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gluten-free forever I S SU E NO. 2 / W I N TE R 2 0 1 5


EDITOR’S NOTE

I’VE BEEN TELLING PEOPLE that this, our second issue,

is better than our first, even though I happen to love the first issue a lot. Still, I think it’s true. We started this magazine with the goal of creating a playful, inspiring, gorgeous, worldclass food lover’s publication that shows just how easy and

Among the many glorious contributions in this issue by my culinary confidante, NY food stylist Victoria Granof, the unbelievably easy Microwave Parsnip Crisps (page 67), Twice-Baked Japanese Sweet Potatoes with Miso (page 65), and crepes (page 40) kind of blow my mind. Like award-winning chef Hiro Sone’s crazy-cool V8 pasta sauce (page 19), they’re pure genius, effortless to make, healthy, and satisfying. Ditto the Indian brunch (page 10) and romantic dinner (page 31) by our favorite food muse Niki Ford; they’re guaranteed to win your heart. Our resident allergen-free baking expert, Jeffrey Larsen, also returns (page 71), and ensures you’ll never have to eat a lame GF scone again. Hallelujah to that!  As promised in the last issue, we venture out of our Northern California backyard, taking you to New York for world-class GF pasta (page 22) and GF/DF desserts (page 74). We also head to my favorite spots on Maui, the island I’ve been addicted to for 30 years (page 80), to show you where to find true island flavor. Because we’re an independent startup set on keeping this magazine personal and fun, this issue is also a family affair. Flip around and you’ll see Maren’s scientist husband injecting fun into the title of Aimee Lee Ball’s fascinating story on the evolution of high-tech food (page 36), my mom’s hands introducing the benefits of bone broth (page 68), and my daughter curating the top kid-friendly foods (page 94). I'm so proud of all the great work in this issue and so grateful to everyone who helped us bring it to fruition, I could list the entire table of contents right here. But I think it’ll be more fun for you to start turning pages and begin discovering for yourself. Thank you so much for supporting our dream. I hope you enjoy reading and eating from this issue as much as we enjoyed making it for you.

delicious it can be to live gluten-free. We also wanted to have a lot of fun and inspire you to do the same. I believe we’re getting into a groove here, again working with exceedingly talented contributors to bring you thrilling, doable recipes;

See you in the spring and happy cooking,  

captivating articles; and impossibly tasty photography (huge props to my founding partner, photographer Maren Caruso). James Beard Award–winning chef Daniel Patterson’s chicken recipe on page 53 is the embodiment of our intentions. If you were part of my book club, you’d know that I seriously can’t stop talking about it. It’s the easiest and best chicken recipe I’ve ever tried, and its iterations are infinite. If you make one recipe from this issue, go with Daniel’s chicken. Plus, you can use the carcass to make the ultra-healthful bone broth on page 70.

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Erika Lenkert


CONTENTS

F E AT U R E S

D E PA R T M E N T S

36

7

Aimee Lee Ball’s dissection of the high-tech food movement

All the news fit to RT,

TEST TUBE TO TABLE

WHERE IT’S @ , and #

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71

ROLL YOUR OWN

SKILL IT

Victoria Granof’s fab (and healthy!) wonder crepes

10

BRUNCH: A SPICE ODYSSEY

A deliciously exotic Indian spin on the most important meal of the day by Niki Ford

58

RAW STAMINA

“Ultramarathon Man” Dean Karnazes on his rough road to a diet of champions

8

Everything you need to know to make perfect GF scones by Jeffrey Larsen

Covet-worthy gear for the home, body, and mouth by Bonnie Cohen

80

16

Our editor’s favorite spots for flavor, sun, and fun on the Valley Isle

GOOD STUFF

GFF FAVES

DESTINATION MAUI

Our recs for the best sandwich breads by Amy Copperman

22

DEL POSTO DELIVERS

Why NYC’s four-star Italian restaurant is our top choice for a world-class GF experience by Stacy Adimando

94

VFF

Magnificent meatballs plus other kid-friendly recipes approved by our junior editor, Viva

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95

WINTER WHITES

28

POT LUCK

Wholesome and delish one-dish dinners to warm you through winter

31

TRUE ROMANCE

Seduction on a plate from our culinary muse Niki Ford

GAME ON!

How to transform this season’s sleeper produce into sensational snacks and sides by Victoria Granof

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68

Five recipes that bring new (and tastier!) meaning to the workday “grind”

SIMMER ON THIS

Jessica Theroux on the benefits of bone broth

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BAKED GOOD

Helene Godin and her superb GF/DF desserts at NY’s By the Way Bakery

A playful reprieve for the bus, bath, or bedside table

WEEKNIGHT WARRIORS

46

CHEF’S TABLE

A deliciously relaxed Sunday supper (including the best chicken EVER) by two-Michelin-star chef Daniel Patterson by Erika Lenkert

95

RECIPE INDEX

The what and where on this issue’s tasty vittles

96

HAPPY ENDING

The only GF chocolate cake recipe you’ll ever need

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FOUNDERS

RECIPE TESTER

Editor: Erika Lenkert

Mandy F. Morris

Photographer: Maren Caruso C R E AT I V E O R AC L E

Victoria Granof C O N T R I B U T I N G E D I TO R S

Bonnie Cohen Amy Copperman Niki Ford

C O PY E D I TO R

Susan Charles Bush PROOFREADER

Eve Lynch S T U D I O M A N AG E R

Elena Graham

Jeffrey Larsen

P H OTO A S S I S TA N T

Viva

Sean Franzen

DESIGNER

R E TO U C H E R

Annessa Braymer

Ian Stout

C O N T R I B U TO R S

INTERN

Stacy Adimando

Isabella Funcka

Aimee Lee Ball Marika Doob Emily Garland Helene Godin Christian Jusinski Dean Karnazes Mandy F. Morris Sherry Olsen Daniel Patterson Hiro Sone Jessica Theroux

A SPECIAL “OOPS” AND “THANKS” SHOUT-OUT

Major props to the following extremely generous and understanding supporters who seriously threw down for our Kickstarter fundraising campaign and were mistakenly omitted from our thank-you list in our inaugural issue: Stephanie Breitbard Ryan Cino Kristine Kidd Diane Tapscott

C O N TAC T

To subscribe, visit gffmag.com. For distribution, advertising, and general inquires, please email info@gffmag.com. PRINTER

Hemlock Printers Vancouver, Canada

Copyright ©2015 GFF. All rights reserved. No part of this magazine may be reproduced in any form for any purpose without written permission from the publisher, except in the case of brief quotations embodied in critical reviews and certain other noncommercial uses permitted by copyright law.

The information offered in GFF is to be used at your own discretion. GFF cannot guarantee that any food will be safe with respect to any reader’s particular allergies or other medical conditions. It is specifically the reader’s responsibility to confirm any recipe’s or product’s suitability for his or her own healthful use. If you have specific medical concerns, please consult with your doctor or with a nutritionist prior to using the recipes or products featured in this magazine.


THE MAKING OF THE MAGAZINE

Top: Niki Ford working wonders with citrus; junior editor Viva playing cover girl at our media launch party; our editor’s mom Faith Winthrop lending a hand; Second row: Maren Caruso on location in Maui; Erika Lenkert and Cup4Cup CEO Lena Kwak at our launch; Erika and Maren with Christian Jusinski; Mandy Morris. Third row: Sherry Olsen creating this issue’s “Edible Art”; Annessa Braymer, Hemlock Printers’ Frits Kouwenhoven, and Erika eating shoot leftovers; Emily Garland frying with flair; Victoria Granof crafting a crepe. Bottom row: Elena Graham, Erika, and Amy Copperman bemused over bread; evidence of a tasty shoot.

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G OO D

ST U FF

From chic kitchen accoutrements to loveable gifts to give and get, behold some of the stuff we’re digging right now. C U R AT E D

1 HANGING SPHERE BASKETS Turn your produce into art with one or several hanging steel-wire baskets. $33 to $54 each or set of three for $134 at etsy.com/shop/ chareststudios

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2 FIRST AID KIT Save the day in style with this chic, mountable metal box loaded with OSHA-approved emergency supplies. $48 at bestmadeco.com

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3 BLUAPPLE PRODUCE PRESERVER Preserve your produce with perky blue apples that naturally slow the ripening process. $18 for two “apples” and absorbing packets plus a year of refills at thegrommet.com

by B O N N I E

CO H E N

4 TRUFFLE FUDGE BITES Treat the chocoholic in your life to world-class indulgence with these ultra rich, salt-kissed chocolate-coma inducers. $16 for four pieces at johnkellychocolates.com

5 KOBENSTYLE COOKWARE Make a colorful serving statement with Dansk’s recently reissued 1950s enamel cookware with inventive lids that double as trivets. $80 to $100 each at poketo.com

6 BOTTLE GRINDER SPICE MILL SET Mill salt, pepper, or larger spices cleanly and elegantly with these tidy minimalist grinders. $60 at leifshop.com


7 CORAL SEA APRON Rock the pro-chef look with this handmade, heavy-duty reversible canvas apron donned by Mario Batali, David Chang, and Nancy Silverton. $87 at hedleyandbennett.com

8 GF RASPBERRY LINZER COOKIES Skip the struggle of finding a great GF gift, and send these classic GF linzers by family-owned Cookies con Amore. $15 for a 1-pound box at cookiesconamore.com

9 FELTED COASTERS Give your beverages a sleek seat with these laser-cut Merino-wool felt coasters. $45 for a set of four at zincdetails.com

10 WOODEN TASTING SPOON SET Behold the go-to gift for every cook you know: wooden chef’s tasting spoons that scoop up a single bite with a handle long enough to keep sleeves out of the sauce. $48 for a set of six at leifshop.com

11 KRENIT BOWL Bowl them over with this stunning rereleased 1953 minimalist showstopper available in an array of sizes and colors. $18 to $145 at normann-copenhagen.com

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Our culinary muse Niki Ford jettisons the most important meal of the day out of the doldrums and into a deliciously exotic frontier with this vibrant Indian-inspired feast. Loaded with wholesome, flavorful ingredients, the recipes can be served en masse for a lavish brunch or on their own for breakfast, a snack, or a superb leftovers lunch. Regardless, they’ll transport you.

ST YLI N G BY VI CTOR I A G RA N OF

A SPICE ODYSSEY


CARDAMOM!SPICED GRANOLA WITH COCONUT AND PUFFED RICE BLOOD ORANGE AND KIWI FRUIT SALAD WITH PISTACHIOS AND ROSE WATER page 12


Cardamom-Spiced Granola with Coconut and Puffed Rice M A K E S A B O U T 6 C U P S Reminiscent

of savory Indian snack mixes, this granola beckons with lively textures and flavors. Perfect for breakfast or anytime munching, it’s a crunchy-chewy contrast of oats, puffed rice, and toasted coconut with golden raisins and dried figs and apricots. Stored in an airtight container, it’ll keep for up to three weeks—if you can resist it that long. 2 cups gluten-free oats 1 cup gluten-free whole-grain puffed rice (or quinoa or millet) ¾ cup cashews, roughly chopped ½ cup almonds, roughly chopped ¼ cup sesame seeds ¾ teaspoon ground ginger 1 teaspoon cardamom powder ¼ teaspoon ground cinnamon

HOMEMADE CHAI TEA

¼ teaspoon kosher salt 5 tablespoons maple syrup 3 tablespoons olive oil 3 tablespoons butter, melted

Homemade Chai Tea S E R V E S 4 Once you make your own chai,

you’ll see how much chai-flavored tea bag blends pale in comparison. 2 slices fresh ginger, each 3 inches long, ½ inch thick, and lightly crushed

Blood Orange and Kiwi Fruit Salad with Pistachios and Rose Water

¾ cup unsweetened coconut chips (large flakes)

S E R V E S 6 Here, beauty lies in simplicity.

½ cup dried apricots, roughly chopped

2 whole cloves

Use nothing but the brightest, juiciest oranges and add surprising dimension with rose water, mint, and pistachios, and you’ve got a fruit salad that’s equally gorgeous and delicious.

½ teaspoon black peppercorns

5 blood oranges

1 teaspoon fennel seeds

2 navel oranges

12 cardamom pods

5 kiwi fruit

1½ cups milk

3 tablespoons honey

3 tablespoons loose black tea

2 teaspoons rose water

¼ cup honey

¼ cup pistachios, toasted and roughly chopped

1 bay leaf 1 stick of cinnamon

In a medium saucepan with a lid, combine 3 cups of water with the ginger, bay leaf, and spices. Bring to a boil, then lower the heat to simmer for 10 minutes. Add the milk and return to a simmer. Add the tea, turn off the heat, cover, and let the chai steep for 5 minutes. Pour the chai through a fine-mesh strainer into a kettle or pitcher, stir in the honey until fully incorporated, and serve.

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2 tablespoons mint, roughly chopped With a sharp knife, peel the oranges, removing as much of the pith as possible. Slice the oranges crosswise into rounds ¼ inch thick and arrange the slices on a large platter. Peel the kiwi fruit, cut into ¼-inch-wide slices, and arrange on top of the orange slices, making sure to keep some nice patches of orange peeking through. Drizzle the fruit with the honey, then sprinkle with the rose water. Scatter the pistachios and mint over the fruit and serve.

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½ cup dried figs, stemmed and roughly chopped ½ cup golden raisins

Preheat the oven to 350ºF. In a large bowl, add the oats, puffed cereal, cashews, almonds, sesame seeds, spices, and salt. Drizzle the maple syrup, olive oil, and melted butter over the dry ingredients, stir well to combine, and transfer to a large, rimmed sheet pan. Spread the granola out evenly with a spatula or wooden spoon and cook for 15 minutes. Remove the granola from the oven, stir in the coconut, smooth out the granola with a spatula, then return it to the oven and bake for an additional 10 to 15 minutes or until the coconut and granola are lightly golden. Remove the granola from the oven, stir in the dried fruit, cool, and store in an airtight container.


SMOKED TROUT KEDGEREE WITH CAULIFLOWER AND KALE SPICED BELUGA LENTILS WITH BLACK MUSTARD SEED"BROWN BUTTER page 14


ROLL YOUR OWN Who needs fussy, wheat flour–based crepes when you can whip up a protein-packed GF crepe batter that doesn’t need to rest overnight, never gets rubbery, and is versatile enough to become your go-to wrap for everything from breakfast to dinner to dessert? Make it into a snack with a schmear of butter or Nutella or a meal with any of the following fillings. Regardless, it’s a guiltless cure for the munchies. by V I CTO R I A

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Chickpea Crepes M A K E S 6 T O 8 C R E P E S This batter can

be made and kept in the fridge for up to three days, though you may need to whisk in a tablespoonful or two of water if it becomes too thick. Once cooked, the crepes can be stacked between wax paper or nonstick parchment paper, wrapped airtight, and refrigerated for one day or frozen for up to a month. To serve frozen crepes, defrost them in the refrigerator, then reheat them briefly in a hot skillet. 1 cup garbanzo bean flour (aka chickpea flour) ½ teaspoon kosher salt 1 tablespoon plain yogurt, whey (the liquid that separates from yogurt), or water Olive oil or gluten-free cooking spray In a medium mixing bowl, stir together the flour and salt. In a small bowl, whisk together the yogurt and ¾ cup lukewarm water, then whisk the liquid into the flour in four additions, until the batter is smooth. Heat an 8-inch nonstick skillet over medium-high heat. Spray with cooking spray or brush with a thin film of oil. Pour ¼ cup of batter into the skillet and immediately tilt it to make the batter evenly cover the bottom of the skillet. Cook until bubbles appear in the center of the crepe, about 2 minutes; flip with a spatula, and cook briefly on the other side, about 30 seconds. Flip the crepe onto a plate and cover it with a clean cloth to keep it warm, and repeat with the rest of the crepe batter.

Olive Oil–Fried Egg and Smashed Avocado FOOD ST YL I NG BY V ICTOR IA GR A N OF

T O M A K E 4 C R E P E S , heat 2 teaspoons

olive oil until hot but not smoking in a large, nonstick skillet. Carefully crack 2 eggs into the pan, without touching, and fry to desired doneness. Repeat with 2 more teaspoons olive oil and 2 more eggs. Place 4 crepes on individual plates, top each with ½ an avocado mashed with a fork and 1 olive oil–fried egg. Squeeze 1 lemon wedge over the crepe, sprinkle with salt and Aleppo pepper, and serve.


CHEF’S TABLE

S U N DAY SUPPER James Beard Foundation’s 2014 “Best Chef of the West” Daniel Patterson elevates the family-style supper with pure, approachable recipes that inspire and satisfy. by

E R I K A L E N K E RT

“I’VE COMPLETELY CHANGED THE MENU,” chef Daniel

Patterson announces when we arrive at his house in Northern California’s Oakland hills, photography crew in tow, to capture a relaxed weekend meal with family and friends by one of America’s most respected culinary talents. This does not come as a surprise. In all the years I’ve worked with chefs, they’ve never been ones to stick with the plan, let alone measure ingredients or even follow their own recipes. A trip to the farmers’ market or the restaurant walk-in results in variations based on the best ingredients at hand, and once in the kitchen, intuition, skill, and measured whimsy drive what ends up on the plate. So on this crisp, late fall afternoon, as Daniel and his wife, attorney Alexandra Foote, host Manhattan-based restaurant designer Scott Kester and mom-and-daughter friends visiting from Berlin, the recipes are developed on the fly in Daniel’s cozy kitchen, and shared with us through an on-the-spot Q&A.

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Famed for meticulousness in his cooking and a seriousness that belies his relaxed approach to the day’s meal, the selftaught chef from Massachusetts explains as he goes, offering the importance of using a fresh, green olive oil to enhance the flavor of his smashed potatoes. He cuts his lettuce into small, “interesting” shapes to make it effortless for diners to eat. For his dessert ice, he squeezes citrus membranes into the palm of his hand, catching and discarding the seeds as the juice trickles into a bowl. It’s a “full use” trick, not unlike the efforts of his six-year-old son, Julian, who, aptly cloaked in a fox costume, sneaks in for tastes of the residual juice pooled on the cutting board. It’s like watching a live cooking show. Still, by the time three-year-old daughter Louise, a flutter of willowy, honey-colored hair and butterfly wings, wakes from her nap and dances through the living room, dinner is nearly ready, reminding me of another chef truism: most serious cooking pros, including Daniel, tend to cook very simply at home.


CHEF’S TABLE

This fact could come as a surprise to anyone who’s dined at Daniel’s two-Michelin-star restaurant, Coi (pronounced kwa), in San Francisco. Here the food is modern California haute cuisine—i.e., intricate, studious, and perfectly composed. Even his more casual restaurants, Alta in San Francisco and Haven and Plum Bar, both in nearby Oakland, don’t hint that anyone with access to a supermarket and basic kitchen equipment can easily make a Daniel Patterson meal. But that’s the beauty of this Sunday supper menu. Proof that a few good ingredients and solid technique make for outstanding eating, these dishes can become favorites you turn to again and again.

Clockwise: Alexandra Foote and Daniel Patterson’s son, Julian, eyes dessert in progress; Scott Kester and Daniel Patterson prep in tandem; Daniel’s cozy kitchen 48

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Top: Scott Kester, Alexandra Foote; dinnertime. Middle: The Patterson family’s relaxing living room. Bottom: An artists’ collaboration in progress; Candy Darling WINTER 2015

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DUNGENESS CRAB AND PARSNIP BISQUE


luxury, he offered this adaptation for the oven. Hands down our new favorite chicken recipe EVER, it delivers everything there is to love about the dinnertable standby—crispy skin, easy-to-eat pieces, impossible juiciness, and rich, savory flavor. Seasoned with fresh and fried herbs, it’s special yet easy enough to make any time. 1 large whole chicken (about 4½ pounds), deboned (ask the butcher to do it for you) Fine sea salt or kosher salt ¼ cup olive oil, preferable pure 10 fresh sage leaves plus 1½ teaspoons minced fresh sage, divided

ROASTED WHOLE CHICKEN WITH HERB VINAIGRETTE

2 tablespoons fresh rosemary leaves plus ½ teaspoon minced fresh rosemary, divided 2 teaspoons minced fresh thyme

Dungeness Crab and Parsnip Bisque S E R V E S 6 This elegant, richly flavored yet wonderfully light bisque is simple to make, but it does require 3 hours of simmering, so plan ahead. Daniel starts with live crab, but you can substitute a cooked whole crab to simplify the process. He also uses pure olive oil, which has lighter color and flavor than extra-virgin olive oil. If you don’t have pure olive oil, go with what you’ve got.

1 2-pound whole live Dungeness crab 1 small head fennel 2 tablespoons pure olive oil ½ onion, peeled and sliced 1 large carrot, peeled and sliced ¾ pound parsnips, peeled and sliced  4 tablespoons (2 ounces) unsalted butter Fine sea salt or kosher salt 1 lemon 1 bunch tarragon Bring a large pot of heavily salted water to a boil, cook the crab in the water for 8 minutes, then remove the crab and let it cool to room temperature. Crack the crab, remove the “crab butter” (the mushy yellowish stuff clinging to the inside of the shell) and crabmeat, and refrigerate them separately. Halve the head of fennel. Slice one half into thin slices and reserve. Shave the other half into thin shavings with a mandoline or vegetable peeler and reserve separately.

Break up the crab shells into small pieces, about 1½ inches wide. Heat the olive oil in a large pot over medium-high heat until hot but not smoking, add the shells and sear them quickly for 2 to 3 minutes. Add the onion, sliced fennel, and carrot and cook for 4 to 5 minutes, until the vegetables are softened. Add 8 cups of water and simmer for 2 to 3 hours, covered, until flavorful. Strain the crab broth, discard the shells and vegetables, and add the parsnips and butter. Simmer for 30 minutes or until parsnips are very tender. In batches in a blender or in the pot using an immersion blender, blend the soup with the reserved crab butter. In a small bowl, combine the shaved fennel, crabmeat, and salt to taste (about 1¼ teaspoon). To serve, place a small mound of crab-fennel mix into the center of each soup bowl, zest some lemon peel over the crab, garnish with 5 to 6 tarragon leaves, then ladle the soup into each bowl at the dinner table. Or pour the soup into bowls, and add a mound of crab-fennel mix topped with a pinch of lemon zest and the tarragon leaves.

Roasted Whole Chicken with Herb Vinaigrette S E R V E S 6 Daniel cooks this chicken on his indoor grill for about 20 minutes, flipping it frequently for even cooking. But since many of us don’t have that

1 tablespoon red wine vinegar Generously salt the chicken with 1 teaspoon salt 1 to 3 hours prior to cooking and reserve in the refrigerator until 10 minutes before cooking. Preheat the broiler. Heat ¼ cup olive oil in a small pan until nearly smoking, add 10 sage leaves, and fry for 10 to 15 seconds or until just crisp. Quickly transfer the fried leaves to a paper towel–lined plate, sprinkle with a pinch of salt, and set aside, keeping the oil hot. Add the 2 tablespoons rosemary leaves to the oil and fry for 3 to 4 seconds. To avoid burning, immediately tilt the pan so the oil pools on one side and scoot the rosemary out of the oil using a fork. Carefully remove the rosemary, transfer to a paper towel, add a pinch of salt, and reserve. Cool the olive oil to warm, add the ½ teaspoon minced rosemary, 1½ teaspoons minced fresh sage, the minced fresh thyme, the red wine vinegar, and salt to taste. Put the chicken, skin-side up, on a rimmed sheet pan and place it under the broiler, about 3 inches from the flame, to brown and crisp the skin, about 10 minutes, rotating the pan a few times for even browning. Turn the oven temperature down to 250°F and cook until the chicken has an internal temperature of 165°F or the juice runs clear when pierced by a knife at the base of the leg, about 25 minutes. Cut the chicken into entrée-size pieces, transfer to a platter, sprinkle with all the herb vinaigrette, crumble the fried herbs on top, and serve.

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R AW S TA M I N A Acclaimed endurance athlete and New York Times best-selling author “Ultramarathon Man� Dean Karnazes shares his path to a clean, gluten-free diet.

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I T WA S N EA R I N G 1 1 P. M . A N D I WA S F A M I S H E D.

Unfortunately, there weren’t a lot of options available. The backcountry road I was traversing was miles from civilization and I didn’t have any food with me, having long ago depleted the supplies in my small backpack. My predicament was an interesting one. Interesting because I was in the midst of an athletic event. But not just any event: a nonstop, 199-mile, twelve-person relay race. Problem was, I didn’t have eleven teammates. I was attempting to run the entire distance solo, as a team of one. “Think, Karnazes, think,” I mumbled to myself. I’d already been running for nearly eleven hours, covering roughly 65 miles, yet I still had a very long way to go. I desperately needed fuel. “Ah!” A thought popped to mind. In my pack I had a cellphone and a credit card. Why not order takeout! I found a listing for the nearest pizza parlor and dialed. After placing my order, they asked for my street address. Instead, I gave them the coordinates of an intersection up ahead in the distance. Half an hour later a pizza-delivery driver pulled up. As you may imagine, he was somewhat confused, having never delivered a pizza to a guy out running before. Thankfully I’d thought through my on-the-go dining strategy prior to placing the order. Although I wanted a large pizza, I knew that attempting to run with a bulky cardboard pizza box wouldn’t be easy. So I requested a thin-crust pizza, unsliced. When I got it, I removed the entire thing, rolled it up like a big Italian burrito, and ate as I ran. It was a sloppy mess, tomato sauce and cheese dripping everywhere. But it was so tasty. Of course, the carb high was inevitably replaced by a brutalizing low point. My joints hurt, and my guts were rebelling, too. Still, I lumbered on.  That story pretty much summarizes my early diet as an ultramarathoner. During those protracted endurance events I was burning roughly 500 to 700 calories per hour. With some races lasting forty or fifty hours that equated to roughly 29,000 calories, or two weeks worth of food in a clip. I figured I could eat pretty much whatever I wanted and get away with it. Of course, I was wrong. For better or worse, as an athlete, your body becomes very fine-tuned to even the subtlest effects of diet and nutrition. What I came to realize as I experimented, learned more about food and health, and paid closer attention to nutritional information, is that all calories are not created equal. When I ate processed or refined foods, I became aware of a particular sluggishness and mental haze that followed twenty to thirty minutes after consumption. Over the next two decades I completely reengineered my diet from eating nearly all processed and refined food to eating no processed or refined food. In doing so, I replaced

the foods that inhibited my performance with foods that boosted my performance. Eliminating gluten was a major turning point. Once I removed gluten from my diet, my performance and overall stamina noticeably increased. Race times got faster, my strength for training routines bettered, and recovery after a hard workout or race improved. I was even able to complete fifty marathons, in fifty states, in fifty consecutive days, a feat many thought would be impossible for any athlete, never mind for one who didn’t load up on heavy carbs. I attribute much of this success to following a healthy, gluten-free diet. My current diet is about as clean as you can get. I never eat anything from a bag, nor do I cook or process the foods I eat. Most of my fruits and vegetables are organic, especially those on the infamous “Dirty Dozen” list. There are a few exceptions. I do enjoy traditional Greekstyle yogurt (full fat, no sugar added). And my primary source of protein—wild, sustainably caught salmon—is cooked, though minimally so. I am also a coffee drinker, though just a cup or two in the morning. I’m now in my fifties, but I still work out and race as competitively as I did twenty years ago. My training typically consists of running seventy to eighty miles per week, and cross-training with a TRX suspension trainer to improve overall body strength. Also, I never sit down. My entire office is set up at standing height, and I do all of my writing and email correspondence, calls, and paperwork on my feet. It’s been said that sitting is the new smoking. I prefer to stand, thank you. My health-benchmark measurement numbers are very good. My cholesterol levels and blood pressure are low, my resting heart rate is around forty (that’s good), my overall body fat percentage is less than five, and my strength-to-weight ratio is that of a much younger man. Perhaps most surprising for a runner, I’ve never suffered an injury. Here again, much of this I attribute to a clean, gluten-free diet. Although people used to question my food choices, more and more athletes are now moving in this same direction. Converts include tennis greats Andy Roddick and Novak Djokovic, basketball legend LeBron James, and even slugger Mike Tyson. When people ask me for diet advice, I always preface my response with the caveat, “Listen to everyone, follow no one.” But for gluten, I’ve modified the Nike slogan: “Just Don’t Do It.”

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S I M M E R O N T H I S

by

J E S S I CA T H E RO UX


Why you should regularly enjoy bone broth, which traditional peoples have relied on for thousands of years.

T H E F I R S T BO N E B RO T H I E V E R TA S T E D was made

by Armida, a ninety-six-year-old sharecropper that I was documenting in the Lunigiana region of Italy. Earlier that morning, Armida had killed one of her prized chickens, stuffed it with bread and borage, and cooked it whole in a large pot. Later in the day, after its meat had been carved, the carcass went back into the pot, along with its head and feet, for a slow simmering in water. She said the resulting broth soothed her aching joints, and that it was also good for nursing mothers, children, and anyone with a sore tummy. It was a perfect example of how traditional elders know the practical health benefits of food, and how to put nothing to waste; the remains of a meal or butchering invariably ending up as a delicious broth that then becomes the basis for more meals—and nutrition. People have been simmering bones, often along with meat scraps, vegetables, roots, and herbs, for centuries. In fact, humble bone-based broths, and the closely related stock, are the foundations of traditional and haute cuisines, homemade sauces, soups, stews, and braises, all around the world. The inspiration was likely more than flavor. Leading nutrition education organization Weston A. Price Foundation says the health benefits of bone broth range from helping fight off a cold to improving skin and athletic performance to healing the digestive tract after a round of antibiotics or a celiac diagnosis. With that reputation it’s no wonder chicken soup is commonly called “Jewish penicillin.”

Armida and the millions of preindustrial home cooks before her knew what Weston A. Price Foundation president Sally Fallon explains in her book, Nourishing Traditions. Along with being an excellent source of calcium, magnesium, and potassium, the gelatin naturally imparted in bone broth is successful in the treatment of many intestinal disorders, and collagen aids rheumatoid arthritis. Better still, it offers a kind of healing that’s available to anyone with access to a pot, water, a few animal bones, and a way to simmer them over low heat for an extended period of time. Beyond that, very little needs to be added to make a bone broth complete. A small amount of vinegar should be included to help pull the nutrients out of the bones and make them easily assimilated when consumed. But everything else is optional— and only sweetens the nutritional pot; fresh or cooked meat, or meaty bones, can be added for extra protein, naturally gelatin-rich feet or knuckles can be thrown in to boost gelatin levels, and a variety of vegetables, roots, seaweeds, and herbs can contribute flavor and a range of additional health benefits. Dr. Lindy Woodard, an expert in pediatric integrative medicine in Mill Valley, California, explains another reason bone broth has stood the test of time and culinary evolution and should become part of your culinary repertoire: “My direct experience is that everyone tolerates it. The sickest kids, the leakiest guts, the most inflamed joints…it works for everybody, and makes everybody feel good. I can’t think of anything else like this, other than water.”

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By the Way Bakery makes a delicious case for eating gluten- and dairy-free.


BAKE D GO OD At New York’s By the Way Bakery, Helene Godin serves some of the most delicious gluten-free, dairy-free desserts we’ve come across.

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W H E N D I S C E R N I N G F O O D - L O V I N G friends

who are not gluten-free tell us there’s a must-try GF bakery in New York, we waste no time investigating. That’s how we connected with Helene Godin, owner of By the Way Bakery, and her delicious recipes. Helene’s story is a fascinating one. A Manhattan intellectual-property and media attorney for twenty-two years for companies like NBC and Bloomberg, she decided she wanted a career change before she lost that loving feeling. So she simply up and quit. But within a few days of retiring her briefcase, she was itching for her next professional challenge. Helene had no idea where she was headed, but she was sure of a few things: She had a fantasy of opening a restaurant; she wanted to work in her hometown of Hastings-on-Hudson in New York’s Westchester County so could get more face time with her teenage sons and her community at large; and, as a longtime vegetarian with an understanding of the challenges of living with a restricted diet, she wanted to serve as large a specialty community as possible while maintaining quality. A simple trip to the grocery store refined her vision. While wandering the aisles in search of new food trends, she noticed the gluten-free food section was growing. Her instincts took over. Leveraging her well-honed researching skills, Helene took to the Internet, teaching herself as much as she could about gluten-free baking. She knew that dairy-free offerings would broaden her bakery’s appeal, so she refined her recipes even further, first attempting to go vegan but settling on eliminating milk and butter from the mix. Just like that, a vision for a bakery where no food-restricted diner would feel left out started taking shape. She opened By the Way Bakery in Hastings-on-Hudson in 2011 and a Manhattan location in 2014, both to instant success. While it’s impressive that she launched her venture with no prior food service experience, the real mind boggler is how she continually offers gluten-free and dairy-free desserts that look, feel, and taste so delicious, they make you want to serve them to unsuspecting friends, then point out the ingredient list just to see the shock on their faces. Never mind that everything is kosher and baked in a certified gluten-free kitchen by hand, from scratch, and in small batches using upscale ingredients. It’s the moist and delicate crumb and enviable flavor of the cakes, cupcakes, and cookies that remind us there really is no reason to settle for anything less.   If you make it to New York, we strongly recommend you pop in, say hi, and buy your body weight in baked goods (they freeze well). But meanwhile, you can get a taste with the following recipes.

Learn more at btwbakery.com. 76

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MINI CHOCOLATE CHIP BUNDT CAKES WITH CHOCOLATE GLAZE page 79

ALMOND COOKIES page 78

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D E S T I N AT I O N


MAUI

Hawaii’s Valley Isle serenades with something for everyone.

Maui is the Goldilocks of Hawaii. Not as cosmopolitan as Oahu nor as sleepy as Kauai, not as spread out as the Big Island or as small as Lanai or Molokai, it’s just right for anyone who wants a little of everything the fiftieth state has to offer. Here, our editor, Maui addict Erika Lenkert, shares her favorite spots for fun, sun, and flavor.


D E S T I N AT I O N

Top: Snorkelers at Napili Bay. Middle: a Maui sunset; Lahaina local motion. Bottom: Surfboards in waiting. Opposite page: Gone fishing

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DO THIS SAILING CRUISE There’s no better way to spend a sunny Maui day than on the water, especially during whale season (November to May), when breaches and tail slaps are as bountiful as the mai tais included in the price of your trip. Cruise options vary from snorkel, dive, or sunset themes and vessels range from small, crowded dive boats to catamarans (our fave!) to spacious, two-level boats; concierges and activity centers can point you to the most convenient option for you.

BEACH Yes, there’s beachfront access pretty much everywhere, but some of the island’s strips of sand are worth a special trip. Check out Kapalua Bay or Napili Bay for mellow waters and quality snorkeling; Baby Beach for shallow, kid-friendly shores; Kā‘anapali for lively promenade strolling and casual, beachfront dining; and Red Sand Beach for a rugged, dramatic, and notably red backdrop like no other.

WATER PLAY

WILLIE K

If you do nothing else, make time to snorkel, paddleboard, surf, or boogie board. Along with the comfort of warm, crystalline waters, you’ll get up-close run-ins with colorful fish, sea turtles, and, if you’re lucky, dolphins. Hotel activity centers rent gear, but you’ll get it for less at nearby shops like Snorkel Bob’s (snorkelbob.com).

Raised on Maui and regularly performing in Wailea and Lahaina, Willie K is a musical force of nature who effortlessly vacillates between Hawaiian a capella ballads, wicked Hendrix-style guitar licks, and everything in between. Expect a wonderfully schizophrenic combination of comedy, traditional Hawaiian music, and good old-fashioned rock and roll. williek.com

LAHAINA BANYAN COURT PARK While this is the location of a historic fort built in 1831, the real wow here is a single Indian banyan tree planted in 1873. It’s one of the largest in the United States, with a trunk and aerial root system that takes up almost a full block. Stop for a group photo once and it’ll become a tradition. At Front Street and Canal Street in downtown Lahaina

ROAD TO HANA Some love it, some loathe it, but for better or worse, the insanely winding and slow drive to the less developed side of the island is one of those things you must do if you want to get the full Maui picture. Expect an all-day affair, most of which will be in your car, with amazing photo ops along the way. Once in Hana, the somewhat precarious but short hike to stunning (and clothing optional) Red Sand Beach is worth considering.

SUNRISE AT HALEAKAL A NATIONAL PARK Driving to the top of this volcanic crater 10,000-plus feet above sea level to watch the sunrise is a top tourist activity. It’s also a totally awesome experience. To do it right, get there early enough to stargaze before the sun comes up, and stop at the impossibly charming Kula Lodge for breakfast on your way back down.

HIKE From flat, one-mile walks that lead to stupidly stunning waterfall-backed swimming holes to all-day forest or volcanic-crater excursions, Maui’s got an adventure for anyone game enough to get off the lounge chair, throw on walking shoes, and get exploring. A little online research or chat with hotel staff leads to a lot of options, but you can also go guided via Hike Maui (hikemaui.com).

MANA FOODS Everyone’s favorite health food store, this Paia-town destination has the biggest GF selection at the best prices and is a must-stop if you want to load up on groceries for your stay. It’s also got a killer deli section. manafoodsmaui.com


Our nine-year-old editor, Viva, shares the recipes in this issue that she enjoys most.

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Pork and Ricotta Meatballs with Marinara Sauce MAKES 16 GOLF-BALL-SIZE M E A T B A L L S Kids and adults love these

light and juicy meatballs with rich, concentrated, roasted-tomato sauce. Serve them as an appetizer, in a sandwich, or piled high, sauce and all, atop spaghetti moistened with a little pasta water and a drizzle of olive oil.

3 slices gluten-free whole grain or white bread, crusts removed (we use Udi brand) ¼ cup milk ⅔ pound ground pork ⅓ pound ground beef 1 egg, beaten ⅓ cup skim ricotta cheese 1 teaspoon herbes de Provence ½ teaspoon kosher salt 1 tablespoon olive oil 25-ounce jar purchased marinara sauce

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Preheat the oven to 400ºF. In a food processor, pulse the bread to coarse crumbs. Transfer the crumbs to a large bowl and add the milk, pork, beef, egg, ricotta, herbes de Provence, and salt. Mix gently with your hands to combine. Shape into meatballs, using about 2 rounded tablespoons of the mixture for each. Grease a medium roasting pan with the oil, transfer the meatballs to the pan, and roast for 15 minutes. Loosen meatballs from the pan with a spatula, pour the marinara over them to coat, then roast for 15 minutes more. Transfer the meatballs and sauce to a bowl or serve over pasta. 


GAME ON!

RECIPE INDEX

Train your brain by finding the hidden words. H I NT: they can be backward, forward, or diagonal.

Breakfast

Sautéed Lamb Sausage Crepes and Orange-Olive Relish, 43

Cardamom-Spiced Granola with Coconut and Puffed Rice, 12

Smoked Trout Kedgeree with Cauliflower and Kale, 14

Cinnamon-Pecan Praline Scones, 73

P S S J L Y S L E N N E F V M I I E

A L N U C L M E Y R E I K D B U T L

T L L W B F A E I I E E M A A A E A

T A Z U K S S E S R D T R M N X U D

E B D H F S C C P G O L N A N Y Q N

R T H V Y Y O R E K H C R I D G S E

S A L D Q N A R I O C G I E W O I R

O E O U E E E L K B E I N H J D B F

N M P S X E R J P M E D H U C I K Y

S E Z A N R A K O K U S A C F N L W

P P F I R S B P W R S U W O O D B A

D M I L P S M P A K E O A L O V E B

W R T C A E N N F B I I I A G F R G

B E Q W E V C I P T K C I Z Z E O H

H J T J O E O R P R O S A X A I U Q

R O M A N C E R L A O U N D T O N J

H A L E A K A L A H C L T A T S O I

A W K N K G E T A L O C O H C Y H K

Perfect GF Berry Scones, 72 Strawberry and Tahini Crepes with Pomegranate Seeds and Toasted Pistachios, 44

GODIN

MEATBALLS

BISQUE

HALEAKALA

ODYSSEY

BREAD

HAWAIIAN

PARSNIP

CHICKPEA

HONU

PATTERSON

CHICORIES

KARNAZES

PLAYFUL

CHOCOLATE

KEDGEREE

POMEGRANATE

COOKIES

KOHLRABI

ROMANCE

ENDURANCE

LADNER

SCONES

FENNEL

LOVE

SPICE

FLAVOR

LUSCIOUS

TATSOI

FUN

MAUI

WINTER

Scone Glaze, 73

Kohlrabi, Cress, and Asian Pear Salad, 64

Desserts Almond Cookies, 78

Salad of Chicories and Shaved Radish, 56

Buttermilk Panna Cotta with Spiced Bosc Pears and Currants, 34

Winter Salad with Moscato Vinaigrette, 33

Citrus Jelly with Citrus Ice, 56

Side Dishes

Ginger Crinkle Cookies, 79 Individual Chocolate Cakes with Chocolate Ganache, 96

Butternut Squash Puree, 33 Del Posto Gluten-Free Focaccia, 27 Milk-Braised Fennel, 67

Mini Chocolate Chip Bundt Cakes with Chocolate Glaze, 79

Mustardy Potato and Celery Root Mash, 67 Olive-Oil Crushed Potatoes with Leeks and Tatsoi Leaves, 56

Homemade Chai Tea, 12

Spiced Beluga Lentils with Black Mustard Seed– Brown Butter, 14

Entreés

Steamed Baby Broccoli with Rice Wine Vinegar, 56 Twice-Baked Japanese Sweet Potatoes with Miso, 65

Braised ‘n’ Glazed Spare Ribs, 21 Chickpea Crepes, 41 Duck Legs Braised in Red Wine and Cocoa, 33

Snacks

Olive Oil–Fried Egg and Smashed Avocado Crepes, 41

Microwave Parsnip Crisps, 67

Pasta with V8 Sauce, 19

Soups

Pork and Ricotta Meatballs with Marinara Sauce, 94

Bone Broth, 70

Roasted Beet and Yogurt Crepes with Pomegranate Molasses and Toasted Cumin Seeds, 42 For the solution, go to gffmag.com/winter2015.

Turkey Chili, 21

Blood Orange and Kiwi Fruit Salad with Pistachios and Rose Water, 12

Cinnamon Pecans, 73

Drinks

ABDOO

Tortilla Española, 21

Salads

Condiments

Pecan Brownie Cookies, 78

A TASTE OF WINTER

Swiss Chard Crepes with Golden Raisins and Pine Nuts, 43

Roasted ProsciuttoWrapped Sole with Sweet and Sour Chard, 19

Dungeness Crab and Parsnip Bisque, 53 English Boiled Dinner with Potato-Parsley Dumplings, 30 Green Pozole, 30 Polish Boiled Dinner, 30

Roasted Whole Chicken with Herb Vinaigrette, 53

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HAPPY ENDING

Individual Chocolate Cakes with Chocolate Ganache

½ cup plus 1 tablespoon white rice flour

M A K E S 6 C A K E S Some GF chocolate

Pinch of salt

cakes are too dense and intense. Not true for these moist ‘n’ fluffy upside-down cupcakes dressed with chocolate ganache. Inspired by a recipe handed to our editor by San Francisco Bay Area pastry chef Marika Doob, they’re perhaps the sexiest little cakes you’ll ever serve and the easiest ones you’ll ever make. If that’s not enough to inspire you to put on your apron, consider that they’re single serving, which means everyone gets his or her own fancy dessert with no extra effort on your part.

1 egg

C AKE S

Butter or gluten-free vegetable spray for greasing the pan ¼ cup milk 2 tablespoons heavy cream ⅓ cup semisweet chocolate chips 2 tablespoons unsweetened cocoa powder 4 tablespoons (½ stick) unsalted butter ⅓ cup sugar

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½ teaspoon baking soda ⅛ teaspoon baking powder

½ teaspoon pure vanilla extract C H OCOL AT E G AN AC HE

½ cup semisweet chocolate chips 1 tablespoon unsalted butter ¼ cup heavy cream Preheat the oven to 275ºF. Moderately coat six muffin molds of a nonstick standardsize muffin pan with butter or gluten-free vegetable spray. Cut six rounds of parchment paper to fit the muffin-mold bottoms and insert them into the bottom of the molds. Make the cakes: Fill a medium pot halfway with water and bring it to a boil. Reduce the heat so the water is steaming but not simmering. In a heatproof bowl (large enough to fit over the pot), combine the milk, cream, chocolate chips, cocoa powder, butter, and sugar. Place the bowl over the steaming water. Heat for a few minutes, stirring frequently, until the

WINTER 2015

chocolate is melted and the mixture is smooth. Remove the bowl from the heat. Sift the flour, baking soda, baking powder, and salt together. Add the sifted ingredients to the chocolate liquid in the bowl, and mix until the batter is smooth. Whisk in the egg and vanilla. Fill the six molds a little more than halfway with batter. Bake for 12 minutes, rotate the pan, and then bake another 8 minutes. Remove the pan from the oven and let the cakes cool for 5 to 10 minutes. Make the Chocolate Ganache: Fill a medium pot halfway with water and bring it to a boil. Reduce the heat so the water is steaming but not simmering. Combine the chocolate chips, unsalted butter, and cream in a heatproof bowl and place it over the steaming water. Heat, stirring occasionally, until the chocolate is melted and the mixture is smooth. Set aside. Run a knife around each cake, gently lift it out of the muffin pan, and peel off the parchment paper. Place each cake, upside-down, in the middle of a dessert plate, drizzle some of the chocolate ganache over the top, and serve.


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GFF: Gluten-Free Forever Magazine, Issue 2, Winter 2015