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ERIC M. SIMON architecture portfolio ems.webmail@gmail.com 6 1 0 . 8 8 3 . 3 1 5 0


Table of Contents

Resume

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Professional Work Philadelphia Flyers Practice Facility Starbucks Coffee Kiosk Melmark Main Hall Vanguard Secondary Energy System QVC Founder’s Park Arrival Experience

2-5* 6-7* 8-11 12-13 14-15*

Student Work A Culinary Arts College A Machine for Living

*Photos of finished construction on these pages credited to Don Pearse Photography. All other images, text, and designs are my original work, unless noted otherwise.

16-19 20-23


Resume ERIC M. SIMON

EXPERIENCE (CONT’D)

SKILLS/SOFTWARE PROFICIENCIES

ems.webmail@gmail.com 610.883.3150

IMC Construction 2008-2010

EDUCATION

Estimating Assistant:

Drexel University Bachelor of Architecture (with Honors) - 2015

• Assembled, maintained, and distributed packages of construction documents • Assembled bid packages • Solicited and coordinated subcontractor bids • Maintained database of subcontractors • Created BIM models from construction documents • Provided take-off data from BIM models • Researched materials and equipment pricing • Facilitated communication between architects/ engineers and subcontractors

Modeling/Rendering Revit AutoCAD 3ds Max Rhino + Grasshopper SketchUp

Areas of concentration: digital fabrication, computational design, graphic representation, enclosure design

EXPERIENCE Heckendorn Shiles Architects 2010 - Present Architectural Designer: • • • • • • • • • • • •

Schematic design drawings Renderings Client presentations Planning studies Code evaluation Construction documents Specifications Consultant drawing coordination Surveying/existing conditions drawings RFI’s and submittals Site visits/field reports/punchlists Project meetings

BIM/CAD Manager: • • • • • • • •

Developed and maintained firm’s graphic standards Created and maintained project template Transitioned firm from 2D CAD to 3D BIM platform Trained staff in use of BIM software Developed production workflows Maintained software licenses and subscriptions Established software policies Created and maintained content libraries

SELECT PROJECT EXPERIENCE Workplace • QVC Studio Park - multiple projects - West Chester, PA • QVC Founder’s Park - multiple projects - West Chester, PA • Ambler Boiler House - Ambler, PA • Vanguard Campus - multiple projects - Malvern, PA

Graphics Photoshop Illustrator InDesign

Productivity MS Office Acrobat Bluebeam MasterSpec

PROFESSIONAL STATUS NCARB Registered IDP Completed Pursuing Professional Licensure

AWARDS/SPECIAL RECOGNITION 2011-2012 ACSA/AISC Steel Design International Student Competition – 2nd Place 2013 Wilson Research Award – Candidate 2014 Drexel Izenour Prize – Finalist 2010-Present Student work featured on Drexel’s website

Recreational • Ed Snider Youth Hockey Facilities - Philadelphia, PA • Flyers Practice Facility - Voorhees, NJ Healthcare/Theraupeutic • Univ. of Penn. Pedestrian Bridge Infill - Philadelphia, PA • Melmark - multiple projects - Berwyn, PA Educational • New Mexico State University Magic Hour - Las Cruces, NM • Avon Grove Charter School KELC - Kemblesville, PA Residential • Addition to a Private Residence - Avalon, NJ

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Philadelphia Flyers Practice Facility Voorhees, NJ 2013

Program The client requested a design for the renovation of this ice hockey practice facility. The renovation included locker room and equipment areas, office/ meeting space, a kitchen and lounge for the players, and improvements to the suite entrance.

Design • Lead designer of locker room & suite entrance • General space planning • Visualization

Documentation • Survey & documentation of existing conditions • Construction documents for locker room & front entrance • Assist with documentation of remainder of project

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Locker Room Rendering

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Philadelphia Flyers Practice Facility Voorhees, NJ 2013

Space Planning The planning of this project involved the accommodation of existing program functions and the addition of new program areas within the existing facility. The space was used by three distinct groups: players, coaches, and support/equipment personnel. In space planning the new facility, special attention was given to the adjacencies of various functions, as well as the circulation of user groups between those programmatic areas. EQUIPMENT / STORAGE AREAS 1. STICKS 2. EQUIPMENT STORAGE 3. EQUIPMENT MANAGER OFFICE 4. EQUIPMENT WORKROOM 5. TRAVELING STORAGE 6. LAUNDRY 7. IT CLOSET COACHING AREAS 8. RESTROOM 9. HEAD COACH’S OFFICE 10. COACH COLLABORATIVE SPACE 11. COACH/PLAYER MEETING ROOM 12. COACH VIDEO ROOM 13. TEAM VIDEO ROOM PLAYER AREAS 14. LOCKER ROOM 15. MEDICAL 16. TRAINER’S OFFICE 17. ASSISTANT TRAINER’S OFFICE 18. STEAM ROOM 19. TUBS 20. SHOWERS 21. TOILETS 22. SINKS 23. CHANGING ROOM 24. LOUNGE 25. DINING 26. KITCHEN CIRCULATION PATH

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Entry Sequence

tive

t perspec

One-poin

Team logo at corridor terminus

Display panels for owner-supplied photos & graphics

Team colors in vestibule

Cantilevered steel and glass canopy with integral lighting Metal panel screen wall conceals existing mechanical equipment

Suite Entry Rendering

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Starbucks Coffee Kiosk West Chester, PA 2014

Program This small coffee shop was designed to supplement the dining services provided to employees at a suburban office building. Located adjacent to the building’s cafeteria, the cafe contains a small kitchen as well as point-of-sale, queuing, and seating areas. The project included the design of custom casework and the synthesis of corporate space and finish standards from owner and vendor.

Design • Lead designer • Space planning • Custom casework

Documentation • Survey & documentation of existing conditions • Construction documents (full set)

Contract Administration • Review of submittals & RFI’s • Site Visits • Punchlist

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Melmark Main Hall Berwyn, PA 2012

Program A non-profit organization providing full-time care and education to developmentally disabled residents is located at the former estate of a wealthy family in suburban Philadelphia. The 1920’s Baroque mansion that was once the primary residence on the estate now serves as the administrative headquarters for the organization. In order to provide additional space for their expanding staff and update the aging building, Melmark requested a design for renovations of the existing building and 23,500 gsf of additional space, to include office space for various departments, training rooms, event space, classrooms, and areas for medical treatment. The massing of the addition was designed as a mirror image of the existing building with a connecting element that opens onto twin courtyards at either side. An existing retaining wall allowed the addition of a walk-out basement level.

Design • Lead schematic designer • Space planning • Vizualization

Documentation • Survey & documentation of existing conditions • Construction documents (team)

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Existing/Renovated New/Addition

Basement Plan

First Floor Plan

Second Floor Plan

Third Floor Plan

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Melmark Main Hall Berwyn, PA 2012

Design Precedent The design of the existing 1920’s residence was inspired by an estate outside Paris known as Malmaison, which was designed for Empress Josephine, the wife of Napoleon, in the early 19th century. The design of the renovation and addition to the Berwyn property attempts to preserve this legacy in both the architectural details and the interior finishes.

Malmaison Exterior

Main Hall Exterior

The legacy of Malmaison can be seen in the proportions and architectural details of the addition, especially in the forms of rooflines and window apertures. The relationship of the building to formal / traditional gardens at Malmaison is also reflected in the design of the Main Hall.

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Malmaison Interior

Main Hall Interior

The interior finishes of the renovation and addition were inspired by Malmaison. The challenge of incorporating the architectural precedent of Malmaison into the design of the Main Hall addition was in adapting the vastly different program/use and budget of the Main Hall to the standard set by the lavish royal mansion. This was accomplished by adapting the design to reflect a contemporary interpretation of Malmaison’s materials and finishes, as well as limiting certain elements to key ground-level public areas.

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Vanguard Secondary Energy System Malvern, PA 2015

Program The client requested a design for architectural enclosures to screen new diesel-powered electrical generators which provide backup electrical power to their suburban office campus in the event of a power failure. The design provides precast concrete panels on a steel frame which conceal the generators from view, dampen the noise generated by their operation, and integrate the enclosures into the existing campus through the use of similar materials and detailing. The project also included the creation of a new pedestrian entrance to the parking garage adjacent to one of the enclosures, a tiered retaining wall to accomodate a re-routed pedestrian path, and new electrical rooms throughout the buildings on campus to house inverters, transformers, and other equipment.

Garage Entry Rendering

Design • Lead schematic designer

Documentation • Construction documents (team)

Contract Administration • • • • •

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Review of submittals & RFI’s Site Visits Field Reports/Punchlist Project Meetings Consultant Coordination

Enclosure Rendering


Retaining Wall / Pedestrian Path Rendering

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QVC Founder’s Park Arrival Experience West Chester, PA 2012

Program In an effort to update the public face of this aging suburban office building, the client requested a design for the renovation of the front entrance, the lobby, and a connecting corridor. Metal panel cladding, new storefront, and a glass canopy provide a sleek modern face to the front entrance. A new security station and turnstiles at the lobby allow the client to better control access to sensitive studio areas within, while opposing curved feature walls direct circulation to the connecting corridor. The removal of existing floor construction in the corridor and the addition of hip-roofed glass skylights creates a dramatic double-height space filled with daylight, while cloth tensile structures featuring the company’s branding colors soar overhead as the visitor proceeds down the corridor to the offices beyond.

Design • Schematic design of “Skylight Corridor” • Front entrance design (team)

Documentation • Construction documents (team) • Survey & documentation of existing conditions

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Culinary Arts College 31st & Market St., Philadelphia PA

2011-2012 AISC/ASCA Steel Design Student Competition 2nd Place Winner (competition boards available) Design Abstract The site of the culinary arts college is a unique intersection of higher education, commerce, mass transit, and industry. It sits on the edge of the Drexel University campus to the west, and north of the recently completed recreational hub of the University of Pennsylvania, Penn Park. The skyline of downtown Philadelphia and the iconic Cira Center are visible from Market St., which runs towards center city along the site’s northern edge. Originating from the rail yards of 30th Street Station just blocks away, a subway line delivers passengers to the college’s front door, and a freight train still runs along the elevated rail line that cuts through the site. The culinary arts college responds uniquely to each of these urban conditions, and gives back to the city by integrating inviting and pleasantly scaled outdoor public spaces, and by providing an exciting and contextually relevant street presence. The culinary profession is part of a distinctive subculture where professional relationships are valued, and the school is designed to reflect these values by creating spaces to encourage and nurture a sense of community among the students. Program spaces, circulation, and common areas are arranged so that informal gathering spaces are integrated into a student’s movement through the building, allowing chance encounters to develop into new ideas and lasting professional relationships. Structural steel is also a driving force in the design of the college. Both the strength and the subtlety that steel can express are apparent in the structural legibility of the building’s facade. The ability of steel to support extensive cantilevers, combined with a bold use of color, create a dynamic and expressive presence for the culinary arts college that reflects the energy and creativity of modern cuisine and those who create it. In addition to creating an exciting sensual and spatial experience, the school is also designed to function efficiently and sustainably. Building orientation and massing, daylighting, and natural ventilation are sustainable strategies that are used to ensure a comfortable, functional space for the students with minimal environmental impact. The culinary arts college is designed to create a great experience and a sense of community for it’s students, provide pleasant spaces for the public, contribute to the architectural character of the neighborhood around it, and to do so in an environmentally responsible way. The following words and images will attempt to demonstrate that these goals were accomplished and to explain how it was done.

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North Elevation

West Elevation

South Elevation


Context: Connections to The City The building is sited in central Philadelphia, adjacent to the campuses of Drexel University and University of Pennsylvania. An active elevated freight rail line runs through the site on its way south from the rail yards at 30th Street Station. The building responds to its urban context though its massing, orientation, and the arrangement of its indoor & outdoor spaces. As the building ascends on the south facade, each floor cantilevers out towards the tracks a bit more than the one below it until the building wraps itself around the existing elevated rail line. On the north facade, the double-height porch matches the elevation of the tracks and is aligned to incorporate the space under the rail line in the building’s entry plaza. This porch also marks the entrances to the primary public spaces (restaurant, bake shop) and is oriented toward Market St. to the north, a major city street and the primary pedestrian route between 30th Street Station to the N/E and the university campuses to the S/W. The vertical approach to spatial organization opens views to the Cira Center and train station to the north (1), and to the Univ. of Penn campus & the modernist post office to the south (5). It also allows the remainder of the site to become a gently sloping green space that terminates in outdoor seating for the double-height restaurant, and creates a link to the food trucks on the Drexel campus to the west (3) and to the recently completed green space of Penn Park to the south (4). The structurally expressive detailing of the building, in addition to highlighting the capabilities of steel, is also responsive to the architectural context established by the glass-and-steel Market St. facade of the Bossone Center to the west (2).

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Program: A Vertical Community The building’s spaces are arranged in a vertical hierarchy which reflects their purpose, as well as the order in which they will be used throughout the day. The majority of the basement consists of service-oriented spaces that support the primary public spaces on the first floor (street level). These public spaces are oriented toward the street, with secondary access points oriented toward exterior seating areas. The school begins on the second floor, and rests on top of the first floor public spaces. The second floor contains teaching areas (classrooms, demo lab, lecture hall) where the students begin their day by seeing and learning about what they will put into practice later in the day on the floors above. As the students ascend through the teaching kitchens throughout the day, they move from the program spaces on the south side to the stairs on the north side by way of large, double-height open areas. The placement of these open spaces between the programmatic elements and the primary circulation route is intended to integrate common spaces for students into their movement through the building, and encourage chance encounters, collaboration, and a sense of community. There is no dedicated “student lounge” area because this building endeavors to create a lively, open, light-filled community space from all areas not used for class activities. The students finish their day at the top floor, where they can enter the library and do research or homework for the following day, relax and enjoy views of the city, or watch the freight train as it passes below, before they descend and leave for the day.

East-West Section

Basement Plan

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SUPPORT 1. RECEIVING AREA 2. MECHANICAL 3. TRASH ROOM 4. WINE ROOM 5. STORAGE KITCHENS 6. PASTRY KITCHEN 9. RESTAURANT KITCHEN 16. TEACHING KITCHEN PUBLIC SPACES 7. RESTAURANT 8. OUTDOOR SEATING 12. BAKE SHOP ADMIN 10. ADMISSIONS 11. DIRECTOR TEACHING 13. DEMO LAB 14. CLASS ROOM 15. LECTURE HALL COMMUNITY 17. STAFF LOUNGE 18. FACULTY LOUNGE 19. CAREER SERVICES 20. LIBRARY

North-South Section

First Floor Plan

Second Floor Plan

Third Floor Plan

Fourth Floor Plan

Fifth Floor Plan


Structure & Sustainability The structural system of the building is a two-way beam system designed to allow extensive cantilevering in two directions, as well as provide a largely column free structural bay for the major program spaces. The exterior expression of structural steel was the main design consideration in determining the architectural character of the building. Exposed structural members articulate forces of tension & compression on the facade. Brilliant red and green intumescent paint coats the steel members, providing fire protection and expressing the energy, vitality, and expressiveness of the culinary profession. Sustainable strategies are also integral to the design solution, and include building orientation and massing, rainwater harvesting & storage, daylighting, and the arrangement of program spaces. All program spaces face south to make maximum use of daylight yearround. Light shelves reflect natural light deeper into interiors while controlling solar heat gain and directing air to operable windows below. The southern orientation of program spaces also makes use of prevailing winds from the southwest in the warmer months. Exterior air enters through operable windows, and moves through the program spaces to a central ventilation shaft that exhausts hot air via the stack effect. Common & circulation spaces on the building’s north side are ventilated via large “pass-thru” openings. Air is cooled & filtered as it passes through vegetable & herb gardens on cantilevered balconies, enters through operable windows, moves past program spaces into the common areas, and exits through a second opening in the roof. During colder months, heat generated by the kitchens is used to condition much of the building. Rainwater harvested from the roof is stored in cisterns and used to irrigate the small balcony gardens and on-site vegetation. Finally, the vertical density of the building reduces its overall footprint and impervious area, and thus its contribution to the urban heat island effect and its impact on Philadelphia’s overstressed stormwater management system.

Daylighting Diagram

Ventilation Diagram

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A Machine for Living 38th & Market St., Philadelphia PA

Drexel Thesis Project (many additional drawings available) 2015 Thesis Statement Architecture plays a special role as the environment in which we experience our life. For most people, however, it is an aspect of our life over which we have little control. We are passive receptors in our experience of space, with very limited ability to determine how it functions. It is static, and for the most part, we must adapt ourselves to our environment. This thesis seeks to change that relationship, to allow the spaces we live to function the way that suits us best as individuals. In recognition of us as the unique individuals we are, the architecture will adapt itself to the changing circumstances and needs inherent to the rhythm of life, thereby participating in our growth as human beings. The project adapts itself to our needs spatially, environmentally, and programmatically, and integrates these needs in a mixed-use, multifamily residential building through the use of sustainable design strategies, modular construction, and building technology. The building’s program provides a variety of amenities that support the adoption of myriad lifestyles, encourage social interaction, and build community at different scales. A hybrid system of modular construction allows the expansion and contraction of living space and the configuration of spatial elements to conform to the needs and priorities of residents. Mediation between the interior and exterior physical environment is given to the user via an interactive building skin. Through each of these interventions, control is passed to the user, and the architecture evolves from an imposed condition to an empowering tool of self-actualization. As we evolve, so too does the building. The language of the project expresses modularity and change, reflecting the life that beats within. Light, form, transparency, and movement are defined by the people inside, and transform as they come and go, and as they grow and change during their time of residency.

East Elevation

North Elevation

South Elevation

Concept Diagram

Build Space is constructed by infilling a structural frame with modular panels

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West Elevation

Add Spatial and service components are added by attaching prefabricated modules to the facade

Inhabit Space is configured to user requirements through the manipulation of modular components

Adapt The spatial configuration is adjusted as user requirements change

Evolve Different tenant spaces continue to adapt and to form new relationships and patterns


North-South Section

Building Massing The volume of the building is determined by the surrounding buildings. The building mass faces the street to maintain the established street wall. A central void establishes a common outdoor space that serves as a nexus for social interaction.

Program The building contains a mix of housing types including streetlevel rowhouses, apartments, and hotel rooms. The inclusion of commercial and office space provides convenience and allows for the possibility of live-work arrangements.

Connections Residential areas are elevated to provide privacy and clear sight lines for views of the Center City skyline and the surrounding area. Commercial and Office Spaces retain a connection to the street.

Gateways Connecting the upper and lower volumes forms iconic gateways, which mark the entrances from the street and frame views to and from the site.

Orientation Elevating residential areas increases exposure to seasonal breezes and insolation. Maintaining a lower elevation to the south exposes the plaza and buildings to more natural light, while increasing building mass to the north protects from cold winter winds.

Roof Terraces The vertical connecting elements make adjacent rooftops accessible as roof terraces. These areas can be fitted with green roofs to create rooftop community gardens and amenity space, while helping to mitigate stormwater runoff and providing pleasant roofscape views from above.

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MARKET ST.

2

4/8

5

1

4/10

2

7

1

4/10

3

16 14

8

7 20

7

20

38TH ST.

39TH ST.

4/6

14

1

1 7 4/15

15

19

7

19

19

7

7

19

19

13

7

19

19

7

11 4

13

19

7

16

4

16

10 12

10

17

14

16

2

5 4

3

9

6

21

1 4/10 13

Ground Floor

LUDLOW ST.

16 7

8

16

10A

7

8

16

10

16

10C

10

C

13

B

10C 7

8

10A

1

7

16

10

10B

5

10C

6

17

4 21

10C 10A

19

9 15

10A

13

4

7

10C

18 10 10B 7

10A

C

16 16

10A

7th Floor - Typical Residential Floor 22

SPACES

1. PLAZA 2. LARGE RETAIL STORE 3. HOTEL RESTAURANT 4. LOBBY 5. CONVENIENCE STORE 6. HEALTH CLUB 7. TERRACE 8. HOTEL ROOMS 9. LOUNGE

10. APARTMENTS 10A. ONE BEDROOM 10B. TWO BEDROOM 10C. SPECIALTY APT. 11. DAYCARE 12. CAFETERIA 13. OFFICE SPACE 14. CAFE/FOOD

15. WORKSHOP 16. ROOF TERRACE 17. WINTER GARDEN 18. STORAGE 19. ROW HOUSES 20. PARKING 21. IT/MECH.

COMMERCIAL

HOTEL

COMMON/PUBLIC

RESIDENTIAL

AMENITY

ONE BEDROOM APT.

OFFICE

TWO BEDROOM APT.

SERVICE

SPECIALTY APT


7 8 9

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BATHROOM MODULE

KITCHEN MODULE

10

Wall Section

1 2 3 4 5 6

12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 BATHROOM MODULE

BALCONY MODULE (OPEN)

20 21 22 23 24

25 27 28 29 30

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1. LIGHT MONITOR SHED ROOF: WHITE TPO MEMBRANE/ PLYWOOD SHEATHING/ RIGID INSULATION/ METAL PURLINS/ WOOD PLANK SOFFIT 2. SOLAR THERMAL COLLECTOR 3. AUTOMATED GLASS VENTILATION LOUVERS 4. 6” STEEL TUBE 5. TROUGH DRAIN 6. GREEN ROOF 7. 12” CELLULAR STEEL W-SECTION W/ 2 LAYERS FIRE-RESISTANT GWB CLADDING 8. PARAPET WALL: METAL PANEL CLADDING/ RIGID INSULATION/ VAPOR BARRIER/ PLYWOOD SHEATHING/ METAL STUD FRAMING/ SHEET METAL/ WATERPROOFING MEMBRANE 9. 6” STEEL HSS 10. FAN-ASSISTED VENTILATION DUCT 11. FLOOR STRUCTURE MODULE / UL LISTED 2HR HORIZONTAL ASSEMBLY 12. PREFABRICATED KITCHEN MODULE: METAL PANEL CLADDING/ RIGID INSULATION/ VAPOR BARRIER/ PLYWOOD SHEATHING/ METAL STUD FRAMING/ STRUCTURAL STEEL/ METAL CHANNELS GWB 13. UNITIZED DOUBLE SKIN CURTAIN WALL “WINDOW BOX” PANEL 14. STRUCTURAL SILICONE GLAZING 15. AUTOMATED/OPERABLE SHADE/PRIVACY LOUVERS 16. OPERABLE INTERIOR GLAZING PANEL 17. LIGHT GAUGE STEEL FLOOR JOISTS 18. RAISED FLOOR 19. FOLDING/OPERABLE BALCONY ENCLOSURE 20. CONDITIONED AIR DIFFUSER 21. CEILING MOUNTED ALL-IN-ONE PACKAGED HVAC UNIT W/ WATER-SOURCE HEAT PUMP 22. RETURN & INTAKE AIR DUCTS 23. GLASS GUARDRAIL 24. PREFABRICATED BATHROOM MODULE 25. FIRE-RATED PARTITION BETWEEN LIVING UNIT & CORRIDOR/ ATRIUM 26. 6” STEEL TUBE CANTILEVER TRUSS MEMBER 27. RETURN AIR REGISTER 28. CONDITIONED AIR INTAKE 29. OUTSIDE AIR DIFFUSER 30. OUTSIDE AIR/VENTILATION PORT

BATHROOM MODULE

1 2 3 4

4

1. WATER SOURCE HEAT PUMP PACKAGED HVAC UNIT 2. HVAC DUCT 3. VENTILATION DUCT 4. DIFFUSERS / VENTILATION

KITCHEN MODULE

1

4

3

2

5 6 7

assembled module

1. INTERIOR FINISHES 2. PRIMARY ALUMINUM FRAME 5. CASEWORK & APPLIANCES 3. RIGID INSULATION 6. METAL PANEL CLADDING 4. STRUCTURAL STEEL FRAME 7. UNITIZED CURTAIN PANEL

BALCONY MODULE

1 3

2

4

7

5 6

1. INTERIOR FINISHES 2. PRIMARY ALUMINUM FRAME assembled module 3. RIGID INSULATION 4. STRUCTURAL STEEL FRAME 6. SECONDARY ALUMINUM FRAME 5. METAL PANEL CLADDING 7. FOLDING GLASS ENCLOSURE

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