Page 1

planning urban design architecture

elizabethschultz


Open Space Health

Buildings

Habitat

Energy

People

Water Transit

Waste

Connections between community organizations, public interest groups and private investors in the various performance areas can help to identify potential collaborations on sustainable initiatives within the community.


MARTIN LUTHER KING JR WAY

I-90

MOUNT BAKER

BEACON HILL

LAKE WASHINGTON

OLMSTED GREENWAY SYSTEM

GROCERY & PHARMACY

SHARED CYCLEWAY

SITE

BANK

MOUNT BAKER LOFTS

FRANKLIN HIGH SCHOOL 6

KIMBALL ELEMENTARY 8

JEFFERSON PARK GOLF CLUB

SWIMMING AREA

COLUMBIA CITY WALKABLE SHOPPING AREA

ENUE

4

0’

1000’

LINK STATION

BUS ROUTE

LINK ROUTE

AMAZON BUS ROUTE

SCHOOL SCORE

PARK

EASTLINK STATION

CYCLEWAY

RETAIL

ATHLETIC FIELD

EASTLINK ROUTE (FUTURE)

CYCLEWAY (FUTURE)

RECREATION

BOULEVARD

2000’ NORTH

EDUCATION 8

4

5

Hysan Place / Hong Kong Central* Suzhou Super Tower / Suzhou, China* Forum 66 / Shenyang, China* Mt Baker Transit Oriented Development / Seattle, WA

Seattle Children’s / Seattle, WA The Everett Clinic / Everett, WA Hospital Proposal / Seattle, WA BC Women’s and Children’s / Vancouver, BC St. Clare Hospital Prompt and Primary Care / Seattle, WA

Mixed Use Developments

AMY YEE TENNIS CENTER

AV RAINIER

DC Streetcar Anocostia Alignments / Washington, DC* Southwest EcoDistrict / Washington, DC DDOT Maryland Ave Study / Washington, DC Swope Parkway Blue Parkway / Kansas City, MO Mt Cleveland Neighborhood / Kansas City, MO Campbell Study / Kansas City, MO Mission Cliffs / Kansas City, KS Wendell Phillips Neighborhood / Kansas City, MO

UE

Neighborhood + Corridor Planning

EN AV

8

BUSES TO DOWNTOWN

IER

Stoke-on-Trent Master Plan / England University of Washington Learning Space Assessment / Seattle, WA The Evergreen State College / Olympia, WA

MOUNTAIN TO SOUND TRAIL AMAZON BUS ROUTE

EASTLINK TO BELLEVUE AND REDMOND

IN RA

Campus Master Planning

WASHINGTON MIDDLE 8 SCHOOL THURGOOD MARSHALL 9 ELEMENTARY

MARTIN LUTHER KING JR WAY

3

MOUNT BAKER ASSET MAP

Transportation District Department of Transportation - Car Barn Training Center / Washington, DC Sacramento Valley Station / Sacramento, CA Seattle Tacoma International Airport - International Arrivals Facility / Seattle, WA Kansas City Airport - New Single Terminal / Kansas City, MO

7

Streetscape design 12th Street / Washington DC Pike Street / Seattle, WA Main Avenue / Spokane, WA Locust Street / Kansas City, MO 52nd Street / Kansas City, MO 28th Street Corridor / Kansas City, MO Crossroads - Southwest Blvd / Kansas City, MO

Healthcare

5

Commercial + Corporate + Civic Microsoft Building 44 / Redmond, WA Downtown Seattle Association / Seattle, WA Swope + Chestnut Study / Kansas City, MO Bluford Library / Kansas City, MO Warren Place Event Center / Gardner, KS

6

Education University of Pittsburgh Medical Center / Pittsburg, PA George Mason - Potomac Science Center / Woodbridge, VA SUNY/ New Paltz, NY Virginia Tech Signature Engineering Building / Blacksburg, VA Evergreen Lecture Hall / Olympia, WA East Kapolia School / Kapolia, HI

11

Residential Credenhill House / Wales* Stadium Place / Seattle, WA ArtsBlock / Kansas City, MO 27th and Troost / Kansas City, MO 27th and McGee / Kansas City, MO Columbus Park - CP Lofts Phase 2+3 / Kansas City, MO Mt Cleveland Chick Site / Kansas City, MO 19th and Oak / Kansas City, MO The Overlook at Mission Cliffs/ Kansas City, KS UNI Wendell Phillips / Kansas City, MO 25th and Troost / Kansas City, MO * indicates projects from co-operative education experiences


research

OPTION 1: CAMPUS

OPTION 1: CAMPUS

Option 1: Campus organizes the site to promote a unique employment campus. It is oriented toward Rainier Ave within signalized crossings that connect to retail, housing, and the Mount Baker Transit Center. It is distinguished by the campus open space as a green refuge shared between business and community members.

INDICATORS

4

Office

Residential

3.5 Water Balance - Program Scenario 1

2 1.5

1,868,724 Office gsf

1

11,326 Residential gsf

0.5

385,070 Retail gsf

4,000,000

Water Water(Gallons) (Gallons)

2,000,000

0

15 Residential Units

January

-0.5

18 Residents

00

February February

March March

March

April

May

June

July

August

September

-1.5

576.78 Jobs: Housing April

April

May May

June June

July July

High-2cooling demand for office uses.

October

November

Blackwater Source Greywater Source

1

Condensate Recapture Source Rainwater Source

0

Non-potable Demand

JAN

FEB

MAR

APR

MAY

JUN

JUL

-1

68.2% Site Coverage

-3

2

March

April

May

June

September

October

Potable Demand Water Balance (Assumes black/greywater to potable)

Water Balance (Assumes black/greywater to non-potab

WATERBalance BALANCE Water (Assumes black/greywater black/greywater to to potable) potable) Water (Assumes (ASSUMESBalance BLACK/GREYWATER TO POTABLE ONLY) Water Balance Balance (Assumes (Assumes black/greywater black/greywater to to non-potable non-potable Water

Rainwater Source RAINWATER SOURCE

RETAIL HW KBTU/FT

Non-potable Demand NON-POTABLE DEMAND

WATER BALANCE

2

February

HVAC Water Demand Irrigation Demand

Irrigation Demand IRRIGATION DEMAND Irrigation Demand POTABLE DEMAND Potable Demand Potable Demand

Condensate Recapture Source CONDENSATE RECAPTURE SOURCE

2

OFFICE HW KBTU/FT

January

DEC

Non-potable Demand Demand Non-potable HVAC HVACWater WATERDemand DEMAND HVAC Water Demand

Blackwater Source BLACKWATER SOURCE December November November December Greywater Source GREYWATER SOURCE

October October

2

28 MT. July BAKER TOD - DRAFT,August MAY 2015

NOV

-4

RESIDENTIAL HW KBTU/FT

-2,000,000 -2,000,000

OCT

Blackwater Source Source Blackwater Greywater Source Source Greywater

-2

RETAIL CHW KBTU/FT

0

SEPT

-5

December

2

-2.5

AUG

Condensate Recapture Recapture Source Source Condensate Rainwater Source Source Low potable water demand. Non-potable water demand can be Rainwater met by recycled wastewater.

August September August OFFICE CHW KBTU/FTSeptember

-3

Water (Gallons)

2

-1

10382 Office Workers

January January

February

4 3

WATER (Gallons)

3

2.5

4.0 FAR

PARKING SPACES

5

Millions

4

0.5%

: HOUSING

WATER BALANCE - OPTION 1

4.5

100.0%

: 1 3,855

WATER BALANCE: 36 M GAL/YEAR

5 ENERGY BALANCE

Retail

17.0%

2,000,000 2,000,000

JOBS

5.5

82.5%

4,000,000 4,000,000

9,836

WATER (MILLIONS OF GALLONS)

6,000,000 6,000,000

6,000,000

8 MAX

Due to dominate office use in Option 1, the campus can be a resource for shared parking with adjacent evening residential uses. Excess daytime byproduct heat, resulting from cooling offices during the daytime, can be made available to adjacent residents. Daytime employees patronize community-oriented retail services in Water Balance -- Program Program Scenario 11 Water the Mount Baker Transit Station Area,Balance FAR Scenario that6 provide vital services for residents.

November

(ASSUMES BLACK/GREYWATER TO NON-POTABLE ONLY)

HVAC Water Demand

December

29

Irrigation Demand -4,000,000 -4,000,000

Potable Demand Water Balance (Assumes black/greywater to potable)

-2,000,000

Water Balance (Assumes black/greywater to non-potable only) -6,000,000 -6,000,000

OPTION 2: PARKWAY INDICATORS

4

Retail

6.0%

Residential

24.0%

4,000,000 4,000,000

6,000,000

1.5

Water (Gallons)

761 Residential Units

Water Water(Gallons) (Gallons)

9249 Office Workers 10.13 Jobs: Housing 41.8% Site Coverage

January January

February February

March March

0

January

-0.5

913 Residents

00

1 0.5

142,703 Retail gsf

April April

February

March

April

May

June

July

August

September

October

November

December

5 4 3 2

Blackwater Source Greywater Source Condensate Recapture Source

1

Rainwater Source

0

Non-potable Demand

JAN

FEB

MAR

June June

July July

Relatively high cooling demand, relative to heating demand. -3

August September August OFFICE CHW KBTU/FTSeptember 2

October October

RETAIL CHW KBTU/FT

-2,000,000 -2,000,000

-2 -3 -4

Blackwater Source BLACKWATER SOURCE December November November December Greywater Source GREYWATER SOURCE

2

Non-potable Demand NON-POTABLE DEMAND

2

-4,000,000 -4,000,000 -2,000,000

-6,000,000 -6,000,000

-6,000,000

Rainwater Source RAINWATER SOURCE

OFFICE HW KBTU/FT

March

April

May

June

36 MT. July BAKER TOD - DRAFT,August MAY 2015

September

October

November

Mt Baker Transit Oriented Development

December

JUL

AUG

SEPT

OCT

NOV

DEC

Blackwater Source Source Blackwater Greywater Source Source Greywater

Condensate Recapture Source CONDENSATE RECAPTURE SOURCE

RETAIL HW KBTU/FT

0 February

JUN

-1

2

-4,000,000

MAY

2

RESIDENTIAL HW KBTU/FT

January

APR

Potable water demand increases with addition of residents. recycled wastewater.

-2

May

PARKING SPACES

-5

-1

-1.5

-2.5May

: HOUSING

Water Balance - Program Scenario 2

3.5

2

4.2 FAR

2,000,000

4 ENERGY BALANCE

2.5 Water Balance - Program Scenario 1

100.0%

570,810 Residential gsf

4,000,000

JOBS

WATER BALANCE: 39 M GAL/YEAR

3

1,664,863 Office gsf

2,000,000 2,000,000

9 : 1 2,467 Millions

Office

70.0%

6,000,000 6,000,000

8 MAX

Due to its mix of office and residential uses, Option 2 has the capacity to manage parking demand onsite, reducing the impact on the surrounding traffic system. It also has the ability to catalyze and expand on a low temperature energy and recycled water system. This mix of 6 creates a balance in jobs to uses Water Balance -- Program Program Scenario 11 5.5 housing, supporting day andWater eveningBalance FAR Scenario use5 of community-oriented services 4.5 (retail, restaurant, culture).

Water (Gallons)

-6,000,000

OPTION 2: PARKWAY Option 2: Parkway organizes the site for a mix of uses to emphasize multimodal connections, north to south, to the Mount Baker Transit Center. A north- south central parkway fronted by office uses to the west, and residential development to the east, creates a crossroads with a new east-west, road connecting Martin Luther King Jr Blvd to Rainier Ave. At either end, two outward facing green gateway parks anchor the north-south parkway with ground level uses that support multimodal access with community services along its length.

WATER (MILLIONS OF GALLONS)

-4,000,000

HVAC Water Demand

HVAC Water Demand Irrigation Demand Potable Demand Water Balance (Assumes black/greywater to potable)

Water Balance (Assumes black/greywater to non-potable

Condensate Recapture Recapture Source Source Condensate Rainwater Source Non-potable water demand can be met by Rainwater Source

Non-potable Demand Demand Non-potable HVAC HVACWater WATERDemand DEMAND HVAC Water Demand Irrigation Demand IRRIGATION DEMAND Irrigation Demand POTABLE DEMAND Potable Demand Potable Demand WATERBalance BALANCE Water (Assumes black/greywater black/greywater to to potable) potable) Water (Assumes (ASSUMESBalance BLACK/GREYWATER TO POTABLE ONLY) Water Balance Balance (Assumes (Assumes black/greywater black/greywater to to non-potable non-potable Water WATER BALANCE

(ASSUMES BLACK/GREYWATER TO NON-POTABLE ONLY)

Irrigation Demand Potable Demand Water Balance (Assumes black/greywater to potable)

Water Balance (Assumes black/greywater to non-potable only)

37


OPTION 3: GREENWAYS

OPTION 3: GREENWAYS Option 3: Greenways organizes office and INDICATORS residential uses within a grid with strong Like Option 2, Option 3 has a mix of office and residential uses having the capacity to manage parking east-west multi-modal street crossings of demand on-site and reducing the impact on the surrounding traffic Rainier Ave. This is complemented by a system. It also has the ability to catalyze and expand a low series of north-south internal greenways temperature energy and recycled water system. The mix of uses Water Balance -- Program Program Scenario 11 creates a balance in jobs to Water housing,Balance FAR Scenario and small plazas connecting activities supporting day and evening use of community-oriented services. across the site. These greenways provide ENERGY BALANCE a north-south bike and pedestrian connection between areas to the north andWater Balance - Program Scenario 1 the Mount Baker Transit Center to the south. It is distinguished by high quality, civic scale multimodal and pedestrian pathways between buildings with active ground floor uses.

8 MAX

5

6

Office

5.5

Retail

4.5

Residential

3.5

44.0%

100.0%

2.5

2

4.5 FAR

1.5

1,121,234 Office gsf

1

1,146,717 Residential gsf

4,000,000

0.5

280,309 Retail gsf

2,000,000 2,000,000

0

1,529 Residential Units

January

-0.5

Water Water(Gallons) (Gallons)

1,835 Residents

2,000,000

February February

March March

March

April

May

June

July

August

September

October

November

December

PARKING SPACES

Water Balance - Program Scenario 3

6

4

Blackwater Source

2

Greywater Source Condensate Recapture Source Rainwater Source

0

Non-potable Demand

JAN

FEB

MAR

APR

MAY

JUN

JUL

AUG

April April

-2.5 May

June June

May

July July

RETAIL CHW KBTU/FT

-2,000,000 -2,000,000

2

Non-potable Demand NON-POTABLE DEMAND

OFFICE HW KBTU/FT

WATER BALANCE

2

January

February

March

April

May

June

September

October

November

(ASSUMES BLACK/GREYWATER TO NON-POTABLE ONLY)

HVAC Water Demand

December

Water Balance (Assumes black/greywater to non-potable only)

WATERBalance BALANCE Water (Assumes black/greywater black/greywater to to potable) potable) Water (Assumes (ASSUMESBalance BLACK/GREYWATER TO POTABLE ONLY) Water Balance Balance (Assumes (Assumes black/greywater black/greywater to to non-potable non-potable only) only) Water

Rainwater Source RAINWATER SOURCE

RETAIL HW KBTU/FT 44 MT. July BAKER TOD - DRAFT,August MAY 2015

Water Balance (Assumes black/greywater to potable)

Irrigation Demand IRRIGATION DEMAND Irrigation Demand POTABLE DEMAND Potable Demand Potable Demand

Condensate Recapture Source CONDENSATE RECAPTURE SOURCE

2

0

HVAC Water Demand

Non-potable Demand Demand Non-potable HVAC HVACWater WATERDemand DEMAND HVAC Water Demand

2

RESIDENTIAL HW KBTU/FT

DEC

Condensate Recapture Recapture Source Source Condensate Non-potable water demand can Source be met by recycled Rainwater Rainwater Source

Blackwater Source BLACKWATER SOURCE December November November December Greywater Source GREYWATER SOURCE

October October

2

NOV

Potable Demand

-4

-6

August September August OFFICE CHW KBTU/FTSeptember

Relatively even, seasonal use of heating and cooling that would -3 afford seasonal storage and reuse.

OCT

Irrigation Demand

-2

67.9% Site Coverage

SEPT

Blackwater Source Source Blackwater Greywater Source Source Greywater

-2

Relatively higher demand for potable water. wastewater.

-1.5

3.39 Jobs: Housing

January January

February

-1

6229 Office Workers

00

Millions

3

Water (Gallons)

4,000,000 4,000,000

: HOUSING

WATER BALANCE: 52 M GAL/YEAR

4

45.0%

6,000,000

JOBS

5

11.0%

WATER ( MILLIONS OF GALLONS)

6,000,000 6,000,000

4 : 1 2,536

45

Irrigation Demand -4,000,000 -4,000,000

Potable Demand Water Balance (Assumes black/greywater to potable)

-2,000,000

Water Balance (Assumes black/greywater to non-potable only) -6,000,000 -6,000,000

OPTION 4: TOWN

-4,000,000

OPTION 4: TOWN Option 4: Town organizes residential uses INDICATORS a grid of streets, with parks and plazas. These reinforce north- south connections through the site toward Rainier Ave and the Mount Baker Transit Station. Water Balance Balance -- Program Program Scenario 11 Water FAR Scenario The angle of the streets allows for easy multimodal southbound movements ENERGY BALANCE from Martin Luther King Jr Blvd to Rainier Ave. As traffic on Rainier Ave is Water Balance - Program Scenario 1 intensified, Martin Luther King Jr Blvd develops as a softer multimodal parkway leading to the Mount Baker Transit Center and Franklin High School.

8 MAX

With predominant residential uses, the site can share parking with employment uses on other adjacent sites. Managing the parking demand reduces impacts on the surrounding traffic system within the district. The demand for water and heating can be shared by using byproduct heat from local employment uses 6 in partnership with residents on site. The balance of jobs to housing is 5.5 dependent on other employment uses 5 developing in the district that will share 4.5 resources in the future.

0.0%

6,000,000 6,000,000

Retail

11.0%

100.0%

000,000

1.5

Water Water(Gallons) (Gallons)

000,000

2,957 Residential Units

84.0% Site Coverage

February February

March March

0

January

-0.5

0 Office Workers

0.00 Jobs: Housing

January January

1

0.5

274,080 Retail gsf

3,548 Residents

00

3.5

2

2,217,552 Residential gsf

April April

February

March

April

May

June

July

August

September

October

November

: HOUSING

December

6

4 Blackwater Source Greywater Source

2

Condensate Recapture Source Rainwater Source

0

Non-potable Demand

JAN

FEB

MAR

APR

May

June June

July July

August September August OFFICE CHW KBTU/FTSeptember 2

October October

HVAC HVACWater WATERDemand DEMAND HVAC Water Demand Irrigation Demand IRRIGATION DEMAND Irrigation Demand

Condensate Recapture Source CONDENSATE RECAPTURE SOURCE

POTABLE DEMAND Potable Demand Potable Demand WATERBalance BALANCE Water (Assumes black/greywater black/greywater to to potable) potable) Water Balance (Assumes

000,000

Non-potable Demand NON-POTABLE DEMAND

October

November

December

HVAC Water Demand

(ASSUMES BLACK/GREYWATER TO POTABLE ONLY)

Water Balance Balance (Assumes (Assumes black/greywater black/greywater to to non-potable non-potable only) only) Water WATER BALANCE (ASSUMES BLACK/GREYWATER TO NON-POTABLE ONLY)

Irrigation Demand -4,000,000 -4,000,000

Potable Demand Water Balance (Assumes black/greywater to potable)

000,000

000,000

September

Water Balance (Assumes black/greywater to non-potable only) -6,000,000 -6,000,000

Water Balance (Assumes black/greywater to non-potable only)

Blackwater Source BLACKWATER SOURCE December November November December Greywater Source GREYWATER SOURCE

2

52 MT. July BAKER TOD - DRAFT,August MAY 2015

HVAC Water Demand Potable Demand

Rainwater Source RAINWATER SOURCE

OFFICE HW KBTU/FT

June

DEC

Water Balance (Assumes black/greywater to potable)

-6

2

May

NOV

Irrigation Demand

2

April

OCT

Blackwater Source Source Blackwater Greywater Source Source Greywater

-4

2

RETAIL HW KBTU/FT

March

SEPT

Rainwater Source Source Rainwater Non-potable Demand Demand Non-potable

RESIDENTIAL HW KBTU/FT

February

AUG

-8

RETAIL CHW KBTU/FT

0

JUL

-2

-2

-2.5 May

JUN

Condensate Recapture Source Highest use of potable water due to high intensity of residential uses. Non-potable water demand can be Condensate Recapture Source met by recycled wastewater.

-1

-2,000,000 -2,000,000

January

MAY

-1.5

Highest -3 demand for heating. Good partner for the UW laundry facility.

PARKING SPACES

Water Balance - Program Scenario 4

8

2.5

0 Office gsf

2,000,000 2,000,000

JOBS

WATER BALANCE: 69 M GAL/YEAR

3

4.4 FAR

000,000

1 : 5 1,757

4

Residential

89.0%

4,000,000 4,000,000

5

Water (Gallons)

Office

WATER ( MILLIONS OF GALLONS)

-6,000,000

53


The Vision

The Mission

research

Georgia Tech will define the technological research university of the twenty-first century. As a result, we will be leaders in influencing major technological, social, and policy decisions that address critical global challenges. “What does Georgia Tech think?” will be a common question in research, business, the media, and government.

Technological change is fundamental to the advancement of the human condition. The Georgia Tech community—students, staff, faculty, and alumni—will realize our motto of “Progress and Service” through effectiveness and innovation in teaching and learning, our research advances, and entrepreneurship in all sectors of society. We will be leaders in improving the human condition in Georgia, the United States, and around the globe.

Informational-graphic analysis

Admissions Information

Academic of the Georgia Tech’sInstitution admission

33%

Georgia Florida California Texas Virginia

of applicants are admitted

Student Body The Vision

:

11%

Georgia Tech will define the technological research university of the twenty-first century. As a result, we will be leaders in influencing major technological, social, and policy decisions that 34% female to 66% male international student address critical global challenges. “What does Georgia Tech population think?” will be a common question in research, business, the media, and government.

Mission

data for reference on a project proposal.

US States with 300+ students enrolled

18:1

North Carolina Maryland Pennsylvania New York New Jersey

The Mission

Student to Faculty Ratio

Academic Calend co-opperative ed

Faculty

1,007

A C E Technological change is fundamental to the advancement of the human S condition. The Georgia Tech community—students, staff, faculty, and alumni—will realize our motto of “Progress and Service” through effectiveness and PE LA 2015 faculty innovation in teaching and learning, our research advances, and entrepreneurship in all sectors of society. We will be leaders in improving the human B

14,682 + 8,427 23,109

52 74 401 214 13 166 87

2014 enrollment condition in Georgia, the United States, and around the globe.

Campus Information Why Georgia ClassTech size % Admissions 1. Top ranked academics

400 33%

Semes Syste

Technology Academic Institution

Semes 18:1OIT Syste

54%

20% 2-9 2. Focus on STEM US 19%States 10-19with 300+ ical change is fundamental to the advancement of the human 3. Cutting Edge Technology Research 15-29 seminar rooms students 19% 20-29 enrolled The Georgia Tech community—students, staff, faculty, and alumni—will 4. Awesome Georgia campus life North Carolina 8% 30-39 motto of “Progress and Service” through effectiveness and Acre Campus Size 5. Fantastic Career Florida 9% Foundation 40-49 Maryland GT audio visual in teaching and learning, our research advances, and entrepreneurship On-campus Housing California 18% 50-99 Pennsylvania services team (98% of Freshman Class) rs of society. We will be leaders in of improving the human Student to Faculty Ratio Academic Calend applicants are admitted 50+ lecture halls Texas 7% 100 + New York on in Georgia, the United States, and around the globe. co-opperative ed Virginia New Jersey SOURCE INFO: Georgia Tech Fact Book 2014 + 2015. CollegeData.com

Academic Institution Student Body

tates with 300+ dents enrolled North Carolina Maryland Pennsylvania New York New Jersey

: 18:1

34%tofemale 66% male Student FacultytoRatio

international Academic Calendar w/ student Colleges population co-opperative education

1,007 400 Campus Size 2015Acre faculty

2-9 10-19 20-29 30-39 40-49 50-99 100 +

54% 293

SOURCE INFO: Georgia Tech Fact Book 2014 + 2015. CollegeData.com

15-29 seminar rooms

50+ lecture halls

439

A 52 C 74 E 401 Professors S 214 PE 13 LA On-campus 166 Housing Associate Professors B (98% 87of Freshman Class)

enrollment

ass size %

23,109

1,007 2015 faculty

A C E S PE LA B

52 74 401 214 13 166 87

*recently received a $50M endowment

2014 enrollment

Faculty Campus

,682 ,427 ,109

11% 6 +14,682 8,427

Semester System

Architecture Computing Engineering Sciences Liberal Arts *Business

Faculty

Technology

OIT

GT audio visual services team

Class size % 20% 19% 19% 8% 9% 18% 7%

71%

2-9 10-19 15-29 seminar rooms 20-29 30-39 tentured faculty 40-49 50-99 50+ lecture halls 100 +

Outreach Connections* 1. Professional Education 2. Alumni 3. Office of Government and Community Relations *potential opporunities for increased funding

Technology

OIT

GT audio visual services team


The University of Washington Learning Space Assessment is a study of the current (Fall 2013) general purpose classrooms on the Seattle campus. The study is the result of a University of Washington faculty and staff task force charged by the University Provost to guide a concise and comprehensive review of the University of Washington’s classrooms needs in light of changing instructional methodologies. The study evaluates utilization rates, scheduling practices, technology deployment and policies, and the physical condition of classroom spaces. The intention is to better understand opportunities for improved delivery of learning space options that are focused on supporting faculty, diverse pedagogical initiatives and a student experience enhanced by integrated and appropriate technologies.

University of Washington Learning Space Assessment

https://opb.washington.edu/sites/default/files/ opb/Architecture/Report_UW%20Learning%20 Space%20Assessment.pdf


analysis MOUNT BAKER ASSET MAP WASHINGTON MIDDLE 8 SCHOOL THURGOOD MARSHALL 9 ELEMENTARY MOUNTAIN TO SOUND TRAIL AMAZON BUS ROUTE

BUSES TO DOWNTOWN

I-90

RA INI ER UE

EN

AV

MARTIN LUTHER KING JR WAY

EASTLINK TO BELLEVUE AND REDMOND

AMY YEE TENNIS CENTER

MOUNT BAKER

BEACON HILL

LAKE WASHINGTON

OLMSTED GREENWAY SYSTEM

GROCERY & PHARMACY

SHARED CYCLEWAY

SITE

BANK

MOUNT BAKER LOFTS

MARTIN LUTHER KING JR WAY

FRANKLIN HIGH SCHOOL 6

KIMBALL ELEMENTARY 8

JEFFERSON PARK GOLF CLUB

SWIMMING AREA

COLUMBIA CITY WALKABLE SHOPPING AREA

UE

R AVEN

RAINIE 0’

LINK STATION

BUS ROUTE

LINK ROUTE

AMAZON BUS ROUTE

EASTLINK STATION EASTLINK ROUTE (FUTURE)

1000’

EDUCATION SCHOOL SCORE

PARK

CYCLEWAY

RETAIL

ATHLETIC FIELD

CYCLEWAY (FUTURE)

RECREATION

BOULEVARD

Mt Baker Transit Oriented Development

8

2000’ NORTH


S

North Rainier is a place in Seattle where business and community interests are served as they develop a civic spaces for themselves and others. Maybe it is a place where new connections across the neighborhood are confirmed. These connections contribute D URBAN TO SITE commonHAVE ideasTHE and ABILITY new partnerships that shape D URBANtoDESIGN, DESIGN, HAVE THE ABILITY TO GENERATE GENERATE SITE the R LARGE SCALE MULTI-FACETED PROJECTS, LIKE MOUNT neighborhood for the community. R LARGE SCALE MULTI-FACETED PROJECTS, LIKE MOUNT BAKER BAKER TOD TOD

ULTIPLE ULTIPLE ITERATIONS ITERATIONS AND AND OPTIONS. OPTIONS.

What if the property owners shared a circulation system that supported access to and through their properties for the highest and best uses?

It would allow a mix of uses that are not necessarily dependent on automobiles.

What if the ground level of buildings and the adjacent open space were designed to support and provide access to community activities?

It would allow community oriented retail services to be supported by evening and daytime activities by people arriving on foot or by bike, in a walkable environment. What if the water system and landscaped areas were designed holistically to create clean water and promote desirable places through the use of plants?

It would reduce downstream flows of surface runoff and wastewater. What if the water system could connect buildings by sharing by-product heating and cooling across streets?

It would use heat exchange with ground source water, sewer, and stormwater while sharing rejected heat from connected buildings. What if residents and employers worked together to shares costs to support an environment that served each other’s aspirations and goals?

It would include a governance association that manages programmed events and maintenance requirements. What if the area could serve as a refuge during a disaster, providing water, services, and supplies?

It would provide water, energy, and refuge supplies for communities affected by natural disaster.


analysis Brighton Corner

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Master of Architecture Thesis


analysis

Hospital Proposal


feasibility The SW Ecodistrict: A Vision Plan for a More Sustainable Future

“The SW Ecodistrict: A Vision Plan for a More Sustainable Future is a comprehensive forward-looking approach to urban sustainability and redevelopment. In 2010, in partnership with federal and local stakeholders, the National Capital Planning Commission (NCPC), established the SW Ecodistrict Task Force to evaluate how to best transform the 10th Street and Maryland Avenue corridors in Washington, DC, into a livable and highly sustainable mixed-use community.� https://www.ncpc.gov/docs/SW_Ecodistrict_Overview.pdf

Southwest EcoDistrict


PHASE

Completed Fall 2017

feasibility Parks + Active Recreation Play fields

Green Infrastructure Restored Habitat

Green Infrastructure Recreation Trail

Mixed-Use Intergenerational

Brush Creek Bridge Connection

Residential Infill Multi-family Retail + Restaurants Sit-down Dining

TO THE PLAZA

MT. CLEVELAND

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LOWER TOWN FORK CREEK

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Swope Parkway

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Blue Parkway

BRUSH CREEK

LAKE OF THE ENSHRINERS

Mixed-Use Intergenerational Vehicular Intersections Pedestrian + Cycleway Commercial Infill Pedestrian Friendly

Realigned Trail Pedestrian + Cycleway

*Rendering by DRAW. Swope Parkway Blue Parkway

Brush Creek Overlook Hardscape Plaza

Public Parking Minimal Impact Design

Urban Farm + Greenhouses Local Fresh Food Market

Community Playground Splash play SWOPE PARKWAY / BLUE PARKWAY CORRIDOR REDEVELOPMENT FEASIBILITY STUDY


_DRAW 2017 1.0

1.0 BACKGROUND

Neighborhood Profile Emanuel Cleaver II Boulevard

HOUSING COSTS IN STUDY AREA

Prospect Avenue

SCB’s Mission� To improve communities by reclaiming neighborhoods and developing quality housing and related services.

Brush Creek Blue

Park

e Heal

th

The Shops

Indiana Avenue

Agnes Avenue

HOUSING DINING SOCIAL COMMUNITY

C. DEVELOPMENT

(4900 Swope Parkway)

(The Shops + H&R Block) COMMERCIAL RETAIL DAY-TO-NIGHT ACTIVITY DESTINATION

GREEN INFRASTRUCTURE HEALTH CARE SERVICES WALKABLE CONNECTIVITY

E 53rd Street

Proposed development Mission: integrateProject community development with health care, social approach per project focus area. History: THE MOUNT CLEVELAND INITIATIVE services, neighborhood revitalization, community-based commercial Mission: integrate community development with health care, social Swope Community Builder’s Project Map along the Corridor revitalization, community-based commercial services, neighborhood and residential development.

and residential development.

4

9

4

9

1

1 See Appendix for Swope Corridor Visions (Previous Planning Documents).

Project Project StartStart Date: Date: 1991 Project Area:Area: 70 acres Project Project Investment: $150M Project Investment: List of Projects:

3

3

2

2

7

5

7 5

8

1 Imani House List of Projects: 2 Swope Health Services

The area’s housing splits about �0� / �0� between owner-occupiers and renters, below the city average of ��.�� owner / ��.�� renter. For renters, the median rent as a percentage of gross income in the area is ���, which is higher than the HUD-recommended threshold of �0�. This means that the area’s rental housing is unaffordable for many residents.

31 YMCA Imani House 4 Affordable Housing

Demographics

Swope Health Services

8 6

8

1991 70 acres $150M

52 Grocery-Anchored retail Office 63 Post YMCA 7 Mazuma Credit Union and hub social services Housing 4 forAffordable 8 Office and Retail Space

6

8

6 Post Office Mt. Cleveland Community Plan | 11 7 Mazuma Credit Union and hub for social services

© 2017 DRAW ARCHITECTURE AND URBAN DESIGN LLC ALL DRAWINGS AND WRITTEN INFORMATION APPEARING HEREIN SHALL NOT BE DUPLICATED, DISCLOSED OR OTHERWISE USED WITHOUT THE WRITTEN CONSENT OF THE ARCHITECT.

$39,034

MEDIAN HOUSE VALUE

POPULATION OF WHOM POVERTY STATUS IS DETERMINED

55.1%

(DOING POORLY OR STRUGGLING)

MEDIAN HOUSEHOLD INCOME

$27,367

About ��� of all households in the area are families (couples, or single parent with children, and ��� are single with no children. This rate is similar to the city’s average. However, the area has over 2 � times more single mothers than average. The area’s age distribution is very similar to the city average, but it skews slightly higher for more people ��+, and slightly fewer adults aged 18-��. The median household income is �2�,���, which is significantly below the city’s median of ���.821.

Grocery-Anchored retail

95 Residential Development

Mt Cleveland looking west along Blue Parkway

78.02

LOW INCOME Low Income - Tracts with a poverty rate of 20� or higher, or tracts with a median family income less than 80� of median family income for the state or metropolitan area.

Kansas City’s 201� Kansas City Market Value Analysis, classifies the area’s housing markets are distressed. This condition is characterized by low sales prices, high vacancy, high number of foreclosures and short-sales) sale. The median sales price for houses in the area range from ��,1�� to ��9,0��. Declining home values discourages private investment, as property owners are less likely to recoup their investments in maintenance and improvements if a property can only be sold for less than what it cost originally.

Project History: THE MOUNT CLEVELAND INITIATIVE

SCB’s signature achievement, the �0-acre Mount Cleveland Initiative, located in the eastern half of the project study area, has generated over �1�0m of investment. This development includes Swope Health Central, a 1��,000 square foot, �18 million health facility� basic neighborhood services (groceries, banking, post office)� a child and family development center� a substance abuse treatment center� office space� and affordable housing.

79

Approximately 20� of the area’s housing units were demolished in the 19�0s to make way for Bruce R Watkins Drive. The number of housing units has remained stable since that time. Vacancy has been low historically, but it increased significantly during late 2000s mortgage crisis. Between 20002010, vacancy increased from 10� to 2�.��. This means that approximately 9�0 of the area’s �08� housing units are not currently occupied.

IUS

Satchel Paige Stadium

B. GREEN SPACE/ HEALTHY LIVING/ ARTS+CULTURE

77 E RAD

Swope Parkway

Swop

E 51st Street

(Strip Mall Site)

GROSS MEDIAN RENT

The area’s neighborhoods contain approximately �,000 housing units. This equals a density of 2.1� units per acre (gross), which is very low for an urbanized area. House sizes and styles are eclectic, but there is little variety of housing type� the large majority of housing units are detached singlefamily houses, at a greater-than-average share (��.�� of all housing units) than the city average (�2.8�). Concomitantly, the area has proportionally fewer attached (aka duplex, townhouse or apartment) units than the average KCMO neighborhood.

way

A. MIX OF USES

$713/MO.

Housing

Elmwood Avenue

Bou leva rd Ben ton 4900 Swope

Since the early 1990s, SCB has responded to neighborhood needs by developing basic health and retail services, new Class A office space, and affordable housing for seniors, working families, and those with special needs. Swope Community Builders’ holistic approach to community development works to overcome community challenges and stabilize neighborhoods. This approach results in vital community improvements, increased housing opportunities, expanded and improved employment prospects, and community programs for residents.

As committed neighborhood stakeholder, SCB has the capacity to deliver much-needed new development, particularly to the section of the corridor between Chestnut and Swope Parkway, which is currently underutilized but has strong redevelopment potential.

Amphitheatre

1 MIL

SCB has been a committed neighborhood stakeholder for almost �0 years. The neighborhoods within and adjacent to its service area (which include the Sheraton Estates, Swope Parkway / Elmwood, and Town Fork Creek neighborhoods), are predominantly low-density residential in character. The vast majority of houses are detached (single-family), generally built between the 1920s-19�0s. Historically middle class, these neighborhoods, like many in Kansas City, suffer from decades of disinvestment. However, conditions are generally more stable there than in other areas of the city. The area is only a short distance from major downtown / midtown employment clusters, and it also has excellent access to cultural, recreational, and institutional amenities to the south (at Swope Park), and to the west (Nelson-Atkins, UMKC).

Cleveland Avenue

Swope Parkway

STUDY AREA

$45,821

HOUSING UNITS VACANCY

KCMO

24.3% OF 4,083

8 Office and Retail Space 9 Residential Development

Mt Cleveland looking west along Blue Parkway

See Appendix for the Demographics Snapshot.

Mt. Cleveland Community Plan | 11 © 2017 DRAW ARCHITECTURE AND URBAN DESIGN LLC ALL DRAWINGS AND WRITTEN INFORMATION APPEARING HEREIN SHALL NOT BE DUPLICATED, DISCLOSED OR OTHERWISE USED WITHOUT THE WRITTEN CONSENT OF THE ARCHITECT.

6

SWOPE CORRIDOR REDEVELOPMENT FEASIBILITY STUDY

7

SWOPE CORRIDOR REDEVELOPMENT FEASIBILITY STUDY

8

9

1.0

1.0

SWOPE CORRIDOR REDEVELOPMENT FEASIBILITY STUDY

� The focus area has a significant amount of underutilized open / commercial space that could be redeveloped. The parcels zoned commercial south of Brush Creek Parkway and Blue Parkway are large enough to meet the building footprint and access requirements of today’s retailers.

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Infrastructure Swope Parkway / Blue Parkway Corridor Existing development along the Corridor is set-back from the street edge and does not give prominence to the Boulevard or Parkway character. Many properties have parking lots adjacent to the roadway decreasing the visibility of commercial offices, health care centers, retail shops and restaurant locations. Highway ��0 is a physical and visual barrier for the Corridor. While this vehicular route is a frequently trafficked by commuters during peak times of weekdays, the traffic counts are very light the remaining times of the week.

Brush Creek / Lower Town Fork Creek Issues� sedimentation, isolated, low visitor usage, geese nuisances, trash, no programming or attractions, stagnant water -algae-low oxygen, island eroding, sidewalk maintenance, decided vegetation, maintenance costs Opportunities� fish and wildlife habitat, degrading sedimentation basin, trash racks and hydronic separators, wetland treatment, aeration and/or circulation systems, native vegetation planting, programming and signage and attractions, better access and maintenance paths and boardwalks, public art

Brush Creek Coordinating Committee Meeting - �une 9th, 201� Focused conversation of habitat restoration at the Lake of the Enshriners. HDR presented the history, issues and opportunities for addressing concerns that the community and stakeholders share regarding the long-term maintenance of the Brush Creek.

Swope Parkway’s existing street section is designed to accommodate daily traffic counts 3-4 times heavier than what it actually carries. The Parkway’s excessive width and highway-like design creates a barrier to north-south connectivity. See Appendix for the potential ROW improvements that would imrpove vehicular �ow, allow for natural traffic calming, and increase pedestrian safety.

Retail Use Category

Commercial Types

See Appendix for the meeting materials and summary.

• • • • • • • • • •

Brush Creek flooding immediately following a storm event. PHOTO: July 4, 2017.

Variant

100-120

1�0-1�0

1�-�0

Westlake, Midland True Value

10-2�,000

90-1�0�

110-1�0

• • •

shopping� mixed-use �lifestyle centers� shopping� traditional CBD / Main St walkability restaurants (drive-thru, sit down, informal) food stores (specialty / ethnic) fitness / gyms diverse / programmed public realm

Coffee shop

national chain� suburban freestanding + drive-thru Starbucks

1,900-2,100

Coffee shop

national chain� urban

Starbucks

Restaurant (sit-down dining)

national chain� suburban

Olive Garden

8,000

80’

100’

Furniture, Home D�cor

national chain

Crate & Barrel

1�,000

�00-2,000

90�

1�0�

Clothing

national chain

Shopping

in suburbs office parks suburban corporate campuses shopping� strip malls shopping� department stores shopping� big box shopping� enclosed malls

Gap

�,�00-10,000 �0�-80�

110�-120�

General Merchandise national chain� suburban

Target

120-1�0,000 �00-�00�

�00-�00�

General Merchandise national chain� urban

Target

��,000

80�-120�

80�-120�

Specialty retailer

Old Westport

1,�00-2,000

1�-2��

�0-�0�

local / chain� urban

Parking sources� ITE, ULI, zoning code

11

SWOPE CORRIDOR REDEVELOPMENT FEASIBILITY STUDY

12

SWOPE CORRIDOR REDEVELOPMENT FEASIBILITY STUDY

13

2.0

SWOPE CORRIDOR REDEVELOPMENT FEASIBILITY STUDY

2.0

10

Depth

1�,000

1-2,000

mom-and-pop / local chain

Food & Beverage • • • •

Frequent flooding buries Brush Creek’s amenities under layers of mud and vegetative debris. PHOTO: August 31, 2017.

SWOPE CORRIDOR REDEVELOPMENT FEASIBILITY STUDY

Frontage

CVS

local

Hardware Store

Bank

mixed uses� adjacent to food, coffee, entertainment, and basic services co-working in CBD near transit sustainability� LEED-certified building, transit, bike, carpooling options family-friendly� on-site daycare, near schools, play areas, community centers

�ut-�f-Favor Features � �menities � Services • • • • • • •

Typical SF

national chain� suburban

Dry Cleaner

Barber

�n-Favor Features � �menities � Services

• • • •

Example Retailer

Pharmacy

Basic Neighborhood Services

Single Tenant Multi Tenant CBD Suburban Office Park High rise Low rise Creative Incubator Co-work

Public Transit

Healthcare

Healthcare

Public Transit

Healthcare Connections Overview • The nation’s healthcare sector is growing rapidly to meet the needs of aging population. Although this area has a relative abundance of health care services, many services are still unavailable, leaving surrounding the residents of surrounding neighborhoods under-served. The area’s existing assets can be leveraged to develop additional healthcare services, and will complement additional investments in healthy local food systems and recreational amenities. This will create local employment opportunities, while also reducing public health risks associated with poor diets, sedentary lifestyles, and lack of access to quality health care.

• Good transit service is a critically important component of any urban transportation system. The focus area is very close to a wealth of employment, educational, and cultural opportunities, but the infrequency and indirectness of current bus routes hinder the viability of transit as a transportation choice. Improved transit service and infrastructure will also increase access between the focus area’s growing employment and service opportunities and other areas of the city.

SWOPE HEALTH SERVICES IN HOME CARE

LOCAL JOBS

Health + Wellness

a. There is demand for additional health care services not currently available to the community. b. Leveraging existing health care assets will enhance the perception of the area as regional health care center, creating new development opportunities. c. Retrofit existing sites with features that draw the connections between personal health and the built environment.

BUS STOP AT AGNES AVENUE /SWOPE PARKWAY Public Transit: Observations And Opportunities

TRANSPORTATION HUB

a. Existing transit facilities lack basic essential features such as shelters, seating, paved landing pads, ridership info, and safe and complete last-mile connections. b. Prioritize improvements to pedestrian and cyclist connections for Swope Parkway/Blue Parkway Corridor. c. Plan development to support a future transit transfer station at Prospect Avenue and Swope Parkway. d. Consider aligning bus stops locations and shelters with future new development on the Corridor.

Public Transit

Public Transit

TEXT NOTE

TEXT TEXT NOTE NOTE

TEXT NOTE

The Shops

Potential Health Care Services

on Bent

h

way The Shops

th

LEGEND The Shops

Frequent Bus Service 12-15 minutes Regular Bus Service 30–60 minutes

E 51st Street

Bus Stop

LEGEND

Frequent Bus Service 12-15 minutes

LEGEND

Regular Bus Service 30–60 minutes

E 53rd Street

E 53rd Street

Bus Stop

Health Care Services

108 121

Potential Health Care Services SWOPE PARKWAY / BLUE PARKWAY CORRIDOR REDEVELOPMENT FEASIBILITY STUDY

20E 53rd Street

Parkw ay

e Healt

Park

e Heal

Potential �ransit Center

E 51st Street

2. DaVita a. Dialysis

SWOPE CORRIDOR REDEVELOPMENT FEASIBILITY STUDY

Brush Creek Blue

Brush Creek Swop Blue Swop

Satchel Paige Stadium

55

Satchel Paige Stadium

Elmwood Avenue

Boul

Ben E 51st Street

LEGEND Health Care Services

Satchel Paige Stadium

4900 Swope

Swope Parkway

71

The Shops

Elmwood Avenue

evard

ton

Bou

leva

rd

Elmwood Avenue

h

lth

Amphitheatre

4900 Swope

e Healt

way

Hea

Amphitheatre

Cleveland Avenue

Swope Parkway

Cleveland Avenue

Parkw ay

Swop

Park

Satchel Paige Stadium

121 108

47

Swope Parkway

Swope Parkway

pe

Brush Creek Blue

Brush Creek

Blue Swo

E 51st Street

Elmwood Avenue

4900 Swope

Amphitheatre

Cleveland Avenue

evard Boul Bent

on

rd leva Bou

Amphitheatre

Ben

ton

Prospect Avenue

Prospect Avenue

Prospect Avenue

Prospect Avenue

Swope Parkway

Swope Parkway

4900 Swope

Emanuel Cleaver II Boulevard

Emanuel Cleaver II Boulevard

Swope Parkway

Unavailable services a. Physical therapy and rehabilitation b. Podiatry c. Audiology d. Specialty Medical e. Specialty Dental f. Dermatology g. Nutrition Counseling h. Physical Fitness i. Chiropractic j. Massage k. Weight Loss / Dietitian

Emanuel Cleaver II Boulevard

Swope Parkway

1. Swope Health Services a. Medical - Ear-nose-throat, Respiratory, Physicals, Eye exams, Lab services, Radiology, Preventative health education, Immunizations, Screenings and preventative check-ups b. Dental c. Behavioral Health d. OB-GYN e. Pediatrics f. ACA Enrollment g. WIC h. KC Health Start Initiative i. Health Care Home Program j. A�er-Hours Clinic

TRANSPORTATION HUB

Health + Wellness

Emanuel Cleaver II Boulevard

Health Care Services along the Corridor

BUS SHELTERS

TRANSIT STOP ON SWOPE?

Observation� Existing transit facilities lack basic essential features such as shelters, seating, paved landing pads, ridership info, and safe and complete last-mile connections. • Opportunity� Stakeholders must prioritize improvements for pedestrian and cyclist connections to Swope Parkway / Blue Parkway corridor transit services. This will redress basic life safety issues, better connect people to jobs and services, and reduce household transportation expenditures. Future development should support a transit transfer station planned for Prospect Avenue and Swope Parkway. Existing bus stops and shelters should be realigned to better connect with new development.

SWOPE HEALTH SERVICES Healthcare: Observations And Opportunities

Cleveland Avenue

Observation� There is a significant amount of un-programmed or underutilized open space within the project area. • Opportunities� Retrofit underutilized sites with features and amenities (e.g. recreational trails, community gardens) that create connections between personal health and the built environment.

BUS SHELTERS

�ublic �ransit: Observations And Opportunities

MODERN MIXED-USE FACILITIES

Healthcare: Observations And Opportunities Observation� There is local unmet demand for health care services. • Opportunities� While the focus area already has strong existing health care assets, many types of services are still not available locally (Shannon wrote out a full list for us � here, or appendix�). Bringing additional health care service providers to the area will connect area residents with much-needed services, while enhancing the project area’s reputation as a regional health care center.

BUS SHELTERS

�ublic �ransit Connections Overview

HEALTH MONITORING

EXERCISE FACILITIES

SWOPE CORRIDOR REDEVELOPMENT FEASIBILITY STUDY

Potential �ransit Center

SWOPE PARKWAY / BLUE PARKWAY CORRIDOR REDEVELOPMENT FEASIBILITY STUDY

E 53rd Street

21

SWOPE CORRIDOR REDEVELOPMENT FEASIBILITY STUDY

26

SWOPE CORRIDOR REDEVELOPMENT FEASIBILITY STUDY

27

SWOPE PARKWAY / BLUE PARKWAY CORRIDOR REDEVELOPMENT SWOPE PARKWAY / BLUE PARKWAY CORRIDOR REDEVELOPMENT FEASIBILITY STUDY

SWOPE PARKWAY / BLUE PARKWAY CORRIDOR REDEVELOPMENT

FEASIBILITY STUDY

FEASIBILITY STUDY

FEASIBILITY MATRIX OPPORTUNITY

Redevelopment summary of the structure of the feasibility matrix.

DESCRIPTION

ORIGIN / LEAD STAKEHOLDER

SYNERGY OPPORTUNITY

POTENTIAL PROJECTS

COMMERCIAL INFILL

New commercial development to complement existing assets.

Swope Community Builders

(all future development, as above)� public realm� street trees, transit service, bus shelters

Pad sites located adjacent to the H&R Block Building

RETAIL INFILL

New retail development (multiple sites) to complement existing assets.

Swope Community Builders

(all future development, as above)� public realm� street trees, transit service, bus shelters

“east of strip mall next to Shops�

IMPLEMENTATION TIMING

Node A - Mixed-Use

Node C - Commercial + Retail

Neighborhood Complimentary

Pedestrian Friendly

New health care service providers to complement existing assets and close local service gaps.

Swope Community Builders

(all future development, as above)� public realm� street trees, transit service, bus shelters

west of Cleveland, across from Swope Health

RESIDENTIAL EXISTING

Support for existing assets� building repairs and maintenance program

Swope Community Builders

(all future development, as above)� public realm� street trees, transit service, bus shelters

RESIDENTIAL MULTI-FAMILY

New multifamily development to complement existing assets.

Swope Community Builders

(all future development, as above)� public realm� street trees, transit service, bus shelters

utilizes incentive programs to encourage home improvements and upkeep

SENIOR INDEPENDENT/ ASSISTED/ NURSING CARE

New senior living development to complement existing assets and provide health care on site. Planned completion of the Mt Cleveland Initiative.

Project Stakeholders Swope Community Builders

(all future development, as above)� public realm� street trees, transit service, bus shelters

Leverage planned repair and/or reconstruction projects to improve public ROW.

(Varies� see Potential Projects)

(Varies� see Potential Projects)

MIXED-USE RETAIL

SIT-DOWN EATERIES

RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT

Commercial + Retail: North of Blue Parkway

a. a� �n�ll �n�ll existing underutili�ed land with new commercial spaces. c� Provi�e the o��ort�nit� �or �i�e���se leasa�le s�ace at the �ro�n� level to activate a e�istin� �n�er�tili�e� lan� �ith ne� co��ercial s�aces� �e�estrian �la�a an� �ro�oteand �al�a�ilit�� site plansite features to incorporate green infrastructure, and b. b. Reconstruct Reconstruct plan featuresnew tolandscaping, incorporate new landscaping� green infrastructure� multi-functional passive outdoor spaces �� S���ort �hase� �evelo��ent �lannin� that enco�ra�es an� allo�s �or co��li�entar� ��lti���nctional �assive o�t�oor s�aces that �ill a�ract tenants an� �a�e the site an a�ractive thatand will attract tenants and make the site an attractive and enjoyable place to work. �evelo��ents on �a� sites� enjoyable place to work. c. Provide the opportunity for mixed-use leasable space at the ground level to activate a pedestrian plaza and promote walkability. d. Support phased development planning that encourages and allows for complimentary developments on pad sites. OFFICE + MIXED-USE (LEASABLE)

A segment of Swope Pkwy will need to be bridged over Town Fork Creek when the creek / �oodway is daylighted.

US Army Corps of Engineers + City of KCMO

Swope �Bridge�, Satchel Paige Stadium, Town Fork Creek Walk, Intersection Improvements

BUS STOPS / BUS SHELTERS

(discussion of increasing headways and/or realignment of routes through the study area, in anticipation of increased transit demand) There is currently a lack of basic infrastructure at study-area transit stops.

Project Stakeholders

Opportunities that increase walkability and/or transit demand� higher residential / commercial densities, bus shelters, community centers, street trees Opportunities that increase walkability and/or transit demand� higher residential / commercial densities, bus shelters, community centers, street trees

�leasa�le s��

B

�stalls�

B

C

105k sf

150k sf

45k sf

150k sf

-

105k sf 45k sf

218

45-68-113

69 on-site

EPT CONC N OPTIO

D

E PARK WAY

D E

117 on-site

B

C 14k sf

-

-

-

-

-

78

195

35

78

�ar�in� �stalls�

88+105 on-site

A

E PARK

B

WAY

C

US Army Corps of Engineers + City of KCMO

Swope �Bridge�, Satchel Paige Stadium, Town Fork Creek Walk, Intersection Improvements

Public realm improvements and programming to complement planned GI improvements. (Varies� see Potential Projects)

Project Stakeholders� � US Army Corps of Engineers + City of KCMO KC Parks and Recreation Department (HDR is consultant)

Swope �Bridge�, Satchel Paige Stadium, Town Fork Creek Walk, Intersection Improvements

sidewalks, programming, etc.

Community Center, Playground, Amphitheater, Amphitheater Pavilion, Exhibition / Performing Arts Space, Event Parking

"dredging habitat restoration longer-term maintenance plan�

EPT CONC N OPTIO

A

(critical path item preceding any Brush Creek community / park improvements)

B C

SWOPE CORRIDOR REDEVELOPMENT FEASIBILITY STUDY

47

D

B retail E

-

C -

D

-

-

15k sf

38

150

-

-

�ar�in�

59

136

136

62 on-site

60k sf 30k sf

62 on-site

E’ -

-

-

�stalls�

E 15k sf

60k sf 30k sf

30.6k sf 10.2k sf

resta�rant

�leasa�le s��

62 on-site

124 on-site

124 on-site

SWOPE PARKWAY / BLUE PARKWAY CORRIDOR REDEVELOPMENT

SWOPE CORRIDOR REDEVELOPMENT FEASIBILITY STUDY

-

-

-

-

6,500sf

8,000sf

5,000sf

24

A

-

16-24

16-24

24-40

parking

32

33

43

35

56

(units)

FEASIBILITY STUDY 54

A

B

SWOP E PARK WAY

EPT CONC N OPTIO C

D

E

RESIDENTIAL + URBAN FARMERS’ MARKET (LOCAL FOOD) + MIXED-USE A

B

C

urban farm

-

1.4 acre

-

mixed-use

17,500sf

5,750sf

-

36-45

-

39

60

50

15

resi�ential (units)

parking (stalls)

-

�i�e���se

C

13,250sf

-

resi�ential

(leasable sf)

OFFICE + MIXED-USE (LEASABLE) + RETAIL/RESTAURANT

Town Fork Creek daylighting and associated green infrastructure improvements

EPT CONC N OPTIO

SWOP

86 on-site

40 on-site

B

2,300 sf

mixed-use

retail

(stalls)

D

90.6k sf 40.2k sf

�leasa�le s��

RESIDENTIAL + RETAIL + MIXED-USE (LEASABLE)

(leasable sf)

A

45-68-113

114 on-site

o�ce��i�e���se

��nits�

LOWER TOWN FORK CREEK� PROGRAM + AMENITIES

EPT CONC N OPTIO

SWOP

C

150k sf or

105k sf 45k sf

retail

resi�ential

LOWER TOWN FORK CREEK� GREEN INFRASTRUCTURE

46

B

or

or

OFFICE + MIXED-USE (LEASABLE) + RETAIL + RESIDENTIAL

A

C

SWOPE CORRIDOR REDEVELOPMENT FEASIBILITY STUDY

D 150k sf

or

B

Project Stakeholders

WATERWAYS AND STORMWATER

LAKE OF THE ENSHRINERS

�ar�in�

C

PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION TRANSIT SERVICE

�leasa�le s��

o�ce��i�e���se

COLLEGE AVE

City of KCMO

�leasa�le s��

�i�e���se

COLLEGE AVE

�SWOPE� BRIDGE

Trail and other park amenity / Watkins cultural center upgrades�

TBD. (GO bond resolution (No. 1�09�1) just says �Benton Blvd Bridge over Brush Creek�)

o�ce D

RESIDENTIAL + RETAIL + MIXED-USE (LEASABLE) A

B

C

retail

-

-

13,750sf

mixed-use

17,500sf

16,750sf

-

resi�ential

36-45

44

-

parking

45

56

46

(leasable sf) COLLEGE AVE

BENTON BRIDGE REPAIR

�1. at Swope & Benton, synergy� Town Fork Creek 2. at Cleveland at Blue Parkway, synergy� Town Fork Creek �. at Cleaver II, synergy� Brush Creek trail realignment� Re-stripe / redesign Benton ROW to dedicate sufficient space for non-vehicular travel modes, facilitate trail connections and north-south connectivity� 1. neighborhood park, 2. improved town fork creek trail, �. pedestrian and cycleway connections, �. green infrastructure education amenity

LOCAL FOOD

1. Create a place-based mix of small-scale retail, healthy food, and sit-down cafes, restaurants, 1.an� Create cafes� restaurants� and�nits co�ee �� �ncl��in� senior an��or rental resi�ential at the shops. stri� �all site �ill increase ho�sin� co�ee sho�s� a place-based mix of small-scale retail� healthy food� and sit-down choice an� �oster vi�ranc� at the ne� � retro��e�employment retail s�aces� new spaces help incubate business-startups by local residents, increasing 2.2. These These newcan spaces can new help incubate new business-startups by local residents, increasing incomes, opportunities, and inco�es� e��lo��ent o��ort�nities� an� increase� nei�h�orhoo� availa�ilit� o� essential retail increased neighborhood availability of essential retail and commercial services. an� co��ercial services� �. Including senior and�or rental residential units at the strip mall site will increase housing choice and foster vibrancy at the new / retrofitted retail spaces.

AGNES AVENUE

INTERSECTION IMPROVEMENTS

EPT CONC N OPTIO

A

STREETS AND ROADWAYS

SOCIAL PLAZAS

Residential + Retail + Mixed-Use: South of Swope Parkway Residential + Retail + Mixed-Use: South of Swope Parkway

AGNES AVENUE

RESIDENTIAL SINGLE-FAMILY & INTERGENERATIONAL

PEDESTRIAN PLAZA + STREETSCAPE

LOW-RISE HOUSING

OUTDOOR SPACE

MIXED-USE RETAIL SITE OVERVIEW

Commercial + Retail� North of Blue Parkway

AGNES AVENUE

F UT UR E DEVE LO PM ENT INVEST M ENT

POTENTIAL HEALTH CARE SERVICES

STRATEGY THREE

STRATEGY TWO

ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

IN FR A ST R UC T URE

2.0

SWOPE PARKWAY / BLUE PARKWAY CORRIDOR REDEVELOPMENT FEASIBILITY STUDY

(units)

(stalls)

SWOPE PARKWAY / BLUE PARKWAY CORRIDOR REDEVELOPMENT SWOPE CORRIDOR REDEVELOPMENT FEASIBILITY STUDY 55 FEASIBILITY STUDY


feasibility

District Concept I Program Mix

COMME 120,000

RESIDEN 209,000

TOTAL: 4

LEGEND RETAIL RESIDENTIAL COMMERCIAL

OPEN SPACE PARKING

JOBS : RESIDENTS Innovation District

:

1

8,000 :

5,000

1.6

A Global Innovation District

FAR

5.6

PARKING SPAC

3,90 2,30


COMMERCIAL 120,000 M2

RETAIL 30,000 M2

PARKING 120,000 M2

DistrictDistrict Concept Concept I Program I Program Mix Mix RESIDENTIAL 209,000 M2 TOTAL: 479,000 M2

LEGEND RETAIL RESIDENTIAL COMMERCIAL

OPEN SPACE

COMMERCIAL FAR 120,000 M2

S

5.6

PARKING

PARKING SPACES

RETAIL 30,000 M2

3,900 2,300

PARKING 120,000 M2 JOBS

RESIDENTIAL 209,000 M2 TOTAL: 479,000 M2

: RESIDENTS JOBS : RESIDENTS

: 1: 1 1.6 1.6 8,000 :

5,000 8,000 :

5,000

A Global Innovation A District Global Innovation District

TIAL

CIAL

PACE

PARKING SPACES

3,900 2,300

ABOVE GRADE BELOW GRADE

ABOVE GRADE BELOW GRADE

FAR

FAR

5.6 5.6


sustainability

Kansas City International Airport - Single Terminal


LEED DOCUMENTATION

Developed LEED Documentation DEVELOPING LEED DOCUMENTATION standardized to STANDARDIZED templates TEMPLATES TO streamline and increase STREAMLINE AND INCREASE efficiency documented EFFICIENCY and FOR ZGF PROJECTS. seven LEED projects.

Created LEED tenantDESIGN design CREATING LEED TENANT and construction guidelines AND CONSTRUCTION GUIDELINES template.TO USE ON ZGF PROJECTS. TEMPLATE

ZGF LEED Documentation Templates


design

_DRAW 2018

The existing site topography slopes gradually down from the 19th & Oak corner in both directions. The corner elevation of roughly 803’ is equivalent to the raised dock-level foor of the existing warehouse structure and will allow for a mostly contiguous grade level fnish foor elevation across the entire Western portion of the site. With 20th street grade sitting roughly š†&)1."Žž."-.,.&0&there will be some challenges connecting all buildings to the parking structure at 20th and Oak.

19th and Oak Development


91_

The overall conceptual massing is broken downinto smaller, more contextually appropriate building blocks. The bar-building along 19th street which is the only concrete podium condition in the development on grade level which will accommodate retail/tenant amenity space, bends to suggest the gateway condition into the site along Locust street. Buildings “B” “E” and “C” help form the central courtyard which will feature unique tenant amenities including community garden space, swimming pool, grilling areas, and a dog park. The existing warehouse structure in the middle of the West portion of the site provides a “step down” in building mass/scale and serves the role of grounding the overall development at the pedestrian scale. This structure (building “E”) will feature a public food/ beverage tenant that will help draw the public into the midblock heart of the overall development. The eastern half of the development will include 45 +/- residentialunits in building “D” which will be provided with its own dedicated parking. The remaining portions of the development area will be phased to accommodate a commercial tenant and/or shared parking for the surrounding area.


______ Guest House _____

design

Clover Chen Josh Hemberger John Iiams

Event Hall _____ PHASE

______

G

F

E

2

D

C

B

G

A

1

F

E

Warren Place Event Center D

2

C

B

A

1


9

8

7

6

5

4

3

2

1 OWNER:

GENERAL NOTES ROOM SCHEDULE Level Basement Basement Basement Basement Basement Basement Basement Basement First Floor First Floor First Floor First Floor First Floor First Floor First Floor First Floor First Floor First Floor First Floor First Floor First Floor First Floor First Floor First Floor First Floor First Floor First Floor

B117

CIGAR LOUNGE

UP

8' - 0"

6' - 0"

4' - 0"

B115

BILLIARDS

2' - 9 1/2"

B120

B116

Storage

BAR AREA

BILLIARDS

B120

B121

UP

B119

B118

TV ROOM

B119

SCOPE OF WORK LIMITED TO CHANGES REQUIRED BY MEP

Built-in Casework

Basement 1/8" = 1'-0"

5

9

9

B109

B107

GUEST ROOM 1

KITCHEN

GUEST CLOSET 1

B109-A

B109-B

GUEST EN SUITE 1

8

B110

B108

4 DN

8

B104-A

B110

B102

ENTRY

B119

5

B105

6

B104

STAIR 2

B103

B102

B100

FRONT ROOM

GUEST ROOM 2

6

5

B104

GARAGE/STORAGE

5

First Floor RE: 1/B105 B117

CIGAR LOUNGE 9

8

UP

7

8' - 0"

6' - 0"

4' - 0"

BILLIARDS

6

2' - 9 1/2"

B120

B116

Storage

BAR AREA

BILLIARDS

B120

B121

UP

LOCKER ROOM

B118

TV ROOM

Basement Basement Basement Basement Basement Basement First Floor First Floor First Floor First Floor First Floor First Floor First Floor First Floor First Floor First Floor First Floor First Floor First Floor First Floor First Floor First Floor First Floor First Floor First Floor First Floor First Floor First Floor First Floor

B124

Mech Room

B119

SCOPE OF WORK LIMITED TO CHANGES REQUIRED BY MEP

Built-in Casework

Basement 1/8" = 1'-0"

5

9

9

B109

B107

GUEST ROOM 1

KITCHEN

B109-A

B112-A

GUEST EN SUITE 2

B112

B113

B112

FRONT ROOM

GUEST ROOM 2

7

B110

5

B106-A

5

B100

ENTRY

B119

6

B102-A

GUEST EN SUITE 3

First Floor 1/8" = 1'-0"

RE: 1/B105

4 DN

8

B104-A

Construction Type

5

ARCHITECT OF RECORD:

DRAW ARCHITECTURE + URBAN DESIGN LLC

G

214 W 21ST ST, SUITE 200 KANSAS CITY, MO 64108 T 816-531-8303 F 816-531-8305 LANDSCAPE ARCHITECT:

CONFLUENCE

417 DELEWARE ST. KANSAS CITY, MO 64105 T 816-531-7227 STRUCTURAL:

PT-2 PT-2 PT-2 PT-2 PT-2 PT-2 PT-2 PT-2 PT-2 PT-2 PT-2 PT-2 PT-2 PT-2 PT-2 PT-2 PT-2 PT-2 PT-2 PT-2

BOB D. CAMPBELL & CO. 4338 BELLEVIEW AVE KANSAS CITY, MO 64111 T 816-531-4144 MEP:

PKMR

13300 W 98TH ST LENEXA, KS 66215 T 913-492-2400 CIVIL:

F

KAW VALLEY ENGINEERING 8040 NORTH OAK TRAFFICWAY KANSAS CITY, MO 64118 T 816-468-5858 KEY PLAN

Hardware Type

A

B

C

Comments

PT-4

EXISTING

PT-7 PT-4 FULL GLASS METAL - RELITE

EXISTING EXISTING

E

D

Project Name Enter address here

accessible ramp PT-4

© 2017 DRAW ARCHITECTURE AND URBAN DESIGN LLC ALL DRAWINGS AND WRITTEN INFORMATION APPEARING HEREIN SHALL NOT BE DUPLICATED , DISCLOSED OR OTHERWISE USED WITHOUT THE WRITTEN CONSENT OF THE ARCHITECT.

EXISTING

ORIGINAL DRAWINGS SCALE TO 24" x 36" SHEET

PRINCIPAL IN CHARGE

D DAVISON

PROJECT ARCHITECT

J IIAMS

METAL - RELITE UP

Operation

spiral

Name

Room Floor Finish

Net Area

DN

T-2 T-1 WD-1 T-2 WD-1 T-2 T-1 tbd T-1 T-1 WD-1 WD-1 T-2 WD-1 tbd T-1 WD-1 T-2 WD-1

1

GENERAL NOTES 1.

Wall Finish

Base Finish

FINISH KEY - GUEST HOUSE tbd tbd tbd Model/Pattern Color Size tbd tbd tbd tbd tbd tbd tbd tbd tbd tbd tbd tbd

181 SF Manufacturer 478 SF 532 SF 405 SF 344 SF 255 SF 107 SF 16 SF 81 SF 223 SF 26 SF 116 SF 37 SF 120 SF 484 SF 27 SF 96 SF 148 SF 4 581 SF 216 SF 75 SF 48 SF 33 SF 31 SF 146 SF 41 SF 329 SF

J HEMBERGER, E SCHULTZ

UNLESS A PROFESSIONAL SEAL WITH SIGNATURE AND DATE IS AFFIXED, THIS DOCUMENT IS PRELIMINARY AND IS NOT INTENDED FOR CONSTRUCTION, RECORDING PURPOSES, OR IMPLEMENTATION.

Comments

2

PT-5 PT-1 PT-1 PT-5 PT-1 PT-5 PT-1 PT-1 PT-1 PT-1 PT-1 PT-1 PT-3 PT-5 PT-3 PT-1 PT-1 PT-3 PT-5 PT-1

3

T-2 PT-4 WD-2 T-2 WD-2 T-2 PT-4 PT-4 PT-4 WD-2 WD-2 T-2 WD-2 PT-4 WD-2 T-2 WD-2

Ceiling Finish

Comments

PT-2 Comments PT-2 PT-2 COMMON AREAS WALLS PT-2 CEILING PT-2 ACCENT WALLS n/a ENAMEL/HIGH-DURABILITY INTERIOR n/a TOILET ROOMS PT-2 BRICK PAINT PT-2 EXTERIOR METAL PAINT PT-2 KITCHEN PT-2 WORK SURFACE PT-2 LARGE FORMAT TILE PT-2 MOSAIC TILE A10 PT-2 A102 PRIMARY FLOORING PT-2 PRIMARY BASE PT-2 4 PT-2 PT-2 2 PT-2 PT-2 PT-2 PT-2 PT-2 PT-2 PT-2 PT-2 PT-2

2. 3.

C

PROJECT TEAM MEMBERS

Storage/ Janitor

stair to Casement Casement loft Casement Entry Casement Casement Casement 3 Casement Casement Casement ê1(#$‹2t ROOM SCHEDULE

4

B114 LOCKER ROOM Item B115 BILLIARDS B116 BAR AREA PAINT B117 CIGAR LOUNGE PAINT B118 TV ROOM PAINT B119 Mech Room PAINT B120 Storage PAINT B121 Toilet PAINT B100 ENTRY PAINT B100-A HALL SOLID SURFACE B101 TOILET SOLID SURFACE B102 GUEST ROOM 3 TILE B102-A GUEST EN SUITE 3 TILE B103 OFFICE/STORAGE WOOD FLOORING B104 GARAGE/STORAGE WOOD BASE B105 STAIR 2 3 B106 LINEN/STORAGE B107 KITCHEN B108 LIVING AREA B109 GUEST ROOM 1 B109-A GUEST EN SUITE 1 B109-B GUEST CLOSET 1 B110 STAIR 1 B111 VESTIBULE B112 GUEST ROOM 2 B112-A GUEST EN SUITE 2 B113 FRONT ROOM

Mark

Door Type

B118 B119 B120 B121 B124 B128 B101 B102 B102-A B103 B104 B104-A B105 B106 B106-A B107 B109 B109-A B110 B111-A B112 B112-A B113 B114 B115 B116 B117 B119 B120

Type Mark

8

B105

B104

STAIR 2

B103

B102

B102

B112-A

TOILET B116

B113

VESTIBULE

B115

B101

HALL

B111-A

B111

T-2 PT-4 WD-2 T-2 WD-2 T-2 PT-4 PT-4 PT-4 WD-2 WD-2 T-2 WD-2 PT-4 WD-2 T-2 WD-2

Width 2' - 6" 2' - 8" 2' - 8" 2' - 8" 2' - 8" 8' - 6" 2' - 0" 2' - 10 1/2" 2' - 8" 2' - 8" 15' - 3" 2' - 10 1/2" 6' - 0" 2' - 10 1/2" 2' - 8" 2' - 8" 2' - 10 1/2" 2' - 10 1/2" 10' - 0" 2' - 8" 2' - 0" 2' - 8" 2' - 6" 9' - 0" 3' - 0" 3' - 0" 6' - 0" 3' - 6 1/2" 3' - 2 1/2"

Height

Finish

8' - 0" 6' - 8" 6' - 8" 6' - 8" 6' - 8" 6' - 8" 6' - 8" 6' - 8" 6' - 8" 6' - 8" 7' - 0" 6' - 8" 7' - 0" 8' - 0" 6' - 8" 7' - 0" 6' - 8" 6' - 8" 8' - 0" 6' - 8" 6' - 8" 6' - 8" 8' - 0" 6' - 8" 6' - 8" 6' - 8" 6' - 8" 8' - 0" 8' - 0"

Hardware Type

1..,‹2t

CONTRACTOR TO CONFIRM LOCATIONS OF Room ALL LOAD BEARING WALLS PRIOR TO DEMOLITION. WHEN POSSIBLE AND ABLE RECYCLE AND SALVAGE DEMOLITION MATERIALS. CONTRACTOR TO CONFIRM LOCATIONS OF ROUGH OPENINGS OF ALL DOORS AND WINDOWS. DN

OWNER:

Owner

B

WARREN PLACE EVENT CENTER, INC 18605 COUNTY LINE ROAD EDGERTON, KANSAS 66021 ARCHITECT OF RECORD:

DRAW ARCHITECTURE RELEASE SCHEDULE + URBAN DESIGN LLC

G

214 W 21ST ST, SUITE 200 KANSAS CITY, MO 64108 T 816-531-8303 F 816-531-8305 LANDSCAPE ARCHITECT:

CONFLUENCE

417 DELEWARE ST. KANSAS CITY, MO 64105 T 816-531-7227 NO. RELEASE STRUCTURAL:

DATE

BOB D. CAMPBELL & CO. 4338 BELLEVIEW AVEFLOOR PLANS

A

KANSAS CITY, MO 64111 T 816-531-4144 MEP:

B101

PKMR 2

1 1

13300 W 98TH ST LENEXA, KS 66215 T 913-492-2400NOT FOR CONSTRUCTION Roof CIVIL: 24' - 0"Printed 10/19/2018 5:22:44 PM KAW VALLEY ENGINEERING

F

8040 NORTH OAK TRAFFICWAY KANSAS CITY, MO 64118 T 816-468-5858 KEY PLAN

A

02 - Loft 9' - 0"

B

C

Comments

B104

GARAGE/STORAGE

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

Manufacturer Anderson Anderson Anderson Anderson Anderson Anderson Anderson Anderson Anderson

Model

Construction Type

100 Series 100 Series 100 Series 100 Series 100 Series 100 Series 100 Series 100 Series 100 Series

E

01 - First Floor 0' - 0"

SCOPE OF WORK WITHIN CRAWL SPACE LIMITED TO CHANGES REQUIRED BY MEP

00 - Basement -10' - 0" PT-4

EXISTING

PT-7 PT-4 FULL GLASS METAL - RELITE

EXISTING EXISTING D

Project Name Enter address here

PT-4

© 2017 DRAW ARCHITECTURE AND URBAN DESIGN LLC ALL DRAWINGS AND WRITTEN INFORMATION APPEARING HEREIN SHALL NOT BE DUPLICATED , DISCLOSED OR OTHERWISE USED WITHOUT THE WRITTEN CONSENT OF THE ARCHITECT.

EXISTING

ORIGINAL DRAWINGS SCALE TO 24" x 36" SHEET

PRINCIPAL IN CHARGE

D DAVISON

PROJECT ARCHITECT

J IIAMS

METAL - RELITE

C

PROJECT TEAM MEMBERS

J HEMBERGER, E SCHULTZ

Window Schedule

B106 B100-A

DN B120

B114

GUEST ROOM 3

B107

B101

B109

7

Model 100 Series 100 Series 100 Series 100 Series 100 Series 100 Series DN Series 100 100 Series 100 Series

B106

DW

LIVING AREA

B117

3.

WARREN PLACE EVENT CENTER, INC 18605 COUNTY LINE ROAD EDGERTON, KANSAS 66021

Operation

UNLESS A PROFESSIONAL SEAL WITH SIGNATURE AND DATE IS AFFIXED, THIS DOCUMENT IS PRELIMINARY AND IS NOT INTENDED FOR CONSTRUCTION, RECORDING PURPOSES, OR IMPLEMENTATION.

Comments

Casement Casement Casement Casement Casement Casement Casement Casement Casement

B

B103

7

Finish

8' - 0" 6' - 8" 6' - 8" 6' - 8" 6' - 8" 6' - 8" 6' - 8" 6' - 8" 6' - 8" 6' - 8" 7' - 0" 6' - 8" 7' - 0" 8' - 0" 6' - 8" 7' - 0" 6' - 8" 6' - 8" 8' - 0" 6' - 8" 6' - 8" 6' - 8" 8' - 0" DN 6' - 8" 6' - 8" 6' - 8" 6' - 8" 8' - 0" 8' - ADA 0"

7 B108

OFFICE/STORAGE

B110

STAIR 1

1

8

LINEN/STORAGE

GUEST EN SUITE 1

8

B109-B

B109-A

2.

PT-2 PT-2 PT-2 PT-2 PT-2

Owner

DOOR SCHEDULE - GUEST HOUSE Level

B119

7

2' - 6" 2' - 8" 2' - 8" 2' - 8" 2' - 8" 8' - 6" 2' - 0" 2' - 10 1/2" 2' - 8" 2' - 8" 15' - 3" 2' - 10 1/2" 6' - 0" 2' - 10 1/2" 2' - 8" 2' - 8" 2' - 10 1/2" 2' - 10 1/2" 10' - 0" 2' - 8" 2' - 0" 2' - 8" 2' - 6" 9' - 0" 3' - 0" 3' - 0" 6' - 0" 3' - 6 1/2" 3' - 2 1/2"

1' - 5"

B118

B114

PT-5 PT-1 PT-1 PT-5 PT-1 PT-5 PT-1 PT-1 PT-1 PT-1 PT-1 PT-1 PT-3 PT-5 PT-3 PT-1 PT-1 PT-3 PT-5 PT-1

Height

B121

Toilet

5

Manufacturer

Number

Basement Tag Basement Basement PT-1 Basement PT-2 Basement PT-3 Basement PT-4 Basement PT-5 Basement PT-6 First Floor PT-7 First Floor SS-1 First Floor SS-2 First Floor T-1 First Floor T-2 First Floor WD-1 First Floor WD-2 First Floor First Floor First Floor 5 Floor First First Floor First Floor First Floor First Floor First Floor First Floor First Floor First Floor

5

B102-A

B115

Width

DN

Anderson Anderson Anderson Anderson Anderson Anderson Anderson Anderson Anderson

Level

GUEST EN SUITE 3

10

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

B103

B113

5

1/8" = 1'-0"

Door Type

B118 B119 B120 B121 B124 B128 B101 B102 B102-A B103 B104 B104-A B105 B106 B106-A B107 B109 B109-A B110 B111-A B112 B112-A B113 B114 B115 B116 B117 B119 B120

Type Mark

8

B106 B106-A

7

B112

B112

7

GUEST EN SUITE 2

B115

B101

TOILET B116

8

tbd tbd tbd tbd tbd

Comments

Window Schedule

OFFICE/STORAGE

B112-A

T-2 T-1 WD-1 T-2 WD-1 T-2 T-1 tbd T-1 T-1 WD-1 WD-1 T-2 WD-1 tbd T-1 WD-1 T-2 WD-1

toilet

GUEST ROOM 3

B111

VESTIBULE B112-A

B114

B100-A

HALL

B101

B107

B113

tbd tbd tbd tbd tbd

Ceiling Finish

ceremony (raised)

B109 B111-A

Base Finish

n/a n/a

B106

DW

LIVING AREA

DN B120

7

tbd tbd tbd tbd tbd

7

B117

9

181 SF 478 SF 532 SF 405 SF 344 SF 255 SF 107 SF 16 SF 81 SF 223 SF 26 SF 116 SF 37 SF 120 SF 484 SF 27 SF 96 SF 148 SF 581 SF 216 SF 75 SF 48 SF 33 SF 31 SF 146 SF 41 SF 329 SF

Wall Finish

CONTRACTOR TO CONFIRM LOCATIONS OF ALL LOAD BEARING WALLS PRIOR TO DEMOLITION. WHEN POSSIBLE AND ABLE RECYCLE AND SALVAGE DEMOLITION MATERIALS. CONTRACTOR TO CONFIRM LOCATIONS OF ROUGH OPENINGS OF ALL DOORS AND WINDOWS.

feature wall

7

1

8

LINEN/STORAGE

B109-A

Mark

Basement Basement Basement Basement Basement Basement First Floor First Floor First Floor First Floor First Floor First Floor First Floor First Floor First Floor First Floor First Floor First Floor First Floor First Floor First Floor First Floor First Floor First Floor First Floor First Floor First Floor First Floor First Floor

B124

Mech Room

LOCKER ROOM

10

LOCKER ROOM BILLIARDS BAR AREA CIGAR LOUNGE TV ROOM Mech Room Storage Toilet ENTRY HALL TOILET GUEST ROOM 3 GUEST EN SUITE 3 OFFICE/STORAGE GARAGE/STORAGE STAIR 2 LINEN/STORAGE KITCHEN LIVING AREA GUEST ROOM 1 GUEST EN SUITE 1 GUEST CLOSET 1 STAIR 1 VESTIBULE GUEST ROOM 2 GUEST EN SUITE 2 FRONT ROOM

Floor Finish

1.

DOOR SCHEDULE - GUEST HOUSE Level

B114

STAIR 1

Net Area

1' - 5"

B118

7

B114 B115 B116 B117 B118 B119 B120 B121 B100 B100-A B101 B102 B102-A B103 B104 B105 B106 B107 B108 B109 B109-A B109-B B110 B111 B112 B112-A B113

Name

B121

Toilet

5

Number

Landscape

1

10

GUEST CLOSET 1

2

75_ _DRAW 2018

5

FINISH KEY - GUEST HOUSE Tag PT-1 PT-2 PT-3 PT-4 PT-5 PT-6 PT-7 SS-1 SS-2 T-1 T-2 WD-1

Item PAINT PAINT PAINT PAINT PAINT PAINT PAINT SOLID SURFACE SOLID SURFACE TILE TILE WOOD FLOORING

Manufacturer

Model/Pattern

Color

Size

Comments COMMON AREAS WALLS CEILING ACCENT WALLS ENAMEL/HIGH-DURABILITY INTERIOR TOILET ROOMS BRICK PAINT EXTERIOR METAL PAINT KITCHEN WORK SURFACE LARGE FORMAT TILE MOSAIC TILE PRIMARY FLOORING

RELEASE SCHEDULE

NO.

RELEASE

DATE

FLOOR PLANS

A


_DRAW 2017

design COMMON GREEN

BREEZEWAY TO PARKING AREA SOUTHFACING ROOF PROFILE DESIGN TO BE PV-READY

PARKING

SOCIAL FRONT PORCHES

STR

COURTYARD

EET

IVE DR

SS CCE YA WA

PROJECT IMPERATIVES Intergenerational Living: Provide a mix of household sizes and building options that allow for intergenerational living close to one another.

R��� ��� - ��

R��� ��� - ��

S����� F���� ��� - ��

S����� F���� ��� - ��

F���� F���� �� - ��

F���� F���� �� - ��

Connect with the Neighborhood: Overall development design will visibly connect with the Mt. Cleveland, SPENA and Sheraton Estates neighborhoods. R��� ��� - ��

R��� ��� - ��

Complimenting Character: Exterior facade should compliment the character of existing housing stock in materiality and form.

S����� F���� ��� - ��

S����� F���� ��� - ��

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Community Social Spaces: Design gathering places for the community by including an indoor social room, children's playground, community garden, and outdoor senior recreation spaces. Incorporate Sustainable Home Features: Design the homes to optimize energy efficiency and leave flexibility to accommodate future sustainable home improvements, like solar panels. Attractive Native Landscaping: Creatively construct natural bioswales as a part of stormwater management on site as an attractive landscape amenity.

Mt Cleveland Chick Site

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129_

BOCCE COURTS

CHESS TABLES TO COMMUNITY GARDENS

COMMON GREEN PARKING AREA PARKING AREA

PATIO

TENANT PATIO

STR EE

WO ON E RF

F ER ON WO

T

E STR

ET

TENANT PATIO

WOONERF

ROOF ��� � ��

ROOF ��� � ��

SECOND FLOOR ��� � ��

SECOND FLOOR ��� � ��

DRI�EWAY ACCESS OR LANDSCAPING

PARKING AREA

FIRST FLOOR �� � ��

WOONERF

FIRST FLOOR �� � ��

ROOF ��� � ��

ROOF ��� � ��

SECOND FLOOR ��� � ��

SECOND FLOOR ��� � ��

PATIO

STREET

STREET

TO PARKING AREA

FIRST FLOOR �� � ��

FIRST FLOOR �� � ��

ROOF ��� � ��

ROOF ��� � ��

SECOND FLOOR ��� � ��

PARKING AREA

SECOND FLOOR ��� � ��

WOONERF

WOONERF

FIRST FLOOR �� � ��

DRI�EWAY ACCESS OR LANDSCAPING

FIRST FLOOR �� � ��

ROOF ��� � ��

ROOF ��� � ��

SECOND FLOOR ��� � �� STREET

SECOND FLOOR ��� � ��

PATIO

FIRST FLOOR �� � ��

TO PARKING AREA

STREET

FIRST FLOOR �� � ��


Using eight Integrated Design Events held over eight months, the team collectively made operational and design decisions to achieve facility outcomes, creating 96 same / right sized examination / procedure rooms with 92% flexibility, and maximizing the connections to the public center.

design

The Everett Clinic - Northpointe The 77,000 SF multi-specialty clinic—modeled after Smokey Point— implements large-scale operational, work flow, and cultural changes within a patient-centered environment. The new facility contains a primary care, walk-in, and a variety of multi-specialty clinical groups, digital imaging, laboratory services, and physical therapy within a “one stop shop” care model by bringing services directly to the patient.

Image of The Everett Clinic - Smokey Point

VICINITY MAP

To achieve the most efficient, patient-centered solution, ZGF used a cross-functional, Lean approach to programming and design. This involved working with an integrated team of care providers, doctors, nurses, medical assistants, laboratory and radiology technicians, and patients assembled to work collaboratively with the architect, contractor, project manager, and Clinic leadership to create a facility fully-focused on TEC’s number one core value: Do what is right for the patient. 537' - 7"

33' - 0" 69' - 4"

25' - 0"

LOT 12 LOT 13

CLINIC POD D

STAIR 1

CLINIC POD STAFF ENTRY C ELEV

Name

LAB AND IMAGING

LEVEL 1 - GROSS LEVEL 2 - GROSS

SUPPORT / MECH 470'

464'

compact spaces

25' - 0"

460'

15' - 6"

25' - 0"

456'

38' - 5"

PUBLIC PLAZA 456'

454'

15' - 6"

NEW CURB CUT

EXISTING CURB CUT NEW CURB EXISTING CURB CUT CUT

454'

452'

SITE PLAN LEGEND

Exisiting Building Footprint

Exisiting Building Footprint

Parking Stall

Parking Stall

CrossCross Walk - Walk Stone Pavers - Stone Pavers

1 1

1 1

SITE PLAN 1" = 20'-0"

SITE PLAN

Trees = 44

AMBULANCE PICK-UP

MINIMUM OPEN SPACE (2% OF FLOOR AREA) EXISTING CURB CUT

73,494 net square feet 73,494 * 2% = 1,469.9 square feet of open space Public Plaza = 1,472 sf

MANOR AVENUE

MANOR AVENUE

452'

SITE PLAN LEGEND

EXISTING CURB CUT

197 above grade / 7 = 28.1

462'

PASSENGER DROP-OFF

RICAL ELECT NT EASEME

PUBLIC PLAZA

1 per 7 parking stalls

s t space compac

38' - 5"

MAIN ENTRY

es ct spac compa

MINIMUM TREE REQUIREMENT

ICAL ELECTR NT EASEME

PASSENGER DROP-OFF

VESTIBULE

compact spaces

ELEV

WALK-IN URGENT CARE WAITING AREA

compact spaces

299' - 0"

compact spaces

compact spaces AMBULANCE PICK-UP

ELEV

RAMP TO LEVEL B1 - PARKING

164TH STREET SW

RAMP TO LEVEL B1 - PARKING

MAIN ENTRY

Landscape = 18,233 sf

462'

RETAIL OPTOMETRY

CHECK-IN LOBBY

CHECK-IN

108,752 * 10% = 10,875.2 square feet

464'

compact spaces

VESTIBULE

466'

TOILETS

WALK-IN URGENT CARE

WAITING AREA

PUBLIC CONCOURSE

152,869 site gross square feet - 44,117 level 1 gross square feet ------------108,752 uncovered site area

464'

RETAIL OPTOMETRY

CHECK-IN LOBBY

468

CHECK-IN

MINIMUM LANDSCAPING (10% OF SITE)

462'

LAB AND IMAGING 466'

460'

GARDEN

MEETING ROOMS

CLINIC POD D

462'

WAITING AREA

PUBLIC CONCOURSE

TOILETS

MEETING ROOMS

GARDEN

STAIR 2

CLINIC POD C

466'

Easement - 1,358 ______________ Total net = 151,511 sf

468'

WAITING AREA

CLINIC POD B

464'

25' - 0"

STAIR 2

Area 44117 SF 32965 SF 77083 SF

NET SITE AREA

G

CLINIC POD A

Level LEVEL 1 LEVEL 2

GROSS SITE AREA - 152,869 sf

SERVICE AND STAFF ONLY

25' - 0"

Area 42249 SF 31245 SF 73494 SF

468

164TH STREET SW

CLINIC POD B

Level LEVEL 1 LEVEL 2

GROSS BUILDING AREA

468'

STAFF BREAK AREA

466'

299' - 0"

472'

GENERATOR

466'

CLINIC POD A

NET NET

compact spaces

compact spaces T/R/C

STORM DRAIN

NET BUILDING AREA

- 8" 27'

LOADING DOCK AREA

compact spaces

AREA CALCULATIONS

Name

472'

470'

468'

LINE

ELECTRICAL EASEMENT

compact spaces

69' - 8"

SUPPORT / MECH

470'

SERVICE AND STAFF ONLY

G

PROPERTY

466'

EXISTING CURB CUT TO REMAIN

ELEV

33' - 0"

STORM DRAIN

compact spaces

STAFF BREAK AREA

STAIR 1

STAFF ENTRY

PROPERTY LINE

DELIVERY TRUCK ACCESS RIGHT TURN IN / RIGHT TURN OUT

GENERATOR

T/R/C 537' - 7"

compact spaces

compact spaces

69' - 4"

VICINITY MAP

compact spaces

compact spaces

- 8" 472'

compact spaces

27'

LOADING DOCK AREA

472'

468'

EXISTING CURB CUT TO REMAIN

470'

ELECTRICAL EASEMENT

Image of The Everett Clinic - Smokey Point

25' - 0"

DELIVERY TRUCK ACCESS RIGHT TURN IN / RIGHT TURN OUT

69' - 8"

Using eight Integrated Design Events held over eight months, the team collectively made operational and design decisions to achieve facility outcomes, creating 96 same / right sized examination / procedure rooms with 92% flexibility, and maximizing the connections to the public center.

LOT 12 LOT 13

PROPERTY LINE

PROPERT Y LINE

12/10/2015 5:12:14 PM

programming and design. This involved working with an integrated team of care providers, doctors, nurses, medical assistants, laboratory and radiology technicians, and patients assembled to work collaboratively with the architect, contractor, project manager, and Clinic leadership to create a facility fully-focused on TEC’s number one core value: Do what is right for the patient.

Building Entry 460'

460'

Building Entry

Existing Trees

Existing Topography Public Plaza (Open Space)

Existing Topography Property Line

Property Line

Landscaped Area

Existing Trees New Tree Location

New Tree Location

Public Plaza (Open Space) Landscaped Area

The Everett Clinic

TRUE NORTH

1" = 20'-0"

0' 5' 10'

20'

40'


PROPERTY LINE

PROGRAM

ELECTRICAL EASEMENT

PROPERT Y LINE

compact spaces compact spaces

compact spaces

compact spaces

STAFF BREAK AREA

PROPERTY LINE

PROGRAM LEGEND

PROGRAM LEGEND

Check-In Check-In

LINE

CLINIC POD D

Retail Optometry

SUPPORT / MECH

UP

RetailWalk-in Optometry Urgent Care

RETAIL OPTOMETRY

CLINIC POD CHECK-IN C

D

LAB AND IMAGING

WALK-IN URGENT CARE

22'-0"

LAB AND IMAGING

ELEV

TOILETS

MEETING ROOMS

CHECK-IN LOBBY

CHECK-IN

WALK-IN URGENT CARE

RETAIL OPTOMETRY

WAITING AREA PUBLIC PLAZA

compact spaces

22'-0"

VESTIBULE

UP

UP

CHECK-IN LOBBY

CHECK-IN

WALK-IN URGENT CARE

RETAIL OPTOMETRY

PUBLIC PLAZA

MANOR AVENUE VESTIBULE

SITE PLAN

AMBULANCE PICK-UP

TOILETS

MEETING ROOMS

MAIN ENTRY

RICAL ELECT NT EASEME

ELEV

STAIR 2

Support / Mechanical

Lab and Imaging

compact spaces

Support / Mechanical

es ct spac compa

ICAL ELECTR NT EASEME

GARDEN

compact spaces

MAIN ENTRY

UP

STAIR 2

Lab and Imaging Walk-in Urgent Care

Meeting Rooms

compact spaces

CLINIC POD D WAITING AREA UP

compact spaces

CLINIC POD C

AMBULANCE PICK-UP

CLINIC POD B

VESTIBULE

compact spaces

CLINIC POD B

Meeting Rooms

compact spaces

MEETING ROOMS

CHECK-IN CLINIC POD LOBBY

compact spaces

CLINIC POD

TOILETS

AMBULANCE PICK-UP

UP

GARDEN A

CLINIC POD A

GARDEN

Clinic Support Space

Clinic Support Space

SUPPORT / MECH

UP

SERVICE AND STAFF ONLY STAIR 2 ELEV

164TH STREET SW

T/R/C

SERVICE AND STAFF ONLY

UP

compact spaces

GENERATOR

compact spaces

ELEV

WAITING AREA

ELEV

STAIR 1

STAFF ENTRY

STAFF ENTRY

ClinicClinic PodPod

compact spaces

compact spaces

LAB AND IMAGING

GENERATOR

T/R/C

G

EA

compact spaces CLINIC POD C

STAIR 1

CLINIC POD B

compact spaces

s t space compac

compact spaces

ELECTRICAL EASEMENT

compact spaces

CLINIC POD compact A spaces

compact spaces

STAFF BREAK AREA

2 2

SUPPORT / MECH

UP

SERVICE AND STAFF ONLY

PROPERTY LINE

PROPERTY

G

164TH STREET SW

ELEV

STAIR 1

T/R/C STAFF ENTRY

s

GENERATOR

es ct spac compa

1" = 20'-0"

MAIN ENTRY

MANOR AVENUE

PARKING COUNTS AND CALCULATIONS ICAL ELECTR NT EASEME

SITE PLAN

CAR COUNTS

1" = 20'-0"

25' - 0"

LEVEL B1 - PARKING GROSS 39444 SF

UP MP RA

Family and Type

PARKING COUNTS AND CALCULATIONS

PARKING SPACE - ADA VAN: 8'-0" x 20'-0" (9' AISLE)

73494 net / 250 =293.98 CAR COUNTS

SPACE - ADA: LEVELPARKING 1 - PARKING COUNTS

parkingnetspaces ASSUMED 4299 stalls/1,000 square feet

Parking Space: 8' x 22' - 0 deg

3 loading dock spaces

77,083 gross / 20,000 = 3.85

1" = 20'-0"

12/10/2015 5:12:56 PM

LEVEL B1 - PARKING GROSS 39444 SF

25' - 0"

1" = 20'-0"

ELEV

121 197

LEVEL 1

6

LEVEL 1

121 197

LEVEL B1 - PARKING COUNTS

Family and Type Level

PARKING SPACE - ADA: 9' x 18' PARKING (5' Aisle)

292 parking spaces * 40%

25' - 0"

2

ELEV

STAIR 1

LEVEL B1 - PARKING LEVEL B1 - PARKING 1

6

LEVEL 1

PARKING SPACE - ADA: 9' x 18' Parking (8' Aisle)

SPACE - ADA: 9' xB1 18' (8' LEVEL 2 Aisle)

LEVELParking 1 - PARKING COUNTS Space: 9' x 18' - 90 deg Grand total: 102

ASSUMED 4 stalls/1,000 net square feet 73494 net / 250 =293.98

Parking Spaces

Grand total: 102

Family and Type Van ADA Minimum Total ADA Minimum

Parking Spaces Minimum Total ADA Minimum Van ADA 201 to 300 7 1 1 201 to 300 7 PARKING SPACE - ADA VAN: 8'-0" x 20'-0" (9' AISLE)

299 parking spaces LOADING DOCK SPACES

77,083 gross / 20,000 = 3.85

LEVEL B1

Level LEVEL 1

Count

PARKING SPACE - ADA: 8'-0" x 20' (5' AISLE)

LEVEL 1

3

Parking Space: 8' x 16' - 90 deg compact

LEVEL 1

66

Parking Space: 8' x 22' - 0 deg

LEVEL 1

6

Parking Space: 9' x 18' - 90 deg Grand total: 197

LEVEL 1

121 197

292 parking spaces * 40% = 116.8 = 116/117 compact spaces ADA MINIMUMS TABLE 1106.1 ACCESSIBLE PARKING SPACES

Parking Spaces 201 to 300

Minimum Total ADA Minimum Van ADA 7 1

49 102

Count 2

LEVEL B1

1

LEVEL B1

50

LEVEL B1

49 102

TRUE NORTH

LEVEL B1 - PARKING COUNTS Family and Type

50

Level LEVEL B1

1

3 loading dock spaces COMPACT CAR COUNTS MAXIMUM

Count

B1 compact 1 Space: 8' x 16'LEVEL - 90 deg

TABLE 1106.1 ACCESSIBLE PARKING SPACESParking Space: 8' x 16' - 90 deg compact ADA MINIMUMS LEVEL B1 Parking Space: 9' x 18' - 90 deg TABLE 1106.1 ACCESSIBLE PARKING SPACES

CAR COUNTS

3

PARKING SPACE - ADA: 9' x 18' (5' Aisle)

PARKING COUNTS AND CALCULATIONS = 116.8 = 116/117 spaces ADA compact MINIMUMS

25' - 0"

1 2

LEVEL 1

LEVEL 1

Space: 9' x 18'LEVEL - 90 deg 1 66 Grand total: 197

Family and Type

= 116.8 = 116/117 compact spaces

ELEV

Parking Space: 8' x 22' - 0 deg

LEVEL B1 - PARKING COUNTS

292 COUNTS parking spaces * 40% COMPACT CAR MAXIMUM

STAIR 2

66

Parking Space: 9' x 18' - 90 deg Grand total: 197

COMPACT CAR COUNTS MAXIMUM 3 loading dock spaces

STAIR 2

3

LEVEL 1

Count

1

Parking Parking Space: 8' x 16' - 90 deg compact

LOADING DOCK SPACES

MANOR AVENUE

Count 1

LEVEL 1

Level

LEVEL 1

PARKING SPACE - ADA: 8'-0" x 20' (5' AISLE)

299 parking spaces 77,083 gross / 20,000 = 3.85

8'-0" x 20' (5' AISLE)

Level LEVEL 1

Parking Space: 8' x 16' - 90 deg compact

Family and Type

PARKING SPACE - ADA VAN: 8'-0" x 20'-0" (9' AISLE)

LOADING 73494 net / 250 =293.98 DOCK SPACES

LEVEL B1 - PARKING GROSS 39444 SF

25' - 0"

P PU AM

ELEV

LEVEL 1 - PARKING COUNTS

ASSUMED 4 stalls/1,000 net square feet

STAIR 1

ELEV

STAIR 1

2 2

Level

Count

PARKING SPACE - ADA: 9' x 18' (5' Aisle)

LEVEL B1

2

PARKING SPACE - ADA: 9' x 18' (8' Aisle)

LEVEL B1

1

Parking Space: 8' x 16' - 90 deg compact

LEVEL B1

50

Parking Space: 9' x 18' - 90 deg Grand total: 102

LEVEL B1

49 102


design

IAN E N PROGRESSIVE DESIGN-BUILD

The Port of Seatte International Arrivals Facility (IAF) is a multi-level, 450,000 sq which will span 900 linear feet at a clears an existing taxi lane and new sterile Bag-first facility will process 2,600 passengers per hour during its peak, as the i circulation, Custom and Border Protection offices, Center for Disease Contro AERIAL VIEW LOOKING EAST SSAT (EXISTING)

BRIDGE

STERILE CORRIDOR POD C

STERILE CORRIDOR POD A STERILE CORRIDOR POD B

CONCOURSE A (EXISTING) AUTOMATED PRIMARY RECHECK

CBP PUBLIC RECEPTION

CBP ADMIN AND SUPPORT

SECONDARY PROCESSING

BAGGAGE CLAIM

TRIAGE

AERIAL VIEW LOOKING WEST

INTEGRATED TEAM

PASSENGER EXPERIENCE

Collaborates with the Port of Seattle IAF Team, Clark Construction, Consultant, and SOM Architectural Design team in a co-location office environment.

Design expert for ensuring inbound international passengers experience the Pacific Northwest sense of place while in the International Arrivals Facility.

FG

FF 12'-6"

FE 8'-6"

1:3

8'-0"

4'-6" CLEAR

6'-0"

4'-9 3/16"

1'-11" STRUCTURAL BRACING

TUG

9'-8 9/16"

TUG

CONVEYOR ZONE

13'-6" CATWALK/CONVEY

4'-1"

1'-0"

6'-0" CONVEY/CAT

1'-0"

STERILE EGRESS 5'-1"

9'-0"

10'-0"

DOMESTIC EGRESS

5'-6" HVAC

3'-6" STRUCT

DUCT ZONE

1'-6"

The Port of Seattle International Arrivals Facility (IAF) is a multi-level, 450,000 square-foot facility connecting the existing South Satellite and Concourse A buildings. A Pedestrian walkway, which will span 900 linear feet at a clears an existing taxi lane and new sterile corridor with gatepods connect arriving international passengers to the new IAF. This first Automated Primary Bag-first facility will process 2,600 passengers per hour during its peak, as the international gates and baggage claim devices. The facility integrates baggage transfer, ramp/ tugpath traffic circulation, Custom and Border Protection offices, Center for Disease Control offices, and Transportation Security Administration security screening checkpoint.

7'-0"

TERRACED WALL OR STEEP SLOPE

LIFE SAFETY

SYSTEMS COORDINATION

Reviews potential for altering existing egress strategies of Concourse A and GMLH Arrivals Hall and develops the egress strategy for sterile and nonsterile persons in the new facility with the AHJ.

Works with structural, mechanical, electrical, plumbing, environmental graphics, civil, security, and baggage consultant teams to orchestrate systems in the facility.

Seattle Tacoma International Airport - International Arrivals Facility


000 square-foot facility connecting the existing South Sattelite and Concourse A buildings. A Pedestrian walkway, sterile corridor with gatepods connect arriving international passengers to the new IAF. This first Automated Primary s the international gates and baggage claim devices. The facility integrates baggage transfer, ramp/tugpath traffic ontrol offices, and Transportation Security Administration security screening checkpoint. RESHOLD AXON

ASK-250 - GMLH Backflow Detec

2-HR RATED DOORS ON HOLD OPENS IAF

CDC

CBP ADMIN

EXISTING SOUTH SATELLITE (SSAT)

L02A

EXISTING SSAT APRON PROPOSED BRIDGE

SECONDARY

EXISTING PROPOSED APRON

CANINE

EXISTING PARKING GARAGE (8 STORIES)

DOOR

RE-√ SSCP L02 LOCKERS+FIT L01A ENTRY/ENROLL L01

EXISTING CONCOURSE A

PARKING 5

PAIRED SLIDING DOORS AT ANTI-PASS-BACK PASSAGEWAY*

2A*

ICE

PROPOSED STERILE CORRIDOR

PROPOSED IAF

THRESHOLD W/ VIEW TO WATER FEATURE

ANTI-PASS-BACK PASSAGEWAY

1A* DOOR

10’-0”

2

2-HR RATING REQ’D

ALARM

ANTI-PASS-BACK PASSAGEWAY

1

ALARM

AERIAL VIEW OF SEATTLE TACOMA INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT

2B DOOR

1B DOOR

12’-0”

OR TO HAVE ROBUST NICAL LOCK TO INHIBIT DOOR FULL CLOSED POSITION.

BACK-FLOW DETECTION ZONE

PRE-ALARM

GMLH

O N G RO UP, LLC & MERRILL LLP

EXISTING CONDITIONS

FACILITIES PROGRAMMING

ACCESS+SECURITY

Coordinates the documentation of existing site, civil, roadway and landscape conditions, as well as, existing Concourse A and GMLH Arrivals Hall building conditions.

Manages the facility programming of international passenger processing, airline operations, baggage transfer, ramp/tugpath traffic circulation, Custom and Border Protection offices, Center for Disease Control offices, Transportation Security Administration security screening checkpoint, and airport maintenance.

Evaluates options for access control considerations, ensuring the security and safety of passengers, CBP officers, airport employees, and airlines employees at the Seattle Tacoma International airport.

GE NT -A GE 4 2 1-A 4

DN UP DN DN

4-AGENT STATIONS

A32

A32.1 S3

A33

A33.4

A64.5

DN

DN

GMLH LADDER TRUSS (E) SHOWN DASHED

UP

DN

DN

GMLH CURTAINWALL MULLION (E)

6

50

3/8"

11'6

4-AGENT STATIONS

SJ

WD

T.O.C. +421' - 3"

15'-

11" 2'-0

13'4

FF +422'-11"

1/2" 4'-3 3/4"

ING OR " FLO 2'-9 OD +42

6'-3 1/8"

T.O.C. +421' - 4" 1/8" 1'-1

slop dn (no greater than 5%) "

3'-1 1 1/2"

UPDN

4" 23'5

1/2"

3' - 9"

3' - 9"

3' - 10"

ELEVATION

5'-3

9

1/4"

"

1/2"

7'-5

1'-0"

SST COLUMN BASE, TYP.

DN UP DN

INTERIOR ELEVATIONS - GMLH THRESHOLD - EAST SCALE: 1/4" = 1'-0"

3 12'-

1/2"

PERFORATED ALUM COLUMN COVER, TYP. SST PROTECTIVE RAIL, TYP.

106.52° 6"

3 A3.10.1.0

11/1 8'-4

6'-11

3' - 9"

34'-

slop dn (less than 5%)

ING OR FLO

3' - 9"

1/4"

e) slop

3' - 10"

IAF-3000 - RAMP LEVEL 375' - 0"

SST GUARDRAIL

OD WO AIN 0" GR 0'-1 " 0'-8 END +42 +42 FF TOC

T.O.C. 420' - 10"

BUTT JOINT TYP.

(no

SEE:21 / A9.5.1.3

BACKFLOW DETECTION

ING OR FLO " 1'-2 OD +42

11

50 50

20170303

WO AIN " TOC GR 1'-4 END +42 FF

SST FIRE-RATED DOORS ON HOLD OPEN

50

"

2" 10'-

EXTERIOR WHT METAL PANELING

SST SLIDING SECURITY DOORS

DN

WO TOC AIN 1" GR 2'-1 END +42 FF

EXTERIOR WHT METAL PANELING 4-AGENT STATIONS 50

A64.2

1/8"

"

5'-3

DN UP DN

50

5'-5

1/2"

DN

T.O.C. 420' - 10"

5'-8

1/2"

9"

1/2"

30'0

5

DN

DN

UP

DN

DN

SPECIAL OPERATIONS

INTERIOR DETAILING

PROCUREMENT PACKAGES

Meets with user groups and stakeholders to discuss the operational needs and desires in the facility, including Port of Seattle Security, Airport Maintenance and Operations, CBP National and Local, CDC, TSA, FWS, and Airlines Representatives.

Documents the detailing of interior finishes of wall partitions, wall protection, flooring transitions, material connections, custom doors, seismic joints, and fire-rated separations.

Manages architectural teams in the development of contractor procurement packages for: stairs, ceilings, flooring, doors and door hardware, millwork/casework, FFE, and interior partitions.


design

INITIAL TUGPATH STUDY

Seattle Tacoma International Airport - International Arrivals Facility CLAR K C O N S TR U C T IO N G R O U P, L L C S K I D MOR E , O W I NG S & M E R R IL L L L P

ASK-248 - Landscape Slope at Tugpath


COST REDUCTION - ALT DESIGN STUDIES

ALT A

ASK-248 - Landscape Slope at Tugpath

ALT B 1:3

ALT C 1:3

1:3

1:2 PLANTING POCKETS

TERRACED WALL OR STEEP SLOPE

TALLUS OR STEEP SLOPE

DD TUGPATH SECTION (11-17-2016)

ASK-248 - Landscape Slope at Tugpath

OPPORTUNITIES:

OPPORTUNITIES:

OPPORTUNITIES:

Maintain vegetation on the north tug path wall Reduction of retaining walls to the north

Tallus provides Northwest landscape character Reduction of retaining walls to the north

Stepped vegetation on the north tug path wall Reduction of retaining walls to the north

CHALLENGES:

CHALLENGES:

CHALLENGES: LIGHTWEIGHT SOIL MEDIUM ON TOP OF STRUCTURE, DEPTH VARIES, SEE SECTION 2/L5.0.1

Fall protection required Maintenance access - ladder

Maintenance access - pathway on tallus

Fall protection required Maintenance access - steps integrated into terrace

RIGID INSULATION PER ARCH

CONTINUOUS DRAINAGE MAT WITH FILTER FABRIC

TUG PATH

GEOFOAM BLOCKS LIGHTWEIGHT FILL MATERIAL, 24" DEPTH LAYERS (EPS-19 AVAILABLE FROM FOAM CONTROL, GEOFOAM.COM, OR EQUAL)

TH

TH

PA

PA

G TU

TU

CA

RT

PA

GEOFOAM BLOCKS LIGHTWEIGHT FILL MATERIAL, 24" DEPTH LAYERS (EPS-19 AVAILABLE FROM FOAM CONTROL, GEOFOAM.COM, OR EQUAL)

G

IN.

TH

4' M

COIR FIBER SOIL WRAPS

DRAINAGE MAT WITH FILTER FABRIC

DRAINAGE MAT WITH FILTER FABRIC

NORTH LIGHTWELL TUG CLARK C ON SPATH T RROOF U C T ION GR OU P, L L C SECTION EAST TO WEST 03

LONGITUDINAL SECTION @ TUGPATH

L2.0.2R R IL L L L P 1/4"DMOR = 1'-0" SKI E , OW IN GS & ME

LIGHTWEIGHT SOIL MEDIUM, MOUNDED TO 24" AT TREE LOCATIONS

CRUSHED ROCK MAINTENANCE STRIP 4" MIN. DEPTH

1

CONCOURSE A

BARK MULCH, 2" DEPTH

STACKED BASALT SLABS, CUT TO 3-5" THICK

2'

4:1 MAX SLOPE

6" DEPTH

CMU LEVELING BLOCKS TUG PATH STRUCTURAL ROOF

1'-9"

REINFORCED CONCRETE RETAINING WALL 24" DEPTH

IAF

WATERPROOF MEMBRANE PER ARCH

TRANSVERSE SECTION @ TUGPATH 1/2" = 1'-0"

02

L2.0.2

CLARK C ON S T R U C T ION GR OU P, L L C SKI DMOR E , OW IN GS & ME R R IL L L L P

3'

DRAINAGE MAT WITH FILTER FABRIC, PER ARCH RIGID INSULATION PER ARCH ROOT BARRIER PER ARCH

NORTH LIGHTWELL TUG PATH ROOF SECTION EAST TO WEST

JUTE MATTING

48"

CONTINUOUS DRAINAGE MAT WITH FILTER FABRIC

MIN

.

JUTE MATTING

1

CRUSHED ROCK MAINTENANCE STRIP 4" MIN. DEPTH


design

Hysan Place


*Photo from: KPF.com


13

eview Board (HPRB) will discuss a new set of designs for the Benning

design

sion on Fine Arts (CFA) already got a look last week.

Aerial view. Top: "Vertical/Civic" option. Bottom: "Horizontal/Podium" option.

DDOT) showed earlier concept designs to HPRB and CFA in November. CFA recom

wanted it to be as small and unobtrosive as possible.

. One has more vertical architectural elements designed to give the building a "ci

the same height, but the "horizontal/podium" design sets the 3rd floor back from

District Department of Transportation - Car Barn Training Center

Aerial view. Top: "Vertical/Civic" option. Bottom: "Horizontal/Podium" option.

ation (DDOT) showed earlier concept designs to HPRB and CFA in November. CFA r


DC Streetcar Anocostia Alignments

*Photo from: ZGF.com


SPACE NEEDS, AND PRIORITIZING RECOMMENDATIONS FOR CAMPUS SCHEDULING, PHYSICAL SPACE IMPROVEMENTS, AND TECHNOLOGY.

design COLLABORATED DESIGN AND COORDINATED DOCUMENTATION OF A RENOVATION OF A LECTURE HALL BUILDING FOR THE EVERGREEN STATE COLLEGE.

EXTERIOR

EAST ELEVATION

Evergreen Lecture Hall

SOUTH ELEVATION


EXTERIOR - RED SQUARE

NOR

Photo from: ZGF.com


detailing

GMLH �H��SH�LD A���

ASK-250 - GMLH Backflow Detection

2-H� �A��D DOORS ON H�LD ����S IAF

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SP

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SP

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2B DOOR

S

S

110

110

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GMLH SHEET NOTES

SP

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SP

AD

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C LARK C ON ST R U C T I ON GR OU P, L L C S KIDM OR E, OW I N GS & M ER R I L L L L P

1 CR-60

SP

15 A9.5.1.1

ASK-250 - GMLH Backflow Detection

75

25 A9.5.1.1

24 A9.5.1.2

A33

A32

GENERAL NOTES

SP

FRITTED TRANSLUCENT TO BE ADDED TO GMLH GLAZING (E)

FJ.2

PS

J.1

5

A6.2.1.1

4' - 0"

D4.0 2 SST WALL PROTECTION CART RAIL, TYP.

3' - 5 1/16"

1' - 0"

SC

4' - 0"

D4.0 2

SP

4' - 0"

3

DETECTION 4'BACKFLOW - 0" 4' - 0" 4' - 0"

4' - 0"

EQ

PS

SP

SLOTTED SLAB

PS

SP

T-BARS TO BE5PLACED AT 4' - 0" O.C. SHOWN DASHED

6' - 7 5/16"

1B DOOR

4' - 0"

2 A9.5.1.3

A6.2.1.1 EQ

DOOR 4' - 0"

3' - 9"

SC

S1

FH.5

�A� ALARM

4' - 0"

3 A9.5.1.3

CL

3' - 9"

9' - 3 1/4"

GMLH LADDER TRUSS (E)

CL

AG

AH

MS

HAT-CHANNEL SPACING SHOWN DASHED EXHAUST FAN ON ROOF

SC BACKFLOW DETECTION

MS

OPEN TO ABOVE

S1

NOT FOR CONSTRUCTION

AH METAL PANEL REQUIRED AT BACKFLOW DETECTION AREA (LIGHT FIXTURES WITHIN BACKFLOW DETECTION TBD).

SC

H

SP

MS

MS

2" X 3" PROFILE LINEAR LIGHT FIXTURE; OMIT WOOD SLAT WHERE LIGHT FIXTURE OCCURS.

3' - 9"

5.03%

3' - 9"

DN 1:20

7

EQ

A6.2.1.1

2B PRE-ALARM

EQ EQ

9' - 3 1/4" 0' 0' - 7"- 7"

8

AF

FH.8DOOR

TERRAZZO TO MATCH EXISTING

9' - 6 9/16"

SST GUARD RAILS

4

SC

30" (6 SLAT) X LENGTH PANELIZED CEILING SECTIONS, TYP.

SC

EQ

FFE +374' - 11" TOC +374' - 8 1/2"

BACKFLOW DETECTION

S

FJ.2

EQ

FFE +375' - 0"

EQ

SLOTTED SLAB

2A� ALARM

A6.2.1.1

110

C4.0 2

CONTINUOUS LINEAR LIGHT FIXTURE, TYP.

J.1

EQ

PS DOOR

A6.2.1.1

SC

6

6

D4.0 2

F1.0 -

A32

AE

PAVING (E) TO REMAIN, REF:A5.5.1.34 LANDSCAPE

3' - 5 1/16"

C4.0 2

A32.1

SP

1 A9.5.1.4

28' - 0 1/16"

FFE +375' - 0"

A33

EQ

A65.8 C4.0 2

REPLACE PAVING TO MATCH EXISTING, REF: LANDSCAPE

A33.4

15' - 0"

EQ

30' - 0"

EQ

11' - 3"

VICINITY MAP

N

H

30" (4 SLAT) X 12' - 0" CEILING SECTIONS, FH TYPICAL

A5.5.1.34

FGSHEET NOTES

9' - 11 5/16"

33' - 10 1/16"

DDR1 PLAN A33.4

2/3/2017 4:36:17 PM STIA1612 - A - IAF Building

Design Builder:

Clark Construction Group, LLC 701 Dexter Avenue North Seattle, WA 98109

A32.1

1

ENLARGED PLAN

PLAN

IAF-7000 - CONCOURSE A OVERPASS RCP, SECTOR IAF 7 - Callout 1 1 SCALE: 1/4" = 1'-0"

IAF - 3000 - RAMP LEVEL ENLARGED PLAN, IAF - GMLH THRESHOLD SCALE: 1/4" = 1'-0"

a� ���-ALA�M S��S��� one at GMLH �o�ta� ��a�e ����-ALA�M� �� ALA�M S��S��� one �e� anti-�a��-�ack �a��a�ewa� � ALA�M � c� �ASSAG� S�A��S� �e����een t�a��c-�i��t �t��e in�icato�� on wa�� at �ot� t�e ent�ance an� e�it �oo�� � PS icon� Architect/Engineers:

Skidmore, Owings & Merrill LLP One Front Street San Francisco, CA 94111

Architect:

Structural:

Consultants:

The Miller Hull Partnership, LLP 71 Columbia-Sixth Floor Seattle, WA 98104

Skidmore, Owings & Merrill LLP One Front Street San Francisco, CA 94111

ARUP North America Ltd 719 Second Ave, Suite 400 Seattle, WA 98104

2 CR-7

Suehiro Architecture 71 Columbia-Sixth Floor Seattle, WA 98104

Schlaich Bergermann and Partner Ip 555 8th Avenue, Suite 2402 New York, NY 10018

BNP Associates 14 Fairfield Drive Brookfield, CT 06804

O'Brien and Company 811 1st Ave, Suite 380 Seattle WA 98104

Patano Studio 603 Stewart St, Suite 207 Seattle, WA 98101

KPFF Consulting Engineers 1601 5th Ave #1600 Seattle WA 98101

Hart Crowser 1700 Westlake Ave North, Suite 200 Seattle WA 98109

Lerch Bates 19515 North Creek Pkwy, Suite 304 Bothell WA 98011

Luma Lighting 1501 E Madison St Seattle WA 98122

Integrated Design Engineers 1200 Fifth Avenue, Ste 1208 Seattle, WA 98101

DESIGNER:

MD

DRAWN BY:

Author SCALE:

1/4" = 1'-0"

DATE:

20 JANUARY 2016 CHECKED BY:

Checker

CHECKED/APPROVED BY:

MMF/SA

THRESHOLD - GMLH - RCP SCALE: 1/4" = 1'-0"

1

0

8

16

24

32

A5.1.1.1 Scale

�� M����� S��S�� �etect� a���oac�in� �e�e�t�ian��� an� act�ate� ent�ance �oo�� � MS icon� SEA-TAC INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT e� S������� �AM��AS �ocate� to �etect �o��i��e �a�� t��o��� INTERNATIONAL ARRIVALS FACILITY IAF- ENLARGED RCP atte��t� � SC icon� �� ��M��� ������L� �n��t� a�e ��o�i�e �o� e�te�na� cont�o� o� �o��owin� ��nction�� an� can �e cont�o��e� �� �e�ote contact� o� a ��i��in� �ana�e�ent ���te�� an� �a�e ��io�it� o�e� t�e �oca� cont�o��e�

Feet

1 CR-59, 59.2, 60

PROJECT ENGR./ARCH:

CKB

Magnusson Klemencic Associates 1301 Fifth Ave, Suite 3200 Seattle WA 98101

ENLARGED PLAN

DDR1 RCP

A2.10.11

POS PROJECT MANAGER:

REVISIONS

NO. 1

DATE 17 NOV 2016 20 JAN 2017 17 FEB 2017

BY SOM SOM SOM

DESIGN DEVELOPMENT DESIGN DEVELOPMENT R1 QA/QC DESIGN DEVELOPMENT R1

DESCRIPTION

APP'D

NO.

DATE

BY

DESCRIPTION

APP'D

POS PROJECT ENGINEER: POS DESIGN ENGINEER: POS DRAFTER: POS SCALE: POS DATE:

POS CHECKED/APPROVED BY:

C LAR K C ON ST R U C T I ON International GR O U P, L L C Seattle Tacoma Airport - International Arrivals Facility SK I D M OR E, OW I N GS & M ERR I L L L L P

NOT FOR CONSTRUCTION

VICINITY MAP

PROJECT NAME:

SHEET TITLE:

POS WORK PROJECT NUMBER

U00059 CONSULTANT'S PROJECT NUMBER

215129 POS PROJECT TRACKING NUMBER

STIA-1612

A4.90.1


GMLH THRESHOLD AXON

ASK-249 - Threshold Wood Slat Profiles

METAL PANEL CEILING WOOD SLAT CEILING

GMLH

METAL PANEL CEILING

BACK-FLOW DETECTION ZONE

A33.4

GENERAL NOTES

25 A9.5.1.5

IAF

10’-0”

24 A9.5.1.3

2-HR RATING REQ’D

WOOD SLAT DETAIL @ WALL

ASK-249 - Threshold Wood Slat Profiles

C L A R K C O NS T RUCT I ON GROUP, LLC S K ID MORE , OW I NGS & M E RRI LL L LP

23 A9.5.1.5

0' - 3 3/4" EQ

21 A9.5.1.5

EILING HEIGHT

3/4" SOLID WOOD NOSING

3/4" VENEERED PLYWOOD GRAIN TO MATCH WOOD NOSING

0' - 5 1/2"

EQ

3/4" VENEERED24PLYWOOD

A9.5.1.4

DE TBD- TO TO NO KNOTS.

3'-9" MODULE.

0' - 7 1/2" O.C.

WITH ER RCP.

0' - 7 1/2" O.C. IAF-3000 - RAMP LEVEL 375' - 0"

*NOTE: ALL EXPOSED WOOD FIRE TREATED

DD (11-17-16) DETAIL @ WALL 1. 2. 3. 4.

PROMINENT WOOD PROFILE. BUILT-UP FABRICATION. WARM/BRIGHT APPEARANCE IN THRESHOLD. CONSISTENT MATERIAL PALETTE.

PLAN ELEVATION

08 PLAN @ VERTICAL WOOD SLAT WALL A9.5.1.3 INTERIOR ELEVATION WEST, WOOD SLAT SCALE: 6"ENLARGED = 1'-0"

04 A6.2.1.1

WALL @ GMLH THRESHOLD FIRE DOORS SCALE: 3/4" = 1'-0"

1 CD

SHEET NOTES

PANEL SIZE VARIES

9.2,60 0' - 5" O.C. 0' - 2"

CONTINUOUS 2" x 3" (ACTUAL DIMS) SOLID WOOD SLATS; WOOD TO BE NORTHWEST SPECIES; GRADE TBD- TO PROVIDE COLOR AND GRAIN VARIETY WITH FEW TO NO KNOTS.

0' - 3"

WOOD VENEER ON FIRE-TREATED MDO (EXTENT OF ACOUSTIC TREATMENT TBD)

*NOTE: ALL EXPOSED WOOD TREATED TO ACHIEVE CLASS A FIRE RATING.

DDR1 DETAIL @ WALL

1. REDUCED AMOUNT OF WOOD. 2. SIMPLIFIED FABRICATION. 3. ALLOW FOR VARIETY OF GRAINING AND COLOR. 4. CONSISTENT MATERIAL PALETTE. C L AR K C ON ST R U C T I ON GR O U P, L L C S KI D M OR E, OW I N GS & M3'ERR - 9" I L L L L P

DETAIL

08

PLAN @ VERTICAL WOOD SLAT WALL SCALE: 6" = 1'-0"

A9.5.1.4

1 CR-59,59.2,60

21 A9.5.1.3

VERTICAL WOOD SLAT (ABOVE) 1" END GRAIN WOOD BLOCK FLOORING ADHERED TO SUBSTRATE 1-1/2" O/C SST RAIL WITH VERTICAL SUPPORTS AT 3' - 9" ON CENTER ALIGN

1/4" SST RAIL SUPPORT ANCHORED TO STRUCTURAL SLAB BELOW 1" END GRAIN FLOORING (SHOWN DASHED)

CONTINUOUS 2X2 SST ANGLE ANCHORED TO STRUCTURAL SLAB

1/4" SST RAIL SUPPORT AND BUTT JOINT OF 12 GA SST SILL PLATE AT 7' - 6" ON CENTER

SILICONE JOINT AT BUTT JOINT GLAZING

SST WINDOW FRAME AND SILL

SST FLOOR PLATE WITH SHIM


detailing

A

INSULATION ABOVE DECK - FROM 12" - 6" EAST TO WEST

1'-0"

0'-2"

1'-0"

0'-4"

TOP OF PARAPET

0'-4"

NEW STEEL FRAMING

NOTE: HORIZONTAL STRUCTURAL MEMBER SIZING TO BE REVIEWED IN CD PHASE.

1.

@ EAST PARAPET

2. A33.4

A33

A32

WD

WD SST SLIDING SECURITY DOORS

IAF-3000 - RAMP LEVEL

PERFORATED ALUM COLUMN COVER, TYP. SST PROTECTIVE RAIL, TYP. SST COLUMN BASE, TYP.

GL-21 4' - 4 1/2"

4' - 0 3/4"

BACKFLOW DETECTION BUTT JOINT, TYP. 4' - 0 3/4"

SST GUARDRAIL

4' - 0 3/4"

4' - 4 1/2"

20' - 11 1/4"

1/2" POLISHED SST WINDOW FRAME

ELEVATION

Seattle Tacoma International Airport - International Arrivals Facility

375' - 0"

INTERIOR ELEVATION - GMLH THRESHOLD - WEST SCALE: 1/4" = 1'-0"

6 A3.10.1.0


GENERAL

25 A9.5.1.1

MULLION (E) TOREMAIN

MULLION (E) TOREMAIN

A34

ALUMTRIMCONCEALED FASTENERS TOMATCH EXISTING

1' - 2"

ALUMTRIMCONCEALED FASTENERS TOMATCH EXISTING

SST PLATE OVER 3/4" FIRETREATED MDOWITH CLEAT AND SHIMTOSUBSTRATE. PAINT EDGES BLACK.

SST PLATE OVER 3/4" FIRETREATED MDOWITH CLEAT AND SHIMTOSUBSTRATE. PAINT EDGES BLACK.

0' - 11"

0' - 0 1/2"

3' - 0"

0' - 11"

0' - 0 1/2"

4 A9.5.1.4

CURTAIN WALL INSULATION

1' - 9"

STRUCTURAL COLUMN (E)

0' - 6"

IAF-5000 - CONCOURSE LEVEL 397' - 6"

ELEVATION

ENLARGED INTERIOR ELEVATION, WOOD SLAT AT TSA SCALE: 3/4" = 1'-0"

AF

04 A6.2.1.5

EXTERIOR FAUX COLUMN

SHEET NO

EXTERIOR METAL PANEL TO MATCH EXISTING, TYP. SLIP JOINT WITH CONCEALED FASTENERS

1' - 9"

AF

TERRAZZOFLOORINGTOMATCH EXISTING

TERRAZZOFLOORINGTOMATCH EXISTING

0' - 6"

BACK-UP FLASHING. FASTEN AND SEAL AT VERTICAL MULLION (E).

SUPPORT SYSTEMFOR EXTERIOR METAL PANELS

EQ

EQ

2"

1/2"

EXTERIOR METAL PANEL (E)

SILL (E)

SILL (E)

C L OF SEISMIC SEPERATION

REFER: STRUCTURAL FOR EDGE OF CONCOURSE A SLAB SHOWN DASHED

SEISMIC JOINT IN WALL

EQ

SST PLATE OVER 3/4" FIRETREATED MDOWITH CLEAT AND SHIMTOSUBSTRATE. PAINT EDGES BLACK.

EXTERIOR PARTY WALL ASSEMBLY

REFER: STRUCTURAL FOR EDGE OF CONCOURSE A SLAB SHOWN DASHED

SEISMICJOINT IN WALL

1' - 6" COMPRESSION MOVEMENT 9"

C L OF SEISMICSEPERATION

EQ

1' - 6" COMPRESSION MOVEMENT 9"

SEALANT AND BACKER ROD

SST PLATE OVER 3/4" FIRETREATED MDOWITH CLEAT AND SHIMTOSUBSTRATE. PAINT EDGES BLACK.

EXTERIOR PARTY WALL ASSEMBLY

1 1/2"

0' - 4 1/8"

FLOATINGJAMB BY DOOR MANUFACTURER

ENDGRAIN WOOD FLOORING

FLOATINGJAMB STOP BY DOOR MANUFACTURER

5"

ENDGRAIN WOOD FLOORING

1 1/2"

C L OF DOOR DOOR BUMPER

0' - 4 1/8"

NOT

C L OF DOOR

POCKET COVER DOOR WITH SPRINGOPENHINGE

VICINITY M

STACKING DEPTH OF DOOR

MAGNETIC CATCH (MUST NOT EXCEED 30 LBS RESISTANCE)

4"

1/8"

JAMB ANCHOR, TYP

3/4"

SST PLATE OVER 3/4" FIRE-TREATED MDOWITH CLEAT AND SHIMTO SUBSTRATE. PAINT EDGES BLACK.

1/8"

4"

12 GA SST FRAME EXTENSION

1 1/2"

SST PLATE OVER 3/4" FIRE-TREATED MDOWITH CLEAT AND SHIMTO SUBSTRATE. PAINT EDGES BLACK.

0

PLAN

PLAN @ SINGLE WON DOOR TSA POCKET SIDE SCALE: 3" = 1'-0"

11/30/2016 4:23:18 PM STIA1612 - A - IAF Building

Design Builder:

Clark Construction Group, LLC 701 Dexter Avenue North Seattle, WA 98109

Architect/Engineers:

Skidmore, Owings & Merrill LLP One Front Street San Francisco, CA 94111

Scale

PLAN

2

1

PLAN @ SINGLE WON DOOR TSA STRIKE SIDE SCALE: 3" = 1'-0"

PROJECT ENGR./ARCH:

CKB

Architect:

Structural:

Consultants:

The Miller Hull Partnership, LLP 71 Columbia-Sixth Floor Seattle, WA 98104

Skidmore, Owings & Merrill LLP One Front Street San Francisco, CA 94111

ARUP North America Ltd 719 Second Ave, Suite 400 Seattle, WA 98104

Magnusson Klemencic Associates 1301 Fifth Ave, Suite 3200 Seattle WA 98101

Luma Lighting 1501 E Madison St Seattle WA 98122

MD

Suehiro Architecture 71 Columbia-Sixth Floor Seattle, WA 98104

Schlaich Bergermann and Partner Ip 555 8th Avenue, Suite 2402 NewYork, NY 10018

BNP Associates 14 Fairfield Drive Brookfield, CT 06804

O'Brien and Company 811 1st Ave, Suite 380 Seattle WA 98104

Integrated Design Engineers 1200 Fifth Avenue, Ste 1208 Seattle, WA 98101

As indicated

Patano Studio 603 Stewart St, Suite 207 Seattle, WA 98101

KPFF Consulting Engineers 1601 5th Ave #1600 Seattle WA 98101

Hart Crowser 1700 Westlake Ave North, Suite 200 Seattle WA 98109

Lerch Bates 19515 North Creek Pkwy, Suite 304 Bothell WA 98011

DESIGNER:

POS PROJECT MANAGER:

REVISIONS NO.

DATE 17 NOV 2016

BY SOM

DESIGN DEVELOPMENT

DESCRIPTION

APP'D

NO.

DATE

BY

DESCRIPTION

APP'D

POS PROJECT ENGINEER:

DRAWN BY:

POS DESIGN ENGINEER:

SCALE:

POS DRAFTER:

EAS DATE:

POS SCALE:

CHECKED BY:

POS DATE:

CHECKED/APPROVED BY:

POS CHECKED/APPROVED BY:

17 NOVEMBER 2016 RW

MMF/SA

PROJECT NAME:

SHEET TITLE:

SEA-TAC INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT INTERNATIONAL ARRIVALS FACILITY INTERIOR DETAILS, IAF, TSA THRESHOLD D


detailing     



   





 

 

   

    



    



  

    



 







 



 





    



 

  

 

SECTION



 

 

     



SECTION





 

   



     



 





 

  



SECTION



 





  







 



 

    





 



   











       



 

    

 





DETAIL

  



 



 



  



  

 

   

 

 

    



 

  



  

 





   

 

DETAIL

 



 

 

  

  

SECTION  

 

Seattle Tacoma International Airport - International Arrivals Facility



 





 

 

   



   



 

   



 

SECTION  












 

 















 

 

 









 

 



 

 



  



















 

  

  

 



  







   



  





 



 





 





 

  





SECTION   



SECTION



 







 



  





  

   

  



 

 



 

 





 

 

 











      

 



  



 







 

  



DETAIL



 

SECTION  





 

 





  

 



   

 



 



 





 







   





 

  

 

DETAIL

 



 

 



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SECTION  

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tools

BOMA CALCULATIONS

Worked toWITH develop process for integrating calculations into ZGF BOMA projectCALCULATIONS standards. INTO THE WORKING SEA, aPDX, AND NYC TO DEVELOPBOMA A PROCESS FOR INTEGRATING STANDARD ZGF TEMPLATE FOR REVIT. Developed a tool to accurately run calculations with RevitWITHIN for multiple TOOL WILL ALLOW YOU TO ACCURATELY RUN CALCULATIONS REVIT schemes. AND ALLOW FOR EXPORTS FOR MULTIPLE SCHEMES.

Seattle Tacoma International Airport - International Arrivals Facility


REVIT STANDARDS

Created an “intelligent” CREATED AN “INTELLIGENT” stationing marker in STATIONING MARKER Revit to locate landscape IN REVIT TO LOCATE elements relative to LANDSCAPE ELEMENTS the street centerline for RELATIVE TO THE construction. STREET CENTERLINE FOR CONSTRUCTION.

Pike Street


i WHEN ST

medical campus WHEN WILL DRIVERS TURN TO RIDERS?

STAGING

LEVEL 2

LEVEL 1

OPTION A

OPTION A

DEPARTMENTS

DEPARTMENTS

CAFETERIA

CONIFER

CAFETERIA

CONIFER

CONIFER

EDUCATION SERVICES

EDUCATION SERVICES

FMG

FMG OFFICES

IT

FMG OFFICES

PBX

COMM ROOM / REGIONAL DATA CENTER

COMM ROOM / REGIONAL DATA CENTER PBX OPERATIONS

PBX OPERATIONS

Electrical

Simulation Lab

REGIONAL DATA CENTER

Office

Training Room 1A

Coffee/ Workroom

Conf

Removal of vault door

Conf

MAIN LOBBY

Conference

FMG

Workstations (3)

Conf

VIRTUAL HEALTH

Training Room

Conf

Elev

Supply Room

COMM

Conf

REQUESTED FUNCTIONS NOT ALLOCATED

DN

DN

Work Area

Storage

CAFETERIA

DN

HOOD

Work Room

Movable Partition

ED SERVICES

EDUCATION SERVICES

Servery

Conference

EDUCATION SERVICES

Report / Breakroom

SECURITY

Conf

DN

Janitor

Support Space

SECURITY

Security Operation / Dispatch

ALTERNATE ROOM CONFIGURATION

EDUCATION SERVICES Option 2 - Training Room

Office

Office

Regional Call Center

CAFETERIA (Increased Seating Capacity)

Classroom

Classroom

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Conference New window

Mechanical

Training Room

REQUESTED FUNCTIONS NOT ALLOCATED

Command Station

Training Room 1D

ED SERVICES

Conf

Conf

EQ

Simulation Storage

Conference/ Training/ Report

Conf

40 racks

Storage

Storage

Storage

EQ EQ

Training Room

STAFF ENTRY

Training Room 1B

Elev

Conf

Training Room

Storage

VIRTUAL HEALTH

Emergency Generator

Training Room

Training Room

DN

REGIONAL DATA CENTER

Conf

EQ

Training Room 1C

COMM

VIRTUAL HEALTH

SECURITY

Workstations (5)

Mechanical

TO SIDEW Franciscan Education and Support Center Master Plan I June 2015

Franciscan Education and Support Center Master Plan I June 2015

DEVELOPED DEPARTMENTAL SCHEMES FOR A MEDICAL EDUCATION SERVICES CAMPUS, INCLUDING: WORKSPACE PLANNING, TRAINING ROOM LAYOUTS, AND PHASING OPTIONS.

g INCREASE DENSITY

LOCAL CONSUMERISM

k t

UNIVERSAL DESIGN

j

DESIGN WAITING AREAS

CONTINUED MAINTAINENCE

E HANDICAP ACCESSIBLE

b

l

PEDESTRIAN CROSSWALKS

TRANSIT ALTERNATIVES

,

PEDESTRIAN SIGNAGE

TRANSIT COLLABORATION

z BICYCLE NETWORKS

b

GENERATED SCHEMES WITH A 14-PERSON LARGE HEALTH CARE DESIGN TEAM TRANSIT FOR A PROPOSAL OF A MOBILE APP CAMPUS. NEW HOSPITAL THE INITIAL BUILDING FORM AND MASTER PLAN ANALYSIS WAS COMPLETED IN THREE WEEKS WITH A 2-PERSON TEAM.


TREETS TURN WALKS. For most people in Cincinnati the transportation is inconvenient, slow, difficult, and time consuming. Why is this? For most people in Cincinnati the To promote walkability in urban environments, Transportation in Cincinnati is car-centric. peopleand usepedestrian personalways transportation transportation is inconvenient, slow,Most sidewalks must be to move from one destination to anotherdifficult, because spread out over suchand long distances it is impossible to walk. and development time consuming.is Why is this? designed maintained. Thethat infrastructure

Transportation in Cincinnati is car-centric. must support pedestrian livelihood. Most people use personal transportation Sidewalks need to be complete and placed In order to go from home to work to the grocery to back home again, most people travel several miles. If the transportation to move from one destination to another in appropriate locations with visibility and systembecause is not directly near an individual’s destination it is not practical to use. But what if development in Cincinnati development is spread out over accessibility as the primary focus. Streets changed to support transportation such long distances making systems? it nearly need to be easy to cross. Drivers in vehicles impossible to walk. need to become the secondary user-group and yieldand to planned the pedestrian right-of-way. Changing the way urban environments are designed can change the transportation needs of Cincinnati. In order to go from home to work to the Landscape plantings and park spaces need Dense mixed-use buildings and types create an urban environment that encourages walkability. If Cincinnati’s grocery back home again, most people to be maintained and not an unintended transportation system was the link multi-modal between walkable urban environments, choice travel several miles. If the nuisance. Sidewalks need to bethe clean and to use the transit system becomes convenient, fast, easy, and preferred. transportation network is not directly debris free. Pedestrian safety needs to be near an individual’s destination it is not the priority. practical to use. in Buturban what ifenvironments, development in sidewalks and pedestrian ways must be designed and maintained. The To create walkability Cincinnati changed to support multi-modal How is this achieved? City leaders, infrastructure must support pedestrian life. Sidewalks need to be complete and placed in appropriate locations. Streets transportation systems? transportation coordinators, developers, need to be easy to cross. Drivers need to yield thecommunity pedestrian right-of-way. need to be maintained. andtothe must be engaged Landscapes in Sidewalks need to clean. Pedestrian safetyurban needs to be the priority. Changing thebeway urban environments development. Investments should are designed and planned can change the be placed in areas where active storefronts needsCity of Cincinnati. Dense and local businesses provide amenities and and the community must be engaged How istransportation this achieved? leaders, transportation coordinators, developers, mixed-use buildings and programmatic promote local consumerism. The street in urban development. Investments should in areas where active storefronts and local businesses provide types create an urban environment that belifeplaced and streetscapes must be thought of amenities and promote localby consumerism. and mustand be thought of as a vital asset to urban encourages walkability increasing the The as street a vital life asset to streetscapes urban development availability of amenities in proximity toTransportation where not a requirement. Transportationneeds to urban development and not a requirement. to urban environments to be planned and the transportation live-work-play. If Cincinnati’s environments needs to be planned and the systemindividuals must be encouraged. multi-modal transportation system was the transportation system must be encouraged. link between walkable urban environments, Transportation can become pedestrian-centric. the choicein toCincinnati use the transit system becomes Transportation in Cincinnati can become convenient, fast, easy, and preferred. pedestrian-centric.

qwqqwqwqwqwqwqwqw b When will drivers turn to riders? When streets turn to sidewalks.

005

Elizabeth Schultz Portfolio 2019  
Elizabeth Schultz Portfolio 2019  
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