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Erik Maday

2013 ADVANCED GRAPHICS PORTFOLIO HINSDALE CENTRAL HIGH SCHOOL


ABOUT My name is Erik Maday, and I created this portfolio as a first semester senior at Hinsdale Central High School in Advanced Graphics. The course is designed for those students who wish to apply the skills learned in their study of Graphic Communications more deeply to real world projects. Students focus on several areas of interest and develop real world products in a client-project manager arrangement. The outcome of this course is a portfolio for use in college and university admission

processes. The projects in the portfolio fulfil guidelines set by the instructor Mr. Michael Cousineau, all falling into the categories of Client, Strength, and/or Weakness. In my portfolio you will find a range of projects including t shirt designs, branding and logos, and covers and infographics for the Devil’s Advocate, the publication for which I am design editor. I hope you enjoy this work as much as I enjoyed making it.

WEAKNESS REFLECTION Through the weakness projects, I forced myself to do things I had never attempted before. Doing so forced me to do a lot of research and learning of how to go about the projects. I learned of many new features and tools in illustrator, but also new ways to approach a project. With the infographics, I learned more about how to display information and get it across to the viewer as easily as possible. Through the visualization of data, the viewer should not even have to think, but just instantly know

what the information is and what it means by glancing at the infographic, as I did more of them I began to better understand and execute this idea. I decided to also do an illustration, after having to do one for Devils’ Advocate. Illustration was something I had never done before. By doing some, I learned how to break an illustration down into small pieces, starting with the broad and moving to the specific making it seem more manageable and much less intimidating.

CLIENT REFLECTION I collaborated with Jack Schmidt on the Naperville White Sox Branding project. We worked closely while deciding what the overall look would be. Jack sketched a few ideas and we settled on one. From there I created a font for our logo and then various wordmarks and logos. We worked together to refine them and present them to the client. After the initial client meeting, I revised all the branding with Jack’s assistance and created mockups to show how the branding may be put to use with things other than uniforms. The most difficult aspect of working this project was determining exactly what the client wanted. We had a great line of communication with Mr. Ivancich, however we later discovered that he was not the final decision maker. We had no contact with the decision maker, which really shook things up at the end of the project. We had been working with Mr. Ivancich and working off his feedback, but at the conclusion

the head of the organization decided he wanted to go a completely different route and thought that the changes he desired would be simple to make. In the end, Jack and I decided to not make any changes and give the organization our work as we thought it should be. In the future, I will make absolutely sure to know who the final decision maker is, so that I do not have another mishap like this one. I am tremendously proud of how this project turned out. Going in, I don’t think either Jack or I thought it would result in an end product like this. We truly believe the branding is of professional quality. We struggled with separating the Naperville White Sox from the Chicago White Sox, while keeping the color scheme of the two identical. We avoided any use of an actual sock, sticking to a type-based brand, which meant creating a custom typeface.


MY DESIGN PHILOSOPHY Problem Based Design Every project is initiated to be a solution to a problem. Even “fun” projects solve a problem, they help you learn to do something you didn’t know how to do, or get better in a field in which you aren’t particularly strong. The “problem” usually comes from client, and the designer’s job is to. Whatever the project is, the designer’s job is to convey the necessary message through the design. Open Mind The easiest way to never be successful as a designer is to close off your mind from influences and ideas. Every idea should be explored, at least superficially because it could end up being the solution, or at least lead to a new idea for the solution. Closing off your mind from new ideas or suggestions will hinder the possibility of creating the best possible end result. Simplicity People like the idea of simplicity, but the simple solution is not the most basic solution, but rather the most elegant. Elegance is the most efficient yet most effective solution. This is achieved by following the idea of Occam’s razor, which is the idea that the simpler solution is better. I have noticed that when designing when by stripping down unnecessary components I notice that as I strip away the unnecessary elements the message becomes clearer. Focus The client supplies a “problem” and the designer’s job is to “solve” it. By keeping the problem and the solution in focus throughout the design process you can better anticipate the user’s viewing experience. Too often it is easy to get off track and create something you perceive as “cool”, without considering if it is the best solution. When you lose focus of the goal, it leads to the creation of many inessential elements. While you can always “strip away” these elements later, it can be hard to do and hard to determine which ones are unnecessary. Even if you can determine that an element is unnecessary, it can be hard to get rid of without wrecking the overall design. It is like build-

ing a house on a cracked foundation, after the house is built, it is hard to fix the foundation without the whole house falling down. Building a design around an inessential idea can cause a lot of trouble later on when you try to simplify the design. This can lead to numerous redesigns, perpetual tweaking, lost time and in the real world lost money. Decisions Based on Fact, Not Opinion In design, it is so easy to make a decision based on what “looks good,” but aesthetics, for the most part, are subjective. What is attractive to one person may be repulsive to another. What designers should do instead is make decisions based on what effect it will have on the outcome of the product and the viewer’s perception. There are certain things that will be interpreted fairly uniformly by all people (black letter type will not give the image of a princess to nearly anyone). Designers should use the psychology of colors, type, positioning, etc. to manipulate the viewer’s perception of the product. Hierarchy The viewer shouldn’t have to think, don’t make them. Everyone knows the most important things are the biggest and (usually) near the top. In order to achieve effective design, use people’s assumptions to your advantage; don’t place the title on a poster at the bottom in 6 pt type. The elements that need to be immediately noticed should stand out in the design. For a design to be successful, the designer must establish a visual hierarchy through contrast in size, color, typeface, etc. Never Finished A project is not finished until the deadline comes. A work can always be modified and improved, always. No design is perfect. In order to achieve the best end product possible the designer should not stop working on the design until the set deadline when they must send the work to the client. While the product still could be improved, the “final product” is the best possible iteration created within the allotted time.


DEVILS’ ADVOCATE COVERS / CLIENT

As Design Editor for the Devils’ Advocate, one of my duties is to create the cover every month. I do all the aspects of the cover except for taking the photos. I am responsible for deciding what will be on the cover, creating all graphics for it, editing the photos for it, and designing it.


DEVILS’ ADVOCATE INFOGRAPHICS / CLIENT & WEAKNESS

As Design Editor for the Devils’ Advocate, one of my duties is to create the infographic every month. I decide what the subject will be, collect the data, and create the graphic.

NUMBER OF CHAMPIONSHIPS

4

3

2

1

1909

1913

1918

1923

1928

1933

1938

1943

1948

1953

1958

year


FAL

-19

ING SPR -35

GIRLs-25 b spor clu

hers-21 ot

*-64 s t

WINTE R

BOYs-60

31 L-

Country 1963

1968

1973

1978

1983

1988

1993

1998

2003

2008

2013

*Country club sports include golf, tennis, and swimming


DEVILS’ ADVOCATE INFOGRAPHICS / CLIENT & WEAKNESS

As Design Editor for the Devils’ Advocate, one of my duties is to create the infographic every month. I decide what the subject will be, collect the data, and create the graphic.

Check My Ride

A comparison between what staff members drive and what students drive. by Erik Maday

Jeep Wrangler

Honda CR-V

Acura MDX

Honda Civic

Honda Accord

Toyota Corolla

Most Popular Models


Acu ra

Volvo

Volkswagon

Toyota

n

Scio

u Subar

cars 260 staff cars 169 student

Au d

i

n tur Sa Pon t

W BM

iac

Olds

mob

k

Buic

ile

Nissa

ac

Cadill

n

Mitsubishi

Chevrolet

15%

10%

5% Chrysler

Mini

Dodge

ry

Mercu

Ford

des GM

zda

Ma

C

nd

oln

Ho

Lex

dai

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InďŹ nit

Jeep

Kia

ver

Land Ro

n Hyu

us

a

Lin c

ce Mer

Percentage of Cars by Make *Due to rounding, percentages may not add to 100%


RETOUCHING AND VINTAGE FILTERING / WEAKNESS

With the boom in photo filtering, especially on social media (Facebook, Twitter, Instagram) I decided to try my hand at doing it myself. Rather than use some preset filter than hundreds of millions of others have used, I created my own. I retouched photos of San Francisco and Chicago, then created and added filters and other vintage effects.


ELLIOTT’S PAINTS T SHIRT / CLIENT

Talcott Hardware shut its doors in 2005, but its legacy lives on. Recently a favorite tshirt from the store was found, and I was asked to recreate it so that one could be printed for every member of the family.


KENT SCHOOL CROSS COUNTRY T SHIRT / CLIENT & STRENGTH

A former classmate of mine is the captain of the Kent School cross country team. He asked if I would be willing to do a shirt for the team. The keys were to make it look classy, yet sporty, while working in the school’s lion mascot. There were no versions of the lion larger than a thumbnail, so I had to recreate the lion, drawing based off the thumbnail. The shirt went through many iterationsand concepts before finalization.

5KENTXC KENTXC2013 2013KENTXC KENTXC KENTXC13


HINSDALE CENTRAL COURSE MAP / CLIENT & WEAKNESS

The coaches of the boys and girls cross country teams approached me asking if I could render a course map. They provided a handdrawn sketch of the course and in combination with satelite photos, I was able to create a map. I created multiple versions, two different course lengths (3.0 miles and 1.93 miles) and also each of those in black and white (for better printing).


CROSS COUNTRY STATE CHAMPS LOGO / WEAKNESS

After the team won the first state championship in program history, I created a logo to commemorate the occasion. The logo went through many iterations, as I was working to get a vintage athletic look. After members of the team saw it, the logo was tweaked to their requests and used on tshirts distributed to all members of the championship team.

Champions Champions State

State

hcxc 2013

State

State hcxc 2013

State

State

State

State

State

State

State

State


NAPERVILLE WHITE SOX BRANDING / CLIENT & STRENGTH

The Naperville White Sox approached our class and asked us to rebrand them, designing all new logo and uniform sets. They wanted to keep their black, white, and gray color scheme, yet seperate themselves from the Chicago White Sox and all other Naperville baseball teams. I collaborated with Jack Schmidt on this project. Our goal was to give the organization a type based, classic looking brand with a modern edge.


NAPERVILLE WHITE SOX BRANDING / CLIENT & STRENGTH

The Naperville White Sox approached our class and asked us to rebrand them, designing all new logo and uniform sets. They wanted to keep their black, white, and gray color scheme, yet seperate themselves from the Chicago White Sox and all other Naperville baseball teams. I collaborated with Jack Schmidt on this project. Our goal was to give the organization a type based, classic looking brand with a modern edge.


NAPERVILLE WHITE SOX BRANDING / CLIENT & STRENGTH

The Naperville White Sox approached our class and asked us to rebrand them, designing all new logo and uniform sets. They wanted to keep their black, white, and gray color scheme, yet seperate themselves from the Chicago White Sox and all other Naperville baseball teams. I collaborated with Jack Schmidt on this project. Our goal was to give the organization a type based, classic looking brand with a modern edge.


IRON PATRIOT ILLUSTRATION / WEAKNESS

I decided to try my hand at doing a simplified object. I chose the Iron Patriot due to it’s fairly geometric composition and simple colors.



2013 Advanced Graphics Portfolio