss, and Kanye West—instantly perceived the potential beauty of the couple’s Montecito, California, house, despite its dark, old-fashioned interiors and somewhat neglected grounds . . . though he and Yael weren’t, at that moment in early 2014, even in the market for a new home. While they were visiting Ellen DeGeneres and Portia de Rossi, their hosts kept talking up Montecito and pushing Braun and Cohen to spend more time


CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT SCOOTER AND YAEL WITH THEIR TWO SONS. SCOOTER WEARS A JAMES PERSE SWEATER FROM MR PORTER AND JOHN ELLIOTT JEANS; YAEL IS IN AN ULLA JOHNSON TOP AND MOUSSY JEANS. PENDANT BY PLUG LIGHTING; ROCKING CHAIR AND STOOL BY DEDON; LOUNGE CHAIR BY SUMMIT FURNITURE. 100-YEAR-OLD TREES LINE THE DRIVEWAY. THE HOUSE IS PAINTED IN SYDNEY HARBOUR PAINT CO.’S JAGUAR. OUTDOOR FURNITURE FROM MALIBU MARKET & DESIGN.


“Once you’re in,” Yael says, “you realize how many things in an old house need a little love and attention.”

FAR RIGHT, FROM TOP: KEVIN MAZUR/GETTY IMAGES; BEN ROSE/GETTY IMAGES; XAVIER COLLIN/IMAGE PRESS/NEWSCOM

CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT YAEL, WEARING A RAG & BONE T-SHIRT, CARMAR DENIM SHORTS, AND A JENNIFER MEYER NECKLACE, WITH JAGGER IN THE KITCHEN. VIKING RANGE; CABINET HARDWARE BY ROMAN AND WILLIAMS FOR WATERWORKS. IN THE ENTRY, VINTAGE MIRRORS HANG ABOVE A LOUIS XV COMMODE. IN THE DINING ROOM, DANISH OAK CHAIRS SURROUND AN 18TH-CENTURY BELGIAN FARM TABLE.


SCOOTER WITH CLIENTS, FROM TOP, ARIANA GRANDE, KANYE WEST, AND JUSTIN BIEBER.

inside and out,” which didn’t exactly suit the couple’s style. “We thought we’d update the kitchen and the bathrooms, and paint a little bit,” she says. Instead, with the help of the architect Marc Appleton and the mother-son interior-design team Kathleen and Tommy Clements, they “ended up painting every inch, redoing the lighting, the roof. Once you’re in,” Yael says, “you realize how many things in an old house need a little love and attention.” Still, everyone involved was working with the same goal in mind: to brighten and modernize the home without losing any of the historic details that make it so special, like the century-old damask panels that decorate the living-room ceiling. At first, Scooter and Yael weren’t sure they wanted to keep them. But once everything else was painted white, they came around to Tommy’s assertion that they’re “a beautiful nod to what was originally happening in the house.” Once the interior work was done, Yael, Kathleen, and Tommy chose a combination of antique, vintage, and ultramodern furnishings (like the Rick Owens double recamier in the reading nook) to further the conversation between old and new. Scooter, Yael, and their son Jagger, now three, moved in around August 2015, just as their architect was ramping up the second phase of the project. “The landscaping was a little bit disheveled,” Appleton explains. “We wanted to give the house a setting that

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“I can’t tell you how many times our friends have sat down to sing and play at the piano in the living room,” says Scooter. was worthy of it.” The work was extensive: In addition to redoing the rose garden, the lawns, and several stone terraces, they built a poolhouse, “separate from the main house but designed in the same materials.” “We wanted a place where we could use every inch of the outdoors,” Scooter says, and there’s no denying they’ve got it: In addition to more-expected features like the outdoor living and dining areas, they’ve installed alfresco gaming tables and not one but two fire pits. “I’m obsessed with fire pits,” Scooter says, “and that’s because some of the best concerts I’ve been to in my life have been around them. I can’t tell you how many times our friends have sat down to sing and play at the piano in the living room, but the real fun happens around the fire pits. We literally sit around and jam. And we are fortunate enough,” he adds slyly, “to know a couple of people who can really sing.” Scooter’s love of music—and his massive success in the industry—made the purchase of the house possible. But he gives Yael all the credit for its transformation. Because of her, he says, “I live in homes I don’t deserve to live in. I’m a guy who was super-excited when I bought my first futon, and she has a sense of taste that’s really astounding. I kind of just get out of the way and say thank you.”

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OPPOSITE A DMITRIY & CO. SLEIGH BED WEARS DUXIANA LINENS. 1950S PAAVO TYNELL CEILING LIGHT; CHINESE CERAMIC JAR LAMPS BY ROSE TARLOW MELROSE HOUSE; CIRCA-1800 GUSTAVIAN CHESTS; ARTWORK BY HARLAND MILLER. ABOVE IN THE LIVING ROOM, A PAIR OF CUSTOM SOFAS IN LEE JOFA LINEN FACE A CUSTOM WALNUT COCKTAIL TABLE. 1970S FRENCH SUEDE ARMCHAIR FROM LUCCA ANTIQUES; BÖSENDORFER GRAND PIANO; RUG FROM MANSOUR.


resources Items pictured but not listed here are not sourceable. Items similar to vintage and antique pieces shown are often available from the dealers listed. (T) means the item is available only to the trade. ON THE COVER

Hanging lounge with sheepskin throw by Blackman Cruz; blackmancruz.com. Custom bronze chain by Stephen Shadley Designs; stephenshadley.com; fabricated by DEC Fabricators; decfabricators.com. Pillow by Harbinger; harbingerla.com. Vintage wrought iron–and–glass cocktail table from Wyeth; wyeth.nyc. Hand-knotted silk rug from Marc Phillips Decorative Rugs; marcphillipsrugs.com. VIEW FROM THE TOP PAGES 64–77: Interiors by Stephen Shadley

Designs; stephenshadley.com; with Clements Design; clementsdesign.com; and Hallworth; hallworth.com. Landscape design by Marcello Villano Garden Design; 760-401-0452; with Anne Attinger Landscape Architect; anneattinger.com. PAGES 64–65: Custom teak chaise longues by Stephen Shadley Designs; stephenshadley.com; in Canvas Weave acrylic, in hello, sailor, by Perennials (T); perennialsfabrics .com. Pillows of vintage textiles from Apsara Arts of Asia; apsara-arts.com. PAGE 66: Vintage French leather club chair from Blackman Cruz; blackmancruz.com. Vintage rug from Jamal’s Rug Collection; jamrug.com. On cabinet, bowl by Harbinger; harbingerla.com. PAGE 67: In family room, vintage Danish rosewood credenza from Morentz; morentz.com. Vases by Harbinger; harbingerla.com. PAGES 68–69: Custom bronze doors by Stephen Shadley Designs; stephenshadley.com; fabricated by DEC Fabricators; decfabricators.com. PAGES 70–71: Piet Hein bar stools from Wyeth; wyeth.nyc; in Made in the Suede leather, in cobblestone, by Holly Hunt (T); hollyhunt.com. Custom walnut, bronze, and mica bar by Stephen Shadley Designs; stephenshadley.com. Custom sofa (right) by Stephen Shadley Designs; in Doppio cashmere, in slate, by Holland & Sherry (T); hollandsherry.com. PAGES 72–73: On terrace, custom teak, leather, and bronze chairs by Stephen Shadley Designs; stephenshadley.com; in Calm Waters Sunbrella acrylic, in shark’s skin, by Savel (T); savelinc.com. Antique bronze Chinese statue from Naga Antiques; nagaantiques.com. In master bath, custom Calacatta-marble tub by Stephen Shadley Designs; with R.W. Atlas fittings by Waterworks; waterworks.com. Vintage rosewood stool from JF Chen; jfchen.com. PAGE 74: On platform, pashmina shag rug from Tai Ping (T); houseoftaiping.com. Custom walnut bed by Stephen Shadley Designs; stephenshadley.com; with headboard of Persueded leather, in stone, by Holly Hunt (T); hollyhunt.com. Pillows of Mongolian lamb hides, in taupe, from Keleen Leathers (T); keleenleathers.com. Vintage Roger Sprunger cabinet for Dunbar from Wyeth; wyeth.nyc. Custom beanbag chairs by Stephen Shadley Designs; in a faux-beaver fur by Romo (T); romo.com. Wool broadloom carpet from Melrose Carpet; melrosecarpet.com. PAGE 75: Vintage French leather club chairs from Blackman Cruz; blackmancruz.com. Vintage rug from Jamal’s Rug Collection; jamrug.com. Don S. Shoemaker cocobolo wood desk from JF Chen; jfchen.com. On walls, paint by Sydney Harbour Paint Co.; shpcompany.com. MORE MORE MORE PAGES 78–87: Interiors by Bibi Monnahan;

bibimonnahan.com. Architecture by Cornacchia Architects & Planners; 212-420-1120. Construction by Milestone Construction Corp.; 718-459-8500. Framing and art installation throughout by DDG Frameshop; ddgframeshop .com. PAGE 78: Pedro Friedeberg Hand-Foot Chair from 1stdibs; 1stdibs.com. On vintage Willy Rizzo sofa, Musa viscose velvet, in anthracite, by Romo (T); romo.com. Cocktail table by Vincenzo De Cotiis; decotiis.it. Custom rug by Stark (T); starkcarpet.com. Marble three-legged side table by Kelly Wearstler;

kellywearstler.com. Epine floor lamps, in red, by Hervé Van der Straeten from Ralph Pucci; ralphpucci.net. Yellow Staklite lamp by Jedd Novatt from 1stdibs; 1stdibs.com. Zénith chandelier by Philippe Starck, with denim shades, for Baccarat; baccarat.com. Animalprint Newton club chair and ottoman (in corner) by Patrick Naggar from Ralph Pucci. Chair (by mantel) by Tom Dixon; tomdixon.net; with pillow by Ardmore Design; ardmoredesign.com. Jie Drumstool side table by Robert Kuo; robertkuo.com. Platner lounge chair (at left) by Knoll; knoll.com. On walls, custom paint by Benjamin Moore; benjaminmoore.com. PAGE 79: Tony Duquette Ghost Snail light for Baker Furniture; bakerfurniture.com. On antique wingback chair (at right), Melbury cotton, in haversham amaryllis, by Romo (T); romo.com. On chair (at left), Mister acrylicblend, in azurite, by Maharam (T); maharam .com. Vladmir Kagan chair (at center) from Holly Hunt (T); hollyhunt.com; in Exotic Butterfly linen, in red, by Josef Frank for Schumacher (T); fschumacher.com. Lantern floor lamp and Arrow pendants, all by Apparatus; apparatusstudio.com. Custom screen by de Gournay (T); degournay.com. Pillows by Gucci; gucci.com. Side table and cocktail table, both by Robert Kuo; robertkuo.com. Custom rug by Stark (T); starkcarpet.com. PAGE 80: Harry sofa by B&B Italia; bebitalia.com. Pillows by Gucci; gucci.com. Fortuny Studio 63 floor lamp by RH; rh.com. Vase from Maison Gerard; maisongerard.com. Occhio stool by Fornasetti; fornasetti.com. Custom carpet by Stark (T); starkcarpet.com. PAGE 81: Mirrored cabinet from Edra; edra.com. Framed scarf by Hiroshi Sugimoto (limited-edition 2012) for Hermès; hermes.com. Desk and armchair, both by Christian Liaigre; liaigre.com. Serratura rug by Fornasetti; fornasetti.com. Fortuny desk lamp from Ralph Pucci; ralphpucci.net. Occhio stool (at right) by Fornasetti. Motorized solar Roman shades by Alluring Window; alluring-window .com; of SilverScreen fabric, in white, by Verosol (T): verosol.com. Vertical blinds (rolled) by David Michael Interiors; davidmichaelinteriors .com. PAGE 82: On walls, Drizzle wallpaper, in rouge, by Schumacher (T); fschumacher.com. Miraggio mirror, in gold, by Fernando and Humberto Campana from Edra; edra.com. Pendant by Baccarat; baccarat.com. Ocean Beige tile flooring, in natural, by Porcelanosa; porcelanosa-usa.com. PAGE 83: In bedroom, custom headboard by Houston Upholstery; houstonupholstery.com; of Blommen Print cotton, in black, by Schumacher (T); fschumacher.com. Shades by David Michael Interiors; davidmichaelinteriors.com; of Blommen Print cotton, in black, by Schumacher (T). On walls, Blommen Print wallpaper, in black, by Schumacher (T). Bed linens by D. Porthault; dporthaultparis.com. On bed, custom throw by Adrienne Rogers; adriennerogers.com. Charlotte armchairs by India Mahdavi from Ralph Pucci; ralphpucci.net. Floor lamp by Bottega Veneta; bottegaveneta.com; with custom shade by Celine Cannon; celine cannon.com. Custom desk by André Joyau; andrejoyau.com. Vintage 1960s Italian desk chair from Architectural Anarchy; architecturalanarchy.com. Desk lamp by Baccarat; baccarat.com. Zebra toy by Steiff; steiffusa.com. Custom rug by Stark (T); starkcarpet.com. In workout room, Framed Square sconce by Modern Forms (T); modernforms.com. On walls, Tumbling Blocks wallpaper, in black, by Schumacher (T). Linkfloor Contract Diamond vinyl flooring by Porcelanosa; porcelanosa-usa.com. PAGE 84: Bubbles chandelier by Charles Paris from Donghia (T); donghia.com. Golden Clover cocktail table by Guy de Rougemont from 1stdibs; 1stdibs.com. Sofa by Christian Liaigre; liaigre.com, of orange leather by Garrett Leather (T); garrettleather.com. Pillows by Gucci; gucci .com. Pastille lamp by Hervé Van der Straeten; vanderstraeten.fr. Armchair by Soane (T); soane.co.uk. On bookshelves, mantel, and walls, Rectory Red paint by Farrow & Ball; farrow-ball.com. Custom carpet by Stark (T);

ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST AND AD ARE REGISTERED TRADEMARKS OF ADVANCE MAGAZINE PUBLISHERS INC. COPYRIGHT © 2018 CONDÉ NAST. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. PRINTED IN THE U.S.A.

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starkcarpet.com. PAGE 85: Wingback chair by BBDW; bddw.com; of Melisse viscose-blend, in paon, by Lelièvre for Scalamandré (T); starkcarpet.com. Pillow by Gucci; gucci.com. Albrizzi Trestle desk for Liz O’Brien (T); lizobrien.com. Chair by Geoffrey Bradfield; bradfieldtobinglobal.com. Wastebasket by Fornasetti; fornasetti.com. Curtains of Utopia cotton-blend velvet, in multicolore, by Pierre Frey (T); pierrefrey.com. FRESH BREEZE PAGES 88–93: Interiors by Atelier AM; atelieram .com. PAGE 89: Custom Murano chandelier by Seguso; seguso.com. Custom bleached-walnut dining table by L’Artigiano Studio; lartigiano studio.com. Vase by Shiro Tsujimura from Axel Vervoordt Gallery; axel-vervoordt.com. PAGES 90–91: In living room, custom sofa by Design Quest Custom; dqcustom.net; in a silk velvet, in honey, by de Gournay (T); degournay.com. On sofa, accent pillow of Un fabric by Toyine Sellers (T); toyinesellers.com. Custom club chair by Design Quest Custom; in Hamilton Natte linen, in bianco assoluto, by Loro Piana Interiors (T); loropiana.com. Antique tabletop mounted on wood base by L’Artigiano Studio; lartigianostudio.com. On giltwood chair, Biarritz cotton-cashmere, in sapphire, by Rogers & Goffigon (T); rogersandgoffigon.com. Curtains of strie linen-silk, in Cream, by George Spencer Designs from Claremont (T); claremont furnishing.com; fabricated by Douglas Wright & Assoc.; 323-931-6578. PAGES 92–93: In living room, on stools, Opus cashmere-silk, in cielo, by Holland & Sherry (T); hollandsherry.com; and Raja II silk, in 0603, by Création Baumann (T); creationbaumann.com. Antique table and vase, both from Axel Vervoordt Gallery; axelvervoordt.com. Antique mantel from Westland London; westlandlondon.com. In kitchen, stainless-steel islands by Arclinea; arclinea.com. Custom pendant lights by Paul Ferrante (T); paulferrante.com. Wood bowl (at left) from Galerie Half; galeriehalf.com. Sink faucet by Rohl; rohlhome.com. Range by Wolf; subzero-wolf.com.

BRINGING UP BABY PAGES 94–99: Nicky Hilton Rothschild of

Mommy & Me for Tolani; tolanicollection.com. Select upholstery throughout by H&A Upholstery; 718-855-9664. PAGE 94: On wall, Stellae wallpaper, in snow on sky, by Peter Fasano (T); peterfasano.com. Carpet by Stark (T); starkcarpet.com. Curtains of Lambada cotton, in aqua, by Jane Churchill from Cowtan & Tout (T); cowtan.com. Armchair by Pottery Barn Kids; potterybarnkids.com. Pillows of Coeurs cotton, in pink, by D. Porthault; dporthaultparis.com. Throw by Hermès; hermes .com. On windowsill, Miffy lamp from Mr Maria; mrmaria.com. Laundry basket by Emily & Meritt for PBteen; pbteen.com. Round rug from Etsy; etsy.com. PAGE 95: On custom club fender, English Oakleaf linen-blend, in faded blue on oyster, by Bennison (T); bennisonfabrics .com. Carpet by Stark (T); starkcarpet.com. PAGE 96: On antique tufted armchairs, Blenheim linen-cotton, in aperol, by Fleurons d’Hélène from John Rosselli & Assoc. (T); johnrosselli .com. On wall (at left), custom silk wall covering by de Gournay (T); degournay.com. Carpet by Stark (T); starkcarpet.com. Curtains of Tynemouth ticking linen, in blue, by Robert Kime (T); johnrosselli.com. PAGE 97: Sofas by Howard Chairs; howardchairs.com. On sofa (at right), Lisle Check wool-polyamide, in gray, by Colefax and Fowler (T); cowtan.com. On sofa (at left), wool by Holland & Sherry (T); hollandsherry.com; with pillow by Hermès; hermes.com. On armchair (center), pillow of Tynemouth Ticking linen, in blue, by Robert Kime (T); johnrosselli.com. On antique wingback chair and window-seat cushions, Cordoba linen-blend, in blue/red, by Bennison (T); bennisonfabrics.com. Table lamps by John Derian Co.; johnderian.com. On ottoman, Porthos cotton-polyester, in red/blue, by Brunschwig & Fils (T); brunschwig.com. PAGES 98–99: In library, on walls, paint by Farrow & Ball; farrow-ball.com. English Roll Arm Sleeper Sofa by RH; rh.com. On armchairs, pillows of

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Herat cotton by Robert Kime (T); johnrosselli .com. On custom ottoman, Lynxia silk by Robert Kime (T). Tray by Cabana from Moda Operandi; modaoperandi.com. Lamp by John Derian Co.; johnderian.com. In nursery, crib and floor lamp from Pottery Barn Kids; potterybarnkids.com. Coeurs bed linens, in pink, by D. Porthault; dporthaultparis.com. On wall, Stellae wallpaper, in snow on sky, by Peter Fasano (T); peterfasano .com. Rabbit Head wall mount by Fiona Walker England from Bergdorf Goodman; bergdorf goodman.com. Baby carriage by Silver Cross; silvercrossbaby.com. Round rug from Etsy; etsy.com. In dining area, Live edge dining table, in black walnut, by Sentient Furniture; sentient furniture.com. On antique dining chairs, Larsson linen, in denim, by Robert Kime (T). In guest bedroom, Demoiselles bed linens by D. Porthault. Headboard of Cochin linen-blend, in blue/red, by Bennison (T); bennisonfabrics.com. FAMILY ROOTS PAGES 100–03: Landscape architecture by

Hollander Design Landscape Architects; hollanderdesign.com. Border garden design by Jane Lappin of Wainscott Farms; wainscottfarms.com. Sycamore, 35’ tall, from Halka Nurseries; halkanursery.com. PAGE 100: Curved settee by Weatherend Estate Furniture; weatherend.com. PAGES 102–03: In garden, custom Bergenbags by Candice Bergen; bergenbags.com. Custom arched gate by Hollander Design Landscape Architects; hollanderdesign.com. IN LIVING COLOR PAGES 104–09: Custom pieces throughout

by Alessandro Mendini; ateliermendini.it. PAGE 104: Atomium suspension lamp by Hopf & Wortmann for Kundalini; kundalini.it. PAGE 106: Poltrona di Proust chair by Alessandro Mendini from Galerie Kreo; galeriekreo.com. Anna G. and Alessandro M. corkscrews by Alessandro Mendini for Alessi; alessi.com. Tavolino bench by Alessandro Mendini for Galerie Kreo. Gorkha rug by Alessandro Mendini for Joseph Carini Carpets; josephcarinicarpets.com. Roy stools by Alessandro Mendini for Kartell. In Elisa’s bedroom, Small FL/Y pendant light by Ferruccio Laviani for Kartell; kartell.com. PAGE 108: Shakti Sky suspension lights by Marzio Rusconi Clerici from Kundalini; kundalini.it. PAGE 109: Hiroshige ottomans by Anna Gili; annagili.com. Proust II rug by Sotirios Papadopoulos from Moret; moret.it. SWEET SPOT PAGES 110–17: Yael Cohen Braun of F*** Cancer;

letsfcancer.com. Interiors by Clements Design; clementsdesign.com. Architecture and landscape design by Appleton Partners LLP-Architects; appleton-architects.com. PAGE 111: Double Récamier by Rick Owens from Carpenters Workshop Gallery; carpentersworkshopgallery .com. PAGES 112–13: In outdoor living area, Mbrace rocking chair and footstool, in pepper, by Sebastian Herkner for Dedon; dedon.de. SummitX Lounge Chair by Alwy Visschedyk for Summit Furniture (T); summitfurniture.com. Solid bronze pendants by Plug Lighting; pluglighting.com. On house exterior, Jaguar paint by Sydney Harbour Paint Co.; shpcompany.com. On deck, Malibu Sonoma sunbed by Malibu Design from Malibu Market & Design; malibumarketdesign.com. PAGES 114–15: In kitchen, Viking induction range; vikingrange.com. R.W. Atlas bar pulls, in unlacquered brass, by Waterworks; waterworks .com. On cabinets, Rococo paint by Sydney Harbour Paint Co.; shpcompany.com. In dining room, rug from Woven (T); woven.is. PAGES 116–17: In bedroom, Seine sleigh bed by Dmitriy & Co.; dmitriyco.com. On bed, linens by Duxiana; duxiana.com. Chinese jar lamps by Rose Tarlow Melrose House (T); rosetarlow.com. Hemp area rug from Mansour; mansour.com. In living room, on custom sofas, Safari linen, in cream, by Lee Jofa (T); leejofa.com. Custom walnut cocktail table by Clements Design; clements design.com. Vintage armchair from Lucca Antiques; luccaantiques.com. Grand piano by Bösendorfer; boesendorfer.com. Hemp and linen area rug from Mansour.

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ANDREW BRADLEY (2)

Hot Seats “There were so many interesting people around the table,” says Irish sculptor Joseph Walsh, recalling an evening when he and some fellow contemporary artists dined at Chatsworth, the Duke and Duchess of Devonshire’s Derbyshire palace. Soon after, his coroneted hosts—longtime Walsh patrons—asked him to take on the private dining room as a new creative challenge. The to-and-fro among the three resulted in a proposal as dramatic as the setting: bold, modern seating “that represents the personalities and characters that come together in that formal interior,” Walsh explains. Fashioned of French walnut and cushioned with rouge leather that echoes the costumes in the room’s full-length portraits, the 24 chairs posture like animated diners, each one subtly different in gesture and silhouette. Even when nobody’s around, the space seems to be in full convivial swing. “That’s what a dining room is all about,” Walsh says. “Encounters.” josephwalshstudio.com —MITCHELL OWENS


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