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WWW.THE-REPORTER.NET

VOLUME 135 — WHOLE 7111

TUESDAY, APRIL 17, 2018

‘Glamping’ - The Future of Delaware County Ag? Page 6

Turf Wars

Polarizing Building Project on Delaware Academy’s May Ballot By Lillian Browne DELHI - As part of the 2018-19 school budget, Delaware Academy at Delhi Central School Dis-

ferent propositions. Proposition One includes the building project plus repair and maintenance costs of the natural-grass athletic field and Proposition Two includes the installation of a synthetic field or

Rosie Cunningham/The Reporter

A view of the Delaware Academy football field in Delhi. trict voters will vote on a multimillion dollar capital project on May 15 which includes major building upgrades. The project will be mostly paid for by state aid. The state will reimburse Delaware Academy for 72 percent of the costs of the project, leaving the district responsible for 28 percent of the costs. The building project will appear on the ballot as part of two dif-

artificial turf. Voters must vote “yes” to Proposition One in order to vote “yes” to Proposition Two; or they can vote “yes” solely to Proposition One and “no” to Proposition Two or “no” to both propositions. Costs associated with Proposition One are $9,607,032. State aid will pay $6,917,063 and the remainder will be funded through See Turf War page 4

$1.00

DA Girls Top 4 Others Page 13

Delaware County Offers Alternative To NYC Land Acquisition By Lillian Browne DELHI - Municipal leaders have assertively moved forward to put an end to New York City’s (NYC) land acquisition program using the renewal of the Filtration Avoidance Determination (FAD) and the lack of developable land throughout the county, as a spring board. Delaware County Supervisors unanimously passed resolutions at a regularly scheduled meeting on April 11 to end the land acquisition program by NYC. The long-time program is part of NYC’s effort to protect water quality. Planning Department spokesman Shelly Johnson-Bennett told supervisors, in support of the resolutions, that NYC’s land acquisition program continues to have a negative economic impact on Delaware County. As an alternative solution to the acquisition program, which includes outright purchases as well as land conservation easements, county officials are proposing a lease-based program modeled after Delaware County Soil and Water Conservation District’s C.R.E.P. (Conservation Reserve

Enhancement Program), which would protect environmentally sensitive streamsides through long-term rental. The supervisors also propose that NYC return one-acre of developable and accessible land to a community for each acre it purchases as part of their buy-out program. Walton Supervisor Charlie Gregory praised the move indicating that his municipality is left with only six percent of developable land, which is, in part, due to the land acquisition program. To add further injury, Gregory said, NYC removed an additional 1,040 acres of potentially developable land in March, via a conservation easement. Hamden Supervisor Wayne Marshfield told legislators that NYC was proposing to buy a 160 acre subdivision in his town as part of the land acquisition program. “In my estimation,” Marshfield said, “It (NYC) has gone too far.” Masonville Supervisor Mike Spaccaforno echoed the pair, saying there is no real evidence that the program is helping or hurting water quality. “There is no testing going on,” he said. “It’s just a matter of time before

they (NYC) own enough land and demand we lower their assessment.” Department of Watershed Affairs spokesman Dean Frazier told supervisors that various environmental groups are supporting NYC’s land acquisition program. A realist, Frazier said the chances of stopping land acquisition for water quality protection were unknown. However, he continued, acquisition of open space must be halted for the sake of the Delaware County’s economy. Frazier recommended that each of Delaware County’s towns pass similar resolutions at their upcoming town council meetings. In response to the proposal, New York City Department of Environmental Protection Spokesman Adam Bosch said, “Over the past several months DEP has met with a variety of stakeholders, including Delaware County leaders, to discuss the future of the land acquisition program. We have listened to all their input with an open mind and with an eye toward protecting both water quality and economic vitality well into the future.”

Judging a Book Village By Its Cover By Lillian Browne HOBART - Books outnumber residents in Hobart, a tiny hamlet in the town of Stamford in northern Delaware County

established in 1880. The population hasn’t changed much since it was first settled - then 390, now about 403. The village itself hasn’t changed much throughout the years either. Businesses have come and gone.

Terri Clark

Country Music Concert Returns to The Delaware County Fair By Ron Galley

Contributed Photo

Serving Delaware County and the Surrounding Areas Since 1881 ———— Delaware County’s Leading News Source

One of the county’s largest manufacturing plants, Covidien - now known as Mallinkrodt helps sustain the local economy, along with a sprinkling of eateries, a retail home embellishment store, a tiny art gallery and a gas station. So, when a national morning cable television station visits to film an episode of “The Today Show,” it’s a big deal. That’s what happened on Monday, April 9. It was the biggest thing to happen in Hobart since September’s annual Festival of Women Writers, which draws hundreds of people from See Judging page 4

Country Singer Terri Clark, whose hits include “Better Things to Do,” “If I Were You” and “Poor Poor Pitiful Me,” has been formally announced as the headline attraction at the Delaware County Fair in August. The announcement confirms the board of directors’ decision to return to the Saturday night country music concert for the fair week finale. Tickets -$10 each - will go on

sale on Friday, April 27. To order concert tickets or for other questions about the fair, call 1-800-585-3737 or www.delawarecountyfair.com. According to fair director Jason Craig, the concert, which will not include any other performer, will start precisely at 7:30 on Saturday, Aug. 18. People who wish to sit on the track for the show are asked to bring their own chair this year. The Saturday night concert at the fair has changed direction.

In previous years, the formula used was to sign up and coming artists - Lady Antebellum, Brad Paisley, Eric Church, Little Big Town and Sara Evans - have all entertained at the Delaware County Fair. This year the fair board has signed an established performer. Clark has been nominated for numerous awards from both the CMA and ACM over the years. The 2018 Delaware County Fair will take place in Walton August 13-18.

County DPW Rebuild Back to the Drawing Board Garage-Mahal is Off the Table

By Lillian Browne DELHI - Following supervisors rejection of a proposal to purchase riverside farmland between county Route 18 and state Route 10, commonly known as the McFarland site, Delaware County Department of Public Works

(DPW) Commissioner Wayne Reynolds said the project is going back to the drawing board. In a hastily drafted, but not unanimously approved, second resolution to address the rebuild, officials are now considering a hybrid option, which includes pursuing the purchase of property on state Route 10 in Hamden, com-

monly known as the Bishop site, for the relocation of the maintenance garage. The hybrid plan also includes a proposed rebuild of a garage to house snow plow trucks and equipment on county owned property off Page Avenue, commonly known as the Wickham site. See DPW page 2


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There will be a senior soup and sandwiches event for just $5 per person on Sunday, May 6 at 4 p.m. at the Trout Creek one room schoolhouse. Brought to you by the Trout Creek Community Committee. Come Fly A Kite! The first 100 people can build and fly their own kite. It’s at the Delaware County Fairgrounds on Saturday, April 21, 10 a.m. - 2 p.m. and is sponsored by New Beginnings from the Riverside Alliance Church.   At the last town board meeting, Walton Supervisor Charlie Gregory requested Donald O’Connell step forward to receive a certificate of appreciation for the years of service on the Town of Walton’s Zoning Board of Appeals.  Mr. O’Connell has served since March 28, 1994, and has stepped down. Walton Chapter of New York State Women Inc. will host a wellness program by Quest Diagnostics on Saturday, May 5 from 6:30-9:30 a.m. at the United Presbyterian Church, 58 East Street. The AMBA screening test will look for coronary disease, kidney disease, anemia, liver disease, diabetes and others. This panel costs $40 plus handling fee of $8. There are optional tests available for prostate, TSH, vitamin D-25, hemoglobin A1C, insure colon rectal kit for additional fees. A separate physician’s order may be needed for these tests. The screening is not covered by Medicare, and most other insurance companies. Payment due at time of test. Photo ID required. Operators are available MondayFriday 8:30-5 p.m. Call 1-800234-8888 for reservations. Lucas Krom-Braen has been accepted as an exchange student for next year and will spend his junior year in Thailand. There will be a fundraising spaghetti dinner on Friday, April 20 at the Walton Vet’s Club to help with expenses. Dinner will be served from 5-8 p.m. and there will be auction items to win. Help support him if you can. The Cole All Star Circus 80th anniversary edition will be coming to Walton on Friday, April 27 at 7 p.m. It will be in the high school gym, and will benefit Girl’s Basketball Boosters. Adult tickets are on sale at either school for $10 in advance, or at the door for $15. Advanced sale tickets will be on sale until Thursday, April 26. Kids 12 and younger are admitted free with an adult. Look for the flyer in your child’s backpack to enter to meet Roscoe the Pig and be a part of the show! Thursday, May 3 is the National Day of Prayer.  The community is invited to come to pray for the seven centers of influence in America:  government, military, media arts, business, education, church and family.  There will be three prayer times:  6:30 a.m., Catholic Church, led by Dr. Mike Freeman; 12 noon at the Village Hall, led by Pastor Larry Light; and 7 p.m., at the Reformed Presbyterian Church, led by Pastor Steven McCarthy. Ephesians 4:3 says, “Making every effort to keep the unity of the Spirit through the bond of peace.” Pray for America with others in the community. The village of Walton administrators are seeking applications for summer help. Applicants must be 16 and over, with a valid driver’s license. Positions include mowers, an arts and crafts supervisor, and tennis and basketball

April 17, 2018

The Reporter

coaches. Also, lifeguards with current Water Safety Instruction certificates, and a weekend pool supervisor are needed. Applications can be picked up at the village clerk’s office on North Street, and should be returned there by April 30. The Delaware County Republican Committee will host its 65th annual Lincoln Day Dinner on Friday, April 20 at 7 p.m. at the Delhi American Legion Hall. Cost per dinner is $50; to attend the VIP reception prior to the dinner at 6 p.m., include $25 more. Tickets are available from Walton GOP chairman Gary Grayson, at his office on Townsend Street, or call 865-6571. Guest speaker for the dinner will be New York State Deputy Majority Leader John A. DeFrancisco, who is also a New York Republican candidate for governor.  There will be a free roast pork dinner for firefighters, EMS personnel and auxiliary members and their families as a thank you for their service from the New Hope Community Church congregation.  Dinner will be served at the church on Stockton Avenue on Friday, April 20 at 6:30 p.m. Reservations must be made in advance by calling Marie Celli at 464-4187. The Delaware County Relay For Life will be held at the Delaware County Fairgrounds in Walton Saturday, April 28, from 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. There will be vendors, games, food, a bonfire, music, performers, 50/50 raffles and more.    The theme this year is: Delaware County is Camping for a Cure! Bentley Hadden is the three year old son of Derik and Brittny Hadden. He was recently diagnosed with leukemia. INKdicted will sponsor a fundraiser Saturday, April 28 and will do flash tattoos all day, starting at 10 a.m. until 8 p.m. The shop is located at 31 West Street. Artists will also hold a raffle with donations from area businesses. Donation can be left at the shop or call Jesse on the Bentleys Brigade Facebook page. There is also an ongoing junk food basket raffle that will benefit 9-month-old Rhemie Roloson, daughter of Rich and Meaghan Roloson. Rhemie was born with kidney abnormalities and has endured several trips to Albany Med for infections and surgeries. Proceeds will go to the family for travel expenses and other needs. Tickets are $1 each and can be purchased from Jennifer Healey or me. Benefit breakfast for Kelly McLaughlin on Saturday, April 21 at the Royal Oasis on Delaware Street from 7-11 a.m. Proceeds will help with expenses as she is undergoing treatment for blood cancer. Reach out to help these families if you can. Christ Church will be holding their spring rummage sale on Friday and Saturday, April 27 and 28 at 9 a.m. To donate call 865-4698. Saturday, April 28 is the bag sale-$1 per bag; 41 Gardiner Place. The Delaware County Fair board has announced that Terri Clark will perform at the fair on Saturday, Aug. 18. Tickets for the show are $10 for both track and grandstand. Grandstand tickets will be limited so get yours early and bring your chair to enjoy the show. Tickets will be on sale April 28 from the website  www.delawarecounty-

fair.org or by phone 1-800-5853737. The recent Dollars for Scholars fundraiser for scholarships raised $8635 for Walton seniors. Thanks to Frontier for the use of facilities and time for the students to call for pledges, and  to Danny’s Restaurant for providing pizza for the students. The library has several events coming. On Friday, April 20, author Denise Dailey will anchor an authors’ tea. Take a seat at the table, enjoy a beverage and cookies while Ms. Dailey reads from her newly-published biography of artist Riko. After the reading, the author will discuss writing the book, and there will be some time to ask questions. The 10:30 a.m. program is free and all in-

terested readers and writers are welcome. The beautiful Celebrate Spring, Celebrate Reading  art exhibit will wind down as the end of the month nears. Don’t miss the chance to view the artistdecorated birdhouses, and place a silent bid on one. Prefer not to bid? Come and vote for your favorites in two categories. The exhibit is open during all library hours. Winning bidders and artists will be revealed on Thursday, April 26 at the end of the Alma Lynch Poetry Slam. The Poetry Slam, a memorial to the late Alma Lynch, will run from 4:30 until 7 p.m. on April 26. It’s a modified slam: readings and recitations are as welcome as original, on-the-spot works.

There will even be poetry books available for those who want to choose their reading at the last minute. For more information, or to ask questions, call 607-8655929. Support the Varsity and JV baseball teams. Enjoy a TA’s breakfast on Sunday, April 29 from 7 a.m. - 12 p.m.; 50/50 and other drawings, the team will be helping bus the tables. Best week ever: Julie and Graham are here visiting. He’s quite a little man, with a mind of his own, who loves to dance and has an inquisitive mind. And boy, does he love balls and dogs. Lots of hugs and kisses and lots of fun. This grandparent thing is great!

Lillian Browne/The Reporter

Hancock Collaborators Honored...

On Friday, April 6, the Hancock Gateway Tourism Council was recognized by the Delaware County Chamber of Commerce with the presentation of its inaugural “Cooperation, Collaboration and Teamwork Award.” The award, given in recognition of outstanding collaboration trust and partnership in developing a common community vision, was presented by Delaware County Chamber President Ray Pucci to council members: The Hancock Partners, Hancock Chamber of Commerce, Friends of the Upper Delaware River, Destination: Hancock and the town and village of Hancock. Pictured from left, front row, are: Pucci, Gerald DaBrescia, Charlene Caramore, Nancy Furdock and Theresa Allen. Back row, from left: Pat O’Brien, Jerry Vernold, Bill Gross and Jeff Skelding.

Surplus Food Distribution April 27 Delaware Opportunities Inc. will conduct a distribution of surplus donated food to Delaware County residents on Friday, April 27 from 10:30 a.m. until all food is distributed. The distribution will take place in the parking lot behind Delaware Opportunities headquarters, 35430 state Highway 10, in Hamden. The food will be provided by the Regional Food Bank of Northeastern New

York. The type of food available will not be known until the day of distribution. Proof of income is not required; however, information on the number of children and adults in each household receiving donated food will be requested. Households must appear in person to receive food - no notes will be accepted. The dis-

tribution is limited to Delaware County residents. Participants should bring boxes and/or bags, rolling coolers, etc. to carry food to their vehicles. People should dress for the weather as there is no indoor space for those waiting for food. For more information contact Nutrition Advocate Tammy Clark at 607-746-1670 or Food Bank Coordinator Kelly Short at 607-746-1685.

Del. Co. Public Health Free Rabies Vaccination Clinics The Delaware County Public Health Programs Manager Heather Warner has announced two rabies vaccination clinics for dogs, cats and ferrets in Delaware County. The first is tonight, April 17, from 7-8:30 p.m. at the Hancock Town Hall, 661 West Main Street, Hancock. The next one will be Thursday, April 19, from 5-7 p.m. at the Pindars Corners Fire Hall, 8898 state Highway 23, Daven-

port. • By law, every dog and cat must be vaccinated against rabies. • Cats and dogs are eligible for their first rabies vaccine at three months of age. • Bring your pet’s previous vaccination record to verify eligibility for three-year coverage. • Dogs must be on a leash and under proper control. Cats and ferrets should be in carrying

cases. • Local organizations donate the use of their facilities for these clinics. It is the pet owners’ responsibility to clean up after the animals. It’s the law; fines can be given. • Veterinarians are only available at the advertised clinic time and no earlier. For questions or for more information, call 607-832-5200 or visit www.delawarecountypublichealth.com.

DPW... continued TLC FAMILY THRIFT SHOP

from front page Relocation of offices are not being considered in the immediate hybrid plan, Reynolds said, as the build out for the garages is more immediate. Since neither property can accommodate the 80,000 square foot structure originally proposed by contracted engineers for the county after consultation with DPW staff, new structures will have to be proposed, Reynolds said. An option agreement, to prevent the Bishop property from being sold to another buyer, while the county undergoes appraisal and environmental quality review, is being drafted. The dollar figure associated with the option agreement has not yet been disclosed, but must be voted on and approved by a majority of the supervisors. The next regularly scheduled board of supervisor meeting will be on April 25 at 1 p.m., at the county office building, 111 Main Street in Delhi.


April 17, 2018

The Reporter

Johns Joins The Reporter

Melissa Johns, Walton, has jointed the Reporter staff. She and her family moved to Delaware County from Sullivan County in 2010. Johns is a 2012 graduate of Walton Central School. She spent several years working in the medical field and has used that experience to develop an online blog with a mental health awareness platform. “I’m excited to report on the stories of our unique community and to learn more about its history along the way,” said Johns. Contact her at 607-4644009, ext. 106, or email her at m.johns@the-reporter.net for news-related inquiries.

Walton Native Leads Technology Company to International Award By Lillian Browne

Ioxus, a multimillion dollar international corporation headquartered in Oneonta, cofounded by Walton resident Chad Hall, earned a Bronze Award for innovative technology at the 2018 Edison Awards held in New York City on April 11. The company received the award for their Ustart - a capacitor-based battery replacement,

built with smart power electronics that decreases the decycle and extends the lifespan of the remaining battery, starter and ancillary electronics in a vehicle. The product was created in 2014 and underwent two years of product testing in 200 vehicles. Ustart is used in class 3 - 8 delivery vehicles - like walkin-style vans - to tractor trailer type trucks. The Ustart launched in 2017

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and is a springboard for a family of products, according to Hall. “It’s an honor to have our product recognized internationally,” Hall said. “We were in competition with widely recognized innovators Mazda, GE and Lockheed Martin, and to have placed in the top three is a tremendous honor.” Ioxus has two manufacturing plants in New York and one in Japan.

Melissa Johns

Dispose of Unnecessary Medications To Make Your Home and Environment Safer Bassett Healthcare Network is encouraging people to spring clean their medicine cabinets and get rid of unnecessary medications. Now is a great time to do it – Earth Day is April 22 and National Prescription Drug Take Back Day is April 28. Bassett Healthcare Network offers three locations for local residents to drop off unwanted, expired, or leftover medications via collection kiosks and prepaid mail-back envelopes at the Bassett Medical Center Pharmacy in Cooperstown, FoxCare Pharmacy in Oneonta and O’Connor Hospital Pharmacy in Delhi. The disposal kiosks and mailback envelopes are a free, safe and secure to get rid of unneeded medications, according to Bassett Healthcare Network Director of Pharmacy Operations Patrick M. Mongillo. “Removing leftover prescription drugs from homes is important in preventing medication misuse. We encourage patients and their families to use the week between Earth Day and National Prescription Drug Take Back Day to rid their homes of all unused medications so they are not accessible to others,” Mongillo

said. According to the U.S. Department of Justice Drug Enforcement Administration, a 2015 national survey on drug use and health revealed that 6.4 million Americans abused controlled prescription drugs. The same study showed that a majority of abused prescription drugs were obtained from family and friends, often from the home medicine cabinet. The Bassett Healthcare Network outpatient pharmacy hours and locations: Bassett Medical Center, One Atwell Road, Cooperstown; 607-547-6681; Kiosk: clinic lobby near outpatient pharmacy; Monday-Friday, 8 a.m. - 5:30 p.m.; Saturday, 8:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. O’Connor Hospital, 460 Andes Road, Delhi; 607-746-0337. Kiosk: Outpatient pharmacy waiting area; Hours: MondayFriday 8:30 a.m. – 5 p.m.; Saturday 8 a.m. - 2 p.m. FoxCare Pharmacy, 1 FoxCare Drive, Suite 215, Oneonta – 607-431-5959; Kiosk: Outpatient pharmacy waiting area; Hours: Monday-Friday 9 a.m. - 5:30 p.m., Saturday 9 a.m. - 1 p.m.

Cortland Judge Will Run for District 6 Supreme Court By Tom Coddington CORTLAND — Elizabeth A. Burns, who currently serves as the Cortland city court judge, announced on April 12 that she will run on the Democratic ticket for the office of supreme court justice in New York’s Sixth Judicial District. The district has 10 counties — Broome, Cortland, Chenango, Chemung, Delaware, Madison, Otsego, Schuyler, Tioga and Tompkins. She was elected to her current office in 2013, but she has more than 15 years of experience on the bench. She also serves as a drug treatment court judge in Cortland County, and as an acting county court judge for felony drug court cases, and as an acting city judge in Binghamton and Ithaca. Additionally, she has been a special counsel to the administrative judge for the Sixth District, an acting court attorney reviewing documents, researching issues and drafting decisions for

Supreme Court judges, advisor to town and village courts and justices throughout the district. As an attorney for more than 20 years, Burns also has experience in Supreme Court in civil litigation and appeals. She stated, “Experience is an important qualification for the office of Supreme Court Justice. As the trial level court with general jurisdiction this court deals with some of the most important and life-changing cases in our court system, including divorce, guardianship, personal injury, home foreclosures, real estate disputes, contract and business disputes, and other areas of the law. “Our Supreme Court Judge must be experienced, as well as impartial and fair, with a thorough knowledge of the law. Voters can have confidence that I will faithfully serve them as our next Supreme Court justice. I look forward to meting with voters in all 10 counties over the coming months and earning their support,” Burns concluded

Contributed Photo

Ioxus President and CEO Mark McGough, left, and Co-Founder and Vice President of Marketing and Product Development Chad Hall, of Walton, received a Bronze Award for innovative technology at the 2018 Edison Awards on April 11.

CWC Annual Meeting Draws a Crowd More than 75 people packed the Catskill Watershed Corporation (CWC) offices April 4 for the annual meeting of CWC member towns. Representatives of Watershed municipalities, as well as many partner agencies and organizations joined CWC coard and staff for a review of 2017 accomplishments, and to welcome the newest board member, Art Merrill. The town of Colchester Supervisor was elected by fellow Delaware County Watershed Supervisors to fill the seat vacated by the retiring Marty Donnelly, who had served on the CWC board since 1998. Re-elected to four-year terms on the board were Jim Eisel of Harpersfield and Tom Hynes of Roxbury. A summary of environmental, economic development and education programs run by the CWC in the New York City West-of-Hudson Watershed was provided by staff members. The 2017 annual report can be viewed at cwconline.org (Documents); hard copies may be obtained by calling 845-586-1400. Among the highlights of the 2017 report: · 178 failed septic systems were replaced, with permanent residents reimbursed 100 percent of eligible costs, part-time residents 60 percent. Two classes for septic designers and contractors were offered in 2017. · 263 septic systems installed since 1995 were pumped and inspected; CWC covered half the cost for each maintenance visit. · Block grants were approved for Community Wastewater Management Projects in Shandaken, West Conesville, Halcottsville and Claryville. Two others, New Kingston and Shokan, are in the study phase. · 15 residential and commercial fuel tanks were anchored under the Flood Hazard Mitigation Implementation Program. Funds were also awarded under this program to remove a closed bridge near Mt. Tremper; design streambank stabilization measures in Windham; prepare for demolition of structures acquired through the NYC flood buy-out program (the first was removed in Jewett in 2017); and study options for relocating buildings from the flood plain in Boiceville. · Stormwater controls required for 15 construction projects across the Watershed were reimbursed by the CWC. Five additional projects were awarded Stormwater Retrofit grants to correct existing runoff conditions. Four previously funded projects received operation and

maintenance support. · 15 low-interest loans were approved for businesses in Watershed Towns through the CWC’s Catskill Fund for the Future. Other economic development initiatives included collaborative efforts to enhance tourism and outdoor recreation in the Catskills. · 30 Watershed Education Grants were awarded to schools and non-profit organizations in the Catskill-Delaware Watershed and in New York City. A new 10-year Filtration

Avoidance Determination was issued to the NYC DEP by the NYS Department of Health in December 2017. It will expand the Small Business Septic Repair program to include non-profit organizations and municipalities, and a community wastewater project will be developed in Shokan. A new building to house both CWC and New York City Department of Environmental Protection staff will be constructed on county Route 38 near Arkville.

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Judging... continued from front page all over the Northeast United States into town. It’s the books that draw people to Hobart, shelved in five different bookstores lining a brief Main Street; and through the marketing genius of longtime resident and entrepreneur Donald Dales, Hobart has become known as The Hobart Book Village of the Catskills. Interested in acquiring investment property, Dales began Hobart’s branding campaign in 2005, when he opened his own bookstore, Mysteries and More. He did not open a bookstore for the love of hobby, he said. Rather, he bluntly disclosed, he did it to fill an empty storefront. Adam’s Antiquarian Book Shop anchors the southern end of the business district and sports three floors of titles. Rounding out the book village is Bleinheim Hill Books, Butternut Valley Books, the newest shop Creative Corner Books, and the largest - Liberty Rock Books, which boasts a 5,000 square foot shop. Dales has always loved reading. It’s entertainment, he said, an escape. His favored genre is mystery. He carries a novel with him, wherever he travels, wheth-

April 17, 2018

The Reporter

Contributed Photo

Contributed Photo

Film crews from NBC’s Today Show were in Hobart on April 9 to produce a segment on The Hobart Book Village of the Catskills, which is scheduled to air on April 23. er a meeting of his local or his arm. The day The Reporter county chamber of commerce, caught up with him, he was where he fills leadership roles, or midway through “Beware of while attending an educational False Prophets.” His appetite for seminar at the county’s histori- books has not changed over the cal association. years, he said, though he now He easily fills the typecast of seeks out large print editions. a retired gent - complete with His eyes are not what they used a gently pilled, button-down to be, he said. sweater, herringbone flat cap, He also recently closed his aromatic tobacco pipe and a bookstore. “cozy” - a light-hearted, easyHe didn’t get too excited when to-read mystery tucked under the film crew came to town. He

Don Dales helped to brand and market Hobart as The Book Village of the Catskills. said he’s been on camera before. As a trained pianist he was filmed by a local television station in the 1960s while playing a grand piano. A member of that film crew tripped, resulting in a mini-crash between the mammoth rolling video equipment and the piano. Dales just kept playing, not missing a note. Each of the bookstore owners were interviewed separately in their stores and following a day of taping, exchanged answers to questions posed by the program host. Without question, Dales

said, the entire business community eagerly awaits the airing of the show. The remaining bookstores are flourishing. Dales patrons each of the bookstores, doing his part for the local economy. How does he choose his reading material? Usually, he said, it’s by the cover. When the Today Show airs the segment about the Book Village on April 23, Dales, said, he hopes people will choose to visit Hobart the same way.

with the upgrades, including replacement and/or repair of the synthetic field and in the case of the approval of either proposition - lighting infrastructure for night use of the field. Thomson encourages the public to attend the next board of education meeting to ask questions about the project. The next meeting will be held tonight, Tuesday, April 17, at 7 p.m. in the media lab. Thomson is eager to have a conversation with the public to address their concerns, as well as listen to what their ideas and needs are. “We have been very fiscally responsible,” Thomson said of this and past building projects, “And we will continue to do so in the future. We take our fiduciary responsibilities very seriously. We are planning for the long term.” Business Manager Carey Schultz reported that the 2018-19 general

budget vote contains a 1.25 percent tax levy increase. However, he said, compared to last year this budget it is -.87 percent below last year’s spending. Last year’s budget allowed for $20,108,665 in spending, whereas this year’s budget calls for $19,934,177. The decrease in spending, Schultz said, is attributed to longterm debt being paid off this year. If approved, the building project will begin in 2020, and the district will still have a “savings account” balance for building projects of between $1.25 and $1.5 million, Schultz said. Approval of the upgrades, Thomson said, is a great opportunity to provide the best for students and community. The vote on the school budget will take place on May 15 from noon to 9 p.m.

Turf War... continued from front page a debt reserve fund - or savings account set up by the district a number of years ago in anticipation of needed facility upgrades. Proposition Two includes figures for the synthetic turf field only of $786,808. State aid will cover $566,502 and as with Proposition One, the remainder will be paid for with debt reserve funds. If voters approve either proposition there will be no increase in their tax bills. The district has saved enough money to pay for its 28 percent share for either option. Superintendent Jason Thomson has been transparent in his advocacy that voters approve the facility upgrades and the synthetic turf option. Though voters have challenged

him about the necessity of synthetic turf, he is championing its approval. If voters choose synthetic turf, Thomson said, it will allow increased use of the field - and not just for football - but for soccer and peewee sports and it will be safer for student athletes. Another reason Thomson is advocating for the artificial turf is because the district is no longer permitted to use pesticides or chemicals on its grass athletic field and broad leaf weeds are taking over the field, which has raised and continues to raise maintenance costs. Thomson also pointed out that annual maintenance costs of grass exceeds those of artificial turf, and the synthetic option would actually save district users money over the long

term, though its installation cost is notable. The eco-friendly material, crumb rubber - sourced from reclaimed tires, is a more forgiving surface providing a less negative impact on youth athletes, Thomson said. “It’s far safer than grass. The studies have proven that,” Thomson said. If synthetic turf was installed, Thomson continued, it would pave the way for other groups to be able to use the field. The athletic field, Thomson said, is not just about sports. He considers the field to be an “outdoor classroom,” used by physical education classes as well as other school-based groups. It is a piece of the puzzle that has helped lead Delaware Academy to be nationally ranked for academic achievements three out of the past five years, he said. Also contained in the proposed budget is a new curriculum at the elementary level, a new reading program and new software-based curriculum in the middle and high schools. Thomson has high praise for board of education members as well as the district’s business management team for managing finances in a way that a leaves a zero-impact on district taxpayers if either project is approved. Opponents of the proposed project question future expenses associated

The Best Way To Help On Earth Day? Quit Smoking On Sunday, April 22, countless numbers of New York state residents will participate in Earth Day activities to better the environment. While there are many ways to beautify and protect the earth, the New York state smokers’ quitline

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suggests the following as one of the most effective ways to “go green” quit smoking. Although smoking rates are at historic lows in New York state, Earth Day volunteers unfortunately will find one particular item to be ubiquitous during their cleanup efforts – cigarette butts. According to the Truth Initiative (truthinitiative. org), cigarette butts are the most littered item in the country. The Truth Initiative reports that cigarette butts are the most prominently littered item on U.S. highways and have consistently comprised 30 to 40 percent of all items collected in annual international coastal and urban cleanups since the 1980s. Although 86 percent of smokers consider cigarette butts to be litter, three-quarters of smokers report disposing of them on the ground or out a car window. As small as cigarette butts are, even one can do immerse harm. A cigarette butt will take a minimum of nine months to break down, during which time its particles can dilute soil and water. Animals, fish and even children may accidentally ingest littered cigarette butts – which contain deadly chemicals. Finally, discarded cigarette butts are a leading cause of forest and house fires. Protecting the environment is one of many reasons to stop smoking. The “quitline” believes that no reason for quitting is trivial; whatever works, go with it. When it’s time to take action, tobacco users should talk with their healthcare provider and also call 1-866-NYQUITS or 1-866-697-8487 for coaching and resources. The New York State Smokers’ Quitline is a free resource for all state residents, and Quit Coaches are available seven days a week from 9 a.m. to help tobacco users achieve and maintain a smoke-free life. Additional resources are available at www.nysmokefree.com.


April 17, 2018

Hamden Officials Will Enumerate Dogs

5

The Reporter

Grant to Upgrade Water System Received By Sara Andros

The town board would like to give all Hamden dog owners advanced notice that a dog enumeration will be taking place in the next couple of months. At the April 4 Hamden town board meeting, the board voted to have Chris Bodo, the town dog control officer, begin the process. Bodo will stop at every residence and business in the town to determine the number of dogs on the property. He will also check to see if the dogs are properly licensed. If the dog license has expired, the owner will be instructed to get it renewed as soon as possible. A letter and licensing forms will be sent to those with unlicensed dogs; the dog owner will have 30 days in which to get their dog licensed. If the owner fails to license the dog within the required time frame, a court appearance ticket will be issued. Currently the town has only 185 licensed dogs. The last time an enumeration was done, in 2002, there were over 400 licensed dogs. It is recommended that an enumeration be done every four to five years, so Hamden Town Supervisor Wayne Marshfield said “It’s time.” The purpose of licensing dogs is two-fold: to license a dog, it must have a current rabies vaccination certificate. By having all the dogs in the town vaccinated it helps prevent the spread of rabies. If a dog becomes lost or injured, having it licensed makes the dog easier to identify and the owner easier to locate. Bodo said he expects the process to take about three months. The board also discussed the purchase of nine parcels totaling 124 acres in the Crystal Creek, Fish Hollow area. Marshfield said the city is now buying out town subdivisions and he thinks it is a terrible shame. Much of the land consists of hay fields, said Marshfield. Every year the number of city owned parcels in Hamden increases. The trucking bids were opened prior to the start of the regular meeting. Two bids were received; one from Carver Sand and Gravel in Schoharie and one from Cobleskill Stone Products. The bids for hauling crushed limestone from the plant to the town were as follows: Carver Sand and Gravel, $9.45 per ton; Cobleskill Stone, $8.65 per ton. The board voted to accept the lower bid for 2018. In other business: • State Senator John Bonacic announced that the town will be receiving a $100,000 grant for upgrades to the Hamden Water District. Marshfield said “Senator Bonacic has done a lot of good for this community.” The board appreciates the effort made by Senator Bonacic to secure the grant and looks forward to moving ahead with the upgrades. • Supervisor Marshfield said that there have been numerous complaints from local residents about the condition of state Route 10. He prepared a resolution to submit to the Department of Public Works (DPW) and got signatures from all the county supervisors with the hope that something might be done about it. It has been 23 years since Route 10 has been rebuilt and many sections are in poor condition • Delaware Opportunities has requested that the town apply for funding for a flood proofing analysis of their building. There is a $5,000 funding program through Catskill Watershed Corporation that would pay for a consultant to come in and determine ways the building could be flood proofed. Marshfield said the funding request needs to be made by the town and he has started a letter to request

funding for both Delaware Opportunities and the Wastewater Treatment Plant. The are other structures in the town that might benefit from this analysis, but Marshfield said he would start with these two and make requests for other structures in the future. • Dennise Yeary, the town clerk, reported that receipts were up the past month; a total of $599.28 was received. This included money paid for dog licenses, town hall use, certified letters, building permits and sporting licenses. • Marshfield reported that payment has been received for damage done to the highway department truck, and the last payment for the schoolhouse renovations has been received. Marshfield also expressed some concern over the financial status of Water District one since they have two upcoming bond payments and a low balance in their savings account. • Highway Superintendent Roger Dibble reported that they have received the new oneton truck. He asked the board if he could list the 2008 Ford F350 for sale on Auction International. By listing it on the site, Dibble thought he would be able to generate more interest than he would by just selling it locally. The truck will be sold with the plow and the sander. Dibble also said that they have been hauling sand and filling sinkholes. “There has been a lot of damage this year to roads and culvert pipes, but we’re doing what we can do,” he said. • Marshfield reported that he and Councilman Richard Smith met with the Delaware County Real Property Tax office personnel to discuss what the Walton Fire Protection contract will mean for the residents in the Mundale area. They wanted to find out how much the residents would be paying for services under the fire district contract versus what they are currently paying. To date, they have not received any information from the Real Property Tax department regarding the changes. • Marshfield said there have been prebid conferences with two firms regarding the property revaluations. Bids were due on April 3, but the bids haven’t been analyzed yet. The board will vote on the bids next month. • Smith spoke with Steve Hood from Delaware County Department of Emergency Services about Automated External Defibrillators (AED) to see if he could get an idea of how much they cost. He hopes to get one unit for adults and one for use on children. He said Hood indicated that training wasn’t required to use an AED and that they were basically foolproof. Smith also said that he reviewed the contract and it indicated that a record needs to be kept of AED use and a report made to a medical professional. The town health officer could function as the necessary medical professional. Councilman Steven Reed said he thought it would be a good thing to have it available, even if everyone wasn’t trained on how to use it. • Smith said he is organizing a meeting of the flood commission so all the members can be brought up to speed about upcoming projects. • Webmaster Jill Ogden has requested to use the town hall for training sessions one night a week for nine weeks. The board voted to charge her the residential rate of $225 for the use of the hall during that period of time. • Marshfield said the New York State Division of Homeland Security and Emergency Services has begun making payments to communities ravaged by the winter storm on March 14 and 15, 2017.

Lillian Browne/The Reporter

Service Recognized...

Donald “Doc” O’Connell was recognized for his many years of service as a member and chairman of the town of Walton’s Zoning Board of Appeals, at a meeting of the Walton Town Council in April. O’Connell, left, is pictured with Walton Town Supervisor Charlie Gregory.

DO Gets Grant to Help Combat Domestic/Sexual Violence By Lillian Browne HAMDEN - Delaware County will share in $20.4 million in state grant funding to be used to streamline and improve services for crime victims and their families, according to a press release issued by Governor Andrew Cuomo on April 9. Of that, Delaware Opportunities (DO) will receive $153,381, to be used to hire a new case manager to service Delaware County. The money will be used to fund the position for three years, with a twoyear option to renew. According to the DO Safe Against Violence Coordinator, the new case manager, once hired, will be largely responsible for public outreach, by working with other agencies such as law enforcement and the county’s Department of Social Services. The new hire, the spokesman said, will visit the other agencies to let them know what DO can do to assist them. Studies have shown that victims of domestic violence are unable to leave their abusive situation until their ninth attempt. DO’s Safe Against Violence program offers comprehensive services for victims of domestic violence, sexual assault and other crimes, including safe, confidential shelter for domestic violence victims and their families, short term crisis and supportive counseling, medical and legal advocacy and accompaniment, information and referrals, and a 24/7 confidential hot line. Educational programs aimed at preventing sexual assault and domestic violence are available for schools, community groups and human service and health care providers. All 223 victim assistance programs funded by New York’s Office of Victim Services were eligible to apply for up to four

case managers. The 86 programs that received grants met all the criteria in the request for assistance application. A total of 61 community-based organizations, hospitals and government agencies administer the 86 different victim assistance pro-

grams that have received grants. For more information about DO’s Safe Against Violence program visit delawareopportunities.org or call 607-746-6278. All services are free and confidential.

sfcu Wants to Help Your Kids See the Future

Every child dreams about their future. Some of those dreams may require money to come true. How do you help your children achieve their dreams? One way is to help them learn to save their money. That’s why for National Credit Union Youth Month in April; sfcu will focus on helping young people develop good saving habits. The financial literacy month theme is “The Science of Saving”, showcasing fun, sci-fi-inspired characters. Science has proven that if you start with small goals, saving your money can become a regular habit. This year’s youth month inspires children to begin saving the money they earn, so they can attain their dreams of a happy future. Also, as part of National Credit Union Youth Month, sfcu will have artwork on display by local school students, in all their lobbies. The artwork will tie into an Earth Week theme as well. sfcu offers financial education presentations to youth all year round as well as the FREE in-school financial literacy program BANZAI! for middle and high school students. Teachers are encouraged to incorporate this into their curriculum during the year. Like all credit unions, sfcu is a member-owned, not-for-profit financial cooperative. Member education and concern for the community are part of the foundational principles of our business structure. Passing along a crucial life skill to the next generation to prepare them for a bright future embodies both those principles. As your credit union, we want to help you teach your children to learn good financial habits. Together we can help them blast-off toward a bright and wondrous future!

ROBERT O. MABLE AGENCY, INC. INDEPENDENT INSURANCE AGENTS

For All Your Insurance Needs • Home • Business • Farm • Auto


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April 17, 2018

The Reporter

Proud Boy Scouts

Joshua Jester has recognized for fulfilling his Arrow of Light requirements.

Rosie Cunningham/The Reporter

A ‘glamp’ site owned by a farm family in Hobart.

‘Glamping’ - The Future Of Delaware County Ag? Eco-friendly Agritourism Start-ups Pop Up By Lillian Browne WALTON - Delaware County farmers in the know are on the cusp of the next “big thing” - agritourism. Stakeholder think-tanks comprised of savvy collaborators in tune with environmental protections and restrictions, tourist trends and available grant money, are turning traditional farms into farmstays. Diversification has become key for traditional farmers to survive. Farm stores and cheese-making operations have popped up on historic dairy farms, while others have created value-added products, or downsized their operations to include meat and fiber animals. Other farmers have tapped their maple trees, built sugar shacks and turned sweet tree-nectar into cash to help supplement the family farm. But a new breed of farmers late-20 and 30-somethings that left the family farm and have since returned to their roots and the second-homeowner or big-city transplant hoping to turn two-dirts for every stone into a paycheck of sorts, are capitalizing on the “all-thingsCatskills-are-hot” trend and setting up camp - literally - in unused pastures, fields and forest. Farms like Walton’s Stony Creek Farmstead and Sidney Center’s Water Wheel Farm have incorporated a “glamping” or camping-in-comfort element to their farms which enable tourists and other groups an opportunity to have an authentic farm-immersion experience while vacationing or visiting. These farms have spacious, canvas shelters, outfitted with amenities like beds, cooking apparatus and eco-friendly toilets atop elevated wooden platforms. Guests or visitors can “camp” with all the comforts of home, while experiencing a day in the life of a farmer - harvesting produce, tending to livestock, collecting eggs, etc. Diversifying the family farm is not always easy, especially if it’s in New York City’s watershed. Many farmers, like Shannon Stanton-Helms of Water Wheel Farm, have sold off portions of their land or deeded conservation easements to the Watershed Agricultural Council (WAC), which is funded by New York City (NYC), to protect water quality and other natural resources. In exchange for the easements, farmers are paid an agreed-upon price and must adhere to development rules and restrictions. In Delaware County approximately 180 properties, consisting of more than 27,000 acres of land, are encumbered with deeded conservation easements. The number of easement acres in Delaware County is projected to grow to 30,000 by 2020. Municipal leaders, who entered into a multimillion dollar reservoir filtration agreement with NYC in the late-1980s, are now regretting its long-term consequences which include

curtailed manufacturing and development, in the name of protecting water quality. Local officials continue to decry the impacts of their decision, while NYC continues to buy acre after acre from willing sellers. Those who have held onto their land, but have also received a financial windfall from NYC through the purchase of a conservation easement, have discovered a work-around - commercial camping. These eco-friendly sites can host up to eight people and are a waiver-approved means of “development” on conserved land. Five different commercial camping sites were approved by WAC on April 9. Once built, those establishments will respond to the demand for experience-driven, farm-immersion tourist destinations - which will boost sales tax in a number of sectors and help answer the call for a lack of lodging establishments throughout the county. Farmer entrepreneurs like Stanton-Helms who has a thriving side-hustle, however, have found themselves facing construction delays because of the lack of governing regulations and newness of the industry, which she sees as a win for both farmers as well as WAC and NYC. She urged WAC’s board of directors, who are farmers like herself, to approve similar applications for waivers to operate commercial camping sites, without needless delay, at the field-staff level, rather than waiting months for unanimous board approval. She spoke to the directors using language and providing a scenario they could all relate to - that of the decision to cull a non-nursing newborn calf. “We can’t wait to make a decision in a week, let alone several months,” she told directors. “Every decision a farmer makes effects their bottom line. I’ve had construction crews on hold since the end of January.” WAC Easement Director Ryan Naatz said the organization is committed to helping farmers achieve their goals, not standing in the way of them. WAC, Naatz said, recognizes that farmer’s land is their greatest resource. However, once an easement is signed, farmers must adhere to the rules that govern development. Commercial camping, he said, is not something that has straightforward guidelines within the confines of an easement, because it’s so new. It’s neither an approved or prohibited activity on conserved land and, he said, expects WAC will develop guidelines that govern commercial camping later this year. Of concern to WAC is “septic effluent” or how human waste will be treated and disposed of on conserved lands. So far each of the applicants who have received waivers have included a composting toilet or outdoor camp toilet in their development plan. For more information about WAC and conservation easements visit nycwatershed.org.

Pack 32’s Arrow of Light class of 2018. Left to right: Gus Miller, Ayden Grosjean, Connor Goodchild; Dylan Carey, Joshua Jester, Liam Seeley.

The Cub Scout Pack 32 of Stamford’s Blue & Gold Banquet/ Arrow of Light Crossover Ceremony was held at the Jefferson Central School. This year, six scouts complete their requirements in the Arrow of Light, which is the highest rank in the Cub scouting program. Scouts from Pack 32 will join Boy Scout Troop 50, of Jefferson. Photos By Amanda Popp

SINCE 1966


April 17, 2018

7

THE REPORTER

SKCS Announces Third Marking Period Honor Rolls The South Kortright Central School has announced its 20172018 school year third marking period honor roll for grades five through 12. Grade 12 Superintendent’s List – Emily Burgher, Samantha Estus, Josh Funk, Kira Helmer, David Jensen, Alyshia Korba, Claudia Lennon, LeAnne Sackett and Freddy Webster. High Honor Roll – Benjamin Dengler, Akyra Olsen, Kyle Soule, Tyler Swantak and Conor Woznick Honor Roll – Brooke Sarno, Evan Whitney. Grade 11 Superintendent’s List – Jordan Finch, Gabriel Goulet, Morgan Hungerford, Anna Reinshagen and Ethan Schmid. High Honor Roll – Sophia Biagini, Alexis Campbell, Chezney Chichester, Joanna Grommeck, Cassidy McGregor, Matthew Northrop and MacKenzie Swantak. Honor Roll – Xander Andrades, Jaidahn Cane, Brynne German and Corey Protsko Grade 10 Superintendent’s List – Faith Dianich, Kyle Funk, Tabitha Gregg, Cody Mattice and Lauren Whritner. High Honor Roll – Christopher Champlin, Emily Feltman, Logan Kaufman, Logan McCracken, Daemon Reed and Mahiya Wright. Honor Roll – Hunter Bevins, Emily Burns, Autumn Burnside, Dominiquie Decker, Azalyn

Hillis-Brunson, Austin Lamport, Michael Stiber and Kassidy Wright. Grade 9 Superintendent’s List – Michael Dianich, Jillian Hungerford, Haley Kosier, Lauren Schmid, Lila Shafer, Mya Stelmashuck and Grace Taylor. High Honor Roll – Cody Estus, George Haynes, Charlie Kuhn, Ben Macaluso and Sara Sluiter. Honor Roll – Aden Gregory, Carli Pardee and Ashley Sarno Grade 8 Superintendent’s List – Brian Dengler, Lacey Eckert, Logan Firment, Jarred Funk, Madison Leaver, Ailee McCracken, Kadence Oblinski, Ella Taylor, Caila Thomas and Kaylee Weaver. High Honor Roll – Abigail Aukstikalnis, Ashley Barr, Chloe Davis, Shelby Macaluso Jasmine Mauras, Payton Pietrantoni, Alexis Rockefeller and Marion Stiber. Honor Roll – Kiersten Acer, Kaylee Bryan and Lily Whitney. Grade 7 Superintendent’s List – Emerson Comer, Emma Dibble and Dylan Mattice. High Honor Roll – Joshua Anderson, Alexis German, Abigail Sander and Jadyn Sturniolo. Honor Roll – Natalie Brunner, Adam Champlin, Troy Dianich, Akasha Finkle, Benjamin Hughes, Keeria Lambert, Levi Martin, Myra Mata, Declan McCracken and Robert Olsen. Grade 6 Superintendent’s List – Hannah Collins, Darren Den-

gler, Gracie Deysenroth, Olivia Goulet and Lee Marigliano. High Honor Roll – Zackary Anderson, Caroline Gorence, Damon Pietrantoni, Connor Quarino, Katherine Reinshagen, Gabriel Taylor, Norah VanBuren and Makenna Wright. Honor Roll – Paige Anderson, Caleb Hardenbergh, Qimora Hayes, Hunter Larsen-Wright, Jeffrey Palmatier, Chase Rockefeller, Cheyenne Sanguedolce and Olivia Westcott. Grade 5 Superintendent’s List – Lauren Dengler, Caitlyn Deysenroth, Adelynn Eckert, Kylie Gregory, Elsa Marigliano and Cole Thomas. High Honor Roll – Jack Byrne, Emily Clum, Jesse Hungerford, Montana Specht, Jordyn Van Sickle, Brian Warner and Christopher Webster. Honor Roll – Alexandria Barnhart, Destiny Clum, Kiersten Hobbie, Lance McLure, Natalia Nebesnik and Destinee Tanner.

College News Jared Burke’s art will be on display in SUNY Oneonta’s Martin-Mullen Art Gallery from April 5 to May 12 as part of the “Annual Student Juried Art Exhibition 2018” in the Fine Arts Center. Burke is a winner of the Jean Parish Art on Campus Award, and will have “STR8 Fire” on display in the gallery. Burke, of Margaretville, is studying Computer Art at SUNY Oneonta.

DWMC Announces 2018 Marian Winand Scholarships The Delhi Women and Men’s Club (DWMC) has announce that applications for the 2018 Marian Winand Scholarships are available on its website www. Delhiwmc.org. Any permanent resident of the Delaware Academy School District is eligible to apply. “This year we are proud to award four scholarships of $2,000 each,” said Wendy Coady of the Scholarship Committee. “Last year three scholarships were awarded, and we had a great response. We hope even more applications will be received this year.” Funding these scholarships is the DWMC’s primary focus throughout the year. Several well-attended fundraising ef-

forts have allowed the club to offer a fourth scholarship this year. Applicants can be high school seniors, students currently enrolled in a college, and adults of any age who want to further their education by attending college or enrolling in a certification course for a profession or trade. This year the application has been streamlined by no longer requiring academic transcripts or financial aid documents to be submitted. Applications may be mailed to the club’s address or emailed (in PDF format only) to the address on the application. Applications must be received by May 1, 2018.

Slight Increase in WCS 2018-19 Preliminary Budget WALTON - Following a Walton Central School District Board of Education workshop on April 10, board members accepted a preliminary 2018-19 budget, that is expected to be adopted as the proposed budget at a meeting on April 17. The budget includes spending of $20,864,607, an increase of 1.43 percent or $293,810 compared to 2017-18. The district’s tax levy limit is 1.5584 percent or $100,476. This is the maximum the district can increase the total amount of taxes collected without approval

of a supermajority of votes cast (greater than 60 percent). The proposal includes the addition of driver education and Broome CCC’s Fast Forward programs. Copies of the proposed budget will be available on the school’s website, and from the clerk of the board at the Stockton Avenue campus, once adopted. District voters will vote on the proposed budget on May 15 from noon to 9 p.m., at the Walton Central School Bus Garage on Delaware Street.

Kids feel better. Parents feel better. A 2-day camp of fun and professional grief support for children and teens who have lost a loved one.

er Togeth n. we ca B:8.125” T:7.875” S:6.875”

Togeth we wiler l. 2018 Camp Dates Camp Shankitunk, Delhi Saturday, April 28 – Sunday, April 29 Riverside Elementary School, Oneonta Tuesday, July 31 – Wednesday, August 1 T:10.5”

B:10.75”

S:9.75”

NYS Power Authority, North Blenheim Saturday, October 13 – Sunday, October 14 The camp is open to any schoolage children/teens (K-12) in Otsego, Delaware and Schoharie counties. For more information, call Rod Roberts, LCSW-R at 607.432.5525 or visit cahpc.org

There is no charge for this camp. There are thousands of siblings in foster care who will take you just as you are. 888. 200. 4005

AdoptUSKids.org

Everyone lives better.


8

April 17, 2018

The Reporter

MURAL Will Host Annual Student Art Show Through May 27 The Mount Utsayantha Regional Arts League - MURAL - will host its annual student art show from Saturday, April 21 through Saturday, May 27 at

the MURAL on Main Gallery, 631 Main Street, Hobart. There will be an opening reception for this exhibit on Saturday, April 21, from 2-4 p.m.

Contributed Photo

Students from the Jefferson Central School hang artwork for the 2018 MURAL Student Art Show.

MURAL has hosted student art shows in the Stamford region for over 30 years. The 2018 event will showcase the talent of artists from four local schools: Stamford, Jefferson, GilboaConesville and South Kortright. Art teachers from the schools selected students in grades 9 through 12 to present work in a variety of mediums. Awards for art in this exhibition will be given based on judging by art teachers Jill Karen Accordino and Lee Sperling. At the opening reception, ribbons will be hung and many of the student artists and art teachers will be present. The reception will include refreshments and is free to the public. The MURAL on Main Gallery is open during special events or by appointment - 607538-3002.  For more information a visit www.muralartgallery.org, email the gallery at muralonmain@gmail.com, or visit our Facebook page: @MURALonMainGallery.

Area Firefighters, EMS and Auxiliary Members To Be Honored At Dinner in Walton Members of the New Hope Community Church will again honor area firefighters, emergency services and auxiliaries at a dinner on Friday, April 20, at the church’s Harby Center on Stockton Avenue. Organizers Marie Celli, her husband Rich, Tim and Kim LaTourette and Deb Ackerly have a full-course, sit-down pork dinner planned for attendees.

“We’ve invited volunteers from Walton, Hancock, Delhi, Downsville, Masonville, Trout Creek, Franklin and Sidney Center and their families,” said Celli. The menu will include roast pork, mashed potatoes, vegetables, gravy, salad and beverages. “The desserts - pies and cakesare being made by church members,” she added.

The church has hosted this event for a number of years to show appreciation for the selfless, necessary and often dangerous service these volunteers provide. There will be one seating at 6:30 p.m. and reservations may be made by calling Celli at 607464-4187.

JAC 39th Annual Fine Arts Show and Bainbridge Art Trail-Regatta Row Visit the 39th annual Fine Art Show in the Jericho Arts Council Gallery at the Bainbridge Town Hall. Paintings, drawings, photographs and prints done by thirty or more different artists will be on display. Exhibit hours are Saturday, April 28, from 1–8:30 p.m., Sunday, April 29, noon-4 p.m.; Monday-Friday, 1-7 p.m. On Saturday, May 5, the gallery opens at noon - closing and awards presented at 1 p.m. Also on Saturday, April 28 from 2 to 4:30 p.m., the Bainbridge Art Trail-Regatta Row will open with a dynamic Street Art Fest. Centering at Town Hall, 15 N. Main Street, the Jericho Arts Council Gallery Committee will host the fourth annual opening of Regatta Row - Street Art Fest. Cosponsors are the Bainbridge Chamber of Commerce, Chenango Arts Council, Lambrecht Auction and Golden Artist Colors. The public is invited to a unique afternoon of art, live music and merchant hospitality. “Meet the

Artists” and listen to 24 musicians playing all through town from Bob’s Diner to Jerry’s Inn. Local restaurants including Bob’s Diner, S & S Cafe, Rosa’s Restaurant and Pizzeria and Jerry’s Inn, will serve a specialty item at no cost to the public. B & W Wines and Liquor, LLC will host a wine tasting. Small Town Perks, the new coffee shop in the village, will have its grand opening celebration that day also. This year’s theme is “Scenes of New York.” The art challenge is to create original art on 10 dramatically beautiful, Adirondack-style folding “side tables” and 10 “canoe paddle chairs.” Regatta Row Street Art will be on display for all to enjoy through May. Golden Artist Colors has supplied each artist with an assortment of acrylic paints. All of the tables and chairs were locally made, primed and top coated for durability - folk art in the making. To encourage emerging artists, this year 29 students, grades 9 to 12, will paint “Scenes of

New York” on full-sized wood canoe paddles created by Fox Worx Paddles. Displayed for the month of May in the windows of businesses in Bainbridge, the paddles will be sold to benefit the Jericho Arts Council with an online auction from April 28 to May 26. Details will be available at www.jerichoarts.com. In front of Bainbridge Town Hall during the Streetfest the Jericho Arts Council will have a table where the public can vote for their favorite table or chair. Voting will continue through May at the restaurants in Bainbridge and online. Register for a raffle by signing in during the Streetfest for your free ticket additional tickets will be available to purchase. Prizes to be awarded just before the finale at 4 p.m. The exciting climax of the month-long Regatta Row Exhibit moves from online to the live table and chair auction at the regatta at General Clinton Park on Saturday May 26 at 3 p.m. to benefit the Jericho Arts Council. This year The United Way of Sidney will create a chair to benefit both their projects and those of the Jericho Arts Council.

Inner Wheel Work Continues

Contributed Photo

Members of the Stamford/Hobart Inner Wheel have been collecting disposable diapers to donate to a local food pantry. The service project has been ongoing for the past year.

Contributed Photo

Stamford/Hobart Inner Wheel President Cindy Keyser welcomes new member, Marianne Ciulla, to the club.

LaFever to Present Program on Wyer Photos in Bovina Bovina historian Ray LaFever will present his fourth annual Bovina Historian’s program April 28 at 7 p.m. at the Bovina Community Hall. This year’s presentation will be “The Photographs of Bob Wyer: Bovina People and Places.” (Thanks to the Delaware County Historical Association for allowing Ray to share these photos from its collection.) A free will donation to benefit the Bovina Historical Society will be collected at the door. Over a 40-year career, Wyer

took over 150,000 images of people, places and events in and around Delhi. The focus of this program will be photographs he took in Bovina, including aerials of some Bovina farms in 1946, as well as wedding, family group and passport and chauffeur license pictures of people from Bovina. Come and see who you recognize. For more information on this program, contact Ray LaFever at 607-832-4609 or at bovinahistorian@gmail.com.

Roast Beef Offered at North Franklin Church

There will be a roast beef dinner at Aldrich Baptist Church, Route 28, North Franklin, on April 28. The dinner will be served from 4 to 7 p.m. and will include, in addition to the roast beef, mashed potatoes with gravy, green beans, rolls, coleslaw,

pie and beverages. Adults, $10; children aged five-12, $5, and under five, free. Takeouts will be available; GPS address: 2770 NY-28, Oneonta. For more information, call JoAnn DeWitt - 607-746-2686.

Fun with Colors Quilting Workshop April 25 Step outside the box and create a colorful quilt. Expert quilter Polly DellaCrosse will guide students through the process from start to finish during an all-day workshop at St. John’s Episcopal Church in Delhi on Wednesday, April 25. Those who resister will need to bring: • A sewing machine (let us know if you need to borrow one) • A variety of color coordinated fat quarters (minimum 10) • Coordinated backing fabric (1-1/2 yards) • Coordinated fabric (1 yard) • Small package of batting (45” x 60”) • Coordinated thread • Embellishments Finished projects can be displayed at the Delaware County Fair in August. Bring a dish to pass to share

for potluck lunch. The workshop will begin at 9 a.m. and go until 3 p.m. A $5 per person donation is suggested for use of the church. To register, contact Cornell Cooperative Extension of Delaware County at 607-865-6531 or email vsd22@cornell.edu.


April 17, 2018

Two-Woman Show Opens May 12 Catskill Art Society (CAS) will present a two-person exhibition from New Yorkbased artists Eunjung Hwang and Paula Stuttman at its art center, 48 Main Street, Livingston Manor, beginning Saturday, May 12. The exhibition will be on view

through Saturday, June 23. CAS will host an artists talk at 3 p.m., followed immediately by a free opening reception from 4-6 p.m. For more information, please visit www.catskillartsociety.org.

Contributed Photo

Eunjung Hwang, 6 Categories, 2017.

Alma Lynch Poetry Slam at Ogden Library The annual Alma Lynch Poetry Slam, in memory of the late Alma Lynch, will run from 4:30 until 7 p.m. on April 26. This is a modified slam: readings and recitations are as welcome

as original, on-the-spot works. Poetry books will be available for those who want to choose their reading at the last minute. For more information, or to ask questions, call 607-865-5929.

Walton Cruisers to Meet and Plan The Walton Cruisers Car Club will have its first meeting for 2018 at Danny’s Restaurant in Walton on April 28 at 1 p.m. Plans will be made for this season’s club runs and meetings.

New members are welcome at this meeting. Club members own cruisers, hot rods, trucks and motorcycles so all wheels are welcome. For more information call Peg at 607-865-6538.

Spaghetti Dinner at United Ministry The Confirmation Class of The United Ministry of Delhi will host a spaghetti dinner and basket raffle at the church on Saturday, April 28, from 4-7 p.m. Tickets are $8 for adults; $6 for Seniors and $6 for children 12 and under. Tickets purchased in advance would be appreciated and are available at The United Ministry office during regular

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The Reporter

office hours. Some tickets will be available at the door. Raffle tickets for the gift baskets will be available at the door. Proceeds will benefit The United Ministry Youth Ministry programs. There is elevator access to the dining area and take-outs will be available. For more information, call The United Ministry office at 746-2191.

Two Artists Display Their Work at CWC Paintings done over the past 50 years by a pair of long-time artists will be displayed through June 8 at the Catskill Watershed Corporation (CWC) offices, 905 Main Street, Margaretville. The public is welcome to visit weekdays from 8 to 4:30 (closed holiday Mondays); 845-5861400. The exhibition, “In Living Color: Still Painting After All These Years,” offers an opportunity to view the work of Roberta vonHahmann, 103, and June Lanigan, 91, in the same space. Both artists have been creating all of their lives, and are still at it – each has a new work in the CWC exhibition. The paintings on display range from oils to pastels to multi-media pieces. The women are similarly inspired by nature but interpret their subjects quite differently. vonHahmann was born in 1915 in Ohio. In 1938 she married Luther vonHahmann and moved to East Worcester where they raised their children. In her 20s, she took classes at the Cleveland School of Art and studied with artists in upstate New York. In 1998 Mt. Utsayantha Regional Art League

Contributed Photo

“Red Barn in Spring” was captured by Roberta VonHahmann in 1963. It is on view at the Catskill Watershed Corporation, 905 Main St., Margaretville, through June 8. (MURAL) presented her solo exhibit “Retrospective” at the Cyr Center in Stamford and she came to know fellow artist and MURAL founder, June Lanigan, at that time. Lanigan was born in 1926. In 1933 her parents bought the Greenhurst Tourist Home on Main Street in Stamford. After high school, she moved to Brooklyn, married and began a family. Later, while living on

Long Island, she raised her daughters and completed her Master’s degree in Art. After retiring, Lanigan moved back to upstate New York and in 1983 helped start MURAL. Her artwork has been in many local competitions and is in a number of private collections and local businesses. She continues to create in her studio at Cold Comfort Farm in Stamford.

Poster Contest Winners Will Be Announced at Cooperstown Jr. Livestock Show

The New York Center for Agricultural Medicine & Health (NYCAMH) has announced its 28th annual poster contest. 4-H members and area youth who live in Chenango, Delaware, Fulton, Herkimer, Madison, Montgomery, Oneida, Otsego or Schoharie counties are eligible to participate. Poster entries can be taken to the Farmers’ Museum Junior Livestock Show on Sunday, July 8 or to the NYCAMH office in Fly Creek on or before Thursday, July 5. This year, the theme is “Water Safety,” which will focus on Farmstead, Farm and Recreation. These areas are hazards when living on the farm. Prizes will be awarded Mon-

day, July 9 at 6 p.m. in the dairy show tent during the annual Farmers’ Museum Junior Livestock Show. All entries will receive a ribbon and a small gift. Poster contest winners will be selected from three age groups ages eight and under, ages nine12, and ages 13 and older. Points will be awarded for the safety message, originality and neatness. Posters must be created on 22” x 28” six-ply poster board. The completed entry form must be attached to the back of the poster. Winning posters will be awarded monetary prizes and ribbons. Winning poster entries will be displayed at the Farmers’ Muse-

um Harvest Festival Sept. 15-16 and in the winners home school district during National Farm Safety and Health Week, Sept. 16-22. Prior to the poster prize presentations, staff from NYCAMH will lead the group in a discussion and activity about safe spaces on the farm. For further information, contact NYCAMH (The New York Center for Agricultural Medicine & Health) at 1-800343-7527 or your local 4-H Educator, or print the registration form at www.nycamh.org/ news/?id=653 . NYCAMH is a program of Bassett Healthcare promoting safe and healthy farming.

Trivia Challenge May 5 at Historical Society Margaretville Are you smarter than a fifth grader? “Trivia Challenge,” a friendly battle of wits sponsored by the Historical Society of Middletown (HSM), will challenge teams of two and four on Saturday, May 5 at 7 p.m. at the HSM hall, 778 Cemetery Road, Margaretville. Bragging rights and awards;

door prizes and libations will be offered. Register your team ($25 per person) at 845-586-4689. Questions will range from geography to the arts, science to popular culture. Questions on world, national and, of course, local history will be on the table. May 5 being Derby Day, you can expect some equine-related

quizzes, too. Jim Rauter (a sixth grade teacher that definitely knows more than a fifth grader) will emcee this event. For more information on HSM and its programs, and to become a member, visit mtownhistory.org, or email history@catskill.net.

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April 17, 2018

The Reporter

Interesting Ball Game at Bovina Centre The May 29, 1903 issue of the Catskill Mountain News had a front-page article about “an interesting game at Bovina Centre.” Though the Margaretville team came out on top, the paper reported “Good Playing Shown by Both Teams.” “That Margaretville has baseball ‘timber’ goes without saying. Saturday our aggregation of ball tossers went over the hills to Bovina Centre, and to the tune of 11 to 9 took into camp the locals of that burg, a team which has practically played together for seasons past, and which has had the benefit of several games already this spring. Of course, the game from start to finish was closely contested, but a succession of hits in the eighth and ninth, combined with Pitcher Jenkins’ exceptionally good work, also in those innings, con-

clusively settled the question in favor of the visitors. “First inning - Margaretville went to the bat and it looked like a bombardment. The first ball over the plate Jenkins lined far out in left field, which had all the earmarks of being a safe one, but proved to the contrary; Gladstone reached first on error and scored on Lasher’s threebagger, Allaben hit safe and the former scored, Countryman sacrificed, Allaben went to third and scored on Kelly’s single, Reed filed out. Three scores. “For Bovina W. Thomson reached first, scoring on A. Thomson’s long drive; McPherson, Alexander and Hastings went out in one, two, three order. One Score.” The second inning was scoreless. Margaretville did not score in the third, but Bovina was dif-

ferent: “H. Thompson was safe on first bag, McPherson was put out, Alexander singled, Hastings’ hit cleared the bases, Phinney was the second victim, Myers got a life but was left at first by L. Thomson’s out. Two scores. “Fourth inning - Reed singled, Shand and Brophy out, Jenkins’ hit scored Reed, and Gladstone closed the inning. One score. “Jackson, W. Thompson and A. Thompson could not deliver the goods and Bovina again took to the field. No scores. “Fifth inning - Lasher did not make safe connections and was out at first, Allaben made first easy, Countryman sacrificed, Kelly hit hard, which looked good for at least two bases, but Bovina’s second bag tender on a hair-raising play pulled it down.

No scores. “McPherson went to first, was advanced by Alexander’s hit, Hastings’ hit filled the corners, Phinney first out, Myers singled, L. Thompson second out, Jackson scored Alexander, W. Thomson third out. Two scores.” Bovina scored one run in the sixth inning. The seventh inning was the most active, with Margaretville scoring four runs and Bovina three. In the eighth inning, Margaretville scored two more runs. Unfortunately, Bovina began to falter: “Hastings’ and Phinney’s club had holes in it...and L. Thomson, like Phinney, unfortunately used Hastings bat.” Bovina did not score again, while Margaretville scored one run in the 9th. The article concluded that “Frank Kittle umpired the game most satisfactorily and was highly

complimented by the Bovina team.” In a game the following June, Bovina came to Margaretville and came out on top, beating Margaretville 15-13. The Catskill Mountain News noted that “The home team followed error by error - the whole game was full of them - though interspersed with sudden flashes of brilliancy in the field by both teams.” The game started off with a shut out for Bovina while Margaretville scored four runs. But Bovina recovered to score three runs in the second inning and six of its runs in the fourth inning. “In the seventh Margaretville furnished some excitement by tieing the score but it was no use and Bovina returned home victorious.”

Christian Boot Camp Easter is not just a single day in the Christian year. The Easter season starts with the Resurrection of our Lord and Savior, commonly referred to as Easter. It’s a season of 50 days that starts with the celebration of the resurrection of Jesus on day we refer to as Easter, and concludes with the celebration of the outpouring of the Holy Spirit that catalyzed the birth of the church on Pentecost - the 50th day! The seasons of the Christian year were created by the early church to support its underlying mission of making disciples of Jesus Christ who is transforming the world. During Lent, Christians are called to explore some of the biblical tools or methods that are used to form Christians

in the habits - the core behaviors - of discipleship. During the Easter season, we are called to explore the key doctrines of the faith that prepare Christians to claim the gifts of the Spirit for their ministry as Christ’s disciples and apostles to the world. Put another way, if the 40 days of Lent are “Rehab,” and the 50 days of Easter are “boot camp” where we as Christians prepare ourselves to live out the gifts and ministries that the Spirit has birthed in us in the name of Jesus and the power of the Holy Spirit. The first three readings from the common lectionary for April are drawn from the Book of Acts and the story of two apostles John and Peter. Through these passages, we are asked to identify our brokenness (individual limitations) with a

person born with a serious disability to whom the apostles, in the name of Jesus, bring healing and thereby delivering him from a life of poverty to a person capable of joyful contribution to God’s creation. Personal and community spiritual healing is at the core of the ministry of Jesus, then and now. During the Easter season many churches explore the core dynamics of testimony, faith, and God’s saving power made available to all in his name. The book of Acts began as a written conversation between a storyteller (Luke) and Theophilus (Acts 1:1) who, from what we can tell, is a new, although socially prominent, believer. As Christians, while reading Acts we identify with Theophilus (Greek interpretation as “dear to God”). Written to energize

believers to the fundamental purpose of the church, these letters seek to deepen the faith of believers and to dampen the confusion caused by the misappropriation of core convictions of God’s Word that threaten to disrupt the call for Christian formation and witness. Acts was written during a time not unlike today when the church seeks to unite faith communities that have unique (differing) interpretations of “church;” making it an especially compelling reading given the diversity of perceptions in today’s church. Acts explores the primary purpose of “church” as an evangelistic mission. Through Acts, Luke provides an instructive commentary on the challenge for Christians to negotiate their citizenship in a “non-Christian” world and the imperative of re-

maining loyal to the gospel. In our current increasing secular environment, Luke challenges us to differentiate between our church’s missionary vocation, to witness to Christ’s love, and our obligations as members of an increasing secular world. The Bible challenges us to reflect and discover the good news of the gospel for ourselves and apply it in our daily lives. We are also challenged by our community to be secular (of this world). May the Holy Spirit bless us with new insights as we explore together these letters to Theophilus and how they may apply to us in this Easter season. God’s peace and blessings. Kent Terchunian is Pastor at First United Methodist Church of Walton.

Hamden Senior Citizens meet on Wednesday, April 25, at noon at the Hamden Town Hall for their monthly luncheon meeting. All are most welcome to come. Just bring a dish to pass and table service. Cathy McLaughlin, nutritionist from Delaware Valley Hospital in Walton, will speak to the group and offer ideas of how to eat nutritionally without having to eat the same food every day and how to manage cooking for just one or two. Bring your questions and concerns as she will have the answers.

Alice Blackman celebrates birthdays in a big way. The Monday before Easter she flew from Albany to Nevada to see granddaughter Janet and greatgranddaughter Bri. From there she met daughter Linda and flew to Guadalaja, Mexico, and then to Ajwic to stay with daughter Jeanne. Daughter Cathy came, too, to join in the festivities. Alice commented about the cobblestone streets and contended that they were bumpy to drive or walk on. Fortunately, the town has some narrow, smooth walking paths. As it was Easter weekend, she saw an outdoor reenactment of the Passion of Christ. The man who portrayed Jesus trained for seven months to develop his back muscles to withstand the beatings that, as

Jesus, he would receive. The Jesus character carries the huge cross up hill with crowds following and heckling him. Roman soldiers with spears kept those who would free Jesus from being hanged on a cross away. Alice and her family sat along the edge of the route to see the procession much as we do to see a parade. The whole experience was emotional and one Alice won’t forget. Other events portrayed were the Last Supper and the washing of feet. For Easter, Jeannie invited 30 friends from various groups to which she belongs to come and celebrate Easter and her mom’s early birthday. All had a lovely day eating and visiting. Alice was most impressed with the flowers and vines which grow in gardens

and up on the sides of houses. That day was also April Fool’s Day, and Jeannie carried on the tradition of tricking mom. She came crying to her mom that the oven wouldn’t work and how was she going to cook the ham for all those people she had invited for dinner. Mom tried to calm her with ways they would manage and then learned “April Fools.” The ham got cooked and all was well. Alice and Jeannie’s sisters awoke to Easter baskets of candy, so we know that the Easter Bunny finds us no matter where we go. Going and coming were made easier for Alice when her family insisted that she use a wheelchair in the airports, which Alice declares is the best way to get around. The man pushing the

chair whizzed by the crowds and got her from point A to point B in no time. She was here in Hamden on her actual birthday, April 12. Happy Birthday, Alice. The next meeting of the Hamden flag committee is Wednesday, April 18, at 9:15 a.m. at Alice Blackman’s home. If anyone has ideas to share and/or would like to join this committee, call Alice at 607-746-6810. The group plans a yard sale for June 9 and the baseball celebration for August 11. Church services for the Hamden, DeLancey and West Delhi churches for Sunday, April 22, will be held in the DeLancey church at 11 a.m.; Rev. Patty Wolff will lead the service.

To rent the Corbett Community Center or field this year contact Kim Lacey at 607-363-7750. It books up fast so call early. The water rent billing per month will be done by Michele Hammond who is replacing Beverly Houck - hamlet of Corbett only. The Corbett Community Corporation has called a special meeting for Wednesday April 18, at 7 p.m. at the Corbett Community Hall. The mowing bids for the community field and park have to be in by then, and will be opened. If you want to

bid hand-deliver it to Janice Stickle before the meeting. The monthly meeting of the Colchester Senior Citizens Club is Thursday, April 19 at the American Legion Hall in Downsville at noon. Bring your own table service, a dish to pass and join the fun. New members are always welcome. Hoping a few seniors are on the road to recovery, like Jessica Houck, Fern Hale and Doris Armstrong. Hope to see you all there. Happy birthday next week to my son Dale Lacey on April 20, Tracey Mills and Toni Vessey, and happy anniversary to Helen and Arnold Buenker. The East Branch/Harvard United Methodist Church (EBHUMC) will hold a

chicken and biscuit dinner April 28 at the East Branch Fire Hall from 4 to 6 p.m. Free will offering, served buffet style. Menu includes real mashed potatoes, gravy and chicken, homemade baking powder biscuits, vegetable, coleslaw, pickles, cranberry sauce, assorted desserts and beverages. The East Branch Fire Department will draw the winning ticket for a seven day vacation at Cape Cod. Tickets are $20 and are for a vacation for two or more. For more information call Kevin Keesler at 363-7751. The winning ticket will be drawn at the chicken and biscuit dinner at the fire hall where tickets will be sold as well. Proceeds will go to the church.

The EBHUMC will hold its annual spring rummage sale May 18 and 19 at the East Branch fire hall. Any good clean clothing, toys, books, dishes, household items, furniture, shoes coats, bedding, crafts, puzzles, decorations, will be accepted. The fire hall doors will be open May 17 to drop items off or if you need items picked up call Kevin Keesler at 607-363-7751, Allen Hadden at 607-363-7396, or Carol Lacey at 363-7387. Anyone that wants to help with the rummage sale contact Kevin. The East Branch Fire Department will hold its annual field days July 6 and 7 -Friday afternoon and all day Saturday. Fireworks both nights; the committee is looking for

flea market vendors. To get a spot to sell on those two days contact Kevin Keesler at 607363-7751 as early as possible. The EBHUMC will sell coffee and bake sale items on May 19 at the rest area on route 17, from 7 a.m. until sold out. Visitors at the home of Joan Luscomb of Shinhopple last week were Betty Space and her brother David of Deposit who came and played karaoke for her. They all had a great day singing and listening to old time music. My sister Mary Charles of East Branch came last week and took me to the doctors for a check up. All went really good, we had a nice outing. It was nice to get out of the house.

By Kent Terchunian

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April 17, 2018

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The Reporter

Early Morning Walton Head-On Collision Walton Man Pleads Not Guilty to Cop Injures Four Bite, Judge Death Threat Charges By Lillian Browne

WALTON - An early morning head-on collision in Walton has sent four people to area hospitals, two in serious condition, according to Walton Fire Chief Bob Brown. Emergency crews were toned at approximately 6 a.m. just east of the intersection of Pines Brook Road and state Route 206, where two passenger sedans collided. Deputies say a 2009 Volkswagon traveling eastbound driven by Tyler J. Cox, 24, Binghamton, collided with a 1998 Volvo traveling westbound, driven by Sante E. Moesle, 70, of Mount Tremper. Walton emergency medical services requested airborne medical evacuation assistance, but helicopter crews were unable

to respond due to weather conditions, Brown said. Both Cox and Moesle, as well as Moesle’s passengers Debra Abreu-Moesle, 60, and John Abreu, 19, were transported to Wilson Hospital in Binghamton for treatment. According to a press release issued by the Delaware County Sheriff’s Office, Sante Moesle was later transported to Upstate Medical Center in Syracuse for additional treatment of internal injuries. State Route 206 was closed in proximity to the collision by New York State Department of Transportation officials until approximately 2:30 p.m. Delaware County Sheriff’s Patrol, New York State Police and Cooperstown Medical Transport assisted at the scene.

Jail Fight Leads to Assault Arrest

Matthew J. Stafford

Matthew J. Stafford, 22, from Sidney Center and incarcerated in the Delaware County Jail, was arrested by Delaware County Sheriff’s Deputies on April 10, and charged with seconddegree assault following a fight that occurred inside the jail on April 1, according to a press release from the Delaware County Sheriff’s Office. He continues to be held at the jail, awaiting arraignment at Delhi Town Court.

Police Blotter Incidents published in the Police Blotter come directly from reports provided by local law enforcement agencies. These reports are a record of the actions taken on a given day by these agencies. Nothing in the published blotter should be construed as a finding of guilt.

Delaware County Sheriff’s Office

• Benjamin Pankiewicz, 37, and Ashlee Calabrese, 31, both of Walton, were arrested on April 9 and charged with third-degree attempted assault, after police say they engaged in a physical altercation with one another. Pankiewicz was also charged with endangering the welfare of a child. He was sent to the Delaware County Jail on $500 cash bail or $1,000 bond. Calabrese was issued an appearance ticket to answer the charge in Walton Town Court. • Mea Borges, 19, Deposit, was arrested on April 9 on a Delaware County Family Court warrant. She was sent to the Delaware County Jail without bail to answer the charge in family court at a later date. • Korey Bush, 22, Grand Gorge, was arrested on April 10 on a Delhi Town Court warrant for failure to pay a fine. At the time of his arrest, he was further charged with unlawful possession of marijuana. He was arraigned at Delhi Town Court and sent to the Delaware County Jail on $375 cash bail or $750 bond, scheduled to answer both charges at a later date. • Steven B. Burnside, 46, Bloomville, was served a criminal summons charging him with second-degree harassment on April 11. He is scheduled to answer the charge in Kortright Town Court at a later date.

Walton Police Department

• Erol Tural, 68, Walton, was arrested on April 6 and charged with first-degree aggravated unlicensed operation of a motor vehicle, first-degree driving while ability impaired by drugs and an equipment violation. • Alfredo Maldonado-Garcia, 18, Mexico, was arrested on April 8 following a traffic stop on Stockton Avenue, and charged with second-degree obstruction of governmental administration and re-

sisting arrest. As part of the same traffic stop, Noel Rubio-Cruz, 26, of the Bronx, was charged with operating a motor vehicle with a suspended registration. Both were sent to the Delaware County Jail on $2,000 cash bail or $4,000 bond. A third occupant of the vehicle, Adrian Peralta-Reyes, 47, of the Bronx, was arrested as a fugitive of justice and turned over to United States Immigration and Customs Enforcement. • Michael A. Billek, 27, Walton, was arrested on April 12 and charged with criminal obstruction of breathing, fourth-degree criminal mischief and second-degree harassment. • Anthony Lame, 57, Walton, was arrested on April 12 and charged with petit larceny. He is scheduled to answer the charge in Walton Village Court.

New York State Police

• Clara M. Korenyik, 20, Bloomville, was arrested by Margaretville State Police on April 9 and charged with fourth-degree grand larceny. • Gerard J. Chretien, 80, Arkville, was arrested by Margaretville State Police on April 9 and charged with driving while intoxicated. • Joshua M. Beardslee, 32, Jefferson, was arrested by Stamford State Police on April 11 and charged with petit larceny. He was issued an appearance ticket. • Jason A. Lester, 36, Sidney, was arrested by Sidney State Police on April 14 and charged with third-degree criminal possession of a weapon, unlawful possession of marijuana and seventh-degree criminal possession of a controlled substance. • Carlos A. Mendoza, 31, Sidney, was arrested by Oneonta State Police on April 15 following a traffic stop on Interstate 88 and charged with driving while intoxicated, failure to keep right and illegal signal. • Juan L. Torres Gonzalez, 32, Fleischmanns, was arrested on April 14 by Margaretville State Police and charged with seconddegree criminal trespass.

By Lillian Browne DELHI - A Walton man pled not guilty in Delaware County Court on April 12, to charges that he bit a Walton police officer and threatened to murder a local judge. Joseph Schmierer, 23, is being held at the Delaware County Jail

on $40,000 cash bail on charges of attempted second-degree assault, five charges of making a terroristic threat and two charges of fifth-degree criminal possession of stolen property. He is accused of possessing two Samsung Galaxy cell phones stolen from a local retailer on July 23, 2017, and while

being placed under arrest bit Walton Police Office Fred Babcock, and threatened to murder him, police officer Tahir Haqq and Walton Village Magistrate Chad Hall. Schmierer is next scheduled to appear in court on April 30 to consider a plea and sentence deal.

Arkville Man Accused of Brandishing Gun, Choking Woman By Lillian Browne DELHI - An Arkville man is being held on $10,000 cash bail after pleading not guilty in Delaware County Court on April 12, to charges of threatening a woman with a rifle and choking her. Israel L. Rivera, 46, is charged with second-degree strangulation, second-degree menacing, second-degree harassment, criminal obstruction of breath-

ing, second-degree criminal contempt and two counts of second-degree harassment. He is accused of strangulating Amanda Bates until she lost consciousness on Dec. 31, 2017 in the town of Middletown. He is further accused of brandishing a rifle while threatening Bates and violating an active order of protection. In another case before the court, Brian T. Bennett, 31, Stamford, pled guilty to a reduced count of attempted sec-

ond-degree assault and fourthdegree criminal mischief. He admitted to attempting to cause physical injury to Patrick Cannon and damaging property belonging to Albert Vamosy III on Jan. 19, 2017 in the village of Stamford. As part of the negotiated plea and sentence deal, Bennett will be sentenced to two to four years in prison. Bennett is being held at the Delaware County Jail on $25,000 cash bail, awaiting sentencing scheduled for July 23.

Sidney Man Admits to Possessing Stolen Rifle By Lillian Browne DELHI - A Sidney Center man pled guilty to possessing a stolen .22 rifle, driving while intoxicated and failure to keep right, in Delaware County Court on April 11, as part of a negotiated plea and sentence deal before Judge Richard Northrup Jr. Anthony C. Masi, 27, Sidney Center, pled guilty to two counts of fourth-degree criminal possession of stolen property, one count of aggravated driving while intoxicated and one count of failure to keep right. He admitted to possessing a stolen Remington model S22 Viper .22 rifle on Sept. 28, 2017 in the town of Walton. In exchange for the guilty plea, charges of driving while intoxicated , thirddegree aggravated unlicensed operation of a motor vehicle, fourth-degree criminal possession of a weapon and moving

from lane unsafely will be dismissed at sentencing. As part of the plea deal, Masi will be sentenced to one to three years in prison, be fined $200 and be required to comply with ignition interlock requirements. He is being held at the Delaware County Jail on $20,000 cash bail or $40,000 bond awaiting sentencing scheduled for May 7. Other cases: • David A. Dykstra, 31, Roxbury, pled guilty to one count of third-degree criminal possession of a controlled substance in exchange for a promised prison sentence of six years in prison, forfeiture of money seized at arrest and an undetermined period of post-release supervision. He admitted to possessing cocaine on July, 24, 2017 in Roxbury. At sentencing, an additional count of third-degree criminal possession of a controlled substance and a charge of unlawfully dealing fireworks, will be dismissed.

Dykstra will be sentenced as a second felony offender, having previously been convicted of third-degree conspiracy related to the possession of a dangerous instrument in New Jersey in 2016. He is being held without bail at the Delaware County Jail, awaiting sentencing, scheduled for May 19. • James H. Young, 28, Walton, pled guilty to a reduced count of fifth-degree criminal sale of a controlled substance in exchange for a promised sentence of five years probation, which includes 100 hours of community service, a $1,000 fine and $50 in restitution to the Walton Police Department. He was originally charged with one count of third-degree criminal sale of a controlled substance, and admitted to selling heroin in the village of Walton on Dec. 9, 2016. Young is at liberty, having posted $20,000 bail, awaiting sentencing scheduled on May 7.

Rape Cases Heard in Felony Court By Lillian Browne DELHI - Two Downsville residents faced rape charges in Delaware County Court on April 11. One resident, Heather L. Merrill, 28, of Downsville pled not guilty to two charges of thirddegree rape and one charge of endangering the welfare of a child. She is accused of engaging in sexual intercourse with a person less than 17 years old and of engaging in sexual intercourse with a person incapable of consent who was in residential care

at the Sergeant Henry Johnson Youth Leadership Academy in the town of Kortright on Oct. 17, 2017. She is at liberty on $2,500 bail. In other cases: • Joshua L. Davis, 19, of Downsville, was charged with seven counts of second-degree rape and two counts of endangering the welfare of a child. As part of a negotiated plea and sentence deal, he pled guilty to one count of second-degree rape and one count of endangering the welfare of a child, admitting to engaging in sexual intercourse with a person less

than 15 years old between Nov. 2016 - Feb. 2017, in the village of Walton. He will be sentenced to 10 years probation, classified as a sex offender, on May 7. • Carl G. Swick, 64, Sidney, was charged with one count of first-degree sexual abuse. He pled guilty to the charge as part of a negotiated plea and sentence deal, admitting that he engaged in sexual contact with a person less than 11 years old in late fall 2017. In exchange for the guilty plea, he will be sentenced to 10 years probation, as a sex offender, at a future date.


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The Reporter

April 17, 2018

The Reporter welcomes letters to the editor. Letters should not exceed 300 words; letters must include the writer’s name, address and phone number for verification, but only the writer’s name and town of residence will be printed. No more than two submissions within 30 days will be considered for publication. Letters to the editor are not to be used as a community calendar. The Reporter reserves the right to edit letters for length and / or content. Letters deemed inappropriate will be rejected. Endorsement letters for political candidates are not accepted and are considered paid advertisements. A paid endorsement notice can be purchased in three sizes: 50 words or less for $15; 51-175 word endorsement - $50 or 176-300 words for $75. Submit letters by email to editor@The-Reporter. net or by U.S. mail to 97 Main St., #5, Delhi, NY 13753

Week of the Young Child: April 16 - 20

The Week of the Young Child is April 16 through April 20. Today it is known more than ever the importance of children’s earliest years in shaping their learning and development. Yet, never before have the needs of young children and their families been more pressing. The Week of the Young Child is an annual celebration hosted by the National Association for the Education of Young Children. It is a time to celebrate our youngest learners, to recognize that children’s opportunities are our responsibilities, and to recommit ourselves to ensuring that each and every child experiences the type of early environment at home, at child care, at school and in the community, will promote early learning. Young children and their families depend on high quality edu-

cation and care to help children get a great start, and bring lasting benefits to our communities and businesses. Delaware Opportunities Head Start, Child Care Resource and Referral (CCR&R), and Day Care Subsidies programs are dedicated to serving Delaware County’s child care community through direct care, information and referral, training, advocacy and education. By supporting child care providers and the families they serve, the CCR&R program helps to build excellence in child care. In celebration of the Week of the Young Child, the Delaware Opportunities CCR&R program has displayed artwork from child care programs in the lobby of their main offices at 35430 state Highway 10 in Hamden. To further promote quality early childhood care, the Delaware Opportunities Head Start

will bring together the 208 children enrolled in their program in a county-wide celebration of early childhood care at the American Legion in Delhi on May 22. Delaware Opportunities will also be hosting its 10th annual Children’s Festival at their main office location on June 27 from 10 a.m. - 2 p.m. For more information about these events, Delaware Opportunities CCR&R services, and/ or how you can advocate for young children, visit the agency website at www.delawareopportunities.org, email a day care specialist at daycare@delawareopportunities.org, or call 607746-1620 or toll free 877-7462279, Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. - 4 p.m. JANELLE MONTGOMERY ACTING EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR DELAWARE OPPORTUNITIES

SNAP Must Include Work, Healthy Food Mandates By Rep. John Faso With over 42 million Americans — and over 2.8 million New Yorkers — receiving critical nutrition assistance, it is a self-evident fact that the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) helps people in meaningful ways. SNAP reduces hunger in low-income households, and when it provides benefits to families with children, it has been shown to improve health outcomes for those children. Like any program of this size, SNAP is not without flaws. The program insufficiently promotes self-sufficiency; too many recipients could be working, but are not. There continues to be too much fraud and abuse in the program, and the program also needs to be much more effective in promoting proper nutrition. Congress will soon reauthorize SNAP as part of the 2018 Farm Bill and now is the time to fix the program. Let’s address these issues one at a time. First, the program needs to better focus on encouraging and helping non-working recipients find and retain employment. While many receiving SNAP benefits do work — and others are seniors, children or disabled, and therefore can’t be expected to work — a large group of those currently receiving benefits are neither disabled nor employed. In 2016, there were over 11 million non-disabled people aged 18-59 receiving SNAP, who

aren’t working. A purpose of benefit programs such as SNAP should be to help people gain self-sufficiency. We would be more successful at reducing systemic hunger and poverty if states required ablebodied adults to participate actively in employment and training programs that put them on a path toward stable employment. Alternatively, if someone does not wish to participate, they could actively self-select and unenroll from the program. This approach was successful in increasing earnings and reducing poverty in the wake of President Bill Clinton’s sweeping welfare reform in the 1990s, and it will work again if applied to SNAP’s current entitlement structure. Second, fraud and the improper use of benefits is still too rampant in the SNAP program. Only in Washington is losing roughly $650 million per year due to fraud and failures in program integrity considered a “good job” because it is a small percentage of the total amount of taxpayer money spent. That is still $650 million that is not being used as intended, which is to feed families. There must be zero tolerance when it comes to fraud and abuse. Hiding income, failing to disclose assets, trafficking benefits or utilizing unscrupulous food vendors are activities we need to stop. Congress needs to allow state and local officials who see this fraud right before their eyes to pursue and penalize this activity. Finally, the SNAP program is

not doing enough to promote nutrition and reduce childhood obesity. Obesity is an issue for far too many American families and childhood obesity in lowincome families is growing. The program’s title suggests that it promotes healthy and nutritious food options but does nothing to limit the ability to purchase products that no one will argue are part of a healthy diet. Hundreds of millions of dollars’ worth of SNAP benefits are spent on sugary beverages, and it’s past time that Washington prohibits the use of SNAP benefits to purchase soda. Every dollar not spent on soda can go toward a healthier alternative. While some will contend we are limiting choice for the poor, tax dollars should only pay to encourage healthier choices. At the same time, we should also fix some of the asset tests for eligibility, such as allowing a recipient to have a car worth over $12,000 instead of the $5,000 limit today. If we expect someone to work, they need a reliable vehicle to get to the job. We should also allow a recipient to have savings up to $2,000, without affecting eligibility. Over the next decade, SNAP benefits will total more than $630 billion in taxpayer dollars. We must do more to ensure that we assist able-bodied recipients in joining the job market, while at the same time continuing to assist those for whom nutrition assistance is a necessity. John Faso, R-Kinderhook, represents the 19th Congressional District.

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April 17, 2018

Sports Reporter The Reporter

13

DA Girls’ Tracksters Nearly Sweep MAC Meet

Benjamin Patton/The Reporter

Delhi’s Sienna Dorr wins the 1,500-meter run in a time of 5:31.78, adding to the Bulldog girls’ easy win at Wednesday’s meet.

Benjamin Patton/The Reporter

Delhi’s Katie Dean leaps during the triple jump during the Wednesday meet at Sidney. She won the event with a leap of 28 feet and 8.25 inches and her team won the meet.

SIDNEY — The Delaware Academy girls’ track and field squad, facing four other Midstate Athletic Conference teams, gathered more points (178) to the rest of the field (154) on Wednesday. They won 12 of the 16 events in the meet. Logan Bruce won the 100-meter dash in 14.08 seconds, the 100-meter hurdles in 16.46, and the high jump at five feet. Katie Dean was a two-time winner for DA with a long jump of 14”8’ and a triple jump of 28”2.25’. Jill Lees won the 800-meter run in two minutes and 42.64 seconds. Sierra Dorr won the 1,500-meter run in five minutes and 31.78 seconds. Cella Schnabel won the 3,000-meter run in a time that was not reported. Lauren Rosa won the pole vault at six feet. The three relay events also went to DA — the 400-meter relay was completed in 55.95 seconds, the 1,600-meters in four minutes and 44.29 seconds, and the 3,200-meters in 11 minutes and 22.68. Sidney’s Mikayla Stefanek swept the weight events with a shot put of 29 feet and four inches, and hurled the discus 84 feet and seven inches. Brooke Austin of Greene won the 200-meter dash in 30.22 seconds, and her teammate Madison Rice won the 400-meter dash in one minute and 8.5 seconds Bainbridge-Guilford earned 45 points, Sidney and Greene 40 and Walton 29.

Benjamin Patton/The Reporter

Sidney’s Liam Matthews wins the 100-meter hurdles with a time of 16.94 seconds at the five-team Midstate Athletic Conference meet at Sidney on Wednesday.

In the boys’ half of the meet, Greene was the team winner with 109 points, Sidney had 95, DA 92, Walton 52 and B-G seven. The Trojans had six winners — the 400- and 1,600-meter relays, the 400-, 100- and 200 dashes and the long jump. DA had five winners — the 3,200-meter relay in 9:16.8, Warren Pardee in the 800-meter run in 2.18.28, Hans Hilson-Schneider in the 3,200-meter run in a time not reported, Ben Arehart with a 5’10” high jump and Jonathon Hadley with a 39’4/5” triple jump. Sidney’s Edward Rajner was the only double winner, with a 49’11.5” shot put and a discus heave of 133 feet and one inch. The Warriors also got wins from Liam Matthews with a time of 16.94 seconds in the 110-meter hurdles and Brandon Evans with an 11foot pole vault. The other male winner was Walton’s Isaac Vesterfelt with a time of five minutes and 14 seconds in the 1,600-meter run. On April 9, at a similar MAC meet involving four teams at Walton, Unatego dominated the boys’ half of the competition with 119 points, Walton had 56, Bainbridge-Guilford 38 and Deposit/Hancock 26. B-G won the girls’ half with 80 points, Walton had 58, D/H 53 and Unatego 18. Full names of athletes other than Walton were not available.

Warriors Hold off Spartans’ Rally, 2-1 By Tom Coddington

WALTON — Pitching was a key to Friday’s game at Walton, as the host Warriors and visiting Unatego played to a scoreless tie until the bottom of the fifth inning. The home forces almost scored in the first frame. With one out, Dylan Jacob reached on a walk, and with two outs, Bailey Wood single, sending Jacob to third and bringing up Kyle Wright. Jacob would have scored on a wild pitch, but Wright had swung at the pitch and was out. In the fifth inning, with one out, Walton’s number nine batter, Brendan McCormick

swatted a triple. Jacob Beach followed with a walk, but Jacob struck out. However, the pitch was wild and when the Spartan catcher tried to catch Beach running to second, the throw went awry and Beach was able to score. Wood had gotten out of jams in the fifth and sixth innings, and after the first two batters in the seventh grounded out, Andrew Santobuono singled and Caden Clow doubled. Warrior Head Coach Art Loomis summoned McCormick, who had warmed up in the bottom of the sixth. Paul Slawson drove a long ball to center field and Beach corralled it for the final out.

Benjamin Patton/The Reporter

Walton’s Isaac Vesterfelt wins the 1,600-meter run during the meet on Wednesday, with a time of five minutes and 14 seconds.

Franklin and Stamford Tracksters Defeat Edmeston In a Friday Tri-Valley League track and field meet at Edmeston, the Franklin boys and the Stamford girls both outscored the host squad. In the boys’ action, Franklin won with 51 points, Stamford had 31 and the Panthers 25. The Purple Devils’ Tyler Gregory won the 1,600-meter run in 5:14.9, the 3,200-meter run in 11:45.9, and teamed up with Brandon Gregory, Danny Coughlin and Jeffrey Bullis to win the 3,200-meter relay in 10:21.3; Chris Kuntz doubled in the weights a 9510 discus throw and a 34-5 shot put effort; Bullis won the 800-meter run in 2:22.9; the 400-meter relay team of, Matt Cox, Nick Chase, Joe Serrao and Peter Niebanck won in 51.9 seconds; Niebanck won

Benjamin Patton/The Reporter

Delhi’s Logan Bruce wins the 100 meter dash with a time of 14.08 during her team’s meet at Sidney on Wednesday.

the long jump at 16 feet. Stamford got wins from Collin Sparling with a 12-2 second 100-meter dash; Dan Olson with a 25.6 200-meter dash; and Eric Fredenburgh with a 5-6 high jump. The Stamford girls prevailed with 57 points, Franklin had 41 and Edmeston had 27. The Indians’ 3,200-meter relay unit of Destiny Bertram, Katrina Alexander, Elizabeth Vlahakis and Leanna McAuliffe won with a time of 12 minutes and 6.5 seconds; Bertram also teamed with Skylar Shafer, Melanie Hoyt and Mary Andrews to win the 400-meter relay in 56-9 seconds; Shafer, Hoyt, McAuliffe and Alexander won the 1,600-meter relay in 5:02.9; Shafer won the 100-meter

T.W. Coddington/The Reporter

SAFE AT FIRST — Unatego’s Andrew Santobuono reaches first base safely on a late throw by a Walton infielder in the seventh inning in Friday’s MAC game.

dash in 13.4 seconds and the 200-meter dash in 28.8 seconds; Hoyt won the high jump at 4-8; and Andrews won to long jump at 13-2. Franklin’s Kirsten Brownell won the 1,500-meter run in 5:38.3 and the 3,000-meter run in 12:35.2; Maddy Ackley won the 100-meter hurdles in 18.9 seconds and the 400-meter hurdles in one minute and 22 seconds; Alexis Belino won the shot put at 25-7; and Kristin Cronk won the discus at 52-10.5.

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T.W. Coddington/The Reporter

EASY OUT — Walton right fielder Ethyn Church holds onto the ball after fielding a fly ball off a Unatego batter during Friday’s 2-1 win in the Midstate Athletic Conference game


April 17, 2018

The Reporter

SK Topples Margaretville in DL Baseball Action By Rosie Cunningham

MARGARETVILLE - The Rams toppled Margaretville

9-0 in a shut out on the road Friday. Starting sophomore pitcher Logan Kaufman earned the win, while senior Conor

Dan Flanagan/The Reporter

Margaretville’s Sam Tanzer hurls the baseball in a 9-0 loss to the Rams.

Woznick and young gun Patrick Dengler closed out in the seventh inning. Woznick went 2-for-3 with a single and a double at bat according to SK veteran coach Bob VanValkenburgh. Tyler Hall and Chris Champlin contributed doubles, while Austin Lamport had a 2-RBI single for one of his two hits. “I thought we played well in all areas of the game,” said VanValkenburgh. “We got good pitching from Kaufman, Woznick an Dengler and defensively, we were solid. Overall, we had 11 hits - a very good game.” Sam Tanzer started at pitcher for the Blue Devils and was relieved by Devon Amundsen in the fourth inning, while Ian Stanton closed.

Dan Flanagan/The Reporter

Dan Flanagan/The Reporter

Derek Burns of South Kortright, looks to steal home during a contest on Friday.

Conor Woznick of SK rips the ball during a win at Margaretville in the Delaware League.

Sports Slates Baseball

Today (Tues.): Unadilla Valley at Unatego, Downsville/Roscoe at Roxbury, Sullivan West at Livingston Manor, South Kortright at Charlotte Valley/Stamford, Gilboa-Conesville at Margaretville. Wednesday: Sidney at Walton, Delhi at Oxford, Afton at Deposit/Hancock (in Deposit), Bainbridge-Guilford at Unatego, Franklin at Edmeston. Thursday: D/R at Delhi, SW at LM, Sharon Springs at Franklin. Friday: Oxford at Walton, Delhi at Harpursville, D/H at B-G, SK at G-C, Jefferson at M’ville, Hunter-Tannersville at Roxbury. Saturday: Walton in Tri-Valley Classic at Ellenville, Susquehanna (PA) at D/H (in Hancock), Sidney at Norwich (Double-Header), Unatego at Chenango Forks and Binghamton. Monday: Walton at Greene, Unatego at Delhi, D/H at Unadilla Valley, Afton at Sidney, SK at Jefferson. Next Tuesday: Worcester at Franklin, Windham-Ashland-Jewett at D/R, LM at Tri-Valley, Roxbury at M’ville. Next Tuesday: WAJ at D/R, LM at Tri-Valley.

Softball

Today (Tues.): Franklin at Edmeston, Roxbury at D/R/LM, SK at CV/ Stamford, G-C at M’ville. Wednesday: Sidney at Walton, Delhi at Oxford, Unatego at Deposit, Hancock at Afton, SS at Franklin. Thursday: D/R/LM at Delhi, SK at Schenevus. Friday: Oxford at Walton, Delhi at H’ville, Deposit at Unatego, Hancock at B-G, Sidney at UV, G-C at SK, M’ville at Jefferson. Saturday: Deposit at Mudville Tournament. Monday: Walton at Greene, Unatego at Delhi, Unadilla Valley at Hancock,B-G at Deposit, Afton at Sidney, Unatego at Oxford, Worcester at Franklin.

Track & Field

Today (Tues.): D/R/LM, Franklin, and Stamford at Laurens/Milford (in Milford); Andes, SK/CV and Richfield Springs at Gilbertsville-Mount Upton/ Morris (at GMU). Wednesday: Walton, Delhi, Sidney and Oxford at Unatego; D/H, B-G, H’ville/Afton and Greene at UV. Friday: Tri-Valley League Relays at Cherry Valley-Springfield. Saturday: Doug Quinney Invitational Meet at Sidney.

Tennis

Wednesday): Delhi at D/H (in Hancock), Sidney at Greene, Oxford at B-G, Stamford at Andes, M’ville at WAJ. Friday: Delhi at Sidney, H-T at Andes. Monday: Delhi at B-G, Oxford at Sidney, Andes at M’ville.

Catskill Mountains Junior Golf Program At Two Courses By Tom Coddington

The Catskill Mountains Junior Golf organization is once again offering a major junior golf program at two locations — at the Ouleout Creek course at North Franklin on Tuesdays and at the Shephard Hills course at Roxbury on Thursdays. Both facilities are offering junior golf clinic days, a championship day and a Parent/Junior tourney in July. All dates will be announced soon, according to Gordie Faulkner, the president of the organization. The program focuses on learning how to play golf, the rules of golf, etiquette, proper dress and much more. Included therein are many of life’s lessons: courtesy, respect, judgment, responsibility, perseverance, integrity, honesty, confidence and sportsmanship. Children between the ages of 5-17 are welcome. Golf is a game that can be played and

enjoyed for life. Many youngsters play various sports during school, with no exposure to golf. Simply by learning basic golf techniques and principles, these junior golfers have a distinct advantage over learning the game after finishing school. For more information visit the website, www.catskillmountainsjuniorgolf.com or email cmjg2013@yahoo. com. The application may be found on the website. Print the application and send it to the name and address on the form. “Should you encounter any problems, please email us,” stated Faulkner. “Please click on our link on the website to go to ‘Friend Us’ on Facebook,” he added. Catskill Mountains Junior Golf Inc. is a 501(c)(3) charity that is managed by a board of five directors. Faulkner, a PGA golf professional is president and the executive director is Steve Mattice, a retired school teacher.

‘Big Wheels’ Golf Tournament Slated for May 11 at College GC The “Big Wheels” golf tournament committee has announced that the event will be held on Friday, May 11 at the Delhi College Golf Course. The tournament serves as a primary fundraiser for programs and services which provide assistance to Delaware County senior citizens.

The entry fee of $65 will be all-inclusive, covering greens fees for 18 holes of golf with cart, guaranteed prizes and a post-tournament dinner. Registrations for the tourney may be obtained by contacting the Delaware County Office for the Aging at 607-832-5750.

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Stiles Opens With Perfect Game, 15 K’s By Tom Coddington On Monday, Deposit softball pitcher Makenzie Stiles picked up where he left off last year. Not only did she beat visiting Walton in the season opener on April 9 with a no-hitter, she threw her first perfect game of the season, striking out all 15 Warriors she faced. Her teammates backed her up with 12 hits in the 19-0 victory. Kyra Martin homered, and Aubrin Smith, Emma Walker and Stiles hit doubles. The Lumberjacks scored 10 of their runs in the third inning. In another Monday Midstate Athletic Conference game, three Bainbridge-Guilford pitchers — Kori Thornton, Morgan Neidig and Alli Miller — combined for a nohitter and a 22-0 win against visiting Unadilla Valley. Megan Palmatier hit a three-run home run and a double and drove in five runs in the game. The Bobcats scored 12 of their runs in the second inning. The Walton girls bounced back on the next day with a 5-4 non-league victory over Downsville/Roscoe/Livingston Manor. The game was scheduled to be played at Walton, but field conditions forced it to Downsville, with Walton playing as the home field.

14

The Warriors tallied three runs in the first inning, keyed by a two-run single by Samantha Layton. D/R/LM came back with two runs in the top of the second stanza, and in the bottom half, Walton built the margin to 5-2, boosted by a Carissa Crandall RBI single. The Eagles scored a run in the third, and got the last run in the seventh frame on a double by Mara Marshall-LeRoy but Walton pitcher Kylee Wiggans buckled down and stopped the rally. MarshallLeroy had three of her team’s five hits, and the Warriors also had five hits, led by two from Crandall. In a MAC game on Tuesday, host Hancock tallied nine runs in the second inning en route to a 21-5 victory over Delhi. The Widcats built a 13-0 lead before the Bulldogs scored five times in the top of the fourth. The home forces tacked on six more in the fourth, and when the visitors did not score in the fifth, the game was stopped by the mercy rule. Also on Tuesday in the MAC, Afton defeated host Unatego, 11-6. The Crimson Knights led all the way, and the Spartans got no closer than 4-3 at the end of the second inning. A four-run rally in the top of the third sealed the verdict for the visitors.

Purple Devils Sweep Panthers on the Diamonds The Franklin softball and baseball teams traveled to Edmeston for Tri-Valley League action on Saturday, and both recorded victories. The Purple Devil softball team routed the host Panthers, 21-7, while the baseball squad edged the home forces, 5-3. Franklin baseball pitcher Joe Serrao helped his own cause with an RBI double in the fourth inning, after which Collin Campbell swatted a two-run double, and Brian Johns doubled Campbell home to end a four-run rally. Serrao struck out 10 batters in a five-inning stint. The Purple Devil softballers

scored in all seven innings, and were aided by five Panther errors and multiple walks. They had 12 hits and committed just one error. Alyssa Nowhitney went the route on the mound for the visitors, scattering seven hits in her first complete game at the varsity level. “In the cold, she was able to find her control and the infielders played their positions well,’ commented Coach Allecia Laing, Alexis Bellino had three hits and drove in four runs, Marissa Campbell and Nowhitney each scored four runs, while Kayla Campbell drew five walks and scored twice.

D/H Baseball Boosts Record to 6-0 The Deposit/Hancock baseball team scored a total of 44 runs in games to close of the week with a 6-0 record. The Eagles routed Midstate Athletic Conference rival Oxford, 20-2 and rolled over non-league foe Milford, 24-10. Against Oxford, Luke Resti doubled home Darren Shaver in the first inning, and in the fourth, Caleb Walker, Austin Chapman, Brody Soules and Cole Russell each had RBI’s. Resti went four-for-five, including a home run, and Caden Forunato, Owen Wormuth, Caleb Walker, Bob Lewis, Ray Rynearson, Shaver and Russell also had multiple hits. In the Saturday game, Shaver hit for the cycle, a triple and a single in a 17-run second inning, a double in the third frame and a homer in the fifth. Resti, Walker, Russell and Chapman also had multiple hits and the team had another 17-hit game. Milford had six

hits in the game. In other MAC action on Friday, Delhi stacked up nine runs in the second inning and finished with a 17-8 drubbing of host Unadilla Valley. Erik Gullow swatted three doubles to lead the Bulldogs’ offense, and winning pitcher Jack Stanton threw six good innings. Greene broke a 6-6 tie in the top of the seventh inning, and defeated host Sidney. Sidney came back on Saturday, defeating non-league foe Newark Valley, 8-1. The Warriors had four-run output in the third and fourth innings. In the MAC on Saturday, Afton swept Bainbridge-Guilford, with a 9-5 verdict in the first game and a 16-6 win in the second one. In non-league action on Saturday, host Windsor held off a Unatego rally in the top of the seventh, and edged the Spartans, 9-8.


April 17, 2018

15

The Reporter

Walton ‘Nine’ Splits First Two Games By Tom Coddington

The Walton baseball team was supposed to play its first game of the season at home, but field conditions moved it to Downsville, where it played as the home team against the Downsville/Roscoe squad on Tuesday. In the bottom of the second, the Warriors capital-

ized on some faulty fielding by D/R to score seven runs. Kyle Wright opened the rally with a double and capped it off with a triple. Walton added another run in the fourth frame, when Joey Yambor singled and later scored on a single by Wright, who had four runs batted in in the game. Southpaw hurler Austin Ladd kept D/R score-

T.W. Coddington/The Reporter

T.W. Coddington/The Reporter

TRYING FOR THE BAG — A D/R player heads for first base as Walton first baseman goes for a high throw during Tuesday’s game.

overcame an 8-5 deficit in the sixth inning with five runs to defeat Bainbridge-Guilford. The game, which was scheduled to be at Delhi, was moved to Bainbridge because of poor field conditions. The Bobcats took an early 6-0 lead before the Bulldogs battled back with four runs in the third inning and one in the fourth. B-G tallied two

runs in its half of the sixth, and DA came back with what proved was a winning rally runs in the bottom of the same frame. In the top of the seventh inning, relief pitcher Jack Stanton held the Bobcats without a score. Stanton also hit a three-run triple in the game and Alex Gullow had two hits, including a double, for the Bulldogs.

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STEALING BASE — Walton’s Joey Yambor heads for a succesful steal of second base in the fourth inning of the Warriors’ 11-3 victory over Downsville/Roscoe on Tuesday.

less in six innings and allowed just two hits. The Warriors added three more runs in the seventh inning, after the Eagles scored three unearned runs in the top of the seventh. On Wednesday, in its first Midstate Athletic Conference game, the Walton squad was not quite as fortunate, at the new baseball field in Deposit, losing by 8-7 on a passed ball in the eighth inning. The game was close all the way. The Eagles scored in the first inning and the Warriors tied the game in the third. D/H got two runs in the bottom of the third, and then Walton took the lead with three runs in the fifth. The home forces countered with three runs in the bottom of the same frame, and then grabbed a 7-4 advantage. The visitors came back with three in the seventh, and held D/H scoreless in their at-bat. Wood homered for the Warriors, and Darren Shaver, the winning pitcher, tripled and doubled for the Eagles. In another Tuesday MAC outing, Delaware Academy


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April 17, 2018

The Reporter

Photo Contributed by New York State Department of Environmental Conservation

Contributed Photo

Stocking Up...

South Kortright fifth grade students assisted New York State Department of Environmental Conservation fisheries staff stock yearling and two-year-old Brown trout in the West Branch of the Delaware River in on the northern end of the village of Walton on April 10.

Trout Fishing on the Famed Beaver Kill...

The wait is over for anglers looking forward to New York’s 2018 trout season, and when it comes to stream trout fishing in the state, it’s tough to beat the famous Beaver Kill in the Catskill Mountains. The Beaver Kill, located in Delaware and Sullivan counties, offers great opportunities to catch wild brown, brook and rainbow trout. In addition to these wild trout populations, New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) annually stocks over 1,500 twoyear-old brown trout and more than 11,000 yearling brown trout. The Beaver Kill has miles of easily accessible public fishing rights easements. Visit the DEC website www.dec.ny.gov for public fishing rights maps of the Beaver Kill, and check the regulations guide for special regulations that apply to the site. For information about camping on the Beaver Kill, visit DEC’s camping webpage.

Celebrate Earth Day at Woodchuck Lodge

Contributed Photo

First-round trout stocking took place in Delaware County last week by the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation. In long-standing tradition, South Kortright fifth grade students assisted. Here, DEC staff unload yearling Brown trout at “Ice House Turn” - a New York State Department of Transportation parking lot along state Route 10 in Walton.

Spring Turkey Season Opens on May 1 Annual Youth Turkey Hunt Weekend April 21-22

Spring turkey season opens May 1 in all of upstate New York north of the Bronx-Westchester County boundary and the Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) annual youth turkey hunting weekend is scheduled for April 21-22, DEC Commissioner Basil Seggos has announced. The youth turkey hunt for junior hunters ages 12-15 is open in all of upstate New York and Suffolk County. With reproductive success below the long-term average in 2016 and 2017, coupled with harsh winter conditions this year, it is anticipated that the spring harvest will be down from last year. However, good hunting opportunities can be found throughout the state, particularly in regions with good nesting and poult success the last two years. Almost 6,000 junior hunters harvested an estimated 1,600 birds during the two-day youthonly hunt in 2017. The estimated turkey harvest for spring 2017 was about 17,500 birds. Important Details for the Youth Turkey Hunt on April 21 and 22: Hunters 12-15 years of age are eligible and must hold a hunting license and a turkey permit. Youth 12-13 years of age must be accompanied by a parent, legal guardian or adult over 21 years of age with written permission from their parent or legal guardian. Youth 14-15 years of age must be accompanied by a parent, legal guardian or adult over 18 years of age with written permission from their parent or legal guardian. The accompanying adult must have a current hunting license and turkey permit. The adult may assist the youth hunter, including calling, but may not carry a fire-

arm, bow, or crossbow, or kill or attempt to kill a wild turkey during the youth hunt. Shooting hours are from onehalf hour before sunrise to noon each day. The youth turkey hunt is open in all of upstate New York, north of the Bronx-Westchester County boundary and across Suffolk County. The bag limit for the youth weekend is one bearded bird. This bird becomes part of the youth’s regular spring season bag limit of two bearded birds. A second bird may be taken only in upstate New York, north of the Bronx-Westchester County boundary, beginning May 1. Crossbows may only be used by hunters age 14 or older. All other wild turkey hunting regulations remain in effect. Other Important Details for the Spring Turkey Season, May 1 through 31 Hunting is permitted in most areas of the state, except for New York City and Long Island. Hunters must have a turkey hunting permit in addition to their hunting license. Shooting hours are from onehalf hour before sunrise to noon each day. Hunters may take two bearded turkeys during the spring season, but only one bird per day. Hunters may not use rifles or handguns firing a bullet. Hunters may hunt with a shotgun or handgun loaded with shot sizes no larger than No. 2 or smaller than No. 8, or with a bow or crossbow. Successful hunters must fill out the tag that comes with their turkey permit and immediately attach it to any turkey harvested. Successful hunters must report their harvest within seven days of

taking a bird. Call 1-866-426-3778 (1-866 GAMERPT) or report harvest on the DEC website. For more information about turkey hunting in New York, see the 2017-18 Hunting and Trapping Regulations Guide or visit the “Turkey Hunting” pages of DEC’s website. New York has an extremely safety-conscious generation of hunters, largely due to the annual efforts of more than 3,000 dedicated volunteer hunter education instructors. DEC suggests hunters follow the cardinal rules of hunting safety: assume every gun is loaded; control the muzzle; keep your finger off the trigger until ready to shoot; be absolutely sure of your target and what may be beyond it; and don’t stalk. DEC recommends that hunters are set up with their backs against a large tree and call birds. To find a hunter education class in your area, visit the DEC website or call 1-888-HUNT-ED2 (1-888-4868332). Citizen Science Opportunities: DEC Seeks Turkey Hunters for Ruffed Grouse Drumming Survey - Turkey hunters in pursuit of that wary gobbler in the spring are ideally suited for monitoring ruffed grouse during the breeding season. Turkey hunters can record the number of grouse they hear drumming while afield to help DEC track the distribution and abundance of this game bird. To get a Ruffed Grouse Drumming Survey form, visit the DEC website or call 518-402-8883. To participate in the DEC Summer Wild Turkey Sighting Survey or other wildlife surveys, visit the “Citizen Science” page of the DEC website.

Celebrate Earth Day with John Burroughs at Woodchuck Lodge and help raise funds to have the apple orchard pruned. This event will be Sunday, April 22, at 1 p.m. at Woodchuck Lodge, 1633 Burroughs Memorial Road, Roxbury. (In case of bad weather, the event will be held at The Catskill Center, 43355 Route 28, Arkville.) Veteran birder Joe Siclare of the Denver Valley will offer a class called “How To Get Started in the Birding Hobby: A Door to the Natural World.” In this class, those who attend will learn to attract and identify eastern bluebirds, maintain

and monitor bluebird nesting boxes, pick a good site for the box, troubleshoot for predators and problems and identify and discourage competitive species. Attendees will go home with a locally crafted Peterson bluebird nesting box compliments of ONCBOCES. This is a family-friendly event; all are welcome. Family registration fee is $30. One nesting box per family for the first 20 registrants. Register by contacting Patti Rudge at 845-254-4126. A door prize will be given to the largest family in attendance. Check www.jbwoodchucklodge.org/blog.

Love Your Mother Earth April 22 is Earth Day - time to shower a little love on your favorite stream. The Catskill Watershed Corporation will provide supplies to groups and individuals who will clean litter and other debris from streambanks. Heavy-duty trash bags, gloves and tokens of appreciation are available to individuals and groups who volunteer to scour streambanks and riversides for

trash. Call Diane Galusha at 845586-1400, galusha@cwconline. org, to arrange to get these items. American Rivers is also calling for groups to participate in the 26th annual National River Cleanup effort this spring. Register your cleanup activity, participate in a photo contest, and to get more information at www. americanrivers.org.

Contributed Photo

HOOKED JAW TROUT — Area sportsman Zachary McNeilly caught this odd-looking hooked-jaw male brown trout on April 14, on one of Delaware County’s beautiful streams. As he always does, he released the fish.


April 17, 2018

17

The Reporter

Hamden Cemetery. Memorial donations may be made in Dave’s name to the Delhi Fire Department, PO Box 405, Delhi, NY 13753 or to Delhi EMS, PO Box 93, Delhi, NY 13753. Visit www.macarthurfh.com to share a condolence with the Gielskie family. ————————————

Donna Wright Rigdon

David J. Gielskie

Ann Liddle Ann Liddle went to be with her God on Saturday, April 14, 2018, surrounded by her beloved family at Basset Hospital in Cooperstown. Louise “Ann” Liddle was born May 7, 1941, to Arthur and Helen M. (Wilson) Aikens in Walton. Ann married Richard L. Liddle at her mother and father’s home in DeLancey on Aug. 6, 1960. She attended Delaware Academy. She moved to Andes in 1958 where she was active in the United Presbyterian Church teaching Sunday School for many years. She was also active in the Women’s Auxiliary of the Andes Fire Department and received a Certificate of Participation Award for 56 years of service. She also was a news reporter for the Andes area, reporting local stories to local newspapers. She is survived by her husband, Richard L. Liddle; her sons Roger W. Liddle (Kim) and Daniel A. Liddle (Michelle); her grandchildren Kate Liddle and Justin Liddle, as well as many nieces, nephews, and extended family including Ritchie Gabriel (Jan), Ricky Gabriel and Mark Liddle. She also leaves behind her special farm dog, Cookie. Funeral service will be held at Andes United Presbyterian Church on Wednesday April 18, at 11 a.m. Calling hours will be held at Hynes Funeral Home, Margaretville, today, Tuesday, April 17 from 2-4 p.m. and 6-8 p.m. Donations in memory of Ann can be made to the United Presbyterian Church of Andes, or the Andes Fire Department Auxiliary. Funeral arrangements have been entrusted to the Hynes Funeral Home, Margaretville. ————————————

Edna (Scherer) Campoli Edna Augusta (Scherer) Campoli, 91, of River Vale, N.J., was welcomed into Heaven on April 12, 2018. Edna was a seasonal resident of “Pete’s Pitchy Patchy Place” on Oxbow Hollow in Walton. She was a sweet woman with quiet strength and a deep love for Jesus. Edna cherished much and held tightly to precious memories.  She would get a special twinkle in her eye if she knew she was being funny.  Offering to bring her pizza always put a smile on her face. Fair week was always a highlight of her year. She especially enjoyed Kozy Korner ice cream. Edna is now reunited in Heaven with her parents, Dorothy and Chester Scherer, her brother Donald Scherer, her daughter-in-law Lila Campoli and her beloved husband, Peter Campoli.  Remembering her fondly are her brother Normand (Barbara) Scherer, her sister-in-law Pat Scherer, her three children, Linda (William) Herrmann, Wendy (Thomas) Nason and James (Lila) Campoli; five grandchildren, many nieces and nephews, and a growing number of great-grandchildren. Donations can be made in memory of Edna to the River Vale Community Church, River Vale, N.J. Edna loved her church and Edna’s family is deeply thankful for their lifetime of love, friendship and support.

David J. “Dave” Gielskie, 85, Hamden, passed away on Wednesday evening, April 11, 2018, at O’Connor Hospital following a brief illness. Dave was born on Feb. 14, 1933, the fifth of John and Mary (Burk) Gielskie’s nine children. John Gielskie, an immigrant from Poland, established the family farm on the Back River Road in DeLancey, and Dave grew up working the farm with his brothers and sisters. He attended the oneroom schoolhouse on Holmes Hollow, and later Delaware Academy Central School, from which he graduated in 1951. In high school he played basketball and ran track, but the pastime he loved most was horse-pulling.   Starting in the late 1940s, the Gielskie brothers competed in horse pulls all over the Northeast. For the next forty years, their teams of Belgian draft horses won numerous prizes at fairs and other contests, including the New York State Fair. Dave was well-known throughout the horse pulling world, and even after retiring from competition in the ‘80s, he travelled with friends to horse pulls as far away as Maine and Michigan. It was at a horse pull that he met his beloved wife, Tina, whom he married on December 30, 1973, at the DeLancey United Presbyterian Church. They loved to take long road trips as a couple, and with their children. In their later years, they continued to travel as much as their health would allow; their favorite destination was the Maine coast. At its height, the Gielskie Brothers farm spanned more than 400 acres, with a large dairy herd, draft horses, and other animals including beef, cattle, pigs, chickens, ducks, geese and sheep. Dave officially retired from dairy farming in 1990, and limited his herd to only sheep. And pigs. And chickens. Dave also served two terms as Hamden Town Justice in the 1980s, and as an alternate justice in Delhi. His favorite part of the job was performing marriages, and many couples whose weddings he officiated remained in touch for years after. After his semi-retirement from farming, Dave went to work for Delaware Opportunities in 1992 as a medical transport driver until he re-retired in 2010.  The job gave him the chance to drive all over New York and to meet many different people, which he enjoyed very much. It also provided ample reading time while he waited for clients; his favorite books were mysteries and history. Dave was predeceased by Tina, his love and wife of 43 years, in April 2017. He was also predeceased by his siblings Frank Gielskie, Marcia Gielskie, Marian Corey Fountain, Kenneth Gielskie, Margaret Conner and Alice Beatty. He is survived by his son, Channing Gielskie of Hamden; his daughter, Colleen Gielskie of New Orleans, La.; his sister Virginia Bartkow of Huntington, W.V. and his brother Alex Gielskie of DeLancey. The family would like to thank the staff of O’Connor Hospital in Delhi for their loving and gracious care. Calling Hours were held on Sunday, April 15, at the MacArthur Funeral Home, Delhi. Graveside funeral services will be held at 11 a.m. on Saturday, May 19, at

Linda L. Allen

Linda L. Allen, 70, of Sidney Center, went to her Heavenly Home on Wednesday, April 11, 2018 following a lengthy illness. She was surrounded by her loving husband of 48 years, Floyd, and their daughters. Linda was born on Aug. 23, 1947, in the town of Tompkins, the daughter of the late Austin and Catherine (Bartschi) Phoenix. She was a graduate of Walton Central School, Class of 1965. On March 21, 1970, she married Floyd Allen at her parents’ home in the town of Tompkins. Linda was an active partner with Floyd on their home farm. She loved farm life and raised their family there. She loved time spent with her children and grandchildren. Cherished moments were also spent with many dear friends. She loved the outdoors, and enjoyed hiking, fishing, gardening, sewing, cooking and baking. She was a devoted member of the Northfield Community Church. All that knew Linda were inspired by her strength, grace and wisdom. Linda is survived by her loving family, her husband, Floyd; three daughters: Michelle and Mark Marshall of Unadilla; Helana and Keith Mulawka of Angola; Kelly and Daniel Cirigliano of Unadilla; grandchildren Hannah, Daniel, Jacob, Ryan, Morgan, Paige, Dillion, Kennedy, Ava, Gabriel and Griffin; son-in-law, Shawn Calkins; sister Sandra and John McClenon of Trout Creek; stepmother Lois Phoenix; brothers- and sistersin-law, Howard and Patricia Allen, Barbara Lathan, Virginia O’Dell and Kathleen Allen and several nieces, nephews, and cousins. Linda was predeceased by a daughter, Lori Calkins; grandchildren Isaac and Matthew and brother-in-law, Reginald Allen. Relatives and friends were invited to call on Sunday, April 15, from 5 to 7 p.m., at the Courtney Funeral Home, 25 Townsend Street, Walton. Services were be held on Monday morning at 11 a.m. with Pastor Marv Root, officiating. Burial will follow in Walton Cemetery. Memorial contributions in Linda’s memory may be made to the Northfield Community Church, 5118 County Highway 23, Walton, NY 13856. Condolences to the family may be made online at www. courtneyfh.com. ————————————

Lettie DeSilva

Lettie DeSilva, 94, passed away on Wednesday, Feb. 21, 2018. She was known for many years by her students at Franklin Central School as Mrs. Stilson. A funeral service will be held on Saturday, May 5, at 2 p.m. at St. Paul’s Episcopal Church on Main Street in Franklin, followed by a reception. The committal will be held at 5 p.m., at Franklin Ouleout Valley Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, the family suggests donations to St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, P.O. Box 72, Franklin, NY 13775.

Donna Ann (Wright) Rigdon, lost her long battle with emphysema at Spartanburg Regional Medical Center, Spartanburg, S.C., on April 2, 2018 at the age of 62. She was born Jan. 13, 1956, to Ralph E. Wright Jr. and Shirley Lee (Merchant) Wood in Stamford. Raised in Walton by her mother Shirley Wood and late stepfather Kenneth L. Wood, she spent the majority of her life there. Donna attended school in Walton, got her diploma at BOCES, and studied Accounting at SUNY Delhi. Donna also lived in Florida, North Carolina and South Carolina. An avid reader, she collected Stephen King novels, loved playing Words with Friends, Scrabble, and crossword puzzles. Donna cherished her kids, friends, animals and being a grandparent. Donna was predeceased by her grandparents, her stepfather Kenneth L. Wood, spouse Marlon “Red” Rigdon, and two uncles, Donald and Sherman Merchant. Also meeting her in heaven are her special dogs. She will be sadly missed by her parents, brother Ralph (Maryann) Wright, sister Crystal (Edward) Anderson, son Marlon Roger Wright, daughters Tia (Steven) B ottum and Kimberly (Brian) Hawley; two grandsons Carson and Tristan, four granddaughters Camille, Destiny, Zariya and Seras; five nieces - Michelle Wright, Christina (Tod) Underhill, Amber (Adam) McGehee, Courtney Wright and Jessica Wright; great-nieces and great-nephews, countless friends, family, and friends that became family. Special people Ronald Hulse, Angela Hulse, Joshua Hulse, Victor Barbato and Spencer Cordts. A private service will be held at Walton Cemetery in Walton at a later date. In lieu of flowers, memorial donations to your local hospice in her name would mean a lot to her family. Special Messages: Shirley, her mother: “My darling sweet daughter, I’m sad you are gone but, my love for you will be forever in my heart. Peace be with you. Love you, Mom” Tia, her daughter: “My mother was super loving, funny, and intelligent. Knowing she is a guardian angel for us all is giving me peace beyond words. The life lessons my mother has given me is a legacy through my children. She is no longer in turmoil within her mind and body that trapped her. Cheers to the one person I loved and loved me first in life!” Marlon, her son: “I lost the one person that always made me feel. She was always my Rock. Even in the worst times I never felt alone. Her heart was big enough for everyone. Mom. She always had a smile on her face, a beer and a cigarette. Every person she met called her ‘mom.’ The more you were around her the more you saw the beauty in her heart. If you knew my mother you were lucky. That’s how special she was. She always wanted to just live as if it was her last day and she did. RIP, Mom”

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Phyllis F. Chase

Phyllis F. Chase, age 88, went to be with her Lord on Dec. 14, 2017, at Norwich Rehabilitation & Nursing Center, where she had resided for the past two and a half years. Phyllis was born in Walton, Sept. 6, 1929, to William S. Frank Sr. and H. Mae Ammon Frank. She was a graduate of Walton High School in 1949 and then married the love of her life, Howard B. Chase, the same year. He predeceased her in 2003. Together, they had one son, Claire B. Chase, who tragically died in a car accident at the age of 15. Phyllis was a member of Christ Episcopal Church and the Order of the Eastern Star, for which she held several offices. She retired from Bendix Corp. as an inspector on Jan. 1, 1983. She and Howard traveled extensively, including the Holy Land. Their other major enjoyment was their camp on Goodyear Lake. Survivors include her brother, Richard J. (Butch) Frank and his wife, Linda, as well as many nieces and nephews. In addition to her husband, son and parents, Phyllis was predeceased by two brothers, William S. Frank Sr. and Robert E. Frank, and two sisters, Ellen M. Woods-Gennarino and Nancy J. Barnard, as well as her constant companion, Buffy. Friends may call from 11 a.m.-1 p.m. on Saturday, April 28, at C.H. Landers Funeral Chapel, 21 Main Street, Sidney. Funeral services will begin at 1:30 p.m. at the funeral chapel with Pastor Pat Robinson officiating. Burial will follow in Prospect Hill Cemetery, Sidney. Share condolences with the family online at www.landersfh. com. Arrangements are under the direction of C.H. Landers Funeral Chapel, Sidney. ————————————

Viola Luehmann

Viola Luehmann, formerly of Rock Royal, passed away peacefully on Jan. 10, 2018, in Venice, Fla., at the age of 96. Family and friends are invited to call on Wednesday, April 25, from 2 to 4 and 6 to 8 p.m. at Courtney Funeral Home, 25 Townsend Street, Walton. Funeral Services will be held privately at the convenience of the family. Burial will be in the Walton Cemetery. Condolences to the family may be made online at www. courtneyfh.com.

Franklin Eyewear LLC


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April 17, 2018

The Reporter

100 Years Ago, SATURDAY, APRIL 20, 1918

THE WEEK IN WALTON What We Are Talking About at the County Hub

FOOD CONSERVATION AGENT Testimonial for Mr. Hopkins − Red Cross Needs Funds − Dairymen Organize. William Burghardt has closed his garage on Delaware street and entered the employ of G. M. Parker in his garage. Donald S. Berray, bugler in Company G, 107th Infantry at Camp Wadsworth, S. C., is home on an eight day furlough, visiting his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Robert Berray. The rule prohibiting licensed dealers from dealing in live or freshly killed hens until April 30 has been amended by the Food Administration to end at midnight Friday, April 19. The moving pictures of the battle of the Somme, furnished by the British and French governments in the interest of the Liberty Loan, will be shown at Walton Hall next Thursday evening. Vincent, the young son of Mrs. Burt Litts of Read’s Creek, fell down the porch stairs at the Litts home Wednesday and sustained a fracture of the right arm above the wrist. Dr. W. R. Gladstone reduced the fracture. B. M. Kilpatrick, director of the Dairymen’s league, organized a branch league at Mundale Tuesday with about twentyfive members. A meeting in the interest of the Farm Bureau will be called in the Mundale church next Thursday evening, April 25. The Risley Lumber Company has started to rebuild its store at Rock Rift which was destroyed by fire last summer. The new structure will be a two-story building consisting of a storeroom on the first floor with a hall and auditorium on the second. R. S. Jones is building the structure. The Walton chapter of the American Red Cross is receiving about $150 a month from the pledge card system. As nearly twice that sum is needed to meet the monthly bill for expenses, it will be seen that either some outside source of revenue must be found, or the pledges increased in amount. Henry L. Seely and Howard R. St. John attended a meeting in New York Thursday in the interests of the Red Cross War fund campaign, which will open May 20. A year ago one hundred million dollars was raised in the country for the Red Cross War

Fund, and this has all been appropriated for relief in France and Belgium.

WHITMAN AN ENEMY FARMERS DECLARE

Mrs. Agnes Robinson Kilpatrick celebrated her ninety-seventh birthday on April 10th at her home on Griswold Street. Mrs. Kilpatrick, in spite of her advanced age, is still active and alert and takes a great interest in current events. Her memory is unimpaired and she can recall very clearly events of many years ago.

Governor Accused of Breaking Pledges to the Farmers

Some farmers were still making maple syrup the first of the week. The season has covered a period of several weeks, and the run of sap has been one of the best in years. Owing to the scarcity of sugar, it is believed that here will be a demand by candy manufacturers for maple sugar, which will furnish a good market for the product. The late afternoon train from Delhi frightened a horse driven by Ira Gregory Monday. Mr. Gregory, who works for H. C. Conner, was on the river road above Haverly’s mill when the train came down. The horse became frightened and started to kick and run. The horse broke the whiffletrees and the wagon slewed around and threw Mr. Gregory off. The horse broke loose and ran as far as Harvey Goodrich’s store, Delaware street, before being stopped. Mr. Gregory had one arm injured. Miss Ethell Snodgrass of Munsey Indiana, has been sent to Walton by the federal government to act as county conservation agent in co-operation with the Farm Bureau. Miss Snodgrass will take up the same line of work as carried out by Miss L. Frances Clark last year. A meeting of the old executive committee in charge of the home economics work was held in Walton last week and a list of names for a new executive committee suggested. The members of the new committee will meet in Walton on April 27th to organize. A program of food demonstrations will be arranged later. Several hundred of the employees of the Ontario & Western railroad gave a smoker in the Masonic Temple, Middletown, Wednesday evening, as a testimonial of their regard for Charles H. Hopkins, who recently retired as division superintendent after many years of service. A special train, donated by the railroad company, left Walton shortly after 4 o’clock Wednesday afternoon and arrived here on the return trip at 5 o’clock Thursday morning. Mr. Hopkins was presented with $600 in gold by the railroad employees as a token of their esteem. Those from Walton present were B. H. Stowe, George Geer, George Williams, U. S. Hawley, Clair Knickerbocker, Clyde Baxter, E. W. North, B. G. North, S. C. St John and Clyde Chase. Frank H. White and Harrison Hulbert of Hamden also attended the smoker.

RED HOT MEETING AT WALDEN Attempt by Executive to Break Up Federation by Offers of Fat Jobs To Officers Charged. The meetings of the New York State Federation of Agriculture now being held throughout the state are giving the politicians the shivers. The farmers have so long been considered as “easy marks” for the politicians that to see them meeting and talking like a lot of revolutionists and refusing to take any further stock in the Greeks bearing gifts is inspiring. The meeting held in Walden recently is a fair example of what is being talked at these gatherings. At that meeting the following accusations were made: First, that it was sought unsuccessfully to break up the federation with offers of lucrative jobs to its officers. Second, federation officers were warned that if they did not quit their warfare upon Whitman their business credit would be assailed and the courts might give unfavorable decisions in cases in which they were financially involved. Third, that men in the interest of Whitman visit the series of federation conventions throughout the state and do all possible to disorganize the movement. The charges above outlined were made in open convention by Secretary J. T. Bush and Vice President Samuel Fraser of the Federation. They were uttered in the presence of three hundred representative farmers, ninety per cent of them Republicans, from Orange, Ulster, Delaware, Sullivan and other southern counties. The disclosures followed a query put by William Trueman, an Ulster county farmer. Following a short outline of the Federation’s purpose by Vice President Fraser, Mr. Trueman said: “The trouble has been that farmers have repeatedly been sold out when they have formed organizations for their own protection. What guarantee have we that this federation will not be sold out?” “I’ll answer that,” declared Secretary Bush, as he opened with an attack upon the governor. He said: “We have established this federation for the very purpose of preventing a sell-out of the farmers through the governor or anybody else. The Albany administration has constantly misrepresented this federation. The governor himself has charged me with being a Democrat and alleged that Democrats are running the federation. “That is lie number one. I have always been a Republican and have been a delegate to Republican state conventions. The only time that I have not been a Republican was when I voted for Colonel Roosevelt for president. They tell me that Roosevelt is a pretty good Republican now. The governor has sent men to break up our meetings. I serve notice that before we are through with those Albany politicians we will nail some dirty hides to the fence. “Certain men have been noti-

fied Wm. P. Rodgers, our treasurer, that unless he quits fighting the governor he may expect an adverse decision from the courts in a case in which he is financially involved. “Personally, I have been offered the secretaryship of the Food and Market Council at $6,000 a year, if I would quit the federation and come into the Whitman camp. My answer was, ‘I am not to be bought.’ Chairman Glynn of the Republican state committee, said to Master Sherman J. Lowell, of the State Grange: “The governor and I are going to take care of you agriculturists all right: haven’t we given G. T. Giles, of the grange, a job? Haven’t we given another one to Dr. Porter?” “They gave Giles his job after Master Lowell of the grange had indignantly spurned an offer of the commissionership of agriculture on condition that he join in giving the governor a third term. There may be Benedict Arnolds who are trying to sell us out. If they are they must be very, very careful. We are not for sale. Vice President Fraser corroborated Secretary Bush’s allegations. He said: “I know personally of the offers of office made to Master Lowell of the State Grange and to Secretary Bush. I know how they were indignantly rejected. I also know of other men in this federation besides Treasurer Rodgers who have been warned that cases in court may be decided against them. “I have a case of my own. They are after me, too. But I shall continue the fight to give the farmer a square deal in spite of threats and offers of personal financial gain from the Albany crowd that have betrayed the farmers and lied to their representatives.” “Governor Whitman promised us a year ago that representative farmers would be appointed if we would help him put through the Farms and Market legislation,” said Charles W. Burkett, editor of the American Agriculturist. “How did he keep that promise? He appointed John Mitchell, a coal miner, and Pratt, an oil man. When we protested he withdrew these nominations and agreed that we should name representatives farmers for their places. How did he keep this agreement? He reappointed Mitchell and Pratt. “Let me tell you that the farmers will never wear the yoke of political expediency.”

COUTNY LEAGUE MEETING Important Gathering of Dairymen in Delhi Thursday. A county meeting of the Dairymen’s League was held Thursday of this week in Delhi and was attended by delegates from nearly all the branches of the league in the county. Edward R. Eastman, formerly county Farm Bureau manager, was the speaker at the meeting. The county meetings are being held in order that the league officers may present the facts regarding the milk situation directly to the league members. During the past month the situation has not improved much. Great Britain has bought a large quantity of cheese and condensed milk is being shipped in larger quantities to the neutral countries, but there is still a troublesome surplus. The federal commission is expected to announce the price of April milk within a few days. A lower price for both May and June is looked for on account of the flush of milk in those months. On Saturday, April 27, there will be the greatest series of dairymen’s meeting ever held in the state. The hour of the meetings is to be set by each local branch and may be in either the day or evening. The purpose of this great meeting drive is to transact several very important matters of business and to get the tremendous concentrated power of the whole organization back of the same

business propositions at the same time. Perhaps the most imortant question at these meetings will be that of getting every member in the organization to pay his one per cent per hundred towards the support of the league organization. It is unfair that a part of the membership should pay for the benefit which all receive. If every member pays his dues, there will be enough money to help pay local league expenses. These meetings come at a time when farmers are busy, but no doubt most of them will be held in the evening that the attendance will be very large because of the importance of the business to be transacted.

TWENTY CITIES DRY AFTER OCTOBER 1ST Binghamton, Oneonta, Norwich, Middletown No License

WOMEN HELPED IN RESULT Their Vote a Deciding Factor for Temperance Forces in Many Cities. Twenty of the thirty-nine cities that voted on the local option propositions this week went dry, while nineteen decided to retain license. Among the cities which voted against the saloon are: Auburn, Binghamton, Batavia, Canandaigua, Corning, Cortland, Elmira, Fulton, Gloversville, Hornell, Ithaca, Jamestown, Johnstown, Middletown, Norwich, Oneonta, Oneida, Plattsburg, Salamanca and Watertown. Those which voted to license the sale of liquor were: Amsterdam, Beacon, Genesee, Glens Falls, Kingston, Mount Vernon, New Rochelle, Newburgh, Little Falls, Lockport, Ogdensburg, Olean, Oswego, Port Jervis, Rome, Schenectady, Syracuse, and Tonawanda. In Syracuse license won by about 10,000. Of the cities in this section Oneonta went dry by 2,200; Binghamton by 3,300, Norwich by 400, and Middletown by 800. In Oneonta the vote on saloon license was 1240 in favor and 3531 opposed, an adverse majority of 2291. The election was held for two days, Tuesday and Wednesday, under a special law, in order that the women’s vote might be handled, as no provision had been made to increase the number of election districts. In the dry cities which voted no license the dry regime becomes effective on October first. Oneonta has long been a dumping ground for Delaware county drunks, but with the nearest wet cities Kingston, Syracuse and Port Jervis, the nuisance should be abated and the highways made once more safe from intoxicated motorists.

CORBETT MAN KILLED Enos Drake Met Death On Way Home From Joy Ride to Liberty. (Special to Reporter.) A fatal accident occurred on the state road near Liberty, Sunday night. A party of four men had come from Corbett, near Downsville, reaching Liberty about dark. They started home at eleven o’clock. All the men in the party are said to have been more or less intoxicated. The machine ran into the fence somewhere between Liberty and Parskvlle. In the back seat were two brothers named Drake and both were thrown out. The older brother, Enos Drake, was put back in the car unconscious from the fall, though the party, did not know the man was hurt until they reached Roscoe, where Dr. Miller saw the man and found that he was dead. An investigation is now going on and there is trouble ahead for some of the booze merchants of Liberty.


April 17, 2018

TWENTY-SEVEN MORE LEAVE ON APRIL 30 Second Call Will Follow in Fifteen Days

BASE QUOTAS ON CLASS 1 Change in Selective Service Regulations Will Benefit the Walton District. Twenty-seven men have been called from the two Delaware county districts to leave for Camp Dix, N. J., on Tuesday, April 30. They will leave Walton at 8:06 in the morning, going by way of New York. Fourteen go from the Walton district and thirteen from the first, or Delhi district. They are part of the increment of 150,000 on the second draft call. An increment of 49,000 more is to leave between May 10 and May 15 for the regular army posts to fill regular army organizations to full strength. For this increment each of the two Delaware county districts will probably furnish about seven men. A call for the voluntary induction of 12,000 skilled men in addition to the above will close on April 27. The men from the two Delaware county districts who will leave April 30 are given below, but the lists are subject to slight changes: From District I, Delhi. Order No. Name 588 Carl Walter Kroneck, Fleischmanns. 612 Francisco Moneta, Colchester. 619 Benj. Birtcher, Hancock. 642 Sherman DeLong, Grand Gorge. 651 John Z. German, Arkville. 653 Chas. B. Mullen, Cooks Falls. 697 Floyd Lewis, Colchester. 708 Ray W. Marks, Margaretville. 730 Horace Infusine, Delhi. 731 Hiley, Kittle, Arena. 738 Harry P. Hunt, Delhi 744 Arthur Mierki, Hancock. 1223 John Stanley Bussey, Margaretville. Alternates. 758 Leroy Bessemer, S. Kortright 765 Henry J. Miller, Pepacton 795 Fred B. Foote, Hobart. 808 Ralph L. Wheelock, Hancock. From District II, Walton. 72 Chas. T. Buck, Stamford. 90A Herman Peake, Walton. 375 Claude J. Scott, Rock Rift. 411 Wm. P. Bruce, Walton. 449 Ichabod Sprague, Walton. 575 Herbert J. Higgs, Sidney. 716 William N. White, Walton. 742 Joseph Marone, Sidney. 816 P. Pelusa, Sidney. 830 Joseph E. Aldrich, Stamford. 830 Joseph E. Kelly, Stamford. 838 George Curley, Norwich. 857 Ward Nichols, Harpersfield. 885 Chas. R Seymour, Hancock. Alternates. 896 Kenneth Daniels, Deposit. 901 Burton Harder, Meridale. 906 Fred Conklin, Deposit. 935 Robert Young, Barboursville. The House of Representatives on Saturday passed the bill advocated by the War Department to base draft quotas on the number of registrants in Class I instead of upon population. The senate had previously passed the measure. An amendment to base the quotas on total registration and liability to military service was defeated. An amendment directing that credits on quotas be given for all volunteers in the military or naval service since April 1, 1917, was adopted. The change will be of great benefit to the Walton district. The Delhi district has nearly twice as many registrants in Class I as the Walton district but in the first draft the Walton district had to furnish three more men than the first district. The change will mean that no men in Class II in this district will be called for service in this district until all the men in Class

19

The Reporter

I throughout the country have been drafted. With the increment of selected men who leave April 30th, the Walton district will have furnished thirty-eight men on the second draft quota and when the quota is apportioned and proper credit given the calls on the district should be greatly reduced. About ninety remain on the available list in Class I in this district, and something like twice that number in the Delhi district.

MOTHER DEAD: BABE STARVES Double Tragedy in Home of Former Burnwood Man. (From our Burnwood cor.) Repeated cries of a three year old son for his mother caused the police to break down the door of the home of Mrs. Clifford Horton in Utica last Thursday. They found the mother dead on the floor and her two sons, aged nine months and three years, weak from lack of food. The baby died in a hospital an hour later. The father went away about a week before looking for work and a letter in the mailbox delivered Tuesday and read by the coroner, announced that he had found employment at Hancock. Mrs. Norton was last seen by neighbors on Monday and her body indicated she had been dead several days. She was about 28 years of age. Mr. Norton at the time was working in Hancock where he had come the week before. He arrived home at the request of his wife, who wrote to him that she was not feeling well, but upon his arrival in Utica found that his wife and child were both dead. Clifford Norton is the son of L. Norton, formerly of Burnwood. Mrs. Norton was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Leonard Lang of Hancock.

ARBUCKLES OWN LAND Win Litigation With Risley Lumber Co. After Four Years. H. C. Stratton, Esq., of Oxford, has filed his decision in the case of Harry D. Arbuckle, Jennie P. Arbuckle and Agnes Ward against Risley Lumber Company, Burton J. Cotton and Mabel A. Barnhart, which is in favor of the plaintiffs. This action has been in court for nearly four years, and during the eight hearings which the referee has held during the time a large amount of evidence has been taken, both as to the question of early titles to lands and as to the value of the timber cut and removed from this particular piece of real estate. As shown by the referee’s findings a summary of the matter is as follows: The action was commenced in the Supreme Court in the year 1914, and was originally brought for trespass on the part of the Risley Lumber Co. for taking and removing the timber on the lands owned by the plaintiffs in the town of Andes below Shavertown. At the first trial it developed that defendants Cotton and Barnhart alleged some part of titled gained by adverse possession and at the February term of the court, 1915, the plaintiffs were allowed to amend the complaint. The action was then in the form of ejectment as well as to recover damages for the removal of the timber. A case of the record title of plaintiffs against the adverse claims of the defendants. A century before the lands in question were owned by Samuel Ver Planck, whose title came from the English crown. In February, 1817, he leased the property to Phillip Barnhart, Jr., and Christian Barnhart for the term of their natural lives, the rent to be two fowls for the first seven years and $12 a year thereafter. The lessees were to make many improvements which should all be surrendered with the land at the expiration of the lease. Christian Barnhart died in 1848 and Philip, Jr., in 1871, and his death termi-

nated the lease according to the stipulations thereon. Some of the descendants continued to occupy portions of the premises and then gave quitclaim deeds, alleging adverse possession. Through their father, the late Judge D. T. Arbuckle, and by virtue of numerous conveyances, transfers and deeds, the plaintiffs succeeded to the title in fee simple. The referee states that before the commencement of this action the plaintiffs were ever since, have been and now are the owners. Two members of the Barnhart family gave to defendant Cotton quitclaim deeds to the lands and after he had the quitclaimed back to them the land, reserving the timber of every kind. Cotton then sold to the Risley Co., the standing timber on the property for $2,860, in June, 1913, the company paying down on the contract $1,160. During the remainder of that year the Risley Company cut and removed a large part of the said timber, in all 412,000 feet of lumber and timber. The referee finds that the plaintiff, being owners of the land are entitled to recover the sum of $3,153.25, and that judgment be entered for that sum against Burton J. Cotton and Risley Lumber Co., and further that plaintiffs are entitled to immediate possession of the premises. That the costs of this action be taxed against all the defendants, by the county clerk of Delaware county. The attorneys in the case were: F. W. Youmans and A. C. Curtis of Delhi and Alva Seybolt of Oneonta for the plaintiffs; Wm. F. White of Walton for Risley Lumber Co.; Neish & Neish for Mr. Cotton; A. D. & C. N. Peake for Mabel Barnhart.

FEDERAL FOOD RULES Substitutes Must Be Bought at Time of Purchase of Wheat − After Violators. The federal food administration’s rulings will be strictly enforced in Delaware county. A federal inspector has been in the county and as a result, one firm has been ordered to close their business three days for failure to comply with the regulations governing the sale of flour. Other merchants are under investigation. While rye flour is not now a substitute for wheat, it may be purchased without buying a substitute with it. Formerly substitutes had to be bought with rye the same as with wheat. With every five pounds of graham or whole wheat flour three pounds of substitutes must be purchased. The following are the latest regulations received by A. J. Courtney of Walton, the federal food administrator, and should be carefully read and observed by both merchants and their customers: In each sale of wheat flour substitutes must be sold in all cases at the time of sale, no person is exempt from buying substitutes because he may have on hand buckwheat flour or corn meal of his own raising. All retail dealers should now buy granulated sugar based on the $7.40 price at the refinery; if not, please report to food administrator It is expected that plans will shortly be worked out so that everyone one may take an ample supply of sugar for canning during the canning season. All bakers must now use 25 per cent substitutes in the baking of bread and rolls; this doubtless will be increased to 30 per cent before long. In the baking of pies, fried cakes and cake 33 1/3 per cent must be used. Every licensed dealer in this country must use on all sale slips, bill heads and letterheads his license number. All cheese in storage must be marketed before June 15th unless a special permission is given by the food administration to hold such cheese longer.

The great problem of winning this war rests largely on the loyalty and sacrifice of the American people in the matter of food, and every one that possibly can should plant a war garden.

sville, as Mrs. Heubi was formerly Miss Frances Walldorff, a niece of Mrs. S. A. Hathaway, River street.

REBEKAH DISTRICT MEETING

Lacteal Fluid Proves Efficient Extinguisher at Gaylord Farm.

Mrs. Mary Wheeler of Delhi New District Deputy. The 14th annual session of Delaware Rebekah district was held at Walton on April 17th under the supervision of the district deputy, Flora Robinson. There were thirty-two delegates present from the different lodges; the assembly president, Anna VanAkin, of Kingston, was also present. Mrs. Mary Wheeler of Delhi was recommended as the next district deputy. After the business meeting an entertainment for the guests, including a drill by the past grands of Gardiner lodge was given, and was enjoyed by all present. The banquet was held at the Central House at six p.m. Later in the evening a reception was held in the lodge room in honor of the assembly president and the past district deputies. The degree was conferred in the evening and a pleasant time was enjoyed by all.

KILLED IN LOCOMOTIVE PLANT John Heubi of Richmond Dies From Accident. (From our Cannonsville cor.) John Heubi, foreman of the paint department of the American Locomotive company of Richmond, Va., was seriously injured on Wednesday morning at the plant, and died at 5:30 the same day. Services were held Thursday evening in the Episcopal church of which he was a member, and the family accompanied the remains to Dunkirk, his former home, for burial. His wife, three sons and a daughter and other relatives are left to mourn his loss. The above will be of interest to many in Cannon-

PUT OUT FIRE WITH MILK

(From our North Kortright cor.) While they were milking at R. H. Gaylord’s one night recently, three explosions were heard in quick succession in the direction of the engine room. Mr. Gaylord and his hired man Grant Effner, hurried to the place and found the room in flames. Effner threw on the pail of milk he carried, which with prompt applications of water checked and subdued the fire without serious damage.

COW’S HORN HITS HIM IN EYE E. E. Parsons of Davenport Meets Painful Injury. (From our Davenport cor.) While cleaning the mangers in front of his cows Saturday morning E. E. Parsons of Davenport met with a very painful accident. One of the cows threw up her head and struck Mr. Parsons in the eye with one of her horns. At this writing he is still unable to see but his many friends hope for a speedy recovery.


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April 17, 2018

The Reporter

ONE WORD PER BOX • PHONE NUMBER IS ONE WORD ––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– ––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– ––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– ––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– ––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– ––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– ––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––— Name _____________________________________________ Phone___________________ Address ______________________________________ City _________________Zip_______

or call 607-464-4009 APPLIANCES / FURNITURE

BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES

For Sale King cherry Sleigh Bed with or without mattress and box spring. $375 607-865-4936 OR TEXT 607-437-3259 WA16Z

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AUCTIONS AUCTION LEWIS COUNTY REAL PROPERTY TAX FORECLOSURES. 40 Properties May 9 @ 10AM. Elk’s Lodge #1605, Lowville, NY. 800-2430061 HAR, Inc. & AAR, Inc. Free brochure: www.NYSAUCTIONS. com 16AX

AUTOMOTIVE Donate your car to Wheels For Wishes, benefiting Make A Wish. We offer free towing and your donation is 100% tax deductible. Call 914 468 4999 Today! Z16AU

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES Wanted Home Care Aide; Part time, $12.50 an hour. Vacation/ sick time; Mornings/evenings and nights. Call 607-441-9060. Experience not necessary. WA17

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HughesNet Satellite Internet - 25mbps starting at $49.99/ mo! FAST download speeds. WiFi built in! FREE Standard Installation for lease customers! Limited Time, Call 1-800-2141903 16G SAWMILLS from only $4397.00 MAKE & SAVE MONEY with your own bandmill Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship! FREE Info/DVD: www. NorwoodSawmills.com 800 5670404 Ext.300N Z16G

Privacy Hedges -SPRING BLOWOUT SALE 6ft Arborvitae Reg $179 Now $75 Beautiful, Nursery Grown. FREE Installation/FREE delivery, Limited Supply! ORDER NOW: 518-536-1367 www.lowcosttreefarm.com 16G Lung Cancer? And Age 60+? You And Your Family May Be Entitled To Significant Cash Award. Call 866-951-9073 for Information. No Risk. No Money Out Of Pocket. 27G

Commercial mortgages: apartments, bridge loans, construction, hard money, hotels, industrial, private financing, mixedused, multifamily, no tax return option, office buildings, rehabs, REO purchases, retail shopping centers. FAST CLOSING (718) 285-0806 16G

NURSERY POTS-Quantity of used 1 gallon and larger. New reams of many sizes. Galvanized outside 5x7 and 3x4 holders for signs with 18” stakes. countrygrownwalton@gmail.com or 607-865-6260 and leave a message. OxG DISH TV $59.99 For 190 Channels +$14.95 High Speed Internet. Free Installation, Smart HD DVR Included, Free Voice Remote. Some restrictions apply. Call 1-800-943-0838 16G

HELP WANTED CDL Class A Driver. Tank, van, and dump trailer. Must have two years experience. Local and over the road. Call 607-278-5212. 17HW

Victims Counselor BA in sociology, psychology, women’s studies or related field and/or 4 years’ experience in education, counseling, or human services. Provide services to victims of domestic violence and sexual assault. Must have good community engagement and community skills. Familiarity with Delaware County a plus. NYS driver’s license, personal vehicle required. 35 hours per week. Salary range $18.83 - $22.47 per hour. Applications accepted through April 27, 2018 at Delaware Opportunities Inc., 35430 State Highway 10, Hamden, NY 13782. EOE B16HW The Town of Bovina Highway Department has an opening for a full time employee. Applicant must have a CDL Class B or be able to obtain one within six months of employment. Will train the right person. For an application contact Highway Superintendent, Edward Weber at 607-832-4220. B17HW Family Residence Parent Candidate to provide a nurturing, supportive, safe home for children in foster care. Must be able to address emotional and behavioral concerns within the home. Candidate responsible for coordinating daily living house needs as well as supervising support staff working in the home. Housing and all related expenses provided to suitable candidate and immediate family members. Bachelor’s degree and/or four years’ experience working with children and adolescents. Master’s degree preferred, but not required. NYS driver’s license and personal vehicle required. Salary range $48,426 - $57,748 annually. Applications accepted through April 25, 2018 at Delaware Opportunities Inc., 35430 State Highway 10, Hamden, NY 13782; frils@delawareopportunities.org. EOE B16HW Pool Director, Lifeguards, and Water Safety Instructor needed for Summer 2018. Send letter of interest to Franklin Recreation Commission, PO Box 886,

Franklin NY 13775. Questions, please call 607-829-6776. B17HW

Now hiring for various positions. Apply at Cannonsville Lumber & Schaefer Enterprises, 315 Old Route 10, Deposit. 607467-4990. BxHW

AIRLINE CAREERS Start Here –Get trained as FAA certified Aviation Technician. Financial aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. Call AIM for free information 866-296-7094 16HW

Part Time Positions available: equipment mechanic, experienced interior painter, housekeeper. Contact: 917-626-7653. WA16HW

HOME IMPROVEMENT Help your local economy and save money with Solar Power! Solar Power has a strong Return on Investment, Free Maintenance, Free Quote. Simple Reliable Energy with No Out of Pocket Costs. Call now! 800-678-0569 16HI SAWMILLS from only $4397.00 MAKE & SAVE MONEY with your own bandmill Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship! FREE Info/DVD: www. NorwoodSawmills.com 800 5670404 Ext.300N 16HI

REAL ESTATE For Sale: Beautiful updated villa! 2 bedroom, 2 bath, 1848 living square feet, plus garage. Located at 5560 Westwind Lane, Ft Myers FL. New wood flooring, newer appliances, updated kitchen and bathrooms, new roof, new sky lights and new tube light installed in May 2015. 3 ton A/C installed in April 2013 with pure air system. Spacious Florida Room, large laundry room, and garage with lots of built in cabinets! Large pool located out the back door. 18 hole golf with clubhouse/restaurant within walking distance. HOA fee is $370 per month, which includes: extended cable package, insurance, lawn, tree and pool maintenance. This association has very healthy reserves! View this listing on Zillow.com to see how beautiful this property is. Please Call Shirley Decker at 607-287-2298 for more information. OTFRE

LENDER ORDERED WATERFRONT LAND SALE! APRIL 28th! 1 DAY ONLY! 7 Waterfront Parcels/Finger LakesIthaca Area! Ex: 6 acres - 150’ Waterfront- $49,900. 8 acres 600’ Shoreline- $69,900. Owner terms avail! Call 888-905-8847 to register. NewYorkLandandLakes. com 16RE

RENTALS For Rent Walton Village. One bedroom apartment on first floor. Large country kitchen, new wall-to-wall- carpeting, recently

We accept painted. Rent of $550 includes heat, electric, water, garbage collection. References and security required. 607-865-8884. 16FR

LARGE FARMHOUSE FOR lease with modern kitchen/family room and bath in Walton area. Reply to: Decker Advertising, Attention: Rentals, 97 Main Street, #5, Delhi, NY 13753. Note “Farmhouse” on envelope. 18FR Walton one bedroom apartments. Remodeling now. Two available April 28. First or second floor. Off street parking. Deposit, rent $650. References required. All utilities included. Call Tom, 610-563-7044. 17FR SECOND FLOOR studio apartment. Located at 18 Platt Street, Walton. No pets, no smoking. $550 a month, utilities included. 607-287-1576 or 607-865-6384. BTFFR

WESTBROOK APARTMENTS, A NICE PLACE TO LIVE. Subsidized/Income Eligible. We offer plenty of storage, appliances, pantries, ample parking, playground, full-time maintenance staff, and on-site laundry. We allow one small pet with pet deposit. Stop in or call for application. Westbrook Apartments, 141 East Street, Walton, NY 13856. 607-865-8762, NYS Relay 711, Tues. and Thurs. 8:00 AM – 4:00 PM, EHO, HCA BTFFR WALTON - 3 bedroom apartment, 1.5 bath, utilities included. $975 per month. Call 845-9878655 or leave message. Security required. 16FR Nice one bedroom 1st floor apartment in updated, well maintained triplex. Available now to the right tenants. No pets, smoking/drugs. Off street parking. Household garbage removal, lawn/snow paid. W/D $600/ month, $600 security. Lease, work/income proof, references. 1-845-679-6430. 17FR

MOUNTAINVIEW ESTATES-A NICE PLACE TO LIVE! All apartments have appliances, ample storage and patio/balcony. Also on-site laundry, playground, on-site parking, and full time maintenance staff. Call or stop in for application. Mountainview Terrace, Walton, NY. 607-8654278, NYS Relay 711, Monday & Wednesday 8AM – 4:00 PM. EHO/HCA BTFFR Apartment for rent, very nice 2 bedroom 1 bath up new stairs. Freshly painted throughout, newer dishwasher, shared washer/dryer, one garage space, attic for light storage, kitchen to be expanded real soon, patio near mountain stream. Located 6 miles from Walton, 8 miles from Delhi on Route 10. $900 per month & 1 month security. Includes all utilities, snow removal & lawn care. Month to month lease, references required, no pets. Available now, on site property manager. 607-3532251 or 708-297-6674. BTFFR


April 17, 2018

21

The Reporter

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the County of Delaware, wherein CIT BANK, N.A. is the Plaintiff and THOMAS D. LYNCH; ET AL. are the Defendant(s). I, the undersigned Referee will sell at public auction at the DELAWARE COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 3 COURT STREET, DELHI, NY 13753, on April 30, 2018 at 10:30 am, premises known as 2184 WELLS BRIDGE ROAD, TOWN OF SIDNEY, OTEGO, NY 13825: Section 75, Block 1, Lot 19: ALL THAT TRACT OR PARCEL OF LAND, SITUATE IN THE TOWN OF SIDNEY, COUNTY OF DELAWARE AND STATE OF NEW YORK Premises will be sold subject to provisions of filed Judgment Index # 520/2016. Daniel Ross, Esq. Referee. RAS Boriskin, LLC 900 Merchants Concourse, Suite 106, Westbury, New York 11590, Attorneys for Plaintiff. LEGAL NOTICE Notice is hereby given that the Board of Education of the Delaware Academy Central School District at Delhi will hold a Public Hearing on Monday, April 30, 2018 at 6:30 p.m. in the High School Auditorium to hold an informational meeting and to receive public comment regarding the proposed Capital Project to be placed before the voters on Tuesday, May 15, 2018. Susan J. Temple District Clerk

Walton one bedroom recently renovated apartment. 3rd floor. $475 plus security. No pets, no smoking, no drugs. Call Michelle, 607-287-7878. B17FR Walton second floor one bedroom apartment, includes all utilities, $625 per month. 732492-1454. Parking, porch, lawn. 16FR

Two bedroom apartment up a flight for 1/2. Available after April 30th. Renovated well maintained private triplex. Laundromat 2 blocks. Off street parking. Household garbage removal, lawn/snow paid. No pets, smoking/drugs. $700/month plus utilities, $700 security. Lease, income proof, references. 1-845679-6430. 17FR Walton/2 bedroom non smoking residential 2nd floor, for quiet living. Off street parking. Utilities not included. $625 per month/ security/lease/written proof of income/references required. HUD accepted. 607-437-4281. TFFR

WANTED Always buying…Movie costume company looking for large quantities of old store stock. Also buying upscale mens, womens and childrens 1970s and earlier clothing and accessories. Cruise wear, workwear, eveningwear, business and casual daywear. Please, no polyester and condition is very important. 607-4985750. E-mail: righttothemoonalice@yahoo.com BTFWT SEEKING LARGE ACREAGESerious cash buyer seeks large acreage 200 acres and up in the Central/Finger Lakes/So. Tier & Catskills Regions of NY State. Brokers welcome. For prompt, courteous, confidential response, call 607-353-8068 or email Info@ NewYorkLandandLakes.com 16WT

LEGAL Notice of Formation of Bollinger Holdings, LLC, Art. of Org. filed with Sec’y of State (SSNY) on 2/14/18. Office location: Delaware County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 60125 State Hwy. 10, Hobart, NY 13788. Purpose: any lawful activities. Bovina Farm and Fermentory LLC, Art. of Org. filed with SSNY on 1/16/18. Off. loc.: Delaware Co. SSNY designated as agent upon whom process may be served & shall mail proc.: 22 Warwick Estates Dr., Pine Island, NY 10969. Purp.: any lawful purp. Notice of Formation of EVERSON PROPERTIES LLC. Articles of Organization filed with the Secretary of State of NY (SSNY) on 2/22/2018. Office Location: Delaware County. SSNY has been designated as agent upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 105 Leonard St, #3, Hancock, NY 13783. The registered agent of the limited liability company whom process against it may be served is Spiegel & Utrera, P.A., P.C., 1 Maiden Lane, 5th FL, NY, NY 10038. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. Hamden’s Finest LLC, Arts of Org. filed with Sec. of State of NY (SSNY) 2/23/2018. Cty: Delaware. SSNY desig. as agent upon whom process against may be served & shall mail process to 1039 Launt

Hollow Rd., Hamden, NY 13782. General Purpose. Howell St LLC, Arts Of Org. Filed with Sec of State of NY (SSNY) on 3/8/18. Cnty: Delaware. SSNY designated as agent upon whom process against may be served & shall mail process to: Howell St LLC, 6413 Dunk Hill Rd, Walton, NY 13856. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Notice of formation of Mould & Deckle LLC. Filed 3/8/18. SSNY designated as agent upon whom process against it may be served & shall mail to: Mina Takahashi, 2150 Chambers Hollow Road, Walton, NY 13856. Notice of Formation of Chronology Pictures, LLC. Arts of Org. filed with NY Secy of State (SSNY) on 3/9/18. Office location:Delaware County. SSNY is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 58 Fox Meadow Ln., Margaretville, NY 12455. The name and address of the Reg. Agent is David Northcutt, 58 Fox Meadow Ln., Margaretville, NY 12455. Purpose: any lawful activity. Notice of formation of Limited Liability Company (LLC). Name: Eagle View Photography, LLC. Articles of organization filed with Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 02/20/18. NY Office location: Delaware county. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to PO BX 705, 6523 River Rd, Downsville, NY 13755. Purpose: Any lawful activity. NOTICE OF FORMATION of SUNNY ALP FARM, LLC A Limited Liability Company. Articles of Organization were filed with the New York State Secretary of State on March 7, 2018. The office of the LLC is to be located in Delaware County. The Secretary of State has been designated as the agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The Secretary of State shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC served upon him/ her to: Sunny Alp Farm, LLC of 221 Wickham Road, Stamford, NY 12167. The purpose of the LLC is to engage in any lawful act or activity. Notice of formation of The Wildness LLC. Articles of Incorporation were filed with NY Secretary of State (SSNY) on 2/27/2018. Location: Delaware County. SSNY is designated as agent to LLC upon whom process it against maybe served. SSNY shall mail process to 52 Meredith St, Delhi, NY 13753. Purpose: any legal activity. Notice of Formation of Weathered Hill Farm LLC. Arts of Org. filed with New York Secy of State (SSNY) on 02/23/2018. Office location: Delaware County. SSNY is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 243 Doroski Road, South Kortright, N.Y. 13842. Purpose: any lawful activity. SUPREME COURT OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK - COUNTY OF DELAWARE CIT BANK, N.A., V. THOMAS D. LYNCH; ET. AL. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated November 16, 2017, and entered in the Office of the Clerk of

NOTICE TO BIDDERS Notice is hereby given, that the Delaware County Department of Emergency Services is accepting sealed bids for the following: Radio Site Development Bids shall be submitted on bid forms that are available for inspection and obtainable at the Office of the Director of Emergency Services, 280 Phoebe Lane, Suite 3, Delhi, New York 13753. Detailed specifications are contained in the said forms. Bids must be filed with Stephen Hood, Director of Emergency Services, 280 Phoebe Lane, Suite 3, Delhi, New York, 13753 on or before 2:00 P.M., Prevailing Time, Tuesday, April 17, 2018, in a sealed envelope plainly marked RADIO SITE DEVELOPMENT BID RESPONSE on the outside and accompanied by a non-collusion bid certificate, at which time and place they will be publicly opened and read. The successful bidder will be promptly notified and must be prepared to enter into a contract for the purchase and sale of the said item(s) or services in conformity with the information in the proposal. The County of Delaware reserves the right to reject any or all bids submitted. Stephen Hood Delaware County Director of Emergency Services DATED: March 22, 2018 NOTICE OF SALE SUPREME COURT - COUNTY OF DELAWARE DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, AS INDENTURE TRUSTEE AND CUSTODIAN FOR OCWEN REAL ESTATE ASSEST LIQUIDATING TRUST 2017-1, ASSEST-BACKED NOTES, SERIES 2007-1, Plaintiff, Against GARY T. MATTHEWS, MARY L. MATTHEWS, ET AL., Defendant(s) Index No.: 1012/2011 Pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale, duly granted 2/10/2018, I, the undersigned Referee, will sell at public auction at Delaware County Courthouse, 3 Court Street, Delhi, NY, on 5/1/2018 at 10:30 am, premises known as Rural Route 1, Box 61B, Town of Andes, NY 13731, and described as follows: ALL that certain plot, piece or parcel of land, with the buildings and improvements thereon erected, situate, lying and being in the Town of Andes, Delaware County, State of New York, and designated on the tax maps of the Delaware County Treasurer as Section 237 Block 3 Lot 15 & 16 The approximate amount of the current Judgment lien is $42,679.98 plus interest and costs. The premises will be sold subject to provisions of the aforesaid Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale; Index # 1012/2011. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. Eugene E. Peckham, Esq., Referee. Leopold & Associates, PLLC, 80 Business Park Drive, Suite 110, Armonk, NY 10504 Dated: 3/20/2018 GNS NOTICE OF BUDGET HEARING AND VOTE WALTON CENTRAL SCHOOL DISTRICT WALTON, NEW YORK A Budget Hearing for the inhabitants of the Walton Central School District qualified to vote at School District Meetings will be held at the Board of Education room the Walton Central School District, commencing at 7:00 PM, on Tuesday, May 1, 2018 where there shall be presented the proposed school district budget for the following school year. Date of Annual Meeting

The vote upon the appropriation of the necessary funds to meet the estimated expenditures or for any propositions involving the expenditure of money or the authorizing of levy of taxes, as well as the election of members of the Board of Education shall be held on Tuesday, May 15, 2018, in the School Bus Garage, Delaware Street, between the hours of 12:00 Noon and 9:00 PM. The following propositions shall be put forth to the voters: Proposition No. 1 Shall the submitted 2018-19 budget as presented by the Board of Education to the voters at the Budget Hearing be approved and be adopted and the necessary funds to meet the estimated expenditures be appropriated and the Board of Education be authorized to levy the necessary taxes to meet the estimated expenditures? Proposition No. 2 RESOLVED that, pursuant to Chapter 472 of the Session Laws of 1998, the Board of Education of the Walton Central School District is hereby authorized to lease and expend therefore, including costs incidental thereto and the financing thereof, an amount not to exceed the estimated maximum cost of Two Hundred Seventy Nine Thousand Dollars ($279,000.00) for the entire term of the lease, and for a term not to exceed five (5) years, the following motors vehicles: three (3) sixty-five (65) passenger school buses; AND, that such sum, or so much thereof as may be necessary, shall be raised by the levy of a tax collected in annual installments; and that in anticipation of such tax, obligations of the District shall be issued. Statement of Money Required for Next School Year A copy of the statement of the amount of money which will be required for the next school year for school purposes shall be completed seven days before the Budget Hearing and may be obtained by any resident of the District, at each schoolhouse, during the period of 14 days immediately before the Annual Meeting and Election, between the hours of 9:00 AM and 4:00 PM, except Saturday, Sunday, or holiday. Vote for Board Members Petitions nominating candidates for the office of member of the Board of Education must be filed with the Clerk of the District between the hours of 9:00 AM, and 4:00 PM not later than 5:00 PM on April 16, 2018. The following vacancies are to be filled: A three-year term ending June 30, 2021 presently held by Jennifer K. Fay A three-year term ending June 30, 2021 presently held by Ronda L. Williams Each petition must be addressed to the Clerk of the District and signed by at least 25 qualified voters of the District, shall state the residence of each signer, and the name and address of the candidate. Vacancies upon the Board shall not be considered separate specific offices. The individuals receiving the highest number of votes shall be elected to the vacancies. Voter Propositions Any proposition that is required to be included for vote shall be submitted in writing by means of a petition, signed by at least 25 qualified voters, stating the residence of each signer, which proposition shall be filed with the Board of Education not later than 30 days before the date of the election as set forth in this notice unless a greater number of days is required by statute. Any proposition may be rejected by the Board of Education if the purpose of the proposition is not within the powers of the voters or where the expenditure of monies is required by the proposition, and such proposition fails to include the necessary specific appropriation. Qualified Voters Qualified voters of the School District shall be entitled to vote at the Annual Meeting. A qualified voter is one who is (1) a citizen of the United States of America, (2) eighteen years of age or older, and (3) resident within the School District for a period of thirty (30) days next preceding the Annual Meeting. The School District may require all persons offering to vote at the Annual Meeting to provide one form of proof of residency. Such form may include, but is not limited to, a driver’s license or a utility bill. Absentee Ballots Applications for absentee ballots may be applied for at the Office of the District Clerk at the District Office. Such applications must be received by the District Clerk at least seven days before the vote set in this notice if the ballot is to be mailed to the absentee voter or the day before the vote if the ballot is to be delivered personally to the absentee voter. Absentee ballots must be received in the Office of the Clerk of the District not later than 5:00 PM on the date of the vote. A list of all persons to whom absentee voters’ ballots have been issued shall be available for public inspection during regular office hours which are between the hours of 9:00 AM and 4:00 PM. Any qualified voter, may upon examination of such list, file written challenge of qualifications of a voter of any person whose name appears on such list, stating the reasons for the challenge. Such written challenge shall be transmitted by the Clerk or designee to the Election Inspectors on election day.

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Dated: March 27, 2018 By Order of the Board of Education of the Walton Central School District S. Corey Phraner District Clerk NOTICE OF SALE SUPREME COURT OTSEGO COUNTY KeyBank National Association, Plaintiff against Timothy Ellis A/K/A Timothy J. Ellis; Armeda Z. Barnes, et al Defendants Attorney (s) for Plaintiff (s) Fein, Such & Crane, LLP 28 East Main Street, Suite 1800, Rochester, NY 14614 Attorney (s) for Plaintiff (s). Pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale Entered December 11th, 2017 I will sell at Public Auction to the highest bidder at the front entrance to the County Office Building, 197 Main Street, Cooperstown, NY 13326 on May 3rd, 2018 at 1:00 p.m. Premises known as 1155 State Highway 165 a/k/a 1161 State Highway 165, Cherry Valley, NY 13320. Sec 120.03 Block 1 Lot 27.00. All that Tract or Parcel of Land, situate in the Village of South Valley, in the Town of Roseboom, County of Otsego and State of New York Approximate Amount of Judgment is $44,492.29 plus interest and costs. Premises will be sold subject to provisions of filed Judgment Index No 20150158. James P. Chamberlain, Esq., Referee The Lew Beach Cemetery Corporation will hold its annual meeting on April 23 at the Beaverkill Valley Firehouse in Lew Beach, NY at 7 PM. Judie DV Smith, Secretary, 607-498-6024. Binnekill Properties LLC. Filed 3/12/18. Office: Delaware Co. SSNY designated as agent for process & shall mail to: 225 White Rd, Margaretville, NY 12455. Purpose: General. Binnekill Tavern LLC. Filed 3/13/18. Office: Delaware Co. SSNY designated as agent for process & shall mail to: 225 White Rd, Margaretville, NY 12455. Purpose: General. Black Bear Holdings LLC. Filed 3/13/18. Office: Delaware Co. SSNY designated as agent for process & shall mail to: 225 White Rd, Margaretville, NY 12455. Purpose: General. Little Engine LLC. Filed 3/13/18. Office: Delaware Co. SSNY designated as agent for process & shall mail to: 225 White Rd, Margaretville, NY 12455. Purpose: General. Never Quit Holdings LLC. Filed 3/13/18. Office: Delaware Co. SSNY designated as agent for process & shall mail to: 225 White Rd, Margaretville, NY 12455. Purpose: General. Notice of formation of Johnson American Bulldog Registry, LLC., filled with SSNY on 2/14/18. Office location: Delaware county. SSNY has been designated as agent, upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to 7014 13th Ave. Suite 202, Brooklyn, NY 11228. The name & address of the reg. agent of the LLC is, United States Corporation agents, 7014 13th Ave. Suite 202, Brooklyn, NY 11228. Purpose: any lawful purpose. SUPPLEMENTAL SUMMONS AND NOTICE Supreme Court of New York, Delaware County. USROF IV LEGAL TITLE TRUST 2015-1, BY U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS LEGAL TITLE TRUSTEE, Plaintiff, -against-WILLIAM LALOSH A/K/A WILLIAM R. LALOSH, AS ADMINISTRATOR OF THE ESTATE OF DOLORES F. LALOSH A/K/A DOLORES F. LALOSH, DECEASED, AND IN-

DIVIDUALLY; DIANE M. LALOSH A/K/A DIANE LALOSH-NEILSON A/K/A DIANE LALOSH NEILSON A/K/A DIANE LALOSH A/K/A DIANE NEILSON; UNKNOWN HEIRS-AT-LAW OF THE ESTATE OF MICHAEL W. LALOSH, DECEASED, NEXT-OF-KIN, DISTRIBUTEES, EXECUTORS, ADMINISTRATORS, TRUSTEES, DEVISEES, LEGATEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, AND SUCCESSORS IN INTEREST AND GENERALLY ALL PERSONS HAVING OR CLAIMING UNDER, BY OR THROUGH SAID DEFENDANT WHO IS DECEASED, BY PURCHASE, INHERITANCE, LIEN OR OTHERWISE, ANY RIGHT, TITLE, AND INTEREST IN AND TO THE REAL PROPERTY DESCRIBED IN THE COMPLAINT; RICHARD J. LALOSH A/K/A RICHARD LALOSH; KARYN J. LALOSH A/K/A KARYN BASILE; NEW YORK STATE DEPARTMENT OF TAXATION AND FINANCE; NBT BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION; M-ARK PROJECT, INC.; NBT BANK, NA; PORTFOLIO RECOVERY ASSOCIATES; UNITED STATES OF AMERICA OBO INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, ALANNA GAVETTE A/K/A ADDISON GAVETTE; DEBRA LUCCI; MICHAEL LALOSH III; “JOHN DOE” AND “MARY DOE”, said names being fictitious it being the intention of plaintiff to designate any and all occupants, tenants, persons or corporations, if any, having or claiming an interest in or lien upon the premises being foreclosed herein, Index No. 118/2016. Mortgaged Premises: 85 Henry Williams Road & 95 Henry Williams Road, Roxbury, New York 12474. TO THE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANT(S): YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED to answer the Complaint in the above entitled action and to serve a copy of your Answer on the Plaintiff’s attorney within twenty (20) days of the service of this Summons, exclusive of the day of service, or within thirty (30) days after service of the same is complete where service is made in any manner other than by personal delivery within the State. The United States of America, if designated as a Defendant in this action, may answer or appear within sixty (60) days of service. If you fail to appear or to answer within the aforementioned time frame, judgment will be taken against you by default for the relief demanded in the Complaint. NOTICE OF NATURE OF ACTION AND RELIEF SOUGHT THE OBJECTIVE of the above captioned action is to foreclose on a Mortgage to secure $42,500.00 and interest, recorded in the Delaware County Clerk’s Office on January 16, 2002 in Liber 897, Page 320 covering premises known as 85 Henry Williams Road & 95 Henry Williams Road, Roxbury, New York 12474. The relief sought herein is a final judgment directing sale of the premises described above to satisfy the debt secured by the Mortgage described above. Plaintiff designates Delaware County as the place of trial. Venue is based upon the County in which the mortgaged premises is located. NOTICE YOU ARE IN DANGER OF LOSING YOUR HOME If you do not respond to this summons and complaint by serving a copy of the answer on the attorney for the mortgage company who filed this foreclosure proceeding against you and filing the answer with the court, a default judgment may be entered and you can lose your home. Speak to an attorney or go to the court where your case is pending for further information on how to answer the summons and protect your property. Sending a payment to your mortgage company will not stop this foreclosure action. YOU MUST RESPOND BY SERVING A COPY OF THE ANSWER ON THE ATTORNEY FOR THE PLAINTIFF (MORTGAGE COMPANY) AND FILING THE ANSWER WITH THE COURT. This Communication is from a debt collector in an attempt to collect a debt. Any information obtained will be used for that purpose. FRIEDMAN VARTOLO, LLP 85 Broad Street, Suite 501, New York, New York 10004, Attorneys for Plaintiff.


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NOTICE OF SALE SUPREME COURT DELAWARE COUNTY Federal National Mortgage Association, Plaintiff against Vincent J. Salvato; Margaret Salvato; Audrey Salvato, et al Defendants Attorney (s) for Plaintiff (s) Fein, Such & Crane, LLP 28 East Main Street, Suite 1800, Rochester, NY 14614 Attorney (s) for Plaintiff (s). Pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale Entered October 16th, 2015 I will sell at Public Auction to the highest bidder at the Delaware County Courthouse, 3 Court Street, Delhi, NY 13753 on May 15th, 2018 at 10:00 a.m. Premises known as 6329 County Highway 28, Long Eddy, NY 12760. Sec 443. Block 1 Lot 20.1. All that Tract or Parcel of Land, together with the buildings and improvements erected thereon, situate in the Town of Hancock, County of Delaware and State of New York Approximate Amount of Judgment is $124,564.59 plus interest and costs. Premises will be sold subject to provisions of filed Judgment Index No 2013-524. Robert B. Schlather, Esq., Referee NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC AUCTION Supreme Court of New York, DELAWARE County. NS0154, LLC, Plaintiff, -against- EHREN E. SCHWEICHLER; STEVEN SCHWEICHLER; PORTFOLIO RECOVERY ASSOCIATES, LLC A/P/O GE MONEY BANK, F.S.B, Index No. 966/2016. Pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale duly dated, January 19, 2018 and entered with the Delaware County Clerk on March 7, 2018, Richard Harlem, Esq., the Appointed Referee, will sell the premises known as 21 Main Street, Stamford, New York 12167 at public auction at the Delaware County Courthouse, 3 Court Street, Delhi, New York 13753, on May 15, 2018 at 9:00 A.M. All that certain plot, piece or parcel of land, situate, lying and being in the Town and Village of Stamford, County of Delaware and State of New York known as Section: 54.11; Block: 1; Lot: 1.2 will be sold subject to the provisions of filed Judgment, Index No. 966/2016.The approximate amount of judgment is $230,868.09 plus interest and costs. FRIEDMAN VARTOLO LLP 85 Broad Street, Suite 501, New York, New York 10004, Attorneys for Plaintiff. SUPREME COURT OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF DELAWARE SUPPLEMENTAL SUMMONS Mortgaged Premises: 5 SAINT JOHN STREET WALTON, NY 13856 District: Section: 251.19 Block: 1 Lot: 25Plaintiff designates DELAWARE as the place of trial situs of the real property INDEX NO. 707/2016 THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON, F/K/A THE BANK OF NEW YORK, AS INDENTURE TRUSTEE ON BEHALF OF THE NOTEHOLDERS AND THE NOTE INSURER OF ABFS MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST 2000-4, Plaintiff, -against- HARRY EDWARD LANGERT, HEIR AND DISTRIBUTEE OF THE ESTATE OF DIANE LANGERT; ROSEMARIE LANGERT, HEIR AND DISTRIBUTEE OF THE ESTATE OF DIANE LANGERT; CARMINE LANGERT, HEIR AND DISTRIBUTEE OF THE ESTATE OF DIANE LANGERT; UNKNOWN HEIRS AND DISTRIBUTEES OF THE ESTATE OF DIANE LANGERT, any and all persons unknown to plaintiff, claiming, or who may claim to have an interest in, or general or specific lien upon the real property described in this action; such unknown persons being herein generally described and intended to be included in the following designation, namely: the wife, widow, husband, widower, heirs at law, next of kin, descendants, executors, administrators, devisees, legatees, creditors, trustees, committees, lienors, and assignees of such deceased, any and all persons deriving interest in or lien upon, or title to said real property by, through or under them, or either of them, and their respective wives, widows, husbands, widowers, heirs at law, next of kin, descendants, executors, administrators, devisees, legatees, creditors, trustees, committees, lienors and assigns, all of whom and whose names, except as stated, are unknown to plaintiff; UNITED STATES OF AMERICA INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE; NEW YORK STATE DEPARTMENT OF TAXATION AND FINANCE; NEW CENTURY FINANCIAL SERVICES, INC., “JOHN DOE #1” through “JOHN DOE #12,” the last twelve names being fictitious and unknown to plaintiff, the persons or parties intended being the tenants, occupants, persons or corporations, if any, having or claiming an interest in or lien upon the Subject Property described in the Complaint, Defendants. To the above named Defendants YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED to answer the complaint in this action and to serve a copy of your answer, or, if the complaint is not served with this summons, to serve a notice of appearance on the Plaintiff’s Attorney within 20 days after the service of this summons, exclusive of the day of service (or within 30 days after the service is complete if this summons is not personally delivered to you within the State of New York) in the event the United States of America is made a party defendant, the time to answer for the said United States of America shall not expire until (60) days after service of the Summons; and in case

April 17, 2018

The Reporter

of your failure to appear or answer, judgment will be taken against you by default for the relief demanded in the complaint. NOTICE OF NATURE OF ACTION AND RELIEF SOUGHT THE OBJECT of the above caption action is to foreclose a Mortgage to secure the sum of $36,000.00 and interest, recorded on January 8, 2001, at Liber 825 Page 232, of the Public Records of DELAWARE County, New York, covering premises known as 5 SAINT JOHN STREET WALTON, NY 13856. The relief sought in the within action is a final judgment directing the sale of the premises described above to satisfy the debt secured by the Mortgage described above. DELAWARE County is designated as the place of trial because the real property affected by this action is located in said county. NOTICE YOU ARE IN DANGER OF LOSING YOUR HOME If you do not respond to this summons and complaint by serving a copy of the answer on the attorney for the mortgage company who filed this foreclosure proceeding against you and filing the answer with the court, a default judgment may be entered and you can lose your home. Speak to an attorney or go to the court where your case is pending for further information on how to answer the summons and protect your property. Sending a payment to the mortgage company will not stop the foreclosure action. YOU MUST RESPOND BY SERVING A COPY OF THE ANSWER ON THE ATTORNEY FOR THE PLAINTIFF (MORTGAGE COMPANY) AND FILING THE ANSWER WITH THE COURT. Dated: March 29, 2018 RAS BORISKIN, LLC Attorney for Plaintiff BY: MATTHEW ROTHSTEIN, ESQ. 900 Merchants Concourse, Suite 106 Westbury, NY 11590 516-280-7675 LEGAL NOTICE FOR RENEWAL OF CABLE FRANCHISE PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that DTC Cable, Inc. has filed an application for renewal of its Cable Television Franchise in the Village of Delhi, Delaware County, New York. The application and all comments filed relative thereto are available for public inspection at the Village of Delhi office during normal business hours. Interested parties may file comments regarding the renewal with the Public Service Commission within 10 days of the date of publication of the Notice. Comments should be addressed to Office of the Secretary, NYS Public Service Commission, 3 Empire State Plaza, Albany, NY 12223. Notice of Formation of Empire Metal Works LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 3/20/18. Office location: Delaware County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Robert A. Gouldin, Esq., 93 Main St., Oneonta, NY 13820. Purpose: any lawful activity. Flairsoft Ltd. App. for Auth. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 3/30/2018. Flairsoft Ltd. was organized in OH on 08/27/2001. Office in Greene Co. SSNY desig. as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY to mail copy of process to 7720 River Edge, Suite 200, Columbus, OH 43235, which is also the registered office and principal business location. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. LEGAL NOTICE FOR RENEWAL OF CABLE FRANCHISE PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that DTC Cable, Inc. has filed an application for renewal of its Cable Television Franchise in the Town of Delhi, Delaware County, New York. The application and all comments filed relative thereto are available for public inspection at the Town of Delhi office during normal business hours. Interested parties may file comments regarding the renewal with the Public Service Commission within 10 days of the date of publication of the Notice. Comments should be addressed to Office of the Secretary, NYS Public Service Commission, 3 Empire State Plaza, Albany, NY 12223. Supplemental Summons and Notice of Object of Action SUPREME COURT OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF DELAWARE Action to Foreclose a Mortgage INDEX #: 2017-808 U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR WELLS FARGO ASSET SECURITIES CORPORATION, MORTGAGE PASSTHROUGH CERTIFICATES SERIES 2006-3 Plaintiff Vs DAVID T. PRIMIANO IF LIVING, AND IF HE/SHE BE DEAD, ANY AND ALL PERSONS UNKNOWN TO PLAINTIFF, CLAIMING, OR WHO MAY CLAIM TO HAVE AN INTEREST IN, OR GENERAL OR SPECIFIC LIEN UPON THE REAL PROPERTY DESCRIBED IN THIS ACTION; SUCH UNKNOWN PERSONS BEING HEREIN GENERALLY DESCRIBED AND INTENDED TO BE INCLUDED IN WIFE, WIDOW, HUSBAND, WIDOWER, HEIRS AT LAW, NEXT OF KIN, DESCENDANTS, EXECUTORS, ADMINISTRATORS, DEVISEES, LEGATEES, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES, COM-

MITTEES, LIENORS, AND ASSIGNEES OF SUCH DECEASED, ANY AND ALL PERSONS DERIVING INTEREST IN OR LIEN UPON, OR TITLE TO SAID REAL PROPERTY BY, THROUGH OR UNDER THEM, OR EITHER OF THEM, AND THEIR RESPECTIVE WIVES, WIDOWS, HUSBANDS, WIDOWERS, HEIRS AT LAW, NEXT OF KIN, DESCENDANTS, EXECUTORS, ADMINISTRATORS, DEVISEES, LEGATEES, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES, COMMITTEES, LIENORS, AND ASSIGNS, ALL OF WHOM AND WHOSE NAMES, EXCEPT AS STATED, ARE UNKNOWN TO PLAINTIFF; GINA RUBANO, PNC BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA ACTING THROUGH THE IRS, JOHN DOE (Those unknown tenants, occupants, persons or corporations or their heirs, distributees, executors, administrators, trustees, guardians, assignees, creditors or successors claiming an interest in the mortgaged premises.) Defendant(s) MORTGAGED PREMISES: 505 VEGA MOUNTAIN ROAD ROXBURY, NY 12474 DSBL #: SECTION 180. BLOCK 2 LOTS 13 AND 14 To the Above named Defendant: You are hereby summoned to answer the Complaint in this action, and to serve a copy of your answer, or, if the Complaint is not served with this Supplemental Summons, to serve a notice of appearance, on the Plaintiff(s) attorney(s) within twenty days after the service of this Supplemental Summons, exclusive of the day of service (or within 30 days after the service is complete if this Supplemental Summons is not personally delivered to you within the State of New York). In case of your failure to appear or answer, judgment will be taken against you by default for the relief demanded in the Complaint. The Attorney for Plaintiff has an office for business in the County of Erie. Trial to be held in the County of Delaware. The basis of the venue designated above is the location of the Mortgaged Premises. TO David T. Primiano Defendant in This Action. The foregoing Supplemental Summons is served upon you by publication, pursuant to an order of HON. Richard D. Northrup, Jr. of the Supreme Court of the State of New York, dated the Thirtieth day of March, 2018 and filed with the Complaint in the Office of the Clerk of the County of Delaware, in the City of Delhi. The object of this action is to foreclose a mortgage upon the premises described below, executed by David T. Primiano dated the December 30, 2005, to secure the sum of $599,200.00 and recorded at Book 1318, Page 107 in the Office of the Delaware County Clerk, on the January 10, 2006. The mortgage was subsequently assigned by an assignment executed November 3, 2015 and recorded on November 25, 2015, in the Office of the Delaware County Clerk at Book 2004, Page 199. The property in question is described as follows: 505 VEGA MOUNTAIN ROAD, ROXBURY, NY 12474 NOTICE YOU ARE IN DANGER OF LOSING YOUR HOME If you do not respond to this summons and complaint by serving a copy of the answer on the attorney for the mortgage company who filed this foreclosure proceeding against you and filing the answer with the court, a default judgment may be entered and you can lose your home. Speak to an attorney or go to the court where your case is pending for further information on how to answer the summons and protect your property. Sending a payment to your mortgage company will not stop this foreclosure action. YOU MUST RESPOND BY SERVING A COPY OF THE ANSWER ON THE ATTORNEY FOR THE PLAINTIFF (MORTGAGE COMPANY) AND FILING THE ANSWER WITH THE COURT. DATED: April 2, 2018 Gross Polowy, LLC Attorney(s) For Plaintiff(s) 1775 Wehrle Drive, Suite 100 Williamsville, NY 14221 The law firm of Gross Polowy, LLC and the attorneys whom it employs are debt collectors who are attempting to collect a debt. Any information obtained by them will be used for that purpose. ALMONTE BASIN REALTY LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 05/21/09. Latest date to dissolve: 05/30/2109. Office: Delaware County. SSNY designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to the LLC, 6620 Avenue U, Brooklyn, NY 11234-6021. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. Downsville Central School District 14784 State Highway 30 Downsville, NY 13755 Notice of Budget Hearing and Vote Budget Hearing A budget hearing for the inhabitants of the Downsville Central School District qualified to vote at School District Meetings will be held in the school auditorium in Downsville, NY commencing at 6:00 PM on Monday, May 7, 2018 where there shall be presented the proposed School District budget for the following school year. Date of Vote The vote upon the appropriation of the necessary funds to meet the estimated expenditures or for any propositions involving the expenditure of money or the authorizing of levy of taxes as well as the election of a member of the Board of Education shall be held on Tuesday, May, 15, 2018 in the school building in Downsville, NY between the hours of 2:00 PM and 8:00 PM. Statement of Money Required for Next School Year A copy of the statement of the amount of money which would be required for the next school year for school purposes shall be com-

pleted seven days before the budget hearing and may be obtained by any resident of the District at the school during the period of 14 days immediately before the annual meeting and election, between the hours of 9:00 AM and 4:00 PM, except Saturday, Sunday or holiday. Vote for Board Members Petitions nominating candidates for the office of member of the Board of Education must be filed with the Clerk of the District between the hours of 7:30 AM and 3:30 PM not later than Monday, April 16, 2018. A five-year term ending on June 30, 2023 presently held by Christian Towsley Each petition must be addressed to the Clerk of the District, be signed by at least 25 qualified voters of the District, shall state the residence of each signer, the name and address of the candidate, and shall describe the specific vacancy on the Board of Education for which the candidate is nominated, which description shall include at least the length of term of office, and the name of the last incumbent. No person shall be nominated for more than one specific office. (Petitions are available in the Main Office of the School Building) Additional Propositions Any proposition that is required to be included for vote shall be submitted in writing by means of a petition signed by at least 25 qualified voters, stating the residence of each signer, which proposition shall be filed with the Board of Education not later than 30 days before the date of the election as set forth in this notice unless a greater number of days is required by statute. Any proposition shall be rejected by the Board of Education if the purpose of the proposition is not within the powers of the voters or where the expenditure of monies is required for the proposition, and such proposition fails to include the necessary specific appropriation. Absentee Ballots Applications for absentee ballots may be applied for at the District Office. Such applications must be received by the District Clerk at least seven days before the vote set in this notice if the ballot is to be mailed to the absentee voter. Absentee ballots must be received in the District Office not later than 5:00 PM on the day of the vote. A list of all persons to whom absentee voters’ ballots have been issued shall be available for public inspection during regular office hours which are between the hours of 7:30 AM and 3:30 PM. Any qualified voter, may upon examination of such list, file written challenge of qualifications of a voter of any person whose name appears on such list, stating the reasons for the challenge. Such written challenge shall be transmitted by the Clerk or designee to the Inspectors of Election on Election Day. DATED: March 13, 2018 By Order of the Board of Education of the Downsville Central School District By: Nancy L. Haynes, District Clerk NOTICE OF BUDGET HEARING AND ANNUAL BUDGET VOTE AND SCHOOL BOARD ELECTION FOR DELAWARE ACADEMY CENTRAL SCHOOL DISTRICT AT DELHI, 2 Sheldon Drive, Delhi, New York Budget Hearing A Budget Hearing for the inhabitants of the Delaware Academy Central School District at Delhi qualified to vote at the School District Meeting will be held at the Delaware Academy High School Auditorium, commencing at 7:00 p.m. on Monday, May 7, 2018 where there shall be presented the proposed school district budget for the following year. Date of Vote The Vote upon the appropriation of the necessary funds to meet the estimated expenditures or for any propositions involving the expenditure of money or the authorizing of levy of taxes, as well as the election of members of the Board of Education shall be held on Tuesday, May 15, 2018 in the lobby of the Delaware Academy Middle School Building between the hours of Noon and 8:00 p.m. Statement of Money Required for Next School Year A copy of the statement of the amount of money which shall be required for the next school year for school purposes shall be completed seven days before the Budget Hearing and may be obtained by any resident of the District, at each schoolhouse, during the period of 14 days immediately preceding the Annual Meeting and Election and on the day of the election, between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m., except Saturday, Sunday or holidays. Vote for Board Members Petitions nominating candidates for the Board of Education vacancies must be filed with the Clerk of the District between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m. and no later than 5:00 p.m. on April 16, 2018. The following three (3) vacancies are to be filled: A three-year term ending June 30, 2018, presently held by Jay Wilson A three-year term ending June 30, 2018, presently held by Elizabeth Huneke A one-year term ending June 30, 2019, presently held by Tammy Neumann Each petition shall be signed by at least twenty-five (25) qualified voters of the district and must state the name and residence of the voter. Nominating petitions are available at the District Office during regular business hours (8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.) Propositions Any proposition that is required to be included for vote shall be submitted in writing by means of a petition, signed by at least 25 qualified voters, stating the residence of each signed, and proposition shall be filed with the Board of Education not later than 30 days before the date of the election as set forth in this notice unless a greater number of days is required by statute. Any proposition may be rejected by the Board of Education if the purpose of the proposition is not within the powers of the voters or where the expenditure of monies is required by the proposition, and

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that, pursuant to Title 5, Chapter 3, Subchapter 3 of the Administrative Code of the City of New York, a public hearing will be held at 1 Centre Street, Mezzanine, Borough of Manhattan on Wednesday May 9, 2018 at 10:00 a.m. on the following: REAL PROPERTY PUBLIC HEARING in the matter of the acquisition by the City of New York of fee simple (Fee) interests on the following real estate in the County of Delaware for the purposes of providing for the continued supply of water, and for preserving and preventing the contamination or pollution of the New York City water supply system: Town Type Tax Lot ID Acres (+/-) NYC ID 2766 Andes Fee 257.-1-23, p/o 279.-1-3.2 & 279.-1-5 336.70 2766 Andes Fee p/o 279.-1-6, p/o 279.-1-10 & 279.-1-16 178.50 8222 Andes Fee 261.-1-11.1 27.74 2986 Delhi CE 172.-1-10 147.80 9241 Harpersfield Fee p/o 52.-1-25.2 10.00 3682 Roxbury Fee 156.-1-25 15.23 3735 Walton Fee 187.-2-49.11 57.40 A copy of the Mayor’s Preliminary Certificate of Adoption and maps of the real estate to be acquired are available for public inspection upon request. Please call (845) 340-7810. Individuals requesting Sign Language Interpreters/Translators should contact the Mayor’s Office of Contract Services, Public Hearings Unit, 253 Broadway, 9th Floor, New York, NY 10007, (212) 788-7490, no later than ten (10) business days prior to the public hearing. TDD users should call Verizon relay service. Vincent Sapienza Commissioner

such proposition fails to include the necessary specific appropriation. NOTICE IS HEREBY FURTHER GIVEN that at said Annual Election to be held on May 15, 2018, the following propositions will be submitted: PROPOSITION NO. 1: FACILITIES AND ATHLETIC FIELD RE-SODDING/LIGHTING Shall the following resolution be adopted, to wit: RESOLVED, that the Board of Education of the Delaware Academy Central School District at Delhi, Delaware County, New York, is hereby authorized to construct improvements to and reconstruct various School District facilities, including athletic fields re-sodding and lighting, together with site and other improvements, furnishings, equipment and incidental expenses, at a maximum estimated cost of $9,607,032. and that $9,607,032. or so much thereof as may be necessary, shall be raised by the levy of a tax upon the taxable property of said School District and collected in annual installments as provided by Section 416 of the Education Law; and, in anticipation of such tax, obligations of said School District shall be issued. PROPOSITION NO. 2: ADDITIONAL ATHLETIC FIELD COST FOR ARTIFICIAL TURF Assuming Proposition No 1 is approved, shall the following resolution be adopted, to wit: RESOLVED, that the Board of Education of the Delaware Academy Central School District at Delhi, Delaware County, New York, is hereby authorized to reconstruct the athletic field with artificial turf instead of re-sodding at the Middle School/High School at an additional cost of $786,808. and that $786,808. or so much thereof as may be necessary, shall be raised by the levy of a tax upon the taxable property of said School District and collected in annual installments as provided by Section 416 of the Education Law; and, in anticipation of such tax, obligations of said School District be issued. The School District has acted as lead agency under the State Environmental Quality Review Act regulations of the State of New York. The capital projects herein authorized have been determined to be an “Unlisted Action” pursuant to of the regulations of the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation promulgated pursuant to the State Environmental Quality Review Act (“SEQRA”), the implementation of which as proposed, it has been determined will not result in any significant adverse environmental impact. PROPOSITION NO 3: BUS LEASE Shall the following resolution be adopted, to wit: RESOLVED that, pursuant to Chapter 472 of the Session Laws of 1998, the Board of Education of the Delaware Academy Central School District at Delhi is hereby authorized to lease and expend therefore, including costs incidental thereto and the financial thereof, an amount not to exceed five (5) years, one (1) 35 passenger WC bus; AND, that such sum, or so much thereof as may be necessary, shall be raised by the levy of a tax collected in annual installments; and that in anticipation of such tax, obligations of the District shall be issued. Contingent upon voter approval on May 15, 2018 and in no way obligates the district should the Board of Education or the voters fail to approve the lease of said bus. Absentee Ballots Applications for absentee ballots are available to Delaware Academy Central School District at Delhi residents from the office of the Clerk of the District during regular business hours of (8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.) All absentee ballot applications must be received by the District Clerk no later than May 8, 2018, if the ballot is to be mailed to the voter or by May 14, 2018, if the ballot is to be delivered personally to the voter. A list of persons to whom absen-

Bill de Blasio Mayor

tee ballots have been issued will be available for inspection in the District Clerk’s office during each of the five days prior to the day of the election, except Saturdays and Sundays, and the same list also will be posted at the polling place. Dated: March 15, 2018 Clerk for the Board of Education Delaware Academy CSD at Delhi NOTICE OF BUDGET HEARING AND VOTE FRANKLIN CENTRAL SCHOOL DISTRICT Budget Hearing-A budget hearing for the inhabitants of the Franklin Central School District qualified to vote at School District meetings will be held in Room 206 of the Franklin Central School District, commencing at 6:00 p.m. on May 1, 2018, where there shall be presented the proposed school district budget for the 2018-2019 school year. Date of Vote-The vote upon the appropriation of the necessary funds to meet the estimated expenditures or for any propositions involving the expenditure of money or the authorizing of levy of taxes, as well as the election of one member of the Board of Education shall be held on Tuesday, May 15, 2018, in the main lobby of Franklin Central School building between the hours of 12:00 noon and 8:00 p.m. Statement of Money required for Next School Year-A copy of the statement of the amount of money which would be required for the next school year for school purposes shall be completed seven days before the budget hearing and may be obtained by any resident of the District at the school during the period of 14 days immediately before the annual meeting and election, between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m., except Saturday, Sunday or holidays. Vote for Board Members-Nominating petitions are available in the District Office at Franklin Central School between the hours of 8 a.m. and 4 p.m. Petitions nominating candidates for the office of member of the Board of Education must be filed with the Clerk of the District between 9:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. not later than April 16, 2018. The following vacancy is to be filled: -A five-year term ending June 30, 2023, presently held by Joan Cronauer – Each petition must be addressed to the Clerk of the District, be signed by at least 25 qualified voters of the District, shall state the residence of each signer, the name and address of the candidate, and shall describe the specific vacancy on the Board of Education for which the candidate is nominated, which description shall include at least the length of term of office, and the name of the last incumbent. No person shall be nominated for more than one specific office. The following propositions shall be voted upon at the same time as the appropriation of monies and for Board member: School Bus Proposition: Shall the Board of Education of the Franklin Central School District, Franklin, New York, be authorized to finance the costs of the acquisition of one (1) 64-passenger bus, not exceed a total of $120,000 and to authorize with a Bond Anticipation Note? Voters will be required to present personal identification or, if none is available, they must sign a declaration confirming their Franklin, New York residency and that they are a qualified voter in this district. Such forms of personal identification may include, but are not limited to: • A driver’s license, • A non-driver’s identification card, • A utility bill, • A voter registration card, • Or any other evidence of residency ADDITIONAL PROPOSITIONS – Any proposition that is required to be included for vote shall be submitted in writing by means of a


April 17, 2018

petition signed by at least 25 qualified voters, stating the residence of each signer, which proposition shall be filed with the Board of Education not later than 30 days before the date of the election as set forth in this notice unless a greater number of days is required by statute. Any proposition shall be rejected by the Board of Education if the purpose of the proposition is not within the powers of the voters or where the expenditure of monies is required for the proposition, and such proposition fails to include the necessary specific appropriation. ABSENTEE BALLOTS - Applications for absentee ballots may be applied for at the District Office at P.O. Box 888, Franklin, New York 13775. The District Clerk must receive such applications at least seven days before the vote set in this notice if the ballot is to be mailed to the absentee voter or the day before the vote if the ballot is to be delivered personally to the absentee voter. Absentee ballots must be received in the office of the Clerk of the District not later than 5:00 p.m. on the day of the vote. A list of all persons to whom absentee voters’ ballots have been issued shall be available for public inspection during regular office hours which are between the hours of

23

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8:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m. Any qualified voter may, upon examination of such list, file a written challenge of qualifications of a voter of any person whose name appears on such list, stating the reasons for the challenge. Such written challenge shall be transmitted by the Clerk, or designee, to the Inspectors of Election on Election Day. Dated: March, 2018 By order of the Board of Education of the Franklin Central School District Donna M. Dean District Clerk PUBLIC NOTICE Bovina Fire District is accepting bids for roof repair and/or replacement of the Bovina Fire Hall located at 36 Maple Avenue, Bovina Center. For details please contact Donn Carlton, 607-832-4885. CATSKILL DREAM TEAM REAL ESTATE, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 12/14/17, with an existence date of 01/01/2018. Office: Delaware County. SSNY designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to the LLC, c/o Meade Campe, 10 Rosa Road, Margaret-

ville, NY 12455. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. Invitation to Bid Corbett Community Corporation is seeking bids for the 2018 lawn mowing season. The mowing consists of the Corbett Community Field and Grounds which is 3.5 acres and The Corbett Community Park which is 1.3 acres. Bids should be a flat rate for the entire mowing season on an as needed basis which is to include trimming. Bids must be received by the Corbett Community Corporation at PO Box 103, Downsville, NY 13755 or they can be hand delivered. They must be sealed and marked Lawn Mowing Bid. All bids must be received by 7:00 pm on April 18th, 2018. Bid opening will be April 18th, 2018 during the monthly Board meeting. The Corbett Community Corporation reserves the right to refuse any and all bids. Corporation Secretary Tammy Lacey NOTICE OF ORGANIZATION Name of the LLC: G PURPURA LLC. Articles of Org. filed with NYS Sec. of State on 03/01/18. Office location is Delaware County. SSNYS

designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNYS shall mail process to The LLC, P. O. Box 253, Walton, NY 13856. Purpose: any lawful activity. OFFICIAL SPECIAL ELECTION NOTICE PURSUANT TO SECTIONS 4-120 AND 4-122 OF THE NEW YORK STATE ELECTION LAW, please take notice that the following list contains the name of every candidate for public office to be filled at the Special Election to be held in Delaware County on Tuesday April 24, 2018: Polls are open the hours of 6 A.M. to 9:00 P.M. MEMBER OF ASSEMBLY – 102ND ASSEMBLY DISTRICT Party Candidate Democratic ... Aidan S O’Connor Jr Republican ....... Christopher Tague Conservative..... Christopher Tague Working Families ................Aidan S O’Connor Jr Independence... Christopher Tague Women’s Equality ...............Aidan S O’Connor Jr Reform .............. Christopher Tague Best Choice Party............ Wesley D Laraway Election Night Results will be on the Delaware County Elections Web Site: http://www.co.delaware.

ny.us/departments/elec/election_ night_reporting.htm Maria E. Kelso Judith L. Garrison Commissioners of Elections Delaware County Dated April 11, 2018 Delhi, New York 13753 LEGAL NOTICE TOWN OF MEREDITH SEEKING CALCIUM CHLORIDE BIDS Pursuant to Section 103 of the General Municipal Law, the Town of Meredith Town Board, 4247 Turnpike Road, Meridale, NY 13806, is soliciting sealed bids for : CALCIUM CHLORIDE IN A 36% SOLUTION Bids received must have the price per gallon to be delivered to the above location and placed in a 6100 gallon tank provided at the site, approximating a 60,000 gallon total for the 2018 season. All bids must meet any applicable New York State specifications and MUST be accompanied by a NonCollusive Certificate. The Town would also like a Bid Price for VENDOR TO APPLY Calcium Chloride at a 36% solution on the Town Roads. Sealed bids must be marked “CALCIUM CHLORIDE”. The Town Board reserves the right to reject any or all bids. Accepted bids will be for the year 2018 only. Bids must be received in Town Hall by May 8, 2018 by 5:00 p.m. Calcium Chloride bids will be opened at the Town of Meredith Regular Town Board Meeting at approximately 7:30 p.m. on May 8, 2018. Mail Bids To This Address: Town of Meredith Attn: Calcium Chloride Bid P.O. Box 116 Meridale, NY 13806 Bids can also be dropped off at Town Hall anytime- use the Black Drop Box located on the Town Hall door. By order of the Town Board of the Town of Meredith Teresa DeSantis, Acting Town Clerk April 11, 2018 KURZATKOWSKI REALTY GROUP LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 04/03/18. Office: Delaware County. SSNY designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served.

Time is running out to apply for the Covered Bridge Run scholarship. Seniors attending high school in Delaware County can enter to win a scholarship for college and money for a local organization of their choice. Catskill Ladies Association to Support and Inspire (C.L.A.S.I.) will sponsor two high school students from Delaware County from the proceeds raised by the annual Delhi Covered Bridge Run. Essays must be received at the Cardio Club by 5 p.m. Friday, May 4. This post can also be found at: www.clasiladies.com/delhicovered-bridge-run.html. The Delhi Women and Men’s Club is also accepting applications for the 2018 Marian Winand Scholarships. Applications are due by Tuesday, May 1, and are available at DelhiWMC.org. The Marion Winand Scholarship Award was established to assist people who plan to continue their education at accredited institutions of higher education. It is open to both high school seniors and adults; four $2,000 scholarships will be awarded. Permanent residents of the Delaware Academy School District are eligible to apply. Extracurricular and/or community service activities, application essays, academic record and financial need are among the areas considered in making the award. The United Ministry’s confirmation class will host a spaghetti dinner fundraiser on Saturday, April 28 from 4 until 7 p.m. in McIntosh Hall. Tickets are $8 for adults, $6 for seniors, and $6 for children 12 and under. Take-out dinners are available. You may purchase your tickets by Sunday, April 22 from Deb Kearney, Christina Gardner, or Pastor Bobby. Proceeds from the dinner benefit Youth Ministry programs. Last week’s trivia question: What charities benefit from the Knockerball tournament scheduled for Saturday, April 21 at 9 a.m. at the Delhi American Legion? The American Legion Post 41 in Delhi, Relay For Life, New Hope Church

of Walton’s Kenya Trip, Bentley’s Brigade, and the Alcohol and Drug Abuse Council will all benefit from the upcoming Knockerball tournament on Saturday, April 21 at the Delhi American Legion. To start a team to support these causes, contact 607-232-7198 or thevillage.ent@yahoo.com. The tournament is sponsored by The Village Entertainment, and the SUNY Delhi Veterans’ Association. Players must be 16 years old and you can sign up for four versus four or one on one last man standing competitions. Following the tournament, there will also be a spaghetti dinner for $5. This week’s trivia question: On April 28, 1883, thirty-five cans of what were placed in the West Branch of the Delaware River here in Delhi? Community volunteers of the week are the Relay For Life team captains. They have been hard at work raising money for the fight against cancer. Support them at the Relay For Life of Delaware County on Saturday, April 28 at the Delaware County Fairgrounds in Walton. Contact Lynn Pickett at 607437-3276 or lynnpickett123@ gmail.com to be added to the list or visit www.relayforlife. org/delawarecountyNY, and join my team, the individual Relayers, if you don’t have a team of your own. To make a donation, go to main.acsevents.org/goto/individualrelayers, and purchase a luminaria in honor of someone fighting cancer or in memory of someone that has passed away. Join the Cannon Free Library, 40 Elm Street, for its Centennial Celebration Wednesday, April 18. There will be an open house from 9:30 a.m. until 6 p.m., kidfriendly activities from 3 until 5 p.m. and a formal presentation at 6:30 p.m. RSVP to Stacey or Heather at 607-746-2662 if you plan to attend. To help celebrate Earth Week, the SUNY Delhi Green Team will present a movie screening of the film “Bag It - Is Your Life Too Plastic?” on Thursday, April 19 at 12:15 p.m. in Okun Theatre at SUNY Delhi. Think about the products you consume daily from the plastic grocery bag holding your lunch to the throwaway

fork you are using to eat it. Ever wonder what happens to all of that plastic after you are done with it and how much fossil fuel energy is needed to create it in the first place? Learn more during this free movie screening. View the trailer online at www.bagitmovie.com/index. html. There will be a history exhibit on Friday, April 20, from 1 until 4 p.m. at the Kellogg Educational & Community Club, 138 Church Street in Treadwell. Friday, April 20, is movie night at the United Ministry at 7 p.m. Bring friends and enjoy a fun filled family movie, Ferdinand. Bring a blanket and pillow to get comfy; popcorn and lemonade will be provided. On Saturday, April 21, there will be a chance to Discover SUNY Delhi at the spring open house at 8:30 a.m. Register online at www.delhi.edu/openhouse. Discover why SUNY Delhi should be the college you chose to send your children or grandchildren. You’ll get to meet with faculty and staff in the area of study you are interested in, tour the beautiful SUNY Delhi campus, and visit the residence halls. Whether you are a high school student or an adult looking to go back to school, SUNY Delhi has a lot to offer. Don’t miss the opportunity to see what SUNY Delhi has to offer you or your family. An Invasive Species Awareness workshop will be held Saturday, April 21, between 10 a.m. and 12 p.m. at the Cornell Cooperative Extension Resource Center at 34570 Route 10 in Hamden. Class size is limited so reserve your spot by calling 607-865-6531. There will be a scavenger hunt on Saturday, April 21, from 10 a.m. until 4 p.m. at Weathered Hill Farm LLC on 243 Doroski Road in South Kortright. Rules: one to four people per team. Figure out the riddles to find the 10 hidden horseshoes located throughout the farm. When a horseshoe is found, a picture is taken with at least one person from the group in the photo. Call 607-538-9323 for more information. The Treadwell Lego Club meets Saturday, April 21, between 10 and 11:30 a.m. at the Kellogg Educational & Com-

munity Club at 138 Church St. in Treadwell. Later that evening at 7 p.m., movie and cinnamon buns will be available at the club. EVAN open house and movie Saturday, April 21 from 1 until 4 p.m. at the United Ministry of Delhi, Church Street. There will be a free showing of “Sing” and an open house to raise autism awareness. Movie starts at 2:30 p.m. The movie will be a sensory-friendly showing, where kids can feel free to move about; free popcorn and lemonade. Bring blankets and pillows to lay on to watch the movie. Come have a blast in the sensory room and play on the equipment. There will be a benefit for Lynn Caston who is battling stage 4 lung cancer on Saturday, April 21 from 4 until 9 p.m. at the East Meredith Fish & Game Club on County Highway 10, in East Meredith. There will be a dinner, music and Chinese auction. Dinner will include baked ziti, salad, dessert, iced tea and coffee and will be available from 4 until 7 p.m. Dinner is $10-adult, $5 for children five to age 12. The next film to be shown in the Get Woke Series is “I Am Not Your Negro” on Sunday, April 22 at 5 p.m. in the Centennial Center in Sanford Hall at SUNY Delhi. The film is 93 minutes long and is narrated by Samuel Jackson. In 1979, James Baldwin wrote a letter to his literary agent describing his next project, to be called Remember This House. The book was to be a revolutionary, personal account of the lives and successive assassinations of three of his close friends — Medgar Evers, Malcolm X and Martin Luther King Jr. But at the time of Baldwin’s death in 1987, he left behind only 30 completed pages of his manuscript. Now, in his Oscar-nominated documentary “I Am Not Your Negro,” master filmmaker Raoul Peck envisions the book James Baldwin never finished. Delhi Senior Social Club that meets on Thursday, April 19 at the Delhi Senior Community Housing Center on 7 Main Street at noon. There will be a luncheon followed by guest entertainment and a short meeting. Open to all area

SSNY shall mail copy of process to the LLC, 237 Piacquadio Drive, Margaretville, NY 12455. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. LEGAL NOTICE TOWN OF MEREDITH SEEKING FUEL BIDS Pursuant to Section 103 of the General Municipal Law, the Town of Meredith Town Board, 4247 Turnpike Road, Meridale, NY 13806, is soliciting SEALED BIDS for the following materials, to be delivered at the direction of the Highway Superintendent: Item #1 – Kerosene Item #2 – Gasoline (Regular 87 Octane) Item #3 – Low Sulfur DieselWinter Mix (60/40) required Nov 1-March 31 Item #4 - #2 Heating Oil All bids must meet New York State specifications and must be accompanied by a Non-Collusive Certificate. Sealed bids must be marked “HIGHWAY FUEL”. The Town Board reserves the right to reject any or all bids. Accepted bids will run from June 1, 2018 to May 31, 2019. Bids must be received in Town Hall by MAY 8, 2018 by 5:00 p.m. Fuel bids will be opened at the Town of Meredith Regular Town Board Meeting at approximately 7:30 p.m. on May 8, 2018. Mail Bids To This Address: Town of Meredith Attn: HIGHWAY FUEL BID PO Box 116 Meridale, NY 13806 Bids can also be dropped off at the Town Hall anytime- use the Black Drop Box located on the Town Hall door. By order of the Town Board of the Town of Meredith Teresa DeSantis, Acting Town Clerk April 11, 2018 The annual lot owners meeting for Ouleout Valley Cemetery Association will be held on Monday May 7, 2018 at 6 PM at the office of Brian Sickler, President, 13171 State Hwy. 357, Franklin, NY 13775. The Roxbury Central School District will have a Special Board of Education meeting on Wednesday, April 25th at 7:00 PM.

seniors. Call 607-464-4012 for more information. The Hamden Senior Citizen Club meets at the Hamden Town Hall on Wednesday, June 28 at 12 p.m. at the Hamden Town Hall. The group meets for covered dish lunch. Beverages furnished. Bring your own table service. Call 607-746-6578 for more information. Delaware River Lodge #439 meets on the first and third Thursday of each month at 7:30 p.m. at the Delhi American Legion. Call 607-434-1403 for information about their meeting on April 19. The Rotary group holds their weekly meeting on Tuesday, April 25 at 6:10 p.m. at Cross Roads Cafe. There will be a Taize’ Prayer on Thursday, April 19 at 7 p.m. at the First Presbyterian Church on Clinton Street. The Delhi Food Bank is open Mondays from 1 until 3 p.m. and Thursdays from 3:30 p.m. until 5:30 p.m. in the United Ministry Church.

William Penn: “Right is right even when everyone is against it; and wrong is wrong even when everyone is for it.” Students, your third marking period ended Friday, April 13 and your report cards will be mailed Friday, April 20. Keep studying and doing well for it’s almost the end of the year and will soon be graduation and time to move on to the next tier in your lives. The next board of education meeting is Tuesday, April 17 in the high school library at 7 p.m. Get ready folks, as soon it will be budget voting time for next year. Here on the Farm, it has been a quiet week and we are all waiting for the weather to get better to start spring work. We are trying to gather all the paperwork we need to start to plan the next growing season for corn and grass planting. There is still lots of baleage left in the fields to feed and lots of

Masonville, continued

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April 17, 2018

The Reporter

GardenScene Scene Garden with withPeggy PeggyBolton Bolton

Cool Weather Gardening April is always a month of change. As in this year, we can go from snow to sixty degrees in a matter of hours. A beautiful warm day may make us think spring is here to stay. It is important not to get over-enthusiastic and push the season. Many box stores have trees, shrubs and vines with leaves and buds. Remember, these plants are way ahead of our gardening season. If purchased, they will need to be pampered for the next six weeks. There is not anything fun about carrying a tree in and out of a garage for that many nights! Plants this far out of sync with our growing season will not survive planted outside. If you have already added a small-sized fruit vine or bush, you might try wrapping it or covering it with mulch until the season moderates. The best rule of thumb is to buy only stock that is in sync with nature. For example: if your landscape does not yet have leaves, do not buy trees that are in full bloom. Most garden soil is much too wet to work with. Walking in the vegetable garden now, simply compacts the soil. Leave it to dry out for several days. You will want it to appear “fluffy” when it is turned, making it easy to pick out rocks and debris. Remember, soil temperature needs to reach at least 50 degrees before plants begin to grow. Safe spring jobs lean towards picking up sticks and branches and raking last fall’s leaves and snow plow debris. Secure fertilizers and lime to apply before a day of gentle rain. Make sure to follow manufacturer’s directions. Patio lettuce gardens may be started, if the container is easily moved indoors or covered on extremely cold nights. Lettuce is a cool-weather crop and grows easily in the spring. Send specific questions to: Country Grown Perennials LLC, Peggy Bolton, 4801 Pines Brook Road, Walton, NY 13846. Enclose a stamped, self addressed envelope if you wish to receive a personal reply. Visit us on the web at countrygrownperennials.com.

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feed in the bunks so it will be quite a year for planning how to get the best yields in the fields for what we need for the cows. Maybe other farmers have the same and they are trying to figure this out, too. We went to a Webinar this week on the program to help farmers and they are still working things out in the program and how to get started soon - we have more to learn, though. The snow is starting to melt around the area and we hope it warms up enough to get started with much-needed projects around the farms. Keep purchasing those dairy products and keep farmers in your thoughts for a good planting season. Birthday greetings this week to Eric Brayman, Peter Masciave and Travis Pierce on April 22, Craig DuMond April 23, Alan DuMond April 24, Rhonda Lent and Regina Heesh April 25, Grace Fisher April 26, Jeff McKown April 27, and Chad Mott April 29. Masonville Federated Church Sunday services are at 11 a.m.; adult Sunday school at 9:45 a.m. Thursdays at 6:30 p.m. - Bible study with “How’s Your Soul?” All are welcome. Friday, April 20, at 6 p.m. is another free movie “I Am Gabriel;” popcorn and beverage provided and begins at the church dining hall. Thursday, May 3 is National Day of Prayer - theme: Prayer for America UNITY-Ephesians 4:3. The church will be open 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. and 3 to 5 p.m. The Fransego Ladies basket meeting and dish to pass luncheon will be held at the Masonville Federated Church on Saturday, May 5, from 9 until 12:30. Masonville ladies will provide beverages and dessert; 8:30 a.m. registration with coffee and snacks.

Worship services for the DeLancey, Hamden and West Delhi churches during April will be held in DeLancey church at 11 a.m. with Rev. Patty Wolff. Josh Shepard, a student at Binghamton University, spent his spring break at home with his parents. On Thursday it was his birthday so his father and mother Randy and Kim Shepard, his sister Chandler and Micci, Emily, grandmother Shirley Pyne, grandmother Linda Shepard, and Uncle Wayne Shepard had a nice turkey dinner and birthday cake in his honor at grandma Shirley’s home. Burneda Ford wanted me to know my helpful hint of a couple weeks ago on turning your stack of coffee filters inside out

Grantor APRIL 6, 2018

Cammer, John M (Exr) Cammer, Jack M (aka)(Exr Of) Cammer, John M (Exr Of) Stanzione, Michael J & Patricia K Safford, Robert & Eileen Wells Fargo Bank NA Palanza, John L Conigliaro, Frank (Ind & Surv Heir) Conigliaro, Frank (Surv Heir Of) Conigliaro, Danielle

APRIL 9, 2018

Richards, Rosemarie (Ref) Ruiz, Geraldo (by Ref) Vicari, Marco Chiaramonte, Giacomo Getman, Michael F (Ref) Moore, Michael (by Ref) Oralls, Timothy J (Exr) Oralls, Evelyn J (Exr Of) Oralls, Timothy J (Exr) Oralls, Evelyn J (Exr Of) Hiemstra, Marian Weiss, Ronald J Russo, Michael & Vincent Russo, Dominick & Nancy Creech, John Noble, Jason J & Justin J 883 Main St Corp

APRIL 10, 2018

2 Bros Partners Dunn, Helen-Jean Arthur (Tr) Helen-Jean Arthur Dunn Trust (By Tr) Bank of America NA (by Atty) Title 365 Company (Atty)

Location

worked great for her. Roy Scrimshaw also tried it when making coffee at church and said it was very helpful. Now I’m always happy to have people tell me when they like something I’ve written - it makes me feel like my time spent on this column is worth while. We are very sorry to learn of the passing away of a very wellknown lady, Lois Stalter. Our condolences are extended to Lois’s family and friends. How fast the years go by, and for these folks it’s time for another birthday during April: Marie Bryden, Bill Bryden, Ann Marie Scobie, Nicci Piroha, Savannah Wake, Bill Moody, Karen Marshfield, Roger Bolles, Susie Pearson, Barb Palmatier, Maria Costa, Emily Gray, Alice Blackman, Mable Hubbard, Verna Loker, Dennis Miller, Teresa Burczak, Adian Bush, Ginny Wilcox, Jamie Dugan, Josh Shepard, Peter DeBrock, Ashlynn Piroha, Grace Reynolds, Riley Wake, Dyer Schriver, Don McKee, Larry Soules, Shane Moshier, Ralph Dandignac and Vi Laing. Happy Anniversary to Bill and Patsy Moody, Whip and Martha Burczak, Karl and Lois Bender, Wilbur and Joyce Mallory. Town of Hamden Senior Citizens will have their monthly dinner and meeting on Wednesday, April 25 at noon at the town hall. Bring a dish to pass, your own table service, beverage will be provided. Speaker will be a UHS Delaware Valley Hospital certified dietitian who will speak on senior citizens’ healthy eating. Saturday, April 28, will be the annual Relay For Life Event at the Walton Fairgrounds from 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. Come help the teams raise money for the American Cancer Society. There will be several fundraisers throughout the day. Opening ceremony will be at 11:30 a.m. followed by a survivors luncheon. Luminania ceremony and bonfire at night..all are invited to attend. Saturday, April 28, will be a volunteer work day at the Delaware Co. Historical Assoc. in Delhi. Come help get the grounds, the Frisbee House, the church and other buildings ready for the summer season. Volunteers are encouraged to bring their own gloves and garden tools for the work. Refreshments and lunch will be provided 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Coming up on Wednesday, April 18, is a Centennial Celebration for the 100th birthday of Delhi’s Cannon Free Library. A full day of events with special activities for kids from 3 to 5 p.m. My thoughts of the week: We’ve had a crazy week of weather, a couple mornings with snow-covered ground, but it was been gone by the end of the day. We have had some very high winds along with it. Wherever I see clear patches of grass the robins are there looking for worms. The very large flock of geese that have been hanging by the river and our cornfield

Real Estate Transactions Grantee

Transfer Tax

Deposit

Sauter, Robert w MacMaster, Sandra S

632.00

Hancock Masonville Stamford Hancock Andes

Munkacsy, Robert M & Lisa S Safford, Robert M Palmatier, Joshua M Lugauer, Richard Costanzo, Peter & Pamela

106.00 0.00 580.00 56.00 110.00

Grantor

Location

Sweeney, Robert F Schlittner, Elaine G (Exx) Schlittner, Henry (Exx Of) Landry, Kenneth Butler, Kevin L (Exr) Suttle, Donald P (Exr Of) Mountainview Mobile Home Park LLC

Middletown Middletown

Moschovakis, Anna (Co Tr) Moschovakis, Nicholas (Co Tr) Gertrude S Rand Trust (by Co Trs) Sweeney, Kevin Leer, Benjamin & Nathaniel

Walton Sidney

Cinel, Utku McCormack, Jeffrey J

Davenport

Mountainview Mobile Home Park II LLC

0.00

Grocholl, Carl E Conklin, Steven J Jr & Steven J Sr Conklin, Steven J III Conklin, William L Jr & William L Sr Greene, Kenneth & Penny Jenkins, Dorothy Cianci, John & Nancy C Tuch, Karoline J (aka Karoline)

Middletown Andes

Grocholl, Carl E & Pamela J Conklin, Steven J Jr & Steven J Sr Conklin, William L Sr

0.00 0.00

Middletown

Hendricks, Nathaniel & Adam

0.00

Bovina Andes

Stormy Edmund Holdings LLC Tuch, Karoline J (Tr) Karoline J Tuch Living Trust (by Tr) Lombard, Leonard Russell, Cortnie Rae

Dunn, Helen-Jean Arthur

APRIL 11, 2018

Sidney

Walton

Deutsche Bank National Trust Co (Tr) First Franklin Mortgage Loan Trust (by Tr) Backus, Brian Wheeler, Stephanie Wells Fargo Bank NA (sbm) (Tr) Wells Fargo Bank Minnesota NA Provident Bank Home Equity Loan (by Tr) Oralls, Timothy J Eckhardt, Karen Oralls, Timothy J Eckhardt, Karen Hiemstra, Marian

Hancock

O’Dell, Travis

Hancock Meredith Middletown

Melrose Sportsmen Inc Noble, Diane G & Barry M Guselnikova, Larisa

Walton Kortright

G Purpura LLC Wilson, Trevor

300.00 604.00

Kortright

Dunn, Helen-Jean Arthur

440.00

Tompkins Franklin Tompkins Tompkins

420.00 828.00 336.00 0.00 0.00 4.00 220.00 6.00 0.00 0.00

have apparently gotten filled up enough that they are gone now, headed off to their summer home up north. I very often check the Delhi Telephone channel on TV to see what is on. Last week I was able to watch the Delhi Girls’ Basketball Championship game. I really enjoyed being able to watch that. I had a nice visit with Charlie Calhoun, who makes his own syrup. He tells me its been a good year for making syrup and the sap is still running due to the cold nights and the trees haven’t budded out yet. He tells me he only makes about 20 gallons a year - his is small scale syrup making and even though he’s done it for a good many years and he loves making the syrup he doesn’t know how much longer he will be able to do it. Hang in there Charlie with something you love. Fun and Wacky Days: April 18 is National Newspaper Columnist Day, Paul Revere makes his famous ride from Charlestown to Lexington, Mass., shouting “The Red Coats are coming,” as the Revolutionary War began in 1775, and the Great San Francisco earthquake hit, killing 700 people, in 1906. April 19, 1775, The Revolutionary War began; April 19 is National Garlic Day and National High Five Day. After a 51-day siege in Waco, Texas, the Branch Davidian compound went up in flames, killing the cult members, April 20, 1993. Timothy McVeigh bombed the Federal Building in Oklahoma City, April 19, 1995, killing 168 people and injuring hundreds more. April 20, 1999, two teenage boys went on a shooting rampage in Columbine High School in Littleton, Colo. One teacher and 12 students were killed. April 20 is National Volunteer Recognition Day; April 21 is Husband Appreciation Day and National Kindergarten Day; April 22 is Earth Day, Girl Scout Leader Day and National Jelly Bean Day; April 23 is National Zucchini Day (they have this at a time when you are not sick of all that zucchini!); April 24 is National Pig in the Blanket Day. Lynn Kinch’s joke of the week: A teacher said to her class, “We can learn a lot from ants. Ants work very hard all the time. And what happens to them in the end?” A student answered, “They get stepped on.” What hair color do they put on the driver’s licenses of bald men? A cute saying: Take your needle, my child, and work at your pattern. It will come out like a rose by and by. Life is like that - one stitch at a time taken patiently and the pattern will come out all right, like embroidery. Helpful Hint: To clean your waffle iron after use, soak four or five paper towels in water, stack them on the bottom cooking surface of the unplugged but still warm waffle iron and close the lid. The warm, moist towels generate steam that loosens food from the waffle iron so that it can be easily wiped clean with the towels.

Batson, Matthew A Bank of America NA (by Atty) Nationstar Mortgage LLC (Atty)

APRIL 12, 2018

Kortright

Sidney Walton

Wallace, Patrick J

Masonville

Banks, Mindy L Boyd, Ralph A Fannie Mae (aka)(by Atty) Federal National Mortgage Assoc (by Atty) David A Gallo & Associates LLP (Atty) Picucci, Frank Manicchio, Angelo & Frank & John Sallucci, Janet Hunt, Vera

Walton Sidney Colchester

Grantee

Wallace, Patrick J McDermott, Wilhelmina Fitzpatrick, Jonathan Christopher Pierce, Dustin P & Erin C Herrmann, Ryan & Sara

Colchester

Picucci, Frank Manicchio, Angelo & Frank

Delhi

Ayers, Anna Lliguin, Fabian

Transfer Tax 440.00

0.00 240.00 120.00 320.00

104.00 0.00 220.00 596.00 0.00 132.00 160.00 820.00 0.00 1316.00

reporter 0417  
reporter 0417  
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