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Landscape plan for

Talbot/Michaelson 156 Riley Road Conway, Massachusetts Fall 2010

Erin Hepfner

Conway School of Landscape Design 332 South Deerfield Road Conway, Massachusetts 01341 www.csld.edu


Conway School of Landscape Design 332 S. Deerfield Road PO Box 179 Conway, Massachusetts 01341

Erin Hepfner

The property that Lora Talbot, Holly Michaelson, and their three children call home is located in Conway, Massachusetts. Conway is a rural town in the foothills of the Berkshire mountains within the rich Connecticut River valley. Although the valley is still farmed, the changing times have allowed many of the fields to be reclaimed by forests. Common in the rural landscape between historic small town centers are old, large fields and farmhouse yards bordered by mature forests.

The driveway, edged by old stone walls, bisects the yard and leads to the barn.

INDEX

Riley Road

Entire 100

acre property

Rural Landscape

To access the residence, one crosses the South River on Rte. 116 and turns onto Riley Road, a narrow and infrequently used dirt road. The road climbs through their 100-acre property until the canopy of the mature forest opens and reveals the driveway. The historic stone walls guide visitors into the four-acre yard now bordered by a forest that replaced the active farm fields in the early 1900s. The family purchased and moved to this 224-year-old house and property in the spring of 2010. The historic residence is the first of only two homes on Riley Road. The four acres around the house are the subject of this landscape design. NOT FOR CONSTRUCTION. THIS DRAWING IS PART OF A STUDENT PROJECT AND IS NOT BASED ON A LEGAL SURVEY.

The house and yard, below surrounding foothills, where children play, adults relax, and the family explores after a day of work and school.

Context 1 Existing Conditions, Vision & Goals 2 Analysis: Soil & Vegetation 3 Analysis: Slope & Drainage 4 Analysis: Sun & Shade 5 Analysis: Views 6 Analysis: Access & Circulation 7 Analysis: Summary 8 Preliminary Designs 9 Final Design 10 Grading and Drainage Plan 11 Planting Design 12 Vegetation Palette 1 13 Vegetation Palette 2 14 Precedents 15

Context & Index

Connecticut River Valley

Landscape Plan for Talbot/Michaelson Fall 2010 156 Riley Road Conway, Massachusetts

Conway

1/15


Lawn

Fence Pool

Parking Area around Island

Flagstone Patio

Current Entrance & Undefined Entryway Existing Ornamental Beds & Stone Walls Covered Porch

Riley 0’

10’

25’

50’

NOT FOR CONSTRUCTION. THIS DRAWING IS PART OF A STUDENT PROJECT AND IS NOT BASED ON A LEGAL SURVEY.

Road

House

Leach Field Existing Ornamental Beds & Stone Walls

Brick Patio

Septic Tank

Project Vision To have a welcoming, well-defined, safe and attractive entryway with a yard that reflects the family’s current environmental ideals while being a beautiful haven to which the family can escape and learn from.

Steep Forest Slope Reserve Leach Field Project Goals • Define entryway • Manage water drainage at entryway • Improve ornamental beds • Increase desirable traits of forest retreat • Site fruit trees to provide family with fresh fruit • Maintain pool privacy from parking • Maintain sightline from patio to pool • Create design with minimal increased maintenance • Relocate compost • Site garage

Goals

Compost Bin

Lawn

and

Path to Forest Retreat

Project Vision

Gravel Driveway

Conway School of Landscape Design 332 S. Deerfield Road PO Box 179 Conway, Massachusetts 01341

Forest Access Path

Erin Hepfner

Forest

Existing Conditions

Tennis Court

Landscape Plan for Talbot/Michaelson Fall 2010 156 Riley Road Conway, Massachusetts

Barn

Existing Conditions Bordered by a mature forest, the four-acre expansive lawn slopes gently from the east to the west and is bisected by a 400’ gravel driveway. Within the driveway there is a cedar island that vehicles park around. From there, people enter the house in the corner of the western L. There is no path to the house indicating where to enter from. An old barn stands at the end of the driveway. The large structure was previously used for livestock and as a chauffeur’s quarters, and currently is used as parking for unused family vehicles and a tractor. Large old trees, rock and retaining walls, and ornamental beds planted by previous owners remain throughout the yard. The tennis court provides summer entertainment. The three young children are able to safely enjoy swimming in the pool under the supervision of their parents relaxing on the brick patio. The pool is surrounded by a flagstone patio and fence which is concealed from arriving vehicles by a hemlock hedge. The east and west edges of the yard have paths into the forest where the family enjoys spending time. A compost bin, sited inconveniently far from the house (200’) by previous owners, is en route to the family’s favorite forest retreat.

2/15


White

White

pine

pine

White

Lawn

White Birch

pine

Cedar Japanese Maple

Red Oak Hemlock Hedge

White

Cedar Island

pine

White

Fence Pool

pine

Black Birch

Existing Ornamental Beds

Weeping Cherry

Hemlock

10’

25’

50’

NOT FOR CONSTRUCTION. THIS DRAWING IS PART OF A STUDENT PROJECT AND IS NOT BASED ON A LEGAL SURVEY.

Sugar Maple

Existing Ornamental Beds Cedar

Sugar Maple

0’

Cedar

Lawn

Vegetation The four-acre yard is bordered by a mixed transitional hardwood forest with white pines and hemlocks that stand nearly 80’ tall. This forest provides shade, serves as a windbreak, and supplies the family with firewood. The forest grew after agricultural fields were abandoned in the early 1900s. Understory plants include mountain laurels and viburnums and a herbaceous layer of ferns, club mosses and sedges. On the lawn that covers most of the yard, majestic old trees also provide shade and serve as a host for children’s rope swings. Smaller trees are fun for the kids to climb. There are two large hemlock trees and a 60’ x 9’ x 9’ hemlock hedge providing privacy for the pool. Hemlock woolly adelgid is present in Conway and it is likely that these trees will eventually die because of it. Ornamental beds are planted at the driveway entrance, around the house and along the eastern wood’s edge. Availability of sunlight has diminished and plant vigor in these beds has suffered as a result. Additionally the poor soil quality isn’t able to support some of the perennials and shrubs planted by previous owners. Turf grass grows within the pool fence, which makes mowing difficult.

Design Directive Appropriate plants for this site are those that thrive in low nutrient, low pH, low organic matter, well-drained soil; however, there is an opportunity to use plants to increase soil health. Due to the presence of the hemlock woolly adelgid in Conway, it is advantageous to be mindful of the future loss of hemlocks.

Conway School of Landscape Design 332 S. Deerfield Road PO Box 179 Conway, Massachusetts 01341

Soil & Vegetation

with white pines and hemlocks

Erin Hepfner

Hemlock

hardwood forest

Landscape Plan for Talbot/Michaelson Fall 2010 156 Riley Road Conway, Massachusetts

Transitional

Soil A UMASS Cooperative Extension soil test estimated lead levels within 15’ of the house are 720 ppm, which is not suitable for a children’s play area, nor is it suitable for food crops. Levels farther out in the yard were estimated to be 83 ppm, a level at which all activity and planting of edible crops are permissible. The soil is very acidic, with a pH of 5.5. The overall macro- and micronutrient and organic matter levels are low. The soil is a fine sandy loam that is well drained to somewhat excessively well drained. Soils that drain this well leach nutrients quickly. In addition, yards that do not accumulate organic matter in the form of dropped leaves and grass clippings aren’t able to return nutrients or organic matter into the soil. Plants that thrive in these conditions are able to tolerate acidic, very well drained, low nutrient and low organic matter soils.

3/15


difficult

to traverse by foot or vehicle

>30%

Adequate

for construction

&

Slope The western yard between the woods and driveway gently slopes down toward the house. The yard adjacent to the house is nearly flat. Both of these locations are easily traversable by foot or vehicle, suitable for many activities, such as lawn games or garden installation. These minimal slopes pose no constraints to constructing a garage.

easy

to traverse by foot or vehicle

5-15%

15-30%

2-5%

<2%

Direction of Water Drainage

Path to Forest Retreat

The eastern yard as it approaches the woods increase in steepness. The woods are not easy to walk in and potentially are erodible if disturbed by construction or activity, but planting to stabilize the slope would be advantageous. There is a gradual path between the tennis court and compost, which allows easy access to the forest retreat.

Compost A

Western

yard

0’

50’

Section depicting from left to right, the western gradual sloped yard, flat dooryard and driveway, gradual sloped eastern yard and steep eastern woods.

Drainage Although the site has a very well drained soil, stormwater that does not infiltrate during a rain storm or once the ground is frozen is guided by the contours of the land. The drainage of most of the western yard is directed towards the house entryway.

Steep

eastern

Woods

Dooryard House

0’

10’

25’

50’

NOT FOR CONSTRUCTION. THIS DRAWING IS PART OF A STUDENT PROJECT AND IS NOT BASED ON A LEGAL SURVEY.

The puddled water and collected ice there is unsafe and unattractive, and creates conditions where dirt and moisture enter the house—yet another reason the clients would like to manage water drainage around the house.

A`

In addition, the house does not have gutters. The portion of the roof that drains towards the entryway is 640 square feet; in a 1” rain storm, 400 gallons of water drains to that location. Design Directive Any activity on the eastern slope should be approached with caution so as to not disrupt the soil. In addition, efforts should be made to stabilize the slope. The slope of the western yard makes activities and traversing easy. Redirecting water from the entrance will alleviate puddling and collected ice in the winter, make a safer entrance, and minimize dirt and moisture tracked into the house.

Conway School of Landscape Design 332 S. Deerfield Road PO Box 179 Conway, Massachusetts 01341

&

Slope & Drainage

Slopes

if disturbed

Erin Hepfner

Erodible

Landscape Plan for Talbot/Michaelson Fall 2010 156 Riley Road Conway, Massachusetts

Legend

4/15


3:00

pm

Barn Hemlock

Tennis Court

9:00 Western lawn

am

Summer: Sun & Shade The yard surrounding the house, the middle of the western lawn, south of the barn and part of the tennis court are in full sun during the summer. Pool water warms quickly, and the surrounding hardscape holds heat and dries adjacent soils quickly. Large deciduous trees are not close enough to the house to provide shade in summer. Trees in the middle of the yard and forest edge cast shade on the eastern side of the tennis court, barn and gardens throughout portions of the day.

Hemlock Hedge

Noon

Dooryard House Entrance Hemlock

Summer Barn Hemlock

Western lawn

3:00

pm

9:00

am

Tennis Court

Hemlock Hedge

Dooryard

Noon

House Entrance Hemlock

Spring

and

Fall

NOT FOR CONSTRUCTION. THIS DRAWING IS PART OF A STUDENT PROJECT AND IS NOT BASED ON A LEGAL SURVEY.

3:00

pm

Spring & Fall: Sun & Shade Because the sun is lower on the horizon in the spring and fall, shade predominates for a longer time. However, early in the spring and late in the fall, deciduous trees have no leaves so sun is able to permeate the yard. The dooryard of the house and the area south of the barn are the only locations receiving at least six hours of full sun in the spring and fall. In these places, plants requiring full sun thrive better, ice melts there fastest in the spring, and these small areas are graced with the waning sun of the late afternoon. However, the entryway is in a low depression, covered by shadows all day, which makes for a dark, cold and potentially icy entrance in inclement weather.

Design Directive The areas of full sun are places where fruit trees would grow well. The western field and areas to the south of the barn and north of the pool are large enough to accommodate the desired fruit trees. If the hemlocks are lost due to the hemlock woolly adelgid, there will be more sunlight in those locations. Planting deciduous trees close to the house will provide summer shade and allow solar gain in the winter. Creating a defined entryway in a shady location needs to address water drainage to minimize ice and puddling.

Conway School of Landscape Design 332 S. Deerfield Road PO Box 179 Conway, Massachusetts 01341

am to

Sun & Shade

9:00

Erin Hepfner

areas indicate location of full sun

Landscape Plan for Talbot/Michaelson Fall 2010 156 Riley Road Conway, Massachusetts

White

5/15


View

to be maintained

View

to be

for safety

X

Doors

visible from

Barn

Tennis Court

parking area

Blocked

Sightlines The most important view to maintain is the sightline from the brick patio to the pool, to ensure swimmer safety. Also, the clients would like to maintain privacy in the pool area from the parking area. The current 60’ x 9’ x 9’ hemlock hedge creates privacy for bathers. If it is lost to the hemlock woolly adelgid, an alternative visual barrier may be needed.

B’ Hemlock Hedge Pool

Parking Area

around island

X

Brick Patio

X

House B

0’

10’

25’

50’

NOT FOR CONSTRUCTION. THIS DRAWING IS PART OF A STUDENT PROJECT AND IS NOT BASED ON A LEGAL SURVEY.

Road

Flagstone Patio The raised bed and area between the flagstone patio surrounding the pool and fence has turf grass that makes maintenance difficult, but allows the pool to be seen from the patio; the clients would like to replace the grass with low-growing plants that are easy to care for.

X

Riley

Property Entrance & Sweeping Views As one drives in, clear parking is not visible nor is an obvious entrance into the house. Cars appear to be haphazardly parked around the cedar island. It isn’t until they’ve parked that a visitor is able to look back and see where they might enter the house; however, there isn’t a path directing people to any of the three doors closest to the parking area. From the house and many places in the yard, there are sweeping views of the surrounding landscape—over the expansive lawn one can see the majestic trees, forest edge and tall tree line.

Design Directive Although there are sweeping views across the yard into the woods, focal points within the yard that guide one’s eyes toward an area of interest do not exist. The sweeping views are attractive, but focal points of vegetation will guide one’s eye to places in the yard, rather than only along the forest edge. The areas of vegetation may also serve as kid’s play spaces, habitat diversity or food for the family. Since it is unclear where to enter the house once a visitor has parked, there is a need to visually guide them with gardens or paths.

Views

from driveway until beyond it

Conway School of Landscape Design 332 S. Deerfield Road PO Box 179 Conway, Massachusetts 01341

not visible

Erin Hepfner

House Entrance

Sweeping Views

Landscape Plan for Talbot/Michaelson Fall 2010 156 Riley Road Conway, Massachusetts

Legend

6/15


Foot Traffic - Frequent Foot Traffic - Occasional

Proposed Entrance Inactive Entrance

Barn

Tennis Court

Compost

Vehicular Circulation The indication of where to park are cars haphazardly parked around a cedar island, which is frequently used by guests and residents as a parking location close to the house. The long driveway leads to the barn where there is parking for two additional cars.

Wood Pile

Path to Forest Retreat

Forest Access Path

Compost

Parking around island

House

Riley 0’

10’

25’

Road

Guest Experience: It is not obvious to first-time guests which of three doors is the entrance to the house. The only clue is a small porch and shoes at the foot of the door. The confusing aspect is something the clients would like to remedy by having an obvious entryway for family and friends. Family Experience: The house is the heart of their yard—the point from which they access the pool, wood pile, forest retreat and compost, woods paths, barn parking and tennis court. The family uses the entire property. The compost is 200’ away from house; the clients would like to relocate the compost for easier access and to remove it from the path to the forest retreat. A frequently used wood pile is 100’ from the house.

Pool

cedar

Pedestrian Circulation

Wood pile

The front of the house does not have a lot of activity there, but it is used frequently to enter and exit the house. The multiple doors and lack of pathways create a confusing, unremarkable experience. This is an opportunity to create a defined entryway that supports frequent use and encourages more activities to take place on the western side of the house – like relaxation and enjoyment of the setting sun.

Conway School of Landscape Design 332 S. Deerfield Road PO Box 179 Conway, Massachusetts 01341

Active Entrance

Parking & accessing the House Where to park and access the house isn’t easily discernible to visitors because there aren’t clear parking spaces, there aren’t paths that direct one to the house, and there are multiple doors on the house.

Access & Circulation

Vehicular Traffic - Frequent Vehicular Traffic - Occasional

Erin Hepfner

Parking Location

Landscape Plan for Talbot/Michaelson Fall 2010 156 Riley Road Conway, Massachusetts

Legend

50’

NOT FOR CONSTRUCTION. THIS DRAWING IS PART OF A STUDENT PROJECT AND IS NOT BASED ON A LEGAL SURVEY.

7/15


In the summer, this location receives midday and afternoon sun, but in the spring and fall it is shaded most of the time. Therefore it is colder and remains wet for longer, which increases dirt and moisture tracked into the house. If the wet ground freezes, the entryway may become unsafe.

Path to Forest Retreat

Forest Access Path 2 Hemlock Hedge

Existing Ornamental Beds & Stone Walls

This area is nearly flat, which makes it a possible location for constructing a garage. 2 Western Yard Sloping to the east, downhill and towards the house, the western lawn is bordered by the forest edge and the 400’ driveway. If rainwater is unable to infiltrate the soil in a storm, it is directed towards the house entrance. The center of the western yard receives full sun during the summer and slightly less in the spring and fall and would be a good location for fruit trees.

3 Barn

At the north end of the yard, the barn serves as parking and storage for extra vehicles and the tractor. The space just to the south receives full sun and would receive more if the hemlock were removed due to the hemlock woolly adelgid. This is another place where fruit trees would thrive.

5 4 1

4 Eastern Yard

Existing Ornamental Beds & Stone Walls

The compost is inconveniently located 200’ from the house and undesirably on the path that leads to the forest retreat. The view from the parking area to the pool is blocked by a large hemlock hedge. Turf currently grows within the fence of the pool, which is difficult to mow but allows a sightline from the brick patio to the pool, contributing to swimmer safety. The eastern woods are very steep, difficult to traverse, and erodible if disturbed. The forest retreat is just north of the steep slope and is accessed from a path that is not steep. A wood pile frequently used in the winter is stacked along the forest edge, 100’ from the house, but close enough to easily walk along the flat lawn to get to.

Hemlock

0’

10’

25’

50’

NOT FOR CONSTRUCTION. THIS DRAWING IS PART OF A STUDENT PROJECT AND IS NOT BASED ON A LEGAL SURVEY.

5

Forest & Vegetation Paths to access the woods are located in the eastern and western forest edges. The mature trees of the forest provide shade and windbreaks from storms and enjoyment for the family. Ornamental beds and stone walls are present throughout the yard and around the house.

Conway School of Landscape Design 332 S. Deerfield Road PO Box 179 Conway, Massachusetts 01341

Hemlock

Summary Analysis

3

Parking & Entry Haphazard parking occurs around the cedar island, from which one walks to the house entrance. The house entrance is not differentiated from two other doors on the same side of the house. There are no paths or other signals that indicate where to enter the house. Puddling occurs around the island and in front of the undefined house entryway during a rainstorm. Gutters aren’t installed anywhere on the house and the roof area that drains into the entryway is 640 square feet, which equates to 400 gallons in a 1” rainstorm. Since the soil is well-drained, water infiltrates quickly.

Erin Hepfner

1

Puddle during rain storm Parking Locations Future house entrance Current house entrance Inactive house entrance Drainage Direction View to Block View to Maintain House Entrance Not Visible Upon Arrival Foot Traffic Roof water Runoff Direction Areas of Full Sun

Landscape Plan for Talbot/Michaelson Fall 2010 156 Riley Road Conway, Massachusetts

Legend

8/15


Erin Hepfner

Summer Compost Extended Woodland

Woods Path

Mown Path & Extended

Meadow Woodland

Woods Path Infiltration Basin

Off-contour swale

Vegetative Screen

Forest Retreat

drainage

Fruit Trees Defined Entryway

• •

Mown Path

Meadow & Extended Woodland

Disadvantages Far summer compost Same confusing parking

NOT FOR CONSTRUCTION. THIS DRAWING IS PART OF A STUDENT PROJECT AND IS NOT BASED ON A LEGAL SURVEY.

Oak

Extended Forest Retreat Woodland Garden

island

Compost Garage Low Vegetation

Low Vegetation

Water Management • One infiltration basin midslope to catch water; its shallow depth and wide width are not noticeable when walking or running over it, yet it is effective • One off-contour infiltration swale to direct storm run-off into a ditch south of the driveway along Riley Road • Mixed deciduous and evergreen shrubs along pool fence to maintain pool privacy • Meadow with small trees and shrubs to soften forest edge and create habitat for wildlife • Extended forest retreat into the yard to expand the favorite area • Close winter compost for ease of winter access and far summer compost to reduce any odor close to house and preserve space in winter compost • Fruit trees close to house for beauty and ease of monitoring health and ripeness Advantages Water management in multiple locations Close fruit trees Close winter compost

Woods Path Overlook Garden

Defined Entryway

Winter Compost

French Drain

• • •

Kids Retreat

Infiltration Basin

Forest Retreat

Rain Barrel

French Drain

Views and Destinations • Emphasizes destinations and visual focal points in the yard with new meadows and extended woodland, newly vegetated oak island and extended forest retreat woodland garden • Creates a new habitat for wildlife by providing shelter and forage within an open space • Garage with adjacent compost to alleviate parking confusion, centralize a concealed compost and provide privacy at the pool • Rain barrel to irrigate garden or to supply water to solar fountain on the new patio from captured roof water runoff • Mixed fruit trees in sunny areas near barn and house for aesthetics and fruit production • Exposed rock wall along Riley Road that is currently overgrown and not visible to help indicate to guests their arrival at the residence • • • •

Advantages Creates views in the yard Creates destinations in the yard Resolves confusing parking Compost close to house

Disadvantages Meadows, extended woodlands and oak island replace lawn that kids play on

Preliminary Designs

Mixed Fruit Trees

Landscape Plan for Talbot/Michaelson Fall 2010 156 Riley Road Conway, Massachusetts

Alternative B: Views and Destinations

Alternative A : Water Management

Conway School of Landscape Design 332 S. Deerfield Road PO Box 179 Conway, Massachusetts 01341

Both alternatives include: • A path from the parking leading to a defined entryway with patio and retaining wall • French drain to manage water in combination with gutters to redirect 640 square feet of roof runoff to a lower elevation, away from the entryway, in addition to other water management strategies within each alternative • Transition zones of shrubs and meadows that extend access into forest retreat and woods path to increase habitat diversity and create focal points in the landscape • Attractive, low maintenance vegetation around pool and patio to maintain sightline • Assumed loss of hemlocks from hemlock woolly adelgid

9/15


Serviceberry

quince trees

Fruit

4

trees

native and

2 Entry

Rerouted

edible shrubs

gravel

driveway

Kids Retreat Regrading

Woods Path

creates a

Extended

swale

Mown Path

Woods Path Overlook

3

path to forest retreat

3 Western Yard

5

Meadow & Extended Woodland Infiltration

The forest is extended by creating a meadow with play spaces for the children and an overlook onto the property for the parents. Around these nooks, mostly native trees and shrubs are planted to provide focal points and habitat diversity. A swath of native and edible shrubs follows the line of the woods between the kids retreat and barn. The edible shrubs provide children with a snack while playing outside and creates attractive yearround vegetative interest. Within the meadow is an on-contour infiltration basin that collects surface run-off. The edge of the meadow is defined by a split rail fences that match existing fences.

Compost

basin

behind split rail fence

1

Garage

Pool

6

Stone

4 Barn & Fruit Trees

walkway

2 Rocky swale

Patio

with

Brick Patio

retaining wall

House

From the garage and guest parking, a 5’-wide stone walkway guides people to a sunken patio (29’ x 30’) with a 2.5’-tall retaining wall, where they then enters the house at the correct door. Water is collected from the roof via gutters that empty into a rocky swale outside the patio that also collects surface runoff directing it away from the house and collects it prior to reaching the retaining wall. The swale, surrounded by vegetation, sheets water onto the lawn where it infiltrates away from the house. See Sheet 11, Grading and Drainage for more detail.

Steep Forest Slope

Fruit trees are planted in an open space with southern exposure in front of the barn. Planted 12’ apart in the well-drained soil, 6 semi-dwarf fruit trees are aligned with space allotted for an additional 3 trees and adjacent vegetable gardens if desired. Behind the orchard a hedge of flowering quince borders the barn. To the west, on either side of the large barn doors, are serviceberry trees. All plants in front of the barn provide flowers in spring, structure year-round, and fall color, and create a focal point in front of the historic barn. The orchard should be under-planted with comfrey and the turf allowed to grow tall to create habitat for pollinators.

5 Eastern Forest Edge Riley

0’

10’

25’

50’

Road

The forest retreat brings woodland plants into the yard by extending the entrance of the family’s favorite woods area. The extended forest retreat conceals the chain link fence surrounding the tennis court. Connecting with current paths, the new beds of native plants direct you to a cool and relaxing destination in the forest. The southeast corner of the yard also contains similar native plants that stabilize the lawn just above the steep slope.

Final Design

Flowering

Conway School of Landscape Design 332 S. Deerfield Road PO Box 179 Conway, Massachusetts 01341

Tennis Court

Erin Hepfner

Barn

The driveway is reshaped to gently curve to the barn, and rerouted to a garage, and the cedar island is removed. There are 5 extra parking spaces for guests; 3 in front of the garage and 2 parallel to the driveway near the house. The garage provides residents parking close to the house, protected from inclement weather; serves as a privacy barrier to the pool area; and conceals a compost bin close to the house but out of the way of daily activity. Along the driveway, slight regrading creates a swale that collects water and directs it down slope, along the driveway, rather than across it towards the house.

Landscape Plan for Talbot/Michaelson Fall 2010 156 Riley Road Conway, Massachusetts

1 Organized Parking

6 Vegetation around Pool NOT FOR CONSTRUCTION. THIS DRAWING IS PART OF A STUDENT PROJECT AND IS NOT BASED ON A LEGAL SURVEY.

Attractive low growing, low maintenance plants between the flagstone patio and pool fence maintain the sightline from brick patio to the pool.

10/15


Conway School of Landscape Design 332 S. Deerfield Road PO Box 179 Conway, Massachusetts 01341

Erin Hepfner

Compost

The new garage has two gutters that drain on the north side to a lower elevation north of the pool and garage. The gutter drain pipes are hidden by new plantings and away from the relocated compost.

99’

98’

A’ B

B’ C Rocky swale

97’

B

C’

NTS

+96.58’

B’

Gutters along the porch and house roof direct water to the corner of the patio where a small stone collection area empties into the rocky swale that sheets water away from the house, onto the lawn where it infiltrates into the soil.

Dry laid stone wall 1’

2’ 6” 6”

C

96’

Pavers underlain with gravel 2-3”

Rocky swale

6”

C’ NTS

NOT FOR CONSTRUCTION. THIS DRAWING IS PART OF A STUDENT PROJECT AND IS NOT BASED ON A LEGAL SURVEY.

Grading & Drainage Plan

+97’

A

The earth around the new retaining wall is regraded to create a rocky swale and direct water away from the house, where it sheets onto the lawn and is infiltrated in the well-drained soil.

A retaining wall and patio surrounded by gutter downspouts and a rocky swale creates a safe, attractive and obvious entry for the family and guests.

Landscape Plan for Talbot/Michaelson Fall 2010 156 Riley Road Conway, Massachusetts

Outside of the patio, a rocky swale collects storm runoff and water from 4 gutters along the roof. The 2 northernmost gutters pipe water underground into to the swale, and the southern 2 gutters pipe water into a stone collection area that filters water into the swale.

A’

NTS

A

11/15


Eastern Woods Edge & Forest Retreat The forest retreat brings woodland plants into the yard by extending the entrance of the family’s favorite woods area. Connecting with current paths, the new beds of native plants direct you to a cool and relaxing destination in the forest.

3

Pool The low-growing grass-like sedges, perennial groundcovers and succulent groundcovers provide a low maintenance, yet visually interesting planting in place of the mown grass.

4

Shady Understory The shrubs and trees planted at the forest edge provide attractive flowers from early spring through early summer, then again in late fall. Without foliage or flowers, many of these specimens have attractive bark and branching structure.

5

Meadow Supplement Although an unmown lawn will turn into a meadow naturally, adding native perennials and grasses adds attractive features and provides pollinator habitat. The meadow may be mown yearly or bi-yearly.

6

Western Woods Edge Shrubs here provide year-round features; red stems in winter and nice branching structures. Some of the shrubs have edible leaves and berries which are conveniently located next to the kids’ retreat.

1 6 native and edible shrubs

Kids Retreat Woods Path

Extended

2

Mown Path

4

path to forest retreat

5 Woods Path Overlook

Eastern woods edge

Garage

Pool

3

7

Rocky swale

House

7

0’

10’

25’

50’

NOT FOR CONSTRUCTION. THIS DRAWING IS PART OF A STUDENT PROJECT AND IS NOT BASED ON A LEGAL SURVEY.

Entryway & Garage Sunlight in this area is varied; primarily sunny to partly sunny, but within the sunken patio it is mostly shady. Plants are recommended accordingly on sheet 14. The rocky swale is planted on either side with perennials and groundcovers because mowing turf next to it is difficult. The perennials and groundcovers also highlight the rocky swale and retaining wall behind it. Shrubs and tall perennials are planted along the garage and house. Shrubs are planted along the exposed fence north of the garage to provide privacy. Plants on the edge of the stone walkway direct people to the stairs and patio.

Conway School of Landscape Design 332 S. Deerfield Road PO Box 179 Conway, Massachusetts 01341

2

Tennis Court

Planting Design

Barn The ornamental trees on either side of the barn doors and ornamental shrubs along the wall provide attractive features all year. The fruit trees provide food for the family during the late summer and fall. Extra space is allotted for the future expansion of orchard and potential flower or vegetable garden.

Erin Hepfner

Barn

1

Landscape Plan for Talbot/Michaelson Fall 2010 156 Riley Road Conway, Massachusetts

All plants recommended tolerate the well-drained, acidic, low fertility soil conditions of this site and are appropriate for the light condition in which they are being placed. The majority of the selected plants for this landscape are native to New England or North America to preserve and support native ecosystems.

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Eastern Woods Edge & Forest Retreat; Shady to partly shady

Pagoda dogwood (Coal) Eastern redbud (Ceca) Vernal witchhazel (Have) Arrowwood viburnum Mapleleaf viburnum Mountain laurel Summersweet clethra Huckleberry Tall thistleweed Solomon’s seal Eastern woodfern Lowbush blueberry Hog peanut Sweet woodruff

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Cornus alternifolia Cercis canadensis Hamamelis vernalis Viburnum dentatum Viburnum acerifolium Kalmia latifolia Clethra alnifolia Gaylussacia brachycera Anemone virginiana Polygonatum sp. Dryopteris marginalis Vaccinium angustifolium Amphicarpaea Galium

Tree Tree Sm Tree Shrub Shrub Shrub Shrub Shrub Perennial Perennial Fern Groundcover Groundcover Groundcover

15-25’ T x 10-15’W White flowers, great structure year-round 20-30’ T x 25-35’W Attractive pink flowers April - May, white flowered cultivars available 6-10’ T x 9-10’ W Yellow flowers Jan - Feb, yellow fall foliage 6-8’ T x 6-15’ W White flowers in May and June, yellow and red fall foliage 4-6’ T x 4-6’ W White flowers in June, dark red fall foliage 6’ T x wider spread White to pink flowers in spring, glossy summer foliage, nice structure 3-5’ T x 3-5’ W Fragrant white or pink flowers depending on cultivar, yellow fall color 6”-2’ T x spreading Edible berries and red fall foliage 2-3’T x 1’ W Delicate white flower in summer, re-seeds easily 2-3’T x spreading Weeping arching stems with pendulous white flowers in summer 1-2’ T x 2’ W Green arching fern spreading Edible berries and red fall foliage spreading Nitrogen fixing; great for soil health spreading Good for slope in woods if developed

6 Havi

Coal

Amla

Groundcover Grass-like Grass-like Succulent groundcover Succulent groundcover

2-4” 15” 8” 2-6” 2-6”

Carpet of blue flowers in early summer Blue-green tufts Bright green tufts Pink star-shaped flowers, dark green/burgundy foliage Silver, green and red foliage in geometric patterns

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2 Ceca

5

Havi

Coal

Amla Have Ceca

3

Have

4

1

Coal

Pool, full sun

Whitley’s speedwell Veronica whitleyi Sedge Carex glauca ‘Blue Zinger’ Sedge Carex pensylvanica Stonecrop Sedum ‘Bertram Anderson’ Hens and chicks Sempervivum

Amla

Have

Shady Understory, shady to partly shady

Allegheny serviceberry(Amla) Amelanchier laevis Tree 15-25’ T x 15-20’W White flowers in April, June fruit tastes like blueberries, attractive structure with red fall foliage Common witchhazel (Havi) Hamamelis virginana Tree 15’ T x 20’ W Yellow fall color and yellow flowers Oct-Dec Pagoda dogwood (Coal) Cornus alternifolia Tree 15-25’ T x 10-15’W White flowers, great structure year round Eastern redbud (Ceca) Cercis canadensis Tree 10’ T x 10’ W Pink flowers in April and May, white flowered cultivars available Vernal witchhazel (Have) Hamamelis vernalis Sm Tree 6-10’ T x 9-10’ W Yellow flowers Jan - Feb, yellow fall foliage Tartarian dogwood Cornus alba Shrub 8-10’ T x 5-10’ W White flowers and red winter stems Arrowwood viburnum Viburnum dentatum Shrub 6-8’ T x 6-15’ W White flowers in May and June, leaves turn yellow and red in fall Mountain laurel Kalmia latifolia Shrub 6’ T x wider spread White to pink flowers in spring, glossy summer foliage, nice structure

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Meadow Supplement, sunny to partly sunny

New England aster Aster novae-angliae Perennial 3’ Blue wood aster Symphyotrichum cordifolium ‘Avondale’ Perennial 3’ Goldenrod Solidago Perennial 3-5’ Ironweed Vernonia lettermanii ‘Iron Butterfly’ Perennial ~3’ Horsetail milkweed Asclepias verticillata Perennial 1-2’ Tall thistleweed Anemone virginiana Perennial 2-3’ Little bluestem Schizachyrium scoparium Grass 3’ Hairgrass Deschampsia Grass 18”

Ceca

Pink and purple flowers in late summer Light blue flowers in early fall Yellow flowers in late summer Purple flowers in late summer White flowers, yellow fall foliage White delicate flowers in summer. Reseeds easily Dark red in the fall, seed heads showy in winter Tufts atop grass

NOT FOR CONSTRUCTION. THIS DRAWING IS PART OF A STUDENT PROJECT AND IS NOT BASED ON A LEGAL SURVEY.

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Western Woods Edge, sunny to partly sunny

Common witchhazel (Havi) Highbush blueberry Sweetfern Tartarian dogwood Huckleberry Cranberrybush viburnum

Hamamelis virginana Vaccinium corymbosum Comptonia peregrina Cornus alba Gaylussacia brachycera Viburnum trilobum

Tree Shrub Shrub Shrub Shrub Shrub

15’ T x 20’ W Yellow fall color and yellow flowers Oct-Dec 6-12’ T x 8-12’ W Edible berries and attractive winter structure 2-4’ T x 4-8’ W Nicely textured and fragrant foliage 8-10’ T x 5-10’ W White flowers and red winter stems 6” -2’ T x spreading Edible berries and red fall foliage 8-10’ T x 8-10’ W Edible leaves, white flowers, burgundy fall foliage

Planting Palette

15-25’ T x 15-25’W White flowers in April, June fruit tastes like blueberries, attractive structure and great fall foliage 8-10’ T x 8-10’ W Disease resistant, recommended in western Massachusetts by fruit growers 8-10’ T x 8-10’ W Disease resistant, recommended in western Massachusetts by fruit growers 8-10’ T x 8-10’ W Asian Pears need one other to pollinate well and produce large fruit 8-10’ T x 8-10’ W Asian Pears need one other to pollinate well and produce large fruit 8-10’ T x 8-10’ W Disease resistant, recommended in western Massachusetts 8-10’ T x 8-10’ W Disease resistant, recommended in western Massachusetts 3’ T x 3-5’ W Red spring flowers, compact shrub with minimal spines 3’ T x 1-2’ W Purple flowers, a dynamic nutrient accumulator for fruit trees, does not compete for nutrients like grass

Erin Hepfner

Allegheny serviceberry (Amla) Amelanchier laevis Tree Peach Prunus ‘Reliance’ Semi-dwarf tree Peach Prunus ‘Red Haven’ Semi-dwarf tree Asian pear Pyrus pyrifolia ’Chojuro’ Semi-dwarf tree Asian pear Pyrus pyrifolia ’Hosui’ Semi-dwarf tree Apple Malus domestica ’Liberty’ Semi-dwarf tree Apple Malus domestica ’Freedom’ Semi-dwarf tree Flowering quince Chaenomelese speciosa ‘Texas Scarlet’ Shrub Comfrey Symphytum officinale Perennial

Conway School of Landscape Design 332 S. Deerfield Road PO Box 179 Conway, Massachusetts 01341

Barn & Fruit Trees; full sun

Landscape Plan for Talbot/Michaelson Fall 2010 156 Riley Road Conway, Massachusetts

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Magnolia x loebneri ‘Leondard Messel’ Magnolia stellata ‘Centennial’ Itea virgiana Syringa meyeri ‘Paliban’ Calycanthus floridus ‘Athens‘ or ‘Katherine‘

Tree Small Tree Shrub Shrub Shrub

10-20’ T x 10-15’W 10-12’ T x 10’ W 3-5’T x spreading 5-6’ T x 5’ W 6-10’T x 6-12’

White flowers in March, attractive year-round structure White flowers in March, attractive year-round structure White flowers in July, foliage turns burgundy in fall Purple fragrant flowers in spring, copper fall foliage Dark red, fragrant flowers, yellow fall foliage

Compost

Garage

B

Syme

A

Malo

Itvi

Stone

walkway

Rocky swale outside of retaining wall

These perennials and groundcovers thrive in full sun and are suitable for an influx of moisture when the rocky swale is moving runoff water Huckleberry Coneflower Speedwell Daylily Whitley’s speedwell Lowbush blueberry Sedge Sedge

Gaylussacia brachycera Shrub Echinacea purpurea Perennial Veronica spicata Perennial Hemerocallis Perennial Veronica whitleyi Groundcover Vaccinium angustifolium Groundcover Carex glauca ‘Blue Zinger’ Grass-like Carex pensylvanica Grass-like

6”-2’ T x spreading 2-3’ T x 2’ W 1-2’ T x 1-2’ W 1-3’ T x 2-3’ W 2”-4” T x spreading spreading 15” 8”

Edible berries and red fall foliage Daisy-like flowers in many colors, native and tough Spikes of pink, white and purples, flowers through summer Many cultivars: dark red, white, yellow, pink or orange Carpet of blue flowers in early summer Edible berries and red fall foliage Blue-green tufts Bright green tuft

Conway School of Landscape Design 332 S. Deerfield Road PO Box 179 Conway, Massachusetts 01341

Cafl

Magnolia (Malo) Star magnolia (Mast) Virginia sweetspire (Itvi) Korean lilac (Syme) Sweetshrub

Erin Hepfner

These trees and shrubs thrive in full sun and are suitable for well drained, acidic and infertile soils

Landscape Plan for Talbot/Michaelson Fall 2010 156 Riley Road Conway, Massachusetts

A Garage and Walkway

B

C Patio Beds

Retaining

These are shade-tolerant perennials to be planted along the house within the retaining wall

wall

C Rocky swale

Tall thistleweed Hosta Foamflower Solomon’s seal

Anemone virginiana Perennial Hosta plantaginae ’Royal Standard’ Perennial Tiarella cordifolia Perennial Polygonatum Perennial

2-3’T x 1’ W 2-3’ T x 2’ W 6”-12” T x 12” W 2-3’T x spreading

Delicate white flower in summer, re-seeds easily White fragrant flowers, lush foliage White flowers in summer Arching stems with pendulous white flowers

Cafl

D D Bottom of rocky swale, in front of house

The shrubs and perennials tolerate sun to partly sunny and are suitable for an influx of moisture when the swale is moving runoff Sweetshrub (Cafl) Calycanthus floridus ‘Athens‘ or ‘Katherine‘ Shrub Summersweet clethra Clethra alnifolia Shrub Cardinal flower Lobelia cardinalis Perennial

NOT FOR CONSTRUCTION. THIS DRAWING IS PART OF A STUDENT PROJECT AND IS NOT BASED ON A LEGAL SURVEY.

6-10’T x 6-12’ 3-6’ T x spreading 3-4’ T x 2’ W

Dark red, fragrant flowers, yellow fall foliage White or pink fragrant flowers in summer Deep red flowers atop tall stalks

Planting Palette

Mast

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Conway School of Landscape Design 332 S. Deerfield Road PO Box 179 Conway, Massachusetts 01341

Erin Hepfner

Landscape Plan for Talbot/Michaelson Fall 2010 156 Riley Road Conway, Massachusetts

Long enclosed meadow paths lead to the forest with places to relax on the way (from C. Llloyd, Meadows, 2005).

PRECEDENT

Under-planted orchards (from C. Llloyd, Meadows, 2005).

A stone walkway, edged with ornamental beds leading to a sunken patio (from S. Frey, Outdoor Living Spaces, 1992).

Shade garden in corner of patio (from P. Jeswald, Patios & Walkways Idea Book, 2008).

Sunken patio with stairs (from P. Jeswald, Patios & Walkways Idea Book, 2008). NOT FOR CONSTRUCTION. THIS DRAWING IS PART OF A STUDENT PROJECT AND IS NOT BASED ON A LEGAL SURVEY.

Groundcover under large conifer by tennis court (from P. Jeswald, Patios & Walkways Idea Book, 2008).

Shady gardens at the forest edge (from S. Frey, Outdoor Living Spaces, 1992).

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Landscape Plan for Talbot / Michaelson