Page 1

Excellent Schools Detroit’s School Score Card Purpose, Measures and Grading Methodology

February 2013


Contents •  Excellent Schools Detroit & Defining Excellent –  How we define excellent? –  Score Card definitions

•  High School Measures & Methodology •  K-8 Measures & Methodology •  Appendix & Notes

2/8/13

2


Excellent Schools Detroit & Defining Excellent

2/8/13

3


What is Excellent Schools Detroit •  What we’re about: Excellent Schools Detroit is a coalition of school, community, civic and business leaders who believe every child in Detroit deserves to attend an excellent school in which: –  90% of students are on track or will graduate from high school; –  90% of those graduates enroll in college or a high quality postsecondary training program; –  90% can succeed in college without remediation.

•  We believe that consistent, accurate and widely shared information about our schools is the foundation for improvement. And we believe that educators, parents, families, students, and community members -- working together as partners with this data -- can reach this goal by the year 2020.

2/8/13

4


Why is Excellent Schools Detroit playing this role? •  Students in Detroit attend over 200 schools that are governed by many different masters with differing expectations and results. The divided authority and uneven information makes it nearly impossible for parents, policymakers and the community to understand how our schools are performing. –  In Detroit, there are 9 active charter school authorizers, along with Detroit Public Schools (DPS), the Education Achievement Authority (EAA), the Archdiocese and other private schools. We will measure the performance of every Detroit school using the same set of measures and against the same standard of excellence. –  Excellent Schools Detroit is a governance neutral coalition and organization. We believe it will take all kinds of schools to educate our kids, and do not believe, based on the evidence, that any single model or leader can do it alone. As such, we will measure the performance of individual schools, not systems or models. 2/8/13

5


Quality Review and Score Card What is the Quality Review, and how is it different from the Score Card? •  The School Quality Review is the process of assessing every Detroit school using the same set of measures. It includes active engagement from community, and leverages knowledge of leading school quality experts. •  The Score Card is a tool published to serve parents, policymakers and community. The Score Card assigns a grade to every school and displays the information in an accessible manner.

2/8/13

6


Score Card Purpose •  Two competing interests of the Score Card: 1.  Serve as a tool for parents/students to find a school. Therefore, the Score Card must highlight enough good and bad choices for parents so they have a choice, and be organized in a simple, accessible format. 2.  Measure all schools against the 90-90-90 standard. Few schools statewide, not to mention in Detroit, perform well up against the college-readiness standard. But the Score Card must serve as a truth teller. •  While function #1 is more important in creating change by driving enrollment to the city’s best performing schools, we believe holding the highest standard is necessary to create the change and the dramatic improvement Detroit’s education system needs.

2/8/13

7


What the Score Card Measures There are hundreds of trendy terms, “best practices” and metrics that come to mind when thinking about school quality. At a high level, the report card focused on:   Student outcomes as measured by academic achievement and attainment, and the progress of that achievement achievement and attainment   Perception of school quality and culture that the students and teachers have of their own school, and that community members have when visiting a school for a day The report card does not measure many other important practices and programs, but we believe that if the program is working (which is often determined by those implementing it), then student outcomes will improve. We will continue to learn, locally and globally, what makes a school excellent and how we can best measure that excellence.

2/8/13

8


What Measures are Included? Every school’s grade will be generated from performance on a combination of measures that fall into following categories: School’s Academic Status

School’s Academic Progress

% of students on track to be college-ready

School-wide progress toward 2020 college readiness goal

School Culture The school’s readiness for improvement based on student and teacher survey and the environment as measured by the community review.

Best Practices Points earned or lost based on best practices that we have collectively made a priority for Detroit and that can be measured fairly across all schools.

Other Considerations Takes into consideration concentration of FRL, ELL, and SPED

2/8/13

9


The Scoring Scale Every mature school serving a large percentage of Detroit kids will receive a grade from the following master scale. Every school starts at 0 points, and can earn well over 100 point. New and turnaround schools will receive a “promising” or “developing” rating. Score out of 100

Grade

What the Grade Means

≥ 97

A+

This school is an excellent school, it should be full and expanding

90-96

A

This school is very strong, it should be full and expanding

80-89

B

This school is strong, it should be full

70-79

C

This school has potential to be strong

60-69

D

This school is showing some positive signs, but needs to improve

50-59

D-

This school needs to improve

0-49

F

This school should be closed, and students should enroll elsewhere

On pace for C or better

Promising

This new or turnaround school, based on available measures, is on pace to be a strong school, and therefore should be full

On pace for D or lower

Developing

This new or turnaround school, based on available measures, needs to improve

2/8/13

10


Applying 90-90-90 to Scales When selecting and developing the point distribution for each of the metrics, we have aligned the top of the distribution (or an “A” score) with the 90-90-90 goal: •  90% Graduate on time (90% of all students) •  90% of those go to college (81% of all students) •  90% are college or career-ready without remediation (73% of all students) The scales have been built so that those schools that are at 90-90-90 standard are “A” schools. For those that are not yet at 90-90-90, we have made available points related to growth, culture and other leading indicators that show the school is on the right track toward 90-90-90.

2/8/13

11


High Schools A school serving students in 9th-12th grades Academic Status

Academic Progress

Up to 50 points

Up to 20 points

School Culture Up to 30 points

Best Practices Up to 10 points

Other Considerations Up to 10 points

Grade = [Status + Progress + Culture + Best Practices+ Other Considerations] 100 Available Points

2/8/13

12


Types of High Schools in Detroit Every Detroit school serving students in grades 9-12 will be classified into 1 of 4 distinct categories. The classification will determine which indicators and grading assignment will be used for the school. Definition

Examples

Cumulative Grade

Mature High School

The current year is the school’s 5th year operating, and it hasn’t had any state recognized reconfiguration within 3 years. Therefore, the school has at least 2 years of ACT scores and 1 year of graduation rates and college enrollment data.

Cass Tech, UD Jesuit, Cesar Chavez

Receives a grade using the master scale.

Turnaround School

The school has retained at least 50% of its students, but has had a substantial turnover in staff and school leadership and a change in operator.

EAA Schools, state recognized charter restarts

Does not receive a grade until the school’s 3rd year. Turnaround schools can receive a designation of Promising.

New School

The school started from scratch, and received a new building code from the state. The school is considered a new school through it’s 4th academic year of operations, or it has a 9-12 for two full years, which ever happens first.

Cody & Osborn small schools, new charter schools,

Does not receive a grade until school meets mature definition. New schools can receive a designation of Promising.

Specialty School

A school that provides a specific program to a specific, qualified student population. Schools in this category are typically alternative programs or special education.

FAM, Blanche Kelso

Does not receive a grade this year.

2/8/13

13


High School: Academic Status Academic Status in High Schools will be measured using 3 metrics: 1.) Graduation Rate, 2.) College Enrollment and 3.) ACT. These 3 metrics align with the 90-90-90 goal. Combined, these measures are worth 50 points.

Academic Status

Academic Progress

Up to 50 points

Up to 20 points

School Culture Up to 30 points

Best Practices Up to 10 points

Other Considerations Up to 10 points

Status Metric

High School Definition

50 total points available

Graduation Rate

% of students graduating within four years. Goal is 90%.

10 points

College Enrollment Rate

% of students enrolling into college within one year of graduating high school. Goal is 81%.

15 points

ACT, % College Ready (21)

% of students in the school who earn a college-ready score on the ACT (composite of 21 or higher). Goal is 73%.

10 points

ACT School Wide Composite Average

The absolute average school wide on the ACT composite.

15 points

* Ideally we want to use the best ACT score for each student as opposed to the 11th grade score as publicly reported with MME, but we will use 11th grade standard ACT until the best is collected and reported publicly.

2/8/13

14


High School: Academic Status Cont’d Academic Status Scales are set using the 90-90-90 goal as the standard to earn full points.

Academic Status

Academic Progress

Up to 50 points

Up to 20 points

School Culture Up to 30 points

Best Practices Up to 10 points

Other Considerations Up to 10 points

Four-Year Graduation Rate

College Enrollment Rate

% ACT Composite 21 or Higher

ACT Composite Average

Grad Rate

Points Earned

Enroll Rate

Points Earned

% of students

Points Earned

% of students

Points Earned

≥ 90%

10

≥ 81%

15

≥ 73%

10

≥ 21

15

85-89%

7

75-80%

10

60-72%

8

20

12

80-84%

5

70-74%

6

40-59%

6

19

9

70-79%

3

60-69%

3

20-39%

4

17-18

6

< 70%

0

< 60%

0

10-29%

2

15-16

3

< 10%

0

< 15

0

2/8/13

15


High School: Progress Academic Progress in High Schools will be measured two ways: •  Has this school improved over last year? •  Is this school on pace to be 90-90-90 by 2020? Using the same 4 metrics as Academic Status, Progress will be calculated by measuring the school’s progress in each indicator against the 2020 goal of 90-90-90, using 2010 performance as the base year.

Progress Metric

Academic Status

Academic Progress

Up to 50 points

Up to 20 points

School Culture Up to 30 points

Best Practices Up to 10 points

Other Considerations

High School Definition

Up to 10 points

20 total points available

Graduation Rate

Did the school meet it’s necessary progress to have 90% of students graduating by 2020?

5 points

College Enrollment Rate

Did the school meet it’s necessary progress to have 81% of students enrolling into a quality post-secondary program by 2020?

5 points

ACT, % College Ready (21)

Did the school meet it’s necessary progress to have 73% of students scoring a 21 or higher on the ACT by 2020?

5 points

ACT Avg Improvement

Did the school improve it’s ACT score 1 point over last year if under the standard, or ½ point if already exceeding the standard?

5 points

2/8/13

16


Academic Progress Scales How much progress did the school make toward a 2020 target of 90% of students graduating, 81% of students enrolling in college, or 73% of students college ready? Calculation   Numerator = Difference Current Year Proficiency % (or College Ready %) and Previous Year   Denominator = Gap Between Previous Year Proficiency % (or College Ready %) and Target % / # Years Till Target   Numerator/Denominator X 100 = Percentage of Annual Progress toward Target Achieved

Progress made toward 2020 Goal (% above or below the school’s slope)

Academic Status

Academic Progress

Up to 50 points

Up to 20 points

School Culture Up to 30 points

Best Practices Up to 10 points

Other Considerations Up to 10 points

Graduation Rate, Pts. Awarded

College Enrollment Rate, Pts. Awarded

ACT, % College Ready, Pts. Awarded

>150%

7

7

7

100-149% (on track)

5

5

5

any growth over previous year, even if under the slope

2

2

2

No growth or negative growth

0

0

0

•  A school already reaching the standard receives all 5 points available per measure as long as it stays above the standard 2/8/13

17


High School Progress, Example High School Growth will measure a school’s annual progress against the expected annual growth (EAG) needed to reach the 2020 goal. For mature schools, 2011 will serve as the baseline year. For new schools, the 2011 citywide average will be the baseline and for turnaround schools, the school’s performance on ACT in the last year before the intervention will serve as the baseline. The line will be recalculated in 2015. In the example below, in 2011 this school had 7% of it’s students score 21 or better on the ACT, and 19% in 2012. Therefore, if this school is to reach the goal of 73% of its students scoring 21 or better by 2020, it needs to have 7.1% more students (on average) score over 21 each year between 2010 and 2020.

100

% Students scoring 21 or higher

80 60 40 20 0

2020 goal

2011

7%

2012

19%

2013

47%

2014

50%

2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020

2/8/13

73%

18


High School Progress Cont’d, ACT ACT average improvement is calculated using absolute growth over the school’s previous school average.   If the school’s previous average was below 21, then the school is expected to grow at a pace of 1 point per year.   If the school’s previous average was at or above 21, then the school is expected to grow at a pace of .5 point per year.

Academic Status

Academic Progress

Up to 50 points

Up to 20 points

School Culture Up to 30 points

Best Practices Up to 10 points

Other Considerations Up to 10 points

2/8/13

Current ACT score

Annual Absolute Growth Expected

Points awarded (up to 5)

≥21

0.5

5

<21

1.0

5

19


School Culture Community Review Visits & 5Essentials Survey

2/8/13

20


School Culture There are other important characteristics of school quality beyond test scores that are important to parents, students and educators. A safe, welcoming and nurturing environment, collaborative teachers and administrators, high expectations, and strategies to engage parents and community in their childrens’ education are all characteristic of an excellent school. And more importantly, research shows that these characteristics are predictive of a school’s academic success.

Academic Status

Academic Progress

Up to 50 points

Up to 20 points

School Culture Up to 30 points

Best Practices Up to 10 points

Other Considerations Up to 10 points

As such, we will include school culture in the report card using two measures: 1.) A nationally respected teacher/student “school effectiveness” survey; 2.) Structured site visits by trained teams of parents and community members. These two measures are worth 30 combined points. We have also made both of these measures free for schools to participate in.

School Culture Measure

2/8/13

30 possible points

5Essentials student/teacher survey

15

Community site visits

15

21


School Culture: Community Site Visits The Community Site Visit is worth 15 out of 30 School Culture points. Trained teams of parents and community members conduct these unannounced site visits so they can observe a typical school day. The team uses an observation/reporting tool vetted by school culture experts that focuses on the following areas: •  Safe & Caring Environment (5 pts.) •  High Expectations for Learning (5 pts.) •  Parent & Community Partnerships (5 pts.)

Academic Status

Academic Progress

Up to 50 points

Up to 20 points

School Culture Up to 30 points

Best Practices Up to 10 points

Other Considerations Up to 10 points

2/8/13

22


School Culture: 5E Survey The 5Essentials student and teacher survey is a diagnostic assessment based on more than 20 years of research that measures a schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s strengths and weaknesses in five essential areas. The Detroit 5Essentials survey is administered and analyzed by the Urban Education Institute at the University of Chicago, and results are reported by back to individual schools and Excellent Schools Detroit.

Academic Status

Academic Progress

Up to 50 points

Up to 20 points

School Culture Up to 30 points

Best Practices Up to 10 points

Other Considerations Up to 10 points

For more on the Detroit 5Essentials, please visit https://detroit.5-essentials.org/2012/

Schools strong on the 5 Essentials are 10 times more likely to improve substantially compared to schools weak on the 5 Essentials.

2/8/13

5E Scale

Pts. Awarded

Well Organized

15

Organized

12

Moderately Organized

9

Partially Organized

6

Not Yet Organized

3

23


Best Practices Points earned or lost based on best practices that we have collectively made a priority for Detroit and that can be measured fairly across all schools.

2/8/13

24


High Schools: Best Practices There are others ways to earn points or have points deducted. Schools can earn additional points by making sure FAFSA is completed by seniors, and that attendance rates are strong. Schools that have major achievement gaps or low retention rates will have points deducted.

Academic Status

Academic Progress

Up to 50 points

Up to 20 points

School Culture Up to 30 points

Best Practices Up to 10 points

Other Considerations Up to 10 points

FAFSA Completion

Points Awarded

State Recognized Achievement Gap

Points Deducted

â&#x2030;Ľ 90% of seniors by June 1st

+5 pts

Focus School as defined by the state

-5 pts

9th & 10th Grade Attendance Rate

Points Awarded

â&#x2030;Ľ 92% 88-91%

2/8/13

Retention Rate

Points Deducted

+5 pts

< 70% Year over Year (YOY)

-5

+2 pts

< 90% Start to Finish Year

-5

25


Other Considerations In consideration of some of the many challenges and barriers that students and schools face in reaching a college-readiness standard

2/8/13

26


Other Considerations Detroit students face all sorts of challenges and barriers on their way to college readiness, including but not limited to their economic status, learning disabilities, and English language skills. Many Detroit schools have large concentrations of these students, while others have lower concentrations. Our collective standard doesn’t change school by school. However, we do believe it is fair to acknowledge those schools that do have a higher level of difficulty, while not penalizing those that may not. Therefore, 10 additional points above the 100 points are made available through Other Considerations.

Academic Status

Academic Progress

Up to 50 points

Up to 20 points

School Culture Up to 30 points

Best Practices Up to 10 points

Other Considerations Up to 10 points

Student Learning Challenges

Definition

School Level Threshold

10 Points Available

Economic Status

What percent of this school’s students qualify for free/ reduced lunch?

Greater than 65%

• 

What percentage of this school’s students are special education classified?

Greater than 15%

What percentage of this school’s students are classified as English Language Learners (ELL)

Greater than 15%

Special Education

English Language Learning

2/8/13

•  • 

10 points: School meets all 3 thresholds. 6 points: School meets 2 of the 3 indicators, and/or the school’s FRL exceeds 90%. 3 points: School receives 3 points if one indicator meets the threshold.

27


Turnaround and New High Schools

2/8/13

28


Turnaround High Schools Expectation: Turnaround schools should change the culture, establish strong attendance and retain it’s students within its first year. While we do not expect Academic Status indicators to improve until the end of it’s third year, we do expect Academic Progress to show improvement quickly, using the preturnaround intervention scores as a baseline. Not including Other Consideration points, a school must earn minimum 70% of the available points to receive Recommendation.

Turnaround School The school has retained at least 50% of its students, but has had a substantial turnover in staff and school leadership and a change in operator.

METRIC

Year 1

Year 2

Year 3Mature

Academic Status

Not Counted

Not Counted

Academic Progress

Same calculation as mature schools but using pre-turnaround intervention year as the baseline. (20 pts)

All Rules Apply

School Culture

All metrics available (30 pts)

All metrics available (30 pts)

Best Practices

Retention within year, FAFSA 9th & 10th grade attendance (10 pts)

Retention within year/YOY, FAFSA, 9th & 10th grade attendance (10 pts)

Other Considerations

All metrics available

All metrics available

Points for Recommendation / Pts. Available

≥ 42/60 = Promising

≥ 42/60 = Promising

2/8/13

LETTER GRADE

29


New High Schools Expectation: New schools should set a strong culture early-on, establish strong attendance and retain it’s students. We expect all new high schools to take and share Explore, Plan and ACT so that growth can be calculated in years 2 and 3. Not including Other Considerations points, a school must earn minimum 70% of the available points to receive Recommendation.

New School The school started from scratch, and received a new building code from the state. The school is considered a new school through it’s 4th academic year of operations, or it has a 9-12 for two full years, which ever happens first.

METRIC

Year 1

Year 2

Year 3

Year 4

Year 5Mature

Academic Status

Not Counted

Not Counted

Not Counted

ACT % Ready and School Avg. (30 pts)

Academic Progress

Not Counted

YOY Growth between Explore & Plan (10 pts)

YOY Growth between Explore, Plan & ACT (20 pts)

YOY Growth between Explore, Plan & ACT (20 pts)

All Rules Apply

School Culture

All metrics available (30 pts)

All metrics available (30 pts)

All metrics available (30 pts)

All metrics available (30 pts)

Best Practices

Retention within year, 9th grade attendance (5 pts)

Retention within year and YOY, 9th & 10th grade attendance (5 pts)

Retention within year and YOY, 9th & 10th grade attendance (5 pts)

Retention within year and YOY, 9th & 10th grade attendance, FAFSA completion (10 pts)

Other Considerations

All metrics available

All metrics available

All metrics available

All metrics available

Points to earn Recommendation / Pts Available

≥ 24.5 / 35 = Promising

≥ 31.5/ 45 = Promising

≥ 35/ 50 = Promising

≥ 63/ 90 = Promising

2/8/13

LETTER GRADE

30


K-8 Schools A school serving any combination of students between kindergarten and 8th grades. Academic Status

Academic Progress

Up to 30 points

Up to 40 points

School Culture Up to 30 points

Best Practices Up to 10 points

Other Considerations Up to 10 points

Grade = [Status + Progress + Culture + Best Practices + Other Considerations] 100 Available Points 2/8/13

31


Types of K-8 Schools in Detroit Every Detroit school serving K-8 students will be classified into 1 of 4 distinct categories. The classification will determine which indicators and grading assignment will be used for the school. Definition

Examples

Cumulative Grade

Mature K-8 School

The current year is the school’s 5th year operating, and it hasn’t had any state recognized reconfiguration within 3 years, or the school has K-5 in place for two full years. Therefore, the school has at least 2 years of Reading and Math proficiency scores in at least 3rd and 5th grades.

Harms Elementary, Premier Academy, Charlotte Mason

Receives a grade using the master scale.

Turnaround School

The school has retained at least 50% of its students, but has had a substantial turnover in staff and school leadership and a change in operator.

EAA Schools or state recognized charter restarts (Loving or Glazer)

Does not receive a grade until the school’s 3rd year. Turnaround schools can receive a designation of Promising.

New School

The school started from scratch, and received a new building code from the state. The school is considered a new school through it’s 4th academic year of operations, or it has a K-5 for two full years, which ever happens first.

Legacy Charter Academy, Detroit Leadership Academy

Does not receive a grade until school meets mature definition. New schools can receive a designation of Promising.

Specialty School

A school that provides a specific program to a specific, qualified student population. Schools in this category are typically alternative programs or special education.

Moses Field, Blanche Kelso

Does not receive a grade this year.

2/8/13

32


K-8: Academic Status Academic Status in K-8 schools will be measured using performance on: 1.) Reading MEAP; 2.) Math MEAP, and 3.) All subjects/all grades MEAP. We believe proficiency on the state assessment is as close as we have to an “on-track to be college/career-ready” metric in lower grades, therefore the standard will be 73%. Combined, these measures are worth 30 points.

Status Metric

K-8 Definition

Academic Status

Academic Progress

Up to 30 points

Up to 40 points

School Culture Up to 30 points

Best Practices Up to 10 points

Other Considerations Up to 10 points

30 total points available

3rd, 5th & 8th Grade Reading Proficiency

% of students proficient combined on MEAP Reading in the three key grades

10 points

3rd, 5th & 8th Grade Math Proficiency

% of students proficient combined on MEAP Math in the three key grades

10 points

School Wide All Subjects Proficiency

% of students who take any of the MEAP assessments and score proficient across all grades and subjects.

10 points

* For those schools that do not serve all grades K-8, the first MEAP-tested grade and the exit MEAP–tested grades will be used for Reading and Math. For example, a K-5 would be 3rd and 5th grade MEAP.

2/8/13

33


K-8: Academic Status Cont’d Academic status scales are set using the 90-90-90 standard, with 73% of students proficient (the 3rd 90) earning the full points.

Academic Status

Academic Progress

Up to 30 points

Up to 40 points

School Culture Up to 30 points

Best Practices Up to 10 points

Other Considerations Up to 10 points

3rd, 5th & 8th Grade Reading

3rd, 5th & 8th Grade Math

% of students

Points Earned

% of students

Points Earned

% of students

Points Earned

≥ 73%

10

≥ 73%

10

≥ 73%

10

60-72%

7

60-72%

7

60-72%

7

50-59%

5

50-59%

5

50-59%

5

40-49%

4

40-49%

4

40-49%

4

30-39%

2

30-39%

2

30-39%

2

< 30%

0

< 30%

0

< 30%

0

2/8/13

School-wide Proficiency

34


K-8: Academic Progress Student growth will be measured using two different assessments: 1.  Growth on MEAP measures toward 73% proficient. 2.  Growth-to-achievement assessment administered by the school. Score based on individual student performance against nationally normed “expected growth.”

Academic Status

Academic Progress

Up to 30 points

Up to 40 points

School Culture Up to 30 points

Best Practices

For those schools that do not share growth-to-achievement data, the full 40 pts. for Academic Progress will be based on year-over-year progress toward the 73% goal in the percent of students proficient, similar to high schools (see following pages).

Progress Metric

High School Definition

Up to 10 points

Other Considerations Up to 10 points

40 total points available

3rd, 5th & 8th Grade Reading Proficiency (MEAP)

Did the school meet it’s necessary progress to have 73% of students proficient in Reading by 2020?

5 points

3rd, 5th & 8th Grade Math Proficiency (MEAP)

Did the school meet it’s necessary progress to have 73% of students proficient in Math by 2020?

5 points

School Wide All Subjects Proficiency (MEAP)

Did the school meet it’s necessary progress to have 73% of students proficient in all subjects by 2020?

5 points

Growth-to-Achievement assessment

Did 90% of students meet their single academic year growth target?

25 points

2/8/13

35


K-8 Academic Progress, cont’d How much progress did the school make toward a 2020 target of 73% of students proficient in each measure. Calculation

Academic Progress

Up to 30 points

Up to 40 points

School Culture

  Numerator = Difference Current Year Proficiency % (or College Ready %) and Previous Year   Denominator = Gap Between Previous Year Proficiency % (or College Ready %) and Target % / # Years Till Target   Numerator/Denominator X 100 = Percentage of Annual Progress toward Target Achieved Progress made toward 2020 Goal (% above or below the school’s slope)

Academic Status

Up to 30 points

Best Practices Up to 10 points

Other Considerations Up to 10 points

MEAP Reading

MEAP Math

MEAP All Subjects

>150%

7

7

7

100-149% (on track)

5

5

5

any growth over previous year, even if under the slope

2

2

2

No growth or negative growth

0

0

0

•  A school already reaching the standard receives all 5 points available per measure as long as it stays above the standard 2/8/13

36


K-8 Progress on MEAP, Example K-8 Progress using the MEAP will measure a school’s annual progress against the expected annual progress (EAP) needed to reach the 2020 goal. For mature schools, 2011 will serve as the baseline year. For new schools, the 2011 citywide average will be the baseline and for turnaround schools, the school’s performance on MEAP in the last year before the intervention will serve as the baseline. The line will be recalculated in 2015. In the example below, in 2011 this school had 32% of it’s students proficient in Reading. Therefore, if this school is to reach the goal of 73% of its students proficient or better by 2020, it needs to have 4.7% more students (on average) proficient each year between 2011 and 2020.

80

% Students Proficient

60 40

2011

32%

2012

33%

2013

41%

2014

49%

2015 2016

20

2017 2018

0

2019 2020

2/8/13

73%

37


K-8 Academic Progress, cont’d, Student Growth A growth-to-achievement assessment is administered in nearly all schools serving Detroit students from 2nd-8th grades. These assessments are administered at least once in the fall and once in the late spring, and the result is a measure of how much a single student grew academically during the one year they attended the school. That academic gain is then compared to an “expected growth” standard calculated from a large sample of similar schools academically and demographically across the nation.

Academic Status

Academic Progress

Up to 30 points

Up to 40 points

School Culture Up to 30 points

Best Practices Up to 10 points

Other Considerations Up to 10 points

ESD will only accept results from schools that administer either NWEA’s MAP or Global Scholar’s Scantron assessment. The school must share this data because it is not collected by the state. Growth-to-Achievement: School Average Growth Percentile

2/8/13

Percentile

Points Earned

≥ 90%

25

80-89%

20

70-79%

16

60-69%

12

50-59%

8

40-49%

4

< 40%

0 38


School Culture Community Review Visits & 5Essentials Survey

2/8/13

39


School Culture There are other important characteristics of school quality beyond test scores that are important to parents, students and educators. A safe, welcoming and nurturing environment, collaborative teachers and administrators, high expectations, and strategies to engage parents and community in their childrens’ education are all characteristic of an excellent school. And more importantly, research shows that these characteristics are predictive of a school’s academic success.

Academic Status

Academic Progress

Up to 30 points

Up to 40 points

School Culture Up to 30 points

Best Practices Up to 10 points

Other Considerations Up to 10 points

As such, we will include school culture in the report card using two measures: 1.) A nationally respected teacher/student “school effectiveness” survey; 2.) Structured site visits by trained teams of parents and community members. These two measures are worth 30 combined points. We have also made both of these measures free for schools to participate in.

School Culture Measure

2/8/13

30 possible points

5Essentials student/teacher survey

15

Community site visits

15

40


School Culture: Community Site Visits The Community Site Visit is worth 15 out of 30 School Culture points. Trained teams of parents and community members conduct these unannounced site visits so they can observe a typical school day. The team uses an observation/reporting tool vetted by school culture experts that focuses on the following areas: •  Safe & Caring Environment (5 pts.) •  High Expectations for Learning (5 pts.) •  Parent & Community Partnerships (5 pts.)

Academic Status

Academic Progress

Up to 30 points

Up to 40 points

School Culture Up to 30 points

Best Practices Up to 10 points

Other Considerations Up to 10 points

2/8/13

41


School Culture: 5E Survey The 5Essentials student and teacher survey is a diagnostic assessment based on more than 20 years of research that measures a schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s strengths and weaknesses in five essential areas. The Detroit 5Essentials survey is administered and analyzed by the Urban Education Institute at the University of Chicago, and results are reported by back to individual schools and Excellent Schools Detroit.

Academic Status

Academic Progress

Up to 30 points

Up to 40 points

School Culture Up to 30 points

Best Practices Up to 10 points

Other Considerations Up to 10 points

For more on the Detroit 5Essentials, please visit https://detroit.5-essentials.org/2012/

Schools strong on the 5 Essentials are 10 times more likely to improve substantially compared to schools weak on the 5 Essentials.

2/8/13

5E Scale

Pts. Awarded

Well Organized

15

Organized

12

Moderately Organized

9

Partially Organized

6

Not Yet Organized

3

42


Best Practices Points earned or lost based on best practices that we have collectively made a priority for Detroit and that can be measured fairly across all schools.

2/8/13

43


K-8: Best Practices There are others ways to earn points or have points deducted. Schools can earn additional points by making sure every student entering kindergarten is assessed using a state-approved 5 domain assessment, and by having strong attendance. Schools that have major achievement gaps or low retention rates will have points deducted.

Academic Status

Academic Progress

Up to 30 points

Up to 40 points

School Culture Up to 30 points

Best Practices Up to 10 points

Other Considerations Up to 10 points

Use of 5 Domain Kindergartenreadiness assessment

Points Deducted

State Recognized Achievement Gap

Points Deducted

â&#x2030;Ľ 90% of students assessed

+5 pts

Focus School as defined by the state

-5 pts

All School Attendance Rate

Points Awarded

Retention Rate

Points Deducted

â&#x2030;Ľ 92%

+5 pts

< 70% Year over Year (YOY)

-5

88-91%

+2 pts

< 90% Start to Finish Year

-5

2/8/13

44


Other Considerations In consideration of some of the many challenges and barriers that students and schools face in reaching a college-readiness standard

2/8/13

45


Other Considerations Detroit students face all sorts of challenges and barriers on their way to college readiness, including but not limited to their economic status, learning disabilities, and English language skills. Many Detroit schools have large concentrations of these students, while others have lower concentrations. Our collective standard doesn’t change school by school. However, we do believe it is fair to acknowledge schools that do have a high level of difficulty, while not penalizing those that may not. Therefore, 10 additional points above the 100 points are made available through Other Considerations.

Academic Status

Academic Progress

Up to 30 points

Up to 40 points

School Culture Up to 30 points

Best Practices Up to 10 points

Other Considerations Up to 10 points

Student Learning Challenges

Definition

School Level Threshold

10 Points Available

Economic Status

What percent of this school’s students qualify for free/ reduced lunch?

Greater than 65%

• 

What percentage of this school’s students are special education classified?

Greater than 15%

What percentage of this school’s students are classified as English Language Learners (ELL)

Greater than 15%

Special Education

English Language Learning

2/8/13

•  • 

10 points: School meets all 3 thresholds. 6 points: School meets 2 of the 3 indicators, and/or the school’s FRL exceeds 90%. 3 points: School receives 3 points if one indicator meets the threshold.

46


Turnaround and New K-8 Schools

2/8/13

47


Turnaround K-8 Schools Expectation: Turnaround schools should change the culture, establish strong attendance and retain it’s students within its first year. While we do not expect Academic Status indicators to improve significantly until the end of it’s third year, we do expect Academic Progress measures to show improvement quickly, using the pre-turnaround intervention scores as a baseline. Not including Other Considerations points, a school must earn minimum 70% of the available points to receive Promising status.

Turnaround School The school has retained at least 50% of its students, but has had a substantial turnover in staff and school leadership and a change in operator.

METRIC

Year 1

Year 2

Year 3Mature

Academic Status

Not Counted

Not Counted

Academic Progress

Only student growth counted as measured by MAP or Scantron (25 pts)

Same calculation as mature schools but using pre-turnaround intervention year as the baseline. (40 pts)

All Rules Apply

School Culture

All metrics available (30 pts)

All metrics available (30 pts)

Best Practices

School readiness assessment, all school attendance, and retention within the year (10 pts)

School readiness assessment, all school attendance, and retention within year and YOY (10 pts)

Other Considerations

All metrics available

All metrics available

Points for Recommendation / Pts Available

≥ 45 / 65 = Promising

≥ 56 / 80 = Promising

2/8/13

LETTER GRADE

48


New K-8 Schools Expectation: New schools should set a strong culture early-on, establish strong attendance and retain its students. We also expect all new schools to administer a growth-to-achievement standard assessment (MAP or Scantron) to create an accurate picture of how much student growth is happening and share those results. Not including Other Considerations points, a school must earn minimum 70% of the available points to receive Promising status.

New School The school started from scratch, and received a new building code from the state. The school is considered a new school through it’s 4th academic year of operations, or it has a K-5 for two full years, which ever happens first.

METRIC

Year 1

Year 2

Year 3

Year 4Mature

Academic Status

Not Counted

Not Counted

Not Counted

Academic Progress

Only student growth counted as measured by MAP or Scantron (25 pts)

Only student growth counted as measured by NWEA or Scantron (25 pts)

Only student growth counted as measured by NWEA or Scantron (25 pts)

All Rules Apply

School Culture

All metrics available (30 pts)

All metrics available (30 pts)

All metrics available (30 pts)

Best Practices

School readiness assessment, all school attendance, and retention within the year (10 pts)

School readiness assessment, all school attendance, and retention within year and YOY (10 pts)

School readiness assessment, all school attendance, and retention within year and YOY (10 pts)

Other Considerations

All metrics available

All metrics available

All metrics available

Points to earn Recommendation / Pts Available

≥ 45 / 65 = Promising

≥ 45 / 65 = Promising

≥ 45 / 65 = Promising

2/8/13

LETTER GRADE

49


APPENDIX & NOTES

2/8/13

50

2013 Score Card Methodology  

Excellent Schools Detroit partnered with many organizations and community to develop a thorough methodology for measuring school performance...

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you