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Untitled document - Google Docs

Why I Wrote These Articles:    The History of Red  The theme of the first issue of the new magazine "The Royal Banner" was red, and as our school colors  are red and white, I thought a story of the history of the colors would fit right in. The story turned to be  harder to find that I thought, our principle did not know, nor did our librarian nor football coach. It was  not in any old yearbooks or copies of the Royal Banner either. I finally asked my math teacher if she  knew, as her late father had gone to Fairview in its early days. She said she was not completely sure but  that her aunt would know, who she graciously let me call, and who luckily had the story. By the time I had  finished I had found out not just how Fairview had gained its colors, but interesting sidelines and  developments of red and white over the years.    First Amendment Rights  The First Amendment is an important issue right now, with student walkouts becoming more and more  common over the past two years, athletes displaying opinions during the national anthem, and the never  ending debate of the line between something unethical but not illegal to say. I was interested not just by  what the law is, but by what the students in my own school understood about the First Amendment, and  how it pertained to their daily lives. What I found through my survey and interviewing of staff was that  students are mostly aware of the general protections of the First Amendment, but when it comes to  specifics less and less understand what the protections of the First Amendment truly entail.    Renovations  The generous taxpayers of Boulder county approved bonds for renovations for all the schools in the  district. Fairview got ~$20 million, but the rumors of the changes coming to the school were wild and  numerous. For the second news magazine of 2018 with the theme of “Changes” I wrote a piece of what  was actually going to change in the school, and when construction on the various aspects would start and  be completed. As is expected, the rumors are mostly wrong, though the truth is at times more wild than  the hearsay.    AL Special Election  I am interested in politics, and like most people incorrectly guessed the outcome of the 2016 presidential  election. I set out to figure out why I was so certainly wrong, and how I could rectify my election result  guessing. I watched the special elections throughout the year, and all the elections on November 7th,  2017. I figured out that polls are uncertain, and pundits are incorrect, but usually all in the same direction,  which means one can guess at a results using those two factors and regional mood to triangulate a result.  However I was intrigued by the AL special election, because it was so weird with so many clashing  factors that nobody was guessing at the outcome, and then everyone was surprised. It was a close race,  neither outcome was a definite, but neither should have been a surprise either. 

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1OL_KB4PA-Iufs_a8DZzf9vH-1CViUy4ojkoHdc48zN8/edit

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THE HISTORY OF RED How the scarlet and white evolved from 1960 to today. BY ELLA WAWRZYNEK Red, white and black--Fairview’s iconic colors. Right? “It’s actually scarlet and white,” said Principal Don Stensrud, “two colors.” That is what all the athletic directors have told him and what the Colorado High School Activities Association (CHSAA) handbook says.

“It’s actually scarlet and white... two colors.”

The black is an accent color, which CHSAA began allowing in the 1980s after there was a big push by high schools to be allowed a highlight color. “Most schools went with black, and it slowly morphed. It went from piping can be accent color, to shorts can be the accent color, and then all of a sudden CHSAA just didn’t really care anymore,” said Stensrud. “So when you look at our football team and they’re Knights and they’re all black, except for the little red and white on the helmet, and red and white on the lettering, that’s actually, you go back 17-18 years ago, that would have been a violation of CHSAA.” But black has not always been the accent color. “In the 80s, early 90s the highlight color was blue,” said football coach Tom McCartney. “When I got here it was a blue trim, and then it switched to black.” The scarlet and white colors go back to the very beginning of Fairview High School. Fairview used to be an entire district out east of Boulder, and the original high school was built out on Baseline, the building where Platt Middle School resides now. An article in the fourth issue of the Royal Banner, published in 1961, writes, “When the administrations began planning for a

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new high school, they thought well into the future, and decided that, should there be reorganization, the name of Fairview High School would be a memory for all former members of Fairview district.” This was a good decision because in 1961 the board voted to redistribute the schools in the Fairview district into Boulder Valley and other surrounding districts so all the schools would have more tax revenue. According to Lynne Bixler, a former Fairview student and aunt of math teacher Amanda Bixler, the summer before the new high school opened the administration sent out a questionnaire to the incoming freshman (the class of 1964, one of whom was Bixler’s brother), asking them to pick the colors and school mascot. “It was a consolidation of the old Fairview district, they knew the kids,” Bixler said. That is how Fairview became the scarlet and white Knights, although from the beginning the scarlet was often mistakenly called red. Over the years, the memory of how the colors were picked has faded from all but a few minds, but the colors are as important to the students of today as they were 58 years ago. “Red represents pride and boldness,” said senior Didi Bulow, “It’s being proud and supportive of your peers.”

A picture of the cheerleaders in the 1961 yearbook.


Football players stand on the field at the Fairview-Boulder game sporting Fairview colors.

PHOTO BY NOAH FINER

The first mentions of the school colors in the Royal Banner and the Lance Yearbook. Both refer to cheerleaders’ uniforms. The Royal Banner in January of 1961 wrote, “The uniforms are white sweaters and white skirts with red pleat insets.” FHSROYALBANNER.COM

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Students and First Amendment Rights Story - Google Docs

Students and First Amendment Rights  By  Ella Wawrzynek  in  Opinion & Politics  ­ featured |  Edit 

100% of students surveyed know that freedom of speech is protected by the First Amendment of  the U.S. Constitution            There are five rights protected under the First Amendment of the Constitution: freedom of  speech, religion, press, and assembly and the right to petition the government. But what do  Fairview students know about First Amendment rights? All students are required to take both  U.S. Government and U.S. History classes, but what truly sinks in, what do students remember?          The Royal Banner recently conducted a survey of 30 students, a small sample, but one that  could indicate trends of understanding of Fairview students. In the survey, 100% of students  correctly thought that speech is protected by the First Amendment, 93.3% thought religion is  protected, 96.7% press, 93.3% assembly, and only 70% thought that the right to petition the  government is protected, despite all but one of the students having taken either a U.S.  government or U.S. history class.          “I think it’s really important that kids learn what their rights are,” said social studies teacher  Amy Paa­Rogers. “I think that’s a really important topic in this day and age. I think it doesn’t get  as much time, and it should because we have a whole long list of curriculum we’re supposed to  cover, unfortunately, that’s just a really small piece of it.”          Maybe this lack of curricular time contributes to students knowing their fundamental rights,  but not understanding what that specifically entails. Thirteen percent of students thought that  minors don’t have constitutional rights, and 6.7% didn’t know whether minors had constitutional  rights or not. 

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1yyPpyiY4J7TnXChtTIZkuAmuetWWZLOK0Y2xyLoxjUg/edit#

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          This misunderstanding regarding specifics is even more drastic when it comes to what  speech actually entails, with only 40% of students correctly thinking that profanity was protected  by the Constitution, and only 23.3% thinking hate speech was protected. 

        A similar pattern shows up when asked if burning an American flag was illegal. Less than  half knew that burning an American flag is legal, and 40% thought it was a crime. 

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1yyPpyiY4J7TnXChtTIZkuAmuetWWZLOK0Y2xyLoxjUg/edit#

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       However Paa­Rogers said her students became very animated when she told her class that it  was legal to burn an American flag. She said they began by talking about the NFL take­a­knee  protest, and her students were not very engaged, but when she told them it was legal to burn an  American flag “they couldn’t believe it, that got their interest going, they got quite passionate  about it, they were riled up.”          This is notable, because 86.7% of students knew that the football players have the right to  kneel, compared to the only 43.3% that knew burning an American flag was protected by the  same right. 

        A majority of students also know that students athletes have the right to kneel if they choose  to do so.          Principal Don Stensrud said if any athletes choose to kneel, he recognizes it is their right: “I  think the coaches would have the conversation, I think with our rights comes responsibility, and  if I’m kneeling down just to make a statement just to make it about me, then I think you’re  abusing your first amendment rights,” said Stensrud. “I think if you really are doing it because  you are protesting something that you feel strongly about, then it’s absolutely your right to do it.”          Despite that a high number of students know that athletes, both professional and student,  have the right to kneel during the national anthem, less knew that the right came from the First  Amendment. When asked whether professional athletes had the right to kneel, 86.7% correctly  thought that kneeling was protected. However when asked, if kneeling was protected, what is it  protected by, only 76.7% said the First Amendment, a ten percent drop from the total number  who knew it was protected. Of the remaining 23.3% of respondents, 3.3% thought it was  protected by federal law, 6.7% didn’t know, and 13.3% thought it was not protected, a 6.6%  increase from the simple yes or no question of whether kneeling was protected at all. 

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1yyPpyiY4J7TnXChtTIZkuAmuetWWZLOK0Y2xyLoxjUg/edit#

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        The numbers were similar when asked about student athlete rights. Eighty­six point seven  percent knew that it is a students’ constitutional right to kneel during the national anthem at a  sport event, whereas 3.3% thought it was not protected (interestingly 3.4% lower than the  number students who thought professional athletes were not protected, more on this below).  However when asked about what protected students’ right to kneel, only 56.7% knew it was  protected by the First Amendment, 20% less than the same question asked about professional  athletes.             The 3.4% drop in students who answered that professional to student athletes don’t have a  right to kneel is noteworthy for a few reasons. The first is that those 3.4% moved to the “don’t  know” category, while the percent of students who knew that it was protected for both (86.7%)  stayed the same when asked about both student and professional athletes. The second reason that  this is noteworthy is that, because a safe school environment takes precedence over students’  constitutional rights, you might expect more respondents to think that student athletes are not  protected, not less.          Whether students are allowed to sit or kneel during the pledge of allegiance was one of the  only two questions asked that received zero percent “no” responses (the other was whether  speech is protected by the First Amendment). Ninety­three point three of respondents correctly  thought that students are allowed to sit or kneel during the pledge, and 6.7% didn’t know one  way or the other. This result by itself is not all that surprising—after all the majority of students  remain seated during the pledge every morning. Paa­Rogers said this issue though, is not due to 

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1yyPpyiY4J7TnXChtTIZkuAmuetWWZLOK0Y2xyLoxjUg/edit#

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Students and First Amendment Rights Story - Google Docs

protest or even lack of awareness, but apathy. 

        “I think most kids sit during the pledge of allegiance because there’s apathy, they just don’t  want to stir themselves to stand up,” said Paa­Rogers. “It’s not that they’re protesting something,  or that they’re supporting something, I think even then it’s not necessarily lack of awareness, I  think it’s just not really having a passion for the idea or the thought.”          Paa­Rogers considers sitting “the worst of the three options.” She said she would “rather  they have a passion one way or the other” than just sit because it’s the easiest to do.          Colorado is one of only 10 states that has laws protecting student freedom of the press,  which ensures student publications editorial freedom from administration.          “I think that is a great law, it’s the balance between rights and responsibility,” said Stensrud.  “Every now and then there are tough editorials that run in the paper. That rail against a decision  that my admin team or myself had to make. And that’s where the human side of me is like ‘that’s  so unfair’ but then I grow up, I had my moment, and then I say well that’s well worded, they did  a good job of writing it.”          Although student freedom of the press is not protected nationally, 30% of student  respondents thought it is protected, while 50% of students knew that student freedom of the press  is protected in Colorado. 

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1yyPpyiY4J7TnXChtTIZkuAmuetWWZLOK0Y2xyLoxjUg/edit#

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Students and First Amendment Rights Story - Google Docs

        The last question on the survey, rather than asking knowledge of rights and protections of  the First Amendment, asked whether the respondent thought that students should be given an  excused absence if they miss class for a protest (without a prearranged absence). Fifty percent of  students said no, 13.3% said they didn’t know, and 36.7% said yes. 

          Unexcused absences for protests would bring a variety of different problems, some along  the lines of kids being out of class and unaccounted for (along the lines of why teachers have to  mark students absent if they are more than five minutes late to class), or more simply, what  would constitute a protest.          “I disagree that protests should be excused,” said Stensrud. “Because then do I have to  choose which protests are valid and which aren’t?”          Both Paa­Rogers and Stensrud said, on the more moral side of it, that one unexcused  absence is not all that bad in the scale of things, and if students protesting is dependent on how  the absence is recorded, it is not as genuine a belief.          “If you want to have your voice heard and feel strongly about something, then an unexcused  absence shouldn’t change your behavior,” said Paa­Rogers. “Stand up and be counted here, you  know people have died for things and you’re worrying about an unexcused absence?”          This sentiment is shared by Stensrud who said if a student will only protest with an excused  absence, then “it’s not civil disobedience, you're not exercising any right” and that the student is  just skipping class without a consequence.          However “if you want to go out and protest and take the unexcused,” said Stensrud, “Then  I’m actually proud of you, because you are exercising your right to civil disobedience.”   

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1yyPpyiY4J7TnXChtTIZkuAmuetWWZLOK0Y2xyLoxjUg/edit#

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RENOVATIONS The changes coming to the school in the next year BY ELLA WAWRZYNEK Starting during spring break and through August 2019, RTA Architects will renovate parts of the school to improve both security and the use of space with a budget of roughly $20 million. This will be the fourth time since the school was built in 1970 by the Hobart D. Wagner Association that the school will be renovated. The 1996 bond expanded the science hallway and added the library, and the 2008 bond redid administration, added the new wing of the 600 hall, and added windows to make the senior balcony the senior lounge. “The biggest change is the library,” said Terry Bradley, the TAG Coordinator and former Fairview Student. “We didn’t have that gorgeous huge sun-filled library, we had what were called ILCs, Individualized Learning Centers.” The spaces that will be redone or updated in the 2018 bond are being done so for different reasons.

Next year the hot lunch will be served where the opening of the 300 hall is now, and there will be seating and a window where the police annex is. The triangle lockers will also be taken out of the student center, and new furniture and more skylights will be added. “Some of the places where kids kind of hang and congregate, we’re going to add some natural light there,” said Stensrud.

Language Arts

The language arts department is moving to the bottom of school, with double doors

from the new cafeteria into it. There will be approximately 10 language arts classrooms, and they will occupy the space where the current cafeteria is, the area where the drafting room is, the film and newsroom, and where the current business classroom is. The catering classroom will remain, but the back stairs to art will be removed. “I’m hoping that when they move us down there maybe I’ll have a window,” said language arts teacher Angela Hunt. “But I heard that they’ll probably just put me in a storage closet, like I already am in. But seriously, that’s what I’m hoping, because

“Some places need to be done because of security.” “Some of the stuff was innovation dollars, figure out more creative spaces—English. Some places need to be redone—auditorium. Other places needed to be redone because of wear and tear—special ed, art and the new gym. Some places need to be done because of security—counseling,” said principal Don Stensrud.

The Cafeteria

The floor of the cafeteria is already gone, and construction was supposed to begin over spring break, but has been delayed. Students will get hot lunch from food carts in the student center for the rest of the current school year. The blue prints for the renovations

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PHOTO BY ALEX RUDAWSKY


The enrance to the cafeteria

PHOTO BY BRODY LARSON

the cafeteria has windows, and I never see the sun.”

“I’m hoping that when they move us down there maybe I’ll have a window.” The 800 Hall and Office

Some special education will move to the outer edge of the 800 hall, where rooms 811 through 813 are now. Some of the biggest changes include the front office and counseling center, mostly for security reasons. Counseling is moving upstairs to the 800 hall, and will connect to the main office. The post-grad/counseling and career center (CCC) will move to the

The cafeteria floor with the tile removed in preparation for the renovations

PHOTO BY ALEX RUDAWSKY

center area in the 800 hall, where 844 and the connected offices are. The IB office will move to where the offices in room 855 are now, by the main stairs to the 600 hall, where the original IB office was. Counseling is moving to the top of the school so if visitors come they cannot walk throughout the whole school. “We’ve seen [someone] come in this way. Anyone coming to see counselors, admin, or IB have to come in this way,” said Stensrud. “So multiple sets of eyes on you as you go through.” The security desk will be where the front desk is right now, and the campus monitors will be able to buzz people into the school from the anteroom. If a suspicious looking person walks in, or someone comes in making threats, security can hide behind and bolt some doors in the office, and the only place for the person to go is

Timeline of Renovation Completion AUG ‘18

The cafeteria The front offices The Language Arts department

NOV ‘18

The auditorium

back outside. “Makes us a little more secure,” said Stensrud. “That’s part of the security stuff, every school has to do that.”

Security

Next year, the inside doors will lock after the first half hour of school, as will the back doors, but students will have swipe cards in their student IDs to unlock the doors if they are coming any other time of day. Boulder High School and Broomfield High School have already implemented this system. Right now there are 2.8 security positions held by 4 people, but there might be funding for another security guard who watches the 38 outside cameras. Security will also be able to lock any door from the security station, and administrators will be able to lock the doors from any computer.

JAN OR FEB ‘19 The art rooms

AUG ‘19

Gym roof top units

FHSROYALBANNER.COM

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According to Stensrud, there is a 95% chance of getting 80 cameras in common areas (such as the halls, cafeteria, student center and gym) that security will watch, and that will wirelessly link to the police in case of an emergency situation where the police need real time knowledge of a situation in the school. The cameras would also link to some admin, such as Stensrud, Jim Lefebvre (the Dean of Students) and Ross Sutter (Assistant Principal), who could access the footage 24/7, even from their houses, in case an alarm went off in the middle of the night. The Student Resource Officer will move to the current IB office, and will most likely have a gun safe for their rifle (right now they have to leave long rifles in their car, which is inefficient in the event of a school shooter or other time imminent threat in the school).

Fine Arts

I had to make a tough decision. We could have shut down the auditorium right after spring break, and then we’d be done by August 1st. The ramifications of that are no pops show, no final band, orchestra or choir concerts, and there’s no place to do the awards nights,” said Stensrud. “If you take out the back side of the year you take all those things away from kids.” The green room will also become one big room with a door onto the stage, so students do not have to walk out through the hall to get onto the stage. The green room can also be used as a classroom.

The auditorium is getting entirely redone, with all new seats, stage, lights and sound system. The renovation of the auditorium will take 5 months, so it will not be complete until partway through next school year. However the decision to not begin the renovation over spring break was conscious. “The auditorium is a 5 month project, and

“The auditorium is a 5 month project, and I had to make a tough decision.” The art rooms will be combined with the area where special ed is currently to become one big art galleria, with 2 to 3 classes happening at a time. The upstairs art will stay the same, with glass windows looking down on the rest of the art classes. The rest of the band hallway will stay the

same, with minor updates to the practice rooms to make them more soundproof.

Miscellaneous Changes

The senior lounge will remain, as will the senior lot. After spring break some of the staff parking will move from next to the kiln to behind the softball field, but the number of spaces will not change. The spiral stairway from the senior locker bank to counseling will be removed, and the counseling offices will become a custodial storage, a teacher lounge and the business teacher’s office. The business classroom will move to the current CCC. The mat room will also become a multi purpose sports room, like a “24 hour sport facility” according to Stensrud. The weights and bikes will move up and be in the same room. The outside changes will be small, only a tiny little press box at the 50 yard line of the football field with an announcer, a new sound system that includes speakers pointed to the senior lot and field, and some rooftop units.

What would you do with the bond money? “I would change the energy and heating systems to reduce the school’s carbon footprint.” NIKO LINDER, JUNIOR

“I would suggest [making] better school foods.” G A R R E T T LY L E , F R E S H M A N

“I would put TVs in the library and add a Chick-Fil-A.” JACKSON HAMMOND, JUNIOR

“I would add windows, buy better computers, build a stadium, and buy better printers. I would also get a better WiFi, build a bigger parking lot, [...] I also would bring back Ronn.” DIDAC GARCIA-GRAU, JUNIOR

6

APRIL 2018


4/15/2018

Untitled document - Google Docs

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https://docs.google.com/document/d/1gynG0CrvEQ33g0sygVXJRKS2ssgt_fJYg647uyR6sDU/edit

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4/15/2018

December Alabama Special Election - Google Docs

December Alabama Special Election  By  Ella Wawrzynek  in  Opinion & Politics  |  Edit 

How AL voted in the December special election. Map created by Carter Hanson.    A few notes on the Alabama Special Senate Election:            We saw something historic on Tuesday the 12th of December.         In a rare occurrence for modern times, there was no conventional wisdom in the modern  media about who would win.          Nate Silver of FiveThirtyEight’s first rule of polling is that the conventional wisdom always  guesses the polling error in the wrong direction. And this seems to hold, especially well in many  recent elections with national recognition:  ● Hillary Clinton was leading the 2016 polls by about a 3­point lead, she lost by about that  much, even though the mainstream media was sure she would win.  ● In Georgia’s 6th district senate special election last June, the conventional wisdom held  that Jon Ossoff, the Democrat, might just squeak by with a win, even in the red state. He  barely lost.  ● Polls in Virginia before last election day (Nov. 7th), put Democrat Ralph Northam ahead  with a 3­point lead, the conventional wisdom said the Republican Ed Gillespie would win  by a small margin. Northam won by 9 points (a bigger polling error than President  Trump’s win in Nov. 2016!).    

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1b9suPvlIh6-5zNJI10fBhGJCFIWf4N_J3EMcTl_jTOA/edit#

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4/15/2018

December Alabama Special Election - Google Docs

       The Alabama race was the race nobody could call, for all the right reasons. The polls were  inconsistent and showed, even just days before, anywhere from a 9­point win for Judge Roy  Moore to a 10­point lead for senator­elect Doug Jones. But the political pundits didn’t posit what  that meant, didn’t leach off each other’s predictions until everyone “knew” which way the race  would go. Everyone accounted for the nuances and caveats that come with any election, but are  often lost to gut guesses and other people’s intuition.          The result itself I would opine, is not all that surprising. I was not expecting it, but I was not  surprised. There were a myriad of unusual circumstances, from the timing to Moore and Jones’  previous reputations, the sexual assault allegations and disordered endorsements. The  culmination of these factors as well as other things pointed toward a tight race, and a narrow win.  That a democrat won this race, even in a state where a generic democrat could almost never win,  while unexpected, was not surprising.          I would even go further and say this result is not terribly unprecedented either. The last time  an Alabama senate election was won by a Democrat was in 1992 by the sitting senior senator  from Alabama, Senator Richard Shelby, before he switched parties in 1994. But there is a much  more recent example of an unexpected result. The 2010 Massachusetts special senate election for  the seat of the late Democratic Senator, Ted Kennedy. It was held in January of 2010, a little over  a year after former President Obama was elected, similar to this race, as Trump was elected a  little over a year ago. In that race another Democrat was expected to win, but the republican  candidate, Senator Scott Brown, won the race with 59.1% of the vote.          So was this race historic? Yes of course, as was it meaningful for Congress, the political  environment, and the midterms next November. However the truly astonishing occurrence was  the lack of conventional wisdom and pundits calling the race days before the polls even opened.      

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1b9suPvlIh6-5zNJI10fBhGJCFIWf4N_J3EMcTl_jTOA/edit#

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Reporter of the Year 2018  

Four examples of my writing from the past school year, and explanations of the inspiration I had for them, or the reporting that I did to wr...

Reporter of the Year 2018  

Four examples of my writing from the past school year, and explanations of the inspiration I had for them, or the reporting that I did to wr...

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