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Díganos un motivo para seguir leyendo a Hemingway. Give us one reason why we should still read Hemingway. Hemingway creó personajes memorables y una serie inolvidable de historias que parecen formar parte de tus propias experiencias. Y su lenguaje es pura poesía. Esa es la razón definitiva por la que fue galardonado con el premio Nobel de Literatura. La obra de Hemingway va más allá de las nacionalidades y de las diferencias políticas o personales. Fidel Castro, John McCain y Barak Obama han escogido For Whom the Bell Tolls (‘Por quién doblan las campanas’) como su libro favorito. Hemingway created memorable characters and unforgettable stories that seem to become a part of your own experience. And his language is sometimes pure poetry. There is good reason why he was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature. Hemingway’s work transcends nationality and politics and personal differences. For Whom the Bell Tolls has been named as the favorite book of Fidel Castro, John McCain, and Barak Obama. ¿Tiene algún consejo para quienes comiencen ahora la obra y la vida de Ernest Hemingway? Do you have any advice for those who follow Hemingway’s work or maybe even his life? Deje a un lado toda opinión preconcebida y acérquese a su obra con una mente abierta. No viéndolo ni como héroe ni como villano. Put aside any preconceptions and approach his work with an open mind (not with heroworship and not with hostility).

THE LETTERS OF

1929–1931

THE LETTERS OF

ERNEST HEMINGWAY

HEMINGWAY

The Letters of Ernest Hemingway, Volume 4, spanning April 1929 through 1931, begins as the writer makes final revisions to the novel that will catapult him to international fame. A Farewell to Arms, published in September 1929 was an immediate critical and commercial success. Breaking new artistic ground in 1930, Hemingway embarks upon his first and greatest nonfiction work, the monumental treatise on bullfighting Death in the Afternoon. With a growing understanding of the literary marketplace, Hemingway increasingly corresponds with publishers, translators, collectors, admirers, autograph seekers, theater agents, movie moguls, and his first bibliographer.

THE LETTERS OF

Vol.

4

6 – 19 2 9

D BY

ANDERSON, SANDRA SPANIER, R T W. T R O G D O N

19 2 9 – 19 3 1 EDITED BY

SANDR A SPANIER AND MIRIAM B. MANDEL

The letters record developments in Hemingway’s personal life, including the birth of his third son and his increasing passion for deep sea fishing and big game hunting. They trace growing strains in his friendship with F. Scott Fitzgerald and the development of his relationships with editor Maxwell Perkins and such writers as Archibald MacLeish and John Dos Passos. The volume ends as Hemingway’s family take up residence in their new home in Key West. During this period of political and economic upheaval in Europe and America, Hemingway remains hard at work despite suffering injuries to his writing arm that require a long and painful rehabilitation. Throughout, he writes (and, when unable to write, dictates) an avalanche of letters that record in witty, humorous, colorful, and sometimes eloquent prose the eventful life and achievements of an enormous personality.

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Profile for Espacio Hemingway

Hemingway Traveler  

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