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Eric Scott Mitchell Portfolio University of Virginia School of Architecture Bachelor of Science in Architecture University of Pennsylvania School of Design Master of Landscape Architecture Š 2010


INDEX DMAVA STATE PARK OLLANTAYTAMBO MASTER PLAN + LANDSCAPE STUDY ESCUELA SANTA RITA DE CASIA NEW ACADEMIC BUILDING T.I.L.T. [TRANSFORMATIVE INTELLIGENT LOOP TOWER]


DMAVA PARK + SHORELINE STABILIZATION

OFFICE / 2009

WITH SCAPE, PLLC J E R S E Y C I T Y, N J

SCAPE recently started the Shore Stabilization Structure, Walkway and DMAVA Park installation with Langan Engineering. This project presents an exciting challenge to merge environmental, historical and recreational issues into a vibrant waterfront park on the Hudson River. New Jersey’s role in the early making of America – epitomized in the movement of goods and cargo from canal boat to ship on the Morris Canal’s Little Basin and the historic migrations of people through nearby Ellis Island and the Statue of Liberty – make this section of the Hudson Riverfront an incredibly compelling story that can be highlighted and interpreted through a sensitive preservation approach, a strong landscape design and ecologically based engineering. The opportunities for historic narrative interwoven into the public experience of movement along the walkway, combined with dramatic views to the Statue of Liberty and Lower Manhattan, are significant, and are a driving force in our landscape design. SCAPE http://www.scapestudio.com/projects/ dmava-park-and-shoreline-stabilization/

My role in the development of the project centered on finding ways not only ro represent the park design to our client and to Langan engineering, but to investigate possible scnarios for materiality, structure, planting and program through the perspective media. Tactile qualities, phenomenal experience and sense of place were important to the development of the scheme and to finding material and construction relationships of that scheme that worked well with both the broad concept and the individual human scale. In addition to the perspective studies seen here I developed a large-scale site model that was used to negotiate issues of boundary, scale and grading and worked with planting plans and presentation drawings for projects throughout the office.


OLLANTAYTAMBO STATION MASTER PLAN + LANDSCAPE STUDY

ACADEMIC / 2008

WITH R. LEWANDOWSKI + S. JEMECS O L L A N TAY TA M B O, C U S C O, P E R U

Ollantaytambo rests at the terminus of the Sacred Valley, home to over 200 sacred Incan sites, and is the gateway to the celebrated site of Machu Picchu. An existing train station situated along the Urubamba River serves thousands of tourists annually. Though the city has worked tirelessly to respond to the growing tourist industry it has barely met the needs of the local economy and the people who are dependent on the valley for their livelihood. A new train station would serve both local workers and international travelers who arrive daily by bus, train and automobile. To serve local workers, the station would also become an epicenter for commercial activity by providing freight access, local pedestrian markets and immediate access to two villages. In collaboration with team members Ryan Lewandowski and Sebastijan Jemec, we developed a design derived from both the local market vernacular and modern rammed-earth and glu-lam technology. The latter was aimed at relieving strain on a timber industry riddled with illegal and unsustainable activity as well as to allow local manual-labor construction techniques to be used most effectively. Though I played a vital role in developing the

station’s architecture, my focus throughout the project was centered on challenges of master planning and landscape remediation strategies. Siting the station close to the nearby village of Rumira, a more modern village that does not struggle with issues of historical preservation, allowed us to focus the growing tourist industry away from sensitive and dilapidated Incan sites. Further studies were made into methods of remediating damaged landscapes due to unsustainable farming practices and years of abuse and a playful landscape was designed as part of the market and to function as a pedagogical tool for travelers to the area. Its planting forms are derived from agriculture and the orchard to reveal the structure, color and character of each plant. Additionally, the scheme playfully suggests, in a way that is legible to Western tourists, that each plant has a cultural significance to Incan Peru.

ru rum rumira

proposed propos propose os d station station

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extant station tation


roof / azotera

superstructure / superstructura

services / servicios

rammed earth / tapial

terraces / terrazas

10m (1:1000)

50m




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ESCUELA SANTA RITA DE CASIA ACADEMIC / 2008

RIMAC, LIMA, PERU

This short design excercise presented a chance to redesign the dilapidated spaces for a small Catholic school in the historic district of Lima and offered a unique opportunity to investigate small-scale construction techniques and emerging material prototypes in an environment dissimilar from any I had worked with before. Structural concerns of the project had to contend with frequent seismic activity, centuries-old nonreinforced masonry and timber construction. In addition, soil types in the area were particularly susceptible to long-period vibrations during and immediately following seismic activity. Peruvian maritime climate conditions also required special care in dealing with exposure to equatorial sun, strong winds and little to no precipitation for extended periods of time. The solution was to design a series of ‘floating’ classrooms that used lightweight steel framing and biocomposite Structural Insulated Panels (SIPs), resting gently on the ground in a vibration isolation scheme. A number of classrooms would be ‘built-into’ exisiting single-story spaces as a reinforcement.

Several new classrooms were designed in a two-story arrangement with operable ventilation schemes that not only benefitted the students’ environmental conditions but created a series of interconnected ‘rooms’ to suit a variety of spatial needs. Walls to the interior of the school could swing upwards to simultaneously shield the sun and open one classrom to its neighboring classroom. Louvres along the opposite wall could adjust to allow breezes to penetrate or seal out dust and smog.


NEW ACADEMIC BUILDING ACADEMIC / 2007

CHARLOT TESVILLE , VA

The New Academic Building for the University of Virginia was the result of two simultaneous paths of intrigue. The first was rooted in a desire to use architecture to provoke an awareness of interpersonal interaction as a series of events. This was to be accomplished by creating a stage for human collision, both manifested and illusory. The second was an investigation into the interaction between architecture and ground. By abstracting the ground as a horizontal plane and making legible the activities within the building I could manipulate the interaction between interior and exterior events, an inclusive design of inside and outside. The first step was to lift the primary programmatic elements and allowing the ground to penetrate the phenomenal boundary of the building. East and west, north and south, were no longer separate and distinct entities of space but rather a continuation and extension of one another. The second, and perhaps most informative, was to arrange the necessary program into an ‘L’ form, thereby creating what I termed an open cloister. This ‘interior’ space was further activated by the transparency of the east façade and the design of the primary circulation just beyond. The result is an activated façade whose response to the open ground is much the same as a projection to a theater audience. Further refinements to the building envelope included a series of large apertures that reveal small moments of activity to the west and to the university’s primary collection of dormitories.


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T.I.L.T. TRANSFORMATIVE INTELLIGENT LOOP TOWER ACADEMIC / 2007

WITH KAREY HELMS, ALEX KONG, HOWARD KIM + KO KUWABARA

T.I.L.T. was a team effort that also included Karey Helms, Howard Kim, Alex Kong and Ko Kuwabara. I played an important role in formulating the conceptual framework for a robotic ecology based on the blowfish, including the specific notion of a spatially-responsive building skin and the environmentally-reactive building system. The design of the static prototype structure as well as conceptual prototypes of skin dynamics were the result of studies with Karey Helms. MAX/MSP programming was a collaborative effort with Alex Kong. Fabrication and construction of the prototype, including rapid-prototyping and hand assembly of 2000+ paper scales, was a full-team effort. T.I.L.T was envisioned as a dynamic space for an individual. Its purpose: to transform the very foundation of architectural space. It’s inspiration: the blowfish. Early studies focused on integrating structure, skin and dynamic mechanism into a single ecology, controlled by proxy using a few actuators. However, through intensive investigations and physical trials it was decided that T.I.L.T would best operate by using a system of “pancake” cam structures arranged into a stacked tower and then skinned with a dynamically porous membrane. This membrane would be pushed and manipulated using three low-voltage DC motors controlled by MAX/MSP responding to any number of stimuli be they proximity, gestural, temperature, sound, even graphic [photographic or video]. We discovered that the responsive nature of

T.I.L.T. also allowed us to consider the mechanism as an energy consumer and to apply that understanding to a new multivalent proposition. Through the same mechanism that gave its inhabitants new architectural space, T.I.L.T. could, for example, become more aerodynamic or more heliotropic, conserving and absorbing energy as necessary. Embedded intelligence could determine the most efficient orientation, form and response while simultaneously manipulating interior and exterior space. Once an energy user, T.I.L.T was now and prototype for an environmentally and architecturally responsive energy producer.


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Eric Scott Mitchell 1470 Lexington Drive Vermilion Ohio 44089 e.scott.mitchell@gmail.com 440 320 2948


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